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In an over sharing world, making photos comes with pressure. It’s important to step away and focus solely on yourself.

During the summer I wrote a piece that questioned if, in the digital age, any of us truly take photos for ourselves. As many photographers build up their social media following, there is an expectation put on them to deliver in a consistent way. For any artist, playing to the beat of your audiences drum can be very demanding and difficult. Every photo walk becomes a means to an end - and passion becomes work. Does it always have to be like that?

Take Photos Without Expectation

I noticed that I had stopped enjoying my photo walks. I would come home with empty SD cards, or at the most, with a few hack shots that meant nothing to me. I noticed I was working with a mind frame of “people won’t like this so I won’t take it”. I was only looking for images that would be popular to followers, rather than important to me. Instead of feeling light and working fluidly, I was tense and anxious when shooting street photography.

This had to change…

Take Photos of What You Like

I went out with the perspective that I would shoot anything and everything I wanted to. I took photos as if I was a tourist on their jolly holiday. If I liked it, I took it - not really worrying about the golden rules of photography.

I felt so free, liberated in my approach to taking photos. Nothing felt important, nothing had to be deep - it was a whole lot of fun! I felt like the young kid who first got a camera and didn’t have a care in the world. The kid who didn’t care about success, public opinion or how many hearts show up in their notifications. I felt like the kid who loved taking photos just for the sake of taking photos…

I know many people reading this will follow this philosophy already. But, I also know there are photographers who are building a brand, and every detail matters. To those photographers, take time just for you - take photos just for you.

Sorry, for the lack of images in this post - they are all for me.

Thanks for reading

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Photo by Deva Darshan 

You won’t change a thing just by telling the world what a good person you are.

The war on the treatment of women in street photography continues. The more I read on social media the more I realise that most of what is being said has no bearing on the representation of women within the field. Rather, it is just an opportunity for other street photographers, often male, to jump on the bandwagon and get some high fives.

Cryptic Whispers

I have lost count of the number of times I have seen men post on social media something that looks like this.

“I am so angry at what I have just heard. A male street photographer said this about a female street photographer. I think it is just wrong because female street photographers are great’.

Honestly, what have we learnt from that? Pretty much nothing. Other than you are not prepared to be forthcoming with what happened, but are more than happy to let people know how much you disagree and that you are not part of the problem.

Well, you are part of the problem, very much so. Virtue signaling is problematic as it takes away from the opportunity to drive change, in order to make yourself look good.

How about you do name the person, or at least share what they said. That way, instead of the post being all about how great you are, filled with likes and pats on the back, we can have a healthy dialogue and try and make some change happen.

What it also does is create a divide. It implants into minds of the people that there is a huge issue, without anyone knowing any context of what has happened.

Then conversations like this happen.

A - There is a problem with how women are treated in street photography.

B - What is the problem exactly?

A - I have no idea, but it’s what I hear on social media.

Without fact-based evidence nothing will ever be fixed. But who really cares about that anyway? As long as the world knows how fantastic you are, all is well!

Carro Rojo 25.00 Stop making it about you

It is not just individuals, it is organisations also (not all). They cannot wait to tell you the percentage of women that are involved in the event or how proud they are to be ‘one of the few events giving a voice to women’. All it is doing is making talented female photographers a novelty piece rather than just allowing them to be involved on the back of their talent.

Do women need to be represented more? I honestly could not tell you - I would need statistics. I have been to some great events this year and seen a strong inclusion of female representatives. Granted, the word I am hearing is it is a big improvement over previous years.

That improvement will have come from the likes of womeninstreet who have rightly shouted loud and proud about all the amazing work being produced by female street photographers.

It won’t have come from, however, the countless numbers of men jumping on social media telling the world they love women and hate hearing a bad word being said about them.

If you want to see genuine change, don’t virtue signal for your own public benefit. Get out there and do something.

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Photo by Simon Abrams

An artist's mind is a sensitive place. What flows through it will always impact their ability to create. That is why it is important to remove as much toxic influence as possible.

My opinion is that someone who has a creative brain becomes more susceptible to the good and the bad that comes their way. I have developed this way thinking through years of my own experience and through dialogue with other creatives. When things are good they are really good. And when things are bad they are really bad.

I’m learning that the way I live my life has such a huge impact on my ability to do my best work. From the activities I do, the people I allow to be close to me; the way I sleep, eat and drink. And it is is amongst managing all those things that I have had to make difficult, but crucial, decisions in order to achieve what I want to.

Identifying Toxic Influence

There is, of course, a variant of toxic influences one will have in their life. Not all of us experience the same. What is important is that you can identify what your toxic influences are.

Earlier this year I realised the way I was using social media on my smartphone was chewing away at my productivity. The amount of time I was using my phone was eating away at my brain. I had poor focus, anxiety, I couldn’t sleep. How could I possibly be my artistic best with all these toxic factors going through my mind? So, I dumbed down my smartphone. I reclaimed my mental energy by using my smartphone less and instead focused more on positive and rewarding projects.

We become the people we have around us

Okay, so we don’t literally morph into our friends and family. But the people we have around us does impact the way we think and feel about ourselves.

Quite a few people have reached out to me and shared their personal stories of bad friendships, relationships, family members. I tell them all the same thing...

Lake Petén Itzá 30.00

You need people in your life that make you feel like the best version of you. If you have people who put you down, knock your confidence, make you feel insecure - remove them from your life. I know it can be hard, but it is worth it. Anything or anyone that is giving you self doubt will only destroy your path to artistic greatness in the long run

It is equally as important to display extreme ownership. This means taking a look at yourself and your own behaviours in great detail. Maybe you’re a toxic influence, and within a group of friends or just two people, it is also you that is contributing to a toxic energy. You still need to make the same decision - walk away.

Mental Strength

Whether you're a street photographer, a writer, a painter, or any other form of creative; the strength of your mind is important. The way you feel about yourself will reflect on the way you feel about your art.

Let me tell you the changes I have made in 2018 and explain the impact I feel they have had

  • Rebuilt relationships with people

  • Quit a job that was unfulfilling

  • Stopped doing the same patterns and went traveling

  • Lost 2 stone in weight (13kg, 28lb)

  • Removed toxic people from my life

  • Ate better

  • Worked harder

As we approach the final quarter of the year I feel so much better about myself. I am writing multiple times a day. My readership has increased. The feedback I am getting is becoming more and more positive. I am now getting paid to write about something I am passionate about.

I feel my street photography is getting better, I am seeing more confidence in the way that I am working. I even got featured in The Guardian!

Removing toxic influence, being more healthy, makes me feel lighter and gives me so much more energy. All this energy can be focused into my art and passions, and the rewards are plenty.

This is not an opportunity to gloat, but rather to show you the impact having a less toxic life really does have.

Make Changes Today

Take some time, be honest with yourself and write down what you feel are your toxic influences. Once you have done this, come up with a plan to change them. If you are as passionate about your artistic success as you say you are, you will have no choice but to make changes.

I promise you that once you do make a change, that short-term pain will only give you long-term gain.

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In the modern era, portfolio reviews have become big business in the photographic world.

In this week’s episode of A Photographic Life United Nations of Photography(UNP) founder and curator, Grant Scott, discussed the business of portfolio reviews. He explored the positive and negatives of paying for a review, and  explained his aim to create a free feedback community for photographers.

Overpriced portfolio Reviews

Scott stated how he has seen portfolio reviews being offered for as much as £150 for a 20 minute Skype conversation.

In my opinion, these kind of prices are absolutely damaging to how we view this market within the industry. For £150 I would be expecting an extensive, detailed analysis of my work, something I do not feel can be achieved in 20 minutes.

We also need to think about who is completing the review. A couple of years ago, I entered 5 images to a LensCulture street photography competition as in return I would get a “free” portfolio review. Now the problem with that review was that I never knew who conducted it. I was only told that it was one of the competition judges.

In reality, I learnt nothing from that review. I was also £35 out of pocket and didn't even know if the reviewer was someone who's opinion had any worth.

Free Portfolio Reviews

In the podcast, Scott proposed the idea of having a database of photographers that worked together to give open and honest feedback. The highlight of this community is that the feedback would be free.

It would give photographers who had worked hard over the years the opportunity to give back. It would allow them to give up and coming photographers an opportunity to develop.

A Photographic Life Episode 17: Plus Photographer Jenny Lewis - SoundCloud
(1232 secs long, 204 plays)Play in SoundCloud

On paper, the concept sounds great, right? If someone with experience wants to pass that knowledge down for free, power to them. However, I do not think we ought to aim to eradicate paid reviews (I did not feel that’s what Scott was suggesting).

Portfolio reviews are good to have as an attainable means of income in the photographic world for professional and experienced photographers. Earning money from reviews is something we can all work towards. In an industry that doesn’t always pay well or offer a stable income, it is extremely important for the industry that we try and preserve as many income streams as we can.

In my opinion, a database of respected photographers who offer well-priced reviews would be the better approach.

That way the income stream remains strong, and people are not getting ripped off in the process.

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Photo by Anete Lūsiņa 

“It doesn’t matter what others think; I just shoot street photography for myself”.

If you’re somebody who likes to converse about street photography a lot, I am almost certain you have listened to someone make the above statement before. It’s highly possible you have even said it yourself. However, in this digital world, do any of us shoot street photography just for ourselves?

How do we shoot street photography for ourselves?

The most well-known example of shooting street photography solely for your own enjoyment is Vivian Maier. As the now well-known story goes, Vivian kept all of her images to herself, many of which remained undeveloped. She was not interested in success or status, she just enjoyed going out with her Rolleiflex and documenting everyday life.

But times have changed since the days of Vivian Maier. They have even changed dramatically since the discovery of her work back in 2007.

In today’s digital world, images are created instantly. We now have the ability to share them with a mass audience just by making a few clicks with our fingers. So, once that frame has moved from your eye to the SD card; the SD card to the hard drive and the hard drive to social media, does it stop being just for ourselves?

Why do you share photography on social media?

The reality is, as soon as we share our photograph publicly, what we are asking for is validation. We are asking people to validate that the image we have shared is as good as we believe it is.

At that moment the whole set up changes, and we become reliant on others to help shape how we feel about our street photography.

Is there anything wrong with that? No, of course not.

For some reason, it still feels slightly taboo for us to say ‘I think I am really good at something, and I want everyone to know about it and agree with me’. It seems like the old cliche of being all about the art and not the popularity, still has a strong grip around our creative necks.

Reaction shapes action

Comments and likes give us a chemical response in our brains. The reward chemical, Dopamine, is activated when people respond positively to something that we have posted. Not only does it feel good, it’s addictive.

This can impact the way we make our photographs, as trial and error will teach us what our audience likes. The less positive response you receive, the less intense the hit of Dopamine.

Now you crave it. So what do you do?

The likelihood is, you go out at the golden hour and take a picture of someone just walking out of the darkness and into the light. Your Instagram explodes with likes and you feel amazing.

There are many defining factors that will contribute to how we shoot street photography. I do not feel that we can say our motive is purely driven from our own perspective.

Also, being influenced by others isn’t a bad thing. The more open we are, the more we can learn.

So, I am happy to say I shoot for everyone - myself included.

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Photo by Jiroe

The ethics of street photography are widely debated, and for some, have become a little tired.

One of the oldest and most common discussions is whether or not we should take photos of homeless people. The topic came up at this year’s Street London event.

Some say yes, it’s all fair game. Whilst others suggest it’s taking advantage of a person at their lowest point.

Personally speaking, I no longer take images of homeless people. I see no purpose to it. When we start to make our work ‘socially aware’ we need to be sure we are really making a difference with it. The truth is that your photo won’t change the world, nor should you be using it as a way to show how connected you are to societal issues.

In reality, you will just have an image of a homeless person on your hard drive, doing absolutely nothing. In the process of that you have likely made someone feel like a trophy, some sort of freak show that you have used to create your ‘art’.

Acception to the rule?

There are some exceptions to the rule, however. Sometimes, the photographer is able to keep the dignity of the person whilst also creating a powerful, and meaningful image. Take this street photograph by Matt Stuart for example.

A post shared by Matt Stuart (@mattu1) on Aug 7, 2018 at 6:13am PDT

The shadow casts the image of a cross on the shelter of the person sleeping rough. The image provokes thought, and encourages you to reflect on the deep pain people like this have to face on a daily basis. You can not identify the person, and their dignity remains intact.

However, the truth is, images like this are very few and far between - you could say they are a once in a lifetime kind of photograph.

The likelihood is that if you were to take an image of a homeless person - it is probably going to look more like this…

A post shared by Célio (@celio.ricardi) on Aug 20, 2018 at 5:24pm PDT

The image does not tell us anything we do not already know about the world. It is just another photographer thinking they are edgy, taking advantage of another human being. The dignity of the person has not been kept, and their identity is fully exposed for all to see.

Something to consider

We all take advantage of the law in relation to street photography. The public setting means all systems go in terms of making photos. However, there is one thing I would like you to consider before you next take an image of that person living on the street.

After a long day of asking for money, substance abuse or generally being looked down upon by many people that walk by - rough sleepers have to find somewhere to take comfort. And wherever that place is on the street, it becomes their home. A place to try and relax and rest, before they have to endure their difficult life again the following day.

So, yes it is a public spot for us. But to them, the unfortunate reality is that they have to make it as private and homely as they possibly can. We wouldn’t like people poking their cameras in our house, would we?

And if you still insist your image has purpose and worth - buy them a coffee, give them a couple of pounds, or have a conversation with them.

At the very least give them their humanity; something they are so commonly stripped of.

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London - Street Photography is dead, at least that is what the pessimists will have you believe.

However, if we take ourselves over to Brick Lane, the home of this year’s Street London event (hosted by Hoxton Mini Press), then there was an abundance of reasons given as to why that certainly isn’t the case.

The event was extremely well attended. A far cry from the tired rhetoric that street photography is for a small group of elitist middle-class white men, the venue was filled with a diverse group of ages, genders, and identities.

The same was true for the lineup. Crossing paths with documentary photography, photojournalism, women in street, new photographers, experienced photographers - the message was clear - this weekend was for the many, not the few.

In a relaxed setting, coupled with a free bar, the opening night was an opportunity for the community to come together, see old friends and meet new people. With opening talks from Creative Director, Nick Turpin, and the two guest Creative Directors, Kirstin Van Den Eede and Olly Lang, the outline was given for the weekend's itinerary.

What was evident from all three, was that this was not just some money spinner, but rather a chance for them to really inject their passion for street photography into the audience. Listening and noticing their enthusiasm; a) made me want to go out and shoot, and b) really got me exicted for the next couple of days.

Saturday arrived and the event was opened by the award-winning landscape and documentary photographer, Simon Roberts. He displayed some beautiful work, both from his inspirations and his time shooting in Russia in 2004.

At first glance, I questioned why an event titled ‘Street London’ would be opened by someone who, whilst extremely talented and successful, was clearly not a street photographer. However, as Simon progressed with this talk, it became apparent that alongside him, we were working together to see if his work borrowed from the elements of street photography. And yes, although his images were clearly more aligned with landscape, there were signs of street style shots within his body of work.

Simon’s style and insightful talk should not just be viewed just in isolation, however, as it was building to the weekends bigger narrative - What is Street Photography?

Which brings us to the event’s first panel discussion - ‘Exploring the Borders of Street Photography'.

Panel discussions are great for two reasons. They encourage debate, and it also gives the audience an opportunity to get involved with the dialogue. Such a topic could be discussed all day, as defending the definition of the craft is clearly important to the many that practice it. The people were opinionated and the conversation remained respectful. They conversed openly about staged photography, the meaning behind an image and how documentary photography and photojournalism incorporate the street style.

Spot Light

The Spot Light gave an opportunity to 6 up and coming photographers to share their work and the meaning behind it. All the photographers had some great portfolios to share, and it was wonderful to see such a diverse approach to the craft - especially after the interesting yet slightly deflating coverage of the Instagram account Street Repeat earlier in the day.

For me, the stand out photographer was Cam Crosland. I personally have been a long time admirer of Cam’s work, but this was the first time I got to understand their creative journey.

Cam uses flash when out shooting and has been able to produce images that display a sensitive approach to flash street photography. Their creative identity was found whilst they settled into their personal identity. Cam identifies as non-binary, and it was clear that as soon as they had become comfortable in their personal self, their artistic work benefited from it. There is a lot to be said about how our mentality and self-confidence really impacts our work.

"Fishing with dynamite" London, 2017 . . #apfmagazine #burnmyeye #burnmagazine #observecollective #everybodystreet #gupmagazine #ourstreets #HCSC_street #lotsmagazine #fragmentphotos

A post shared by Cam Crosland (@cjcroslandstreet) on Jan 9, 2018 at 11:04am PST

Street Walks

It was time for less talk and more walk, as some of the attendees got to see inside the working process of successful street photographers. Hosted by Nick Turpin, Kristen Van De Eede, Charlie Kwai, David Gaberele and Olly Lang, these 5 photographers gave a treat to those that walked with them. The feedback was that the walks were both very insightful and challenging, with those involved feeling like they had a clearer view of how to make better photographs.

The only downside to the walks is that not everyone was able to get on them due to the size limitations of the groups. It may have been better advised to do the walks across two days, giving more people the opportunity to learn and develop their skills.

The day ended with a street party, where we were all spoilt with some delicious food, beer, and wine. The community swapped Instagram accounts, business cards, and portfolios. I’m certain nobody went home feeling disappointed.

Final Day

After a diverse and thought-provoking experience the previous day, Sunday really got down to the nitty-gritty. Opened up by the amazing Matt Stuart, the tone was set that the final day was for the hardcore street photography lovers.

Matt’s work speaks for itself. For me, there is no better active street photographer working today. Matt isn’t about status, and regardless of all his success, here is a man that through his words really wants to pass on all that he has learnt. It was a great opening talk and as should be the case with all the talks, really made me want to go out and take better photos.

Following Matt, we got to the creme de la creme of all street photography questions - How do you make money from street photography?

The panel included; Matt Stuart, Nick Turpin, and Global Head of Commercial Assignments at Magnum, Tim Paton.

The harsh reality had to be made clear - pretty much nobody is going to pay you to roam around freely, make photos as you please, and then give you a stack of cash for it. However, that doesn’t mean your style of street photography cannot be utilised. If you market yourself well, make good photos, many commercial companies will be more than happy to commision you for their projects. If you wanted to have an understanding of the amount of effort, and failure, that goes into marketing your work, listen to Matt Stuart:

“When I was first starting out I sent 1000 postcards, which had my work on them, to companies offering my services. Out of those 1000 postcards I got 4 responses. 3 of which were just a thank you, and one which gave me an actual job. 1000 postcards into one commission. However, that commission paid me £10,000 and I was able to use that to go out and do what I love”.

All three panelists strongly advised taking all the work you can. Whilst more often than not you won’t have the creative freedom you are used to, it is a chance to earn funds to then go out and do what you care about. One commercial commission can allow you to finish that book, bring that project to life, or take you on a nice little holiday abroad.

As with any event, one of the key rules is to start big and end even bigger. Well, the closing hours of Street London went completely off the scale.

Everyone was spoilt, and I mean everyone, by an impromptu talk by the legendary Joel Meyerowitz. Joel is such a nice man, and even at the age of 80 still has the same passion for street photography as he did when he was one of the original innovators. He loves being with people who share the same passion as he has had for all these decades.

The event closed with a full video interview with Dorothy Bohm. 

At the age of 94, all of us would have been understanding if Dorothy decided to sit this one out. However, that was not the case, and as if it was no problem at all, Dorothy was in attendance - ready to mix with everyone. Much respect has to be given to Dorothy, she conversed with as many people as she could and took the time to sign books. A real class act and a perfect sign off for a real class event.

© Adam Maizey

Value for Money

In my opinion, everyone got their value for money and then some from this weekend. From the directors to the bar staff, everyone involved in running the event worked effortlessly to ensure everyone had a great time. No detail was left untouched and everything had a high quality feel to it - they really did fly the flag for street photography.

Street Photography: born in Paris, grew up in New York, now lives in London. Street London has certainly played their part in making that a reality - ensuring all is alive and well.

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As I look through this body of work I see passion. Not just for the practise of photography, but also for the the scene that is being photographed. These are not fancy images giving the photographer the opportunity to say “look how cool I am”, rather they are a collection of strong individual stories contributing to the overall narrative.

Dawn Mander is a street photographer working in her beloved Blackpool. Dawn has been perfecting her craft and telling her story for nearly 15 years. Born and bred in this sometimes weird, but mostly wonderful northern town, Dawn’s message is simple - This is Blackpool. This is what I am proud of.

When asked about her relationship with the town, she says...

“I love my hometown. After traveling the world with an itinerant theatre and dance company, and starting my married life in Rome, I still convinced the family to come back to the north-west to live”.

The evident pull back to where she first entered the world is very much alive in her work. Whilst many photographers can become disheartened by photographing the same old same old, and their images can be damaged because of it, Dawn’s work suggests she is very much at home and happy when taking images of the land she is most familiar with.

“There is usually a story somewhere and the back streets are full of life waiting to be documented. I just keep moving. I rarely stand still when taking pictures, capturing many images mid-stride and there's always something new”.

Looking through her photographs you will notice that there is a lot of red in them. Curious to understand, I asked if this was the colour Dawn was most attracted to, or the colour she feels best represents Blackpool.

“Ha! Red, yes its Blackpool. It’s passion, it's danger and it really is a fabulous colour to photograph, rich in vibrancy”.

What I have always found most fascinating about long-term street and documentary photography is that there is a story to be told about a transition. How the people change, how the buildings change, how attitudes and opinions evolve; the photographer has a wonderful insight into all those changes, both the good and the bad. Dawn’s perspective is...

“There have been many improvements over the last few years and there are still many more needed. But like the rest of the country we are all in a difficult moment, and I do think Blackpool gets more than its fair share of bad publicity”.

A post shared by DawnMander (Bird) (@dmanderphotography) on Jul 19, 2018 at 5:44am PDT

I myself have visited Blackpool many times. Attracted by the lights, the roller coasters, the candy floss and the amusements - I have many fond memories of the place. I have never been to shoot street, however, and wanted to understand how Dawn is received when shooting in a place that attracts people from all across the UK.

“I tend to get away with it probably because of my age and the little grey haired old bird image. I do try to shoot without being noticed, although I never hide, and use a 28mm prime lens so I do get very close.

I work as a ninja and I try to be very fast. As I say, I am constantly moving, so I take the photograph and I am gone before they have even realised what has happened”.

A post shared by DawnMander (Bird) (@dmanderphotography) on Jul 1, 2018 at 4:30pm PDT

For me, Dawn Mander is a photographer that encourages you to question your own relationship with the place in which you were born. She makes you think about how you can tap into that deep understanding of an environment that, no matter where you are in life, you will always refer to as home. There is a beautiful piece of photographic poetry in her work, and I personally find myself getting lost and mesmerized within her story.

A post shared by DawnMander (Bird) (@dmanderphotography) on Jun 9, 2018 at 2:46pm PDT

When all is said and done, many of today’s photographers will have a host “made for Instagram” style photos that in time have no context. Whereas photographers like Dawn will have a record of time and progression. A tale that is true to her and the place that she cares about the most.

Dawn, like her, wants you to love Blackpool. Her work speaks volumes as she achieves her creative objective. And when the viewer takes a moment to reflect on both her journey and the journey of Blackpool, what she wants you to know is...

“That Blackpool is the hardest working coastal town in the U.K. Don't believe all the negative press, it's a great place to visit”.  

Thanks for reading

****

You can keep to date with Dawn by following her on her Instagram page.

****

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Shooting street photography all day every day is pretty much heaven for me. Sure I have leg cramps and blisters, but as the hipsters would say - “it’s all for the art, man!”. For many, taking the step to leave the mundane and do something you are passionate about is rather daunting. The biggest hurdles are money and your mind. You have to be savvy with what you have in the bank and do all you can to keep mentally strong. Here are some steps I have taken to ensure I am travelling cheap and keeping sane.

Accommodation

During my travel, I have been using a combination of hostels and Airbnb.

Hostels are great to get a cheap sleep and also meet people. Shooting street photography can be lonely at times, and if you’re truly in the zone it can be hard to fully interact with people. After a long day shooting, it can be nice to chill in the common room and have a good conversation. The plus side is, they are super cheap. I have been spending between £13-£15 per night, much cheaper than a private room in a hotel.

Airbnb is a great option also, as you get to stay with someone who is local to the city you are in. The advantage of this is that they will have information that the companies would not want to tell tourists. For example, when in Valencia a Paella averaged £12-£18. However, my Airbnb host told me about a lovely little street food set up that provided huge portions for only £3.50 - a big money saver! I was able to stay in this lovely place - Airbnb digs - for only £11 (prices may vary depending on dates).

Beach Life 40.00 Food

When you get into these cool new cities, it can be tempting to go and dine at at all the wonderful restaurants that are being thrust into your face. This is where you need to show some self-restraint, and think about your budget above anything else. I have been surviving off fruits for breakfast, tortilla for lunch and then a small treat like chicken for dinner. The below lunch cost me £1.80 and gave me enough energy to get back out and shooting!

Also, many of the Airbnbs and hostels have access to a kitchen - so you can bulk cook for a few days and have more time to be creative and more money in your wallet.

Travel

Whenever I plan to travel to a different country, my first point of planning is to use Skyscanner. Now, if you are like me and happy to go anywhere, here is a little step I take to ensure I get cheap flights.

In the search section, I type in: London - Everywhere. Skyscanner then generates a list of flights, starting with the lowest priced. I then pick one of the top 3, and plan my trip from there. I have had flights as low as £10!!

Whilst in Spain, for inland travel I have been using BlaBlaCar. BlaBlaCar, is a great website that brings together people doing a certain trip. Essentially you are car sharing with a group of people, all contributing to the overall cost. I spent £14 on a trip from Valencia to Barcelona. In comparison, the coach cost £25, and the train £32.

Valencia 

Seize opportunities

It is amazing what little things can come up whilst travelling. Sometimes you have to be in the right place at the right time in order to get some savers under your belt. Below are some money savers that happened to me.

  • Another guest leaving two day early at a hostel. The guest overbooked by two days and the hostal would not refund him. I offered him 50% of what he paid. He got some money back and I got some cheap rates.

  • Traveller going home early. A traveller bought a 7 day travel pass, but had to go home early. I again offered a discounted price for what he paid, but he was more than happy to give it to me for free.

  • Free books. Whilst travelling, it is imperative you keep your mind healthy and sane. Reading is a wonderful way to pass time and learn. Rather than go splurge £10 on a fancy new hard back - you will come across many people who are more than pleased to pass on a great read they have had.

  • Communal dinners. In hostals you will find people will cook large meals, often having more than their stomach can take. It is not uncommon for someone to offer you to sit with them and enjoy their excess. You get a good meal and some nice conversation!

I would note, however, whilst these are great ways to save money, it can’t all be take take take. When you can, keep the positive vibes going and share or give away the things you no longer need.

Bilbao

Keep yourself healthy and happy, travelling is a dream but it can be tough and stressful. Your objective is to keep funds low, keep your mind stimulated and ensure you get as much time as possible shooting the streets you have chosen to explore

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Dan Ginn Photo Blog by Daniel Ginn - 1y ago

I have spent the last 7 days shooting street photography across 3 different towns and cities in Spain. I have visited: Bilbao, Zaragoza and Valencia. Rather than write an overview of my experience so far, for once I am going to let the images do the talking.

Below are some highlights...

Bilbao

Taken outside Museo Guggenheim Bilbao

Love becomes so much more once two lovers become a family.

She is street fashion and she knows it

Zaragoza 

RED

Love

Youth

Valencia

A lesson from wisdom

Cinema Style

A man works outside Palau de les Arts Reina Sofia

****

Next stop, Barcelona!

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T: danginntweets
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