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Danger Press Downloads

Download files to help with your T-shirt and poster designs.

Learning about screen printing and garment decoration can be overwhelming. There are lots of details and you may not even know what to ask to further your education.
From sizing your artwork, to choosing the best colors, garment types, deciding on a good size/location, and picking the right ink, there’s a lot to consider.

Whether you’re looking to print T-shirts or posters, the files below will hopefully make the process of getting started or finishing go a bit smoother for you.

Downloads J.Gilman

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Danger Press What Type of Ink Should You Use on T-Shirts?

When screen printing on a t-shirt, you have three choices of ink to use: water-based, discharge, and plastisol, which are all equally priced and equally durable.

We’ve been using and testing these inks since 2004 and have learned the best way to mix them for optimum results. Based on our experience, this is a general guide to help you determine what will work best for your project and preferred fabric type.

If you’re still deciding on the shirt fabric type you want, we discuss the differences between them in detail here: Very Very Soft Prints

Water Based

Our water-based ink is a translucent formula that is extremely soft. It feels like a part of the shirt once you wash it.

Discharge
Discharge ink is water-based ink with a chemical additive that removes the dye of your shirt and replaces it with your ink color. It generally only works with 100% cotton shirts and is a good option to maintain their breathability.
Plastisol
Plastisol ink is the most traditional ink. If you’ve seen a vintage shirt from the 80’s with a cracked print, that’s plastisol. Technology has improved and made this ink longer lasting. Don’t let the name fool you: we’re able to accomplish soft prints with this ink by using reducer and a screen with a finer mesh that can almost match the softness of our water-based and discharge.

We created this infographic for you to download and help choose one of the three ink types.

Use this decision tree to pick the best ink for your project

Whenever you have your project details ready, one of our account managers may advise differently based on your artwork and shirt choice. Email your artwork to hello@dangerpress.com and we can discuss what will work best for your design.

What Type of Ink Should You Use on T-Shirts? Melyssa Micallef

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Danger Press Angie Chiappori

One of the sweetest souls you’ll ever meet – Angie Chiappori is an ever-growing Ink Specialist here at Danger.

Recently she had the opportunity to create a featured piece for a print show we coordinated, so we caught up with Angie outside of her typical work domicile to get her thoughts on the whole experience and to get a more detailed look at what it’s like for her working at Danger Press.

Could you tell us a little about yourself and what you currently do as printmaker, artist, etc? Do you consider yourself an artist – How do you label yourself? 

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Do you find your self with more creative freedom or with more creative pressure working with/for Danger Press? How does that affect your artistry.

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Are there any creative advantages or disadvantages working in your position at Danger Press? If so what?

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Are there any artists (current or past) that you look to for motivation? What else inspires, motivates you?

 

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What mediums / software do you use in your process? How is that process affected when you’re preparing artwork for screen printing?

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How does the tangible print of your artwork make you feel as an artist and printmaker?

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What’s your most used tool as an artist? Your favorite? Are they the same? How would you describe your art?

 

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How long have you been pursuing printmaking and how has your craft evolved throughout your time? Better or worse?

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What’s a typical day at Danger Press like for you?

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What other projects are you currently working on?

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Is there anything specific you’re NOT good at that you’re  currently towards improving?

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What’s your ultimate end goal?

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Angie Chiappori José Ibarra

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Danger Press Mo’ Safavynia

Mo’ Safavynia is a rad dude. Once a Danger employee, Mo’ now spends his time making killer design work over at Nebo, a design agency here in Atlanta. When he’s not at work, Mo’ enjoys spending time with his wife, his buddies, and his two pups.

He was recently given the opportunity to turn three of his latest illustrations into limited edition prints and chose us to get the work done. We took the opportunity to catch up with Mo’ at his condo to hear about how things have been since Danger, his current art projects, and his creative process.

Could you tell us a little about yourself and what you currently do as artist, designer, etc?

I am a designer at a marketing company called Nebo. I get to do a lot of things there, lately working on websites and ads and the like. I also get to do a lot of illustrations and branding stuff through work too. On my off time, I still draw constantly and work on freelance and personal works. Really just staying busy doing what I like to do. I am trying to wrap up my site and maybe start creating things I can sell and set up a store with some of the homies.

Could you tell us about the inspiration behind these prints? You seem to have been inspired by wildlife for this series; could you tell us more about it?

Yeah, man, so the prints started as a pitch to a client I was working with. We were driving donations for animal wellness during the holiday season and I pitched the posters as a gift. It was a good idea, but ultimately the client wanted to go with photos instead. We wrapped up the project and it went well but I wanted to just knock these out for my own. My boss saw that I was working on these and was into them so we decided to print them for ourselves. Pretty stoked that I got to do something with them for sure.

You were once part of our team over here at Danger. What would you say your biggest takeaway was from your time with us?

Danger was rad. It was super fun and I was lucky to have gotten the job out of college. I guess one thing I took away was to work hard but enjoy it. The job was tough but fun; I met a bunch of my best friends there. I feel like I still work hard and enjoy it, and I think it shows. There is no point in grinding away at something that is killing you, and when you are into what you are doing, the work speaks for itself. I think it also helped me in the digital world too. Now when I am working on posters and stuff I try and think like if I was printing them myself, trying to think about the way lines meet up and how colors can help textures.

How important is it for you to continue creating works on paper through screen printing?

Super important when I can. It always feels good to be able to have something tangible to look at and have. So much of what I do these days is all digital and so they live on screen. I try to print things out as much as I can and, lately, I have been trying to think of new things that I can get done like pins, stickers, and patches.

Favorite artist tool?

I basically stay using Illustrator. I do a sketch on paper first to get things kinda where I want them, but once I get things down, I move to Illustrator to get them done. I have recently started using the iPad and Procreate to work and it’s pretty rad. I can get quick sketches done and drag in reference material as I go. It’s not like working with paper, but it has its sweet spots.

What projects are you currently working on?

I actually just wrapped up a poster for a show being held by AIGA and I made my first 2 enamel pins and am working on 4 more to finish the set. Got a few other things in the works but it’s too early to really talk about (haha).

To learn more about Mo’, you can visit his website by clicking here.
You can also catch him on Instagram and Dribble.

@safavynia
590 followers

Mo’ Safavynia José Ibarra

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Danger Press Social Media Intern

We currently have an opening for a Social Media Intern. If you’re in Atlanta, interested in working with us, and know what skills you want to improve, send us your info.

_________________________________

marketing@dangerpress.com

Social Media Intern J.Gilman

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Danger Press Second Print Show

This past Friday, April 19th, we hosted our second print show where we treated our loyal clients to some great food from Elmyriachi, an open bar, live jazz, and some of our best print work to date.

We’ve been long overdue for a print show and we knew it was time to not only show our clients how appreciative we are for their constant support but we also wanted to give our crew the opportunity to showcase their creative abilities.

Second Print Show José Ibarra

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Danger Press Iain Macarthur | Kissing

In this article, we’ll be documenting the screen printing process of our latest print for London-based artist, Iain MacArthur. He’s been making beautiful graphic illustrations for over ten years. He’s a classically trained artist with a degree in HND Illustration from Swindon College and has proven to be an artist capable of existing in not only traditional gallery spaces but can hold is own in major commercial projects for clients such as Nike, BAFTA, and HBO .

We first encountered MacArthurs’ work on years ago when we printed his Rawr! poster and have since followed his work closely.

We have plenty of MacArthur’s work coming up. But for now, we are excited to announce the release of Kissing, a beautiful eight color print that exemplifies MacArthur’s ability to combine surrealism and naturalistic features to create art that is gentle and intimate.

These limited edition prints come in a general release of 3o and a variant edition of 15. We took the opportunity to document the printing process of these beautiful 24″x24″ prints and you can view them below.

This beautiful eight color prints will be avialable later this month via dangerprints.com. You can find the print details below and be on the lookout for the official release date announcement via Instagram at @dangerpress!

Kissing by Iain MacArthur
24″x24″ Screen Print  |  Edition of 30
Shipping April 2019
$30
Kissing (Variant) by Iain MacArthur
24″x24″ Screen Print  |  Edition of 15
Shipping April 2019
$50

To learn more about the beautiful work of Iain MacArthur, visit iainmacarthur.com or click here!

@iain.macarthur
66k followers

Iain Macarthur | Kissing José Ibarra

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Danger Press Sanithna La Petite Mort Revisitée

La Petite Mort Revisitée by Sanithna
18″x24″ Screen Print  |  Edition of 30 / 30 / 20
Shipping March 2019
$40 / $40 / $50

We’ve had the honor and privilege of working with Atlanta fine artist Sanithna Phansavanh for over seven years now. We’ve witnessed his growth firsthand, and throughout his creative journey, we’ve collaborated on a number of projects from t-shirts to limited edition prints. Our collaborative efforts go back to 2012, when we first released “La Petite Mort,” a beautiful piece that depicts a feeling of ecstasy entering the female body. Because of its unique vertical shape and aesthetic appeal, the print activated any given space. The piece also demonstrated the artist’s early interest in exploring and examining the human condition via the human figure.

Since 2012, Sanithna has evolved and reinvented himself. “La Petite Mort” heavily depended on line and geometric shapes to depict the female figure. Today, Sanithna employs fewer lines and shapes to equally convey the female figure, thus demonstrating the growth of his technical abilities but, most importantly, his growth as an artist.

In honor of our collaborative history, we are happy to announce the release of “La Petite Mort Revisitée,” featuring three unique prints that revisit the original release of 2012. “La Petite Mort Revisitée” maintains the same feeling of ecstasy as the original release but takes on a different path of exploration through color and line simplicity. The result is three beautiful and intriguing prints that depict the artist’s creative growth and his continued exploration of the human figure.

We caught up with the artist to learn more about his approach and inspiration behind “La Petite Mort Revisitée.” You can find the interview below as well as process shots of the limited edition prints releasing on Friday, March the 8th. 

“La Petite Mort” was a big success. How do you feel about revisiting this piece seven years later?

The first print is a clear marker of where I was, technically and stylistically, and using it to visually track the evolution of my work, to where I am now, felt like a fun and intriguing exercise. Being able to compare the two pieces, to see the different approaches to composition, color, and mark-making, gives me really valuable insight. It’s kind of like being around a kid that’s growing. If you’re constantly around the growth, it’s not a dramatic thing. But, if you haven’t seen the kid for a few years, that growth is going to be surprising.

Could you tell us about the inspiration behind this new interpretation of “La Petite Mort”?

“La Petite Mort” is a French phrase that translates to “The Little Death.” It’s an expression which describes the feeling you have after an orgasm, that brief moment where your existence seems to disintegrate and you experience transcendence — spiritual release through physical release. So, I tried to express that idea with the visual elements: the brushwork is sparse, fragmented, and imbued with energy, and the palettes describe the arc of the experience. The pink colorway, “Blush,” corresponds to the initial spread, the blue/magenta/black colorway, “Vibrate,” maps to the intense highpoint, and the red/black/gold colorway, “Dissolve,” represents the final melting away of body and mind.

Blush

Vibrate

Dissolve

How do you think your work has evolved throughout the years?

I think the biggest evolution has been in why I create art in the first place. Starting out, it was rooted in this need to show art as proof that I existed. Now, I’m much more interested in the process of creating art, of losing myself in the flow-state that art inherently provides. Beyond that, my skillset has been refined and expanded, which means that my mark-making is more confident. I think there’s a familiar DNA in my aesthetics, but how I apply it is determined by what I’m trying to achieve conceptually (instead of leading with a visual or stylistic goal). From a conceptual standpoint, I find myself wanting to simplify and reduce elements to only what’s necessary, to distill an idea to its essence.

Why do you choose screen printing when it comes to making limited edition prints? Considering the other printing options available such as giclée, etc?

There’s a certain quality to screen printing that can’t be rivaled. Prints just feel more crisp, saturated, and rich. And, as someone who loves the process of making art, I really enjoy the development of screen prints. From separating the art to burning the screens to figuring out how different inks lay together, it’s such a fun way to explore creative problem-solving. With this piece, in particular, I learned so much more about the process, of what to do and what not to do. Also, shout out to Danger Press for being such amazing partners. I’ve always held y’all in high esteem for your professionalism and the quality of work, but I got an even deeper appreciation for your expertise and character with this project. Everyone involved (Ed remembering some of my previous printing preferences, J giving great creative feedback, Dan working out the separations and the ink, and José doing damn near everything) prioritized making the art as good as possible and that I was pleased with what was being created.

Favorite creative tool?

A Bic #2 pencil with 0.7mm lead is my favorite tool; it’s ubiquitous and humble, but it can achieve some pretty amazing results. Graphite will always be my first and favorite love.

Any advice for up-and-coming artists in Atlanta?

Work as much as you can. Work, work, work. Constantly working allows you to establish a unique perspective, to develop your skills, to build a strong portfolio, and to gain exposure. Also, don’t be a jackass. Be productive and be a decent human being (which, I guess, is just generally good life advice) and Atlanta will show you love.

What projects are you currently working on?

I’m working on a couple of painting commissions, prepping for some murals, and doing a fair amount of brand identity projects. It’s the ideal balance for me: I need the gallery work to balance the public art work to balance the design work to balance the gallery work. They’re all related enough for me to stay creative, but the variety helps to mitigate burnout.

Any shows in the works?

I’ll be a part of ABV Gallery’s Spring Invitational Show, which is always an amazing exhibition (Greg Mike consistently brings in amazing international artists to Atlanta). I have a few other things that I’m also cooking, but I’m not ready to speak on them just yet, haha.

La Petite Mort Revisitée” releases Friday, March 8th at 11:00 AM EST at dangerprints.com

La Petite Mort Revisitée by Sanithna
18″x24″ Screen Print  |  Edition of 30 / 30 / 20
Shipping March 2019
$40 / $40 /$50
@sanithna
6,106 followers

Sanithna La Petite Mort Revisitée José Ibarra

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Danger Press Justin Coelho

Justin Coelho has been our Screen Technician for over a year now and his interest and background in screen printing made him a perfect fit for our shop. Our shop flow depends heavily on Justin to ensure that our screens are up to standard prior to print production. Justin was first introduced to screen printing as a Fine Arts student at Ivy Tech Community College in Indiana. He would go on to conclude his undergraduate degree in Fine Arts at SCAD (Savannah) before moving to Atlanta, Georgia.

As a company of Artist’s and Designers, we take pride in having crew members like Justin, who continue to explore their creativity through a diverse range of media. We caught up with Justin to learn more about his creative journey, his current body of work, and his artistic aspirations. 

Justin, in your latest VoyageATL interview, we learned about your very diverse background. How has this influenced the work that you make?

I wouldn’t say my family lineage directly influences the work but growing up in the Midwest with parents from two differing cultures did give me an interesting perspective on what it means to be an American, and that might have led to developing a wide perspective as an imaginative kid. Geographically speaking though, Indianapolis has some great neighboring hip-hop influences, Chicago and Detroit to name a few.  The music scene all around in Indy can be very rich and diverse but growing up I was engrossed with the authentic elements of hip-hop and self expression. I think that might have led me on the trajectory I’m in. When I was younger I was a big graffiti nerd and liked art that was really loud and grabbed your attention. Although my subject matter may have shifted a bit, I still have bits of that approach influencing the process in how I like to suddenly grab attention.

You have a very unique way of blending surrealism and abstraction together. Where does your interest in these styles come from?

Talking about abstraction gets pretty difficult for me but its just always been a fun activity for me whether I choose to reflect these thoughts into my art or just sit for a second and appreciate something til it floats away to some other part of my brain. As a kid I loved being outside and around the natural world. Observing and interacting with everything around me was sometimes all I needed and I think what I got from that though, is a curiosity to bend and play with my observations/ ideas until they were pushed much further then from where they started. Also in high school I became interested in some of the classical surrealists, like Renee Magritte and Dali. There’s quite a bit of magic happening when you take things from our actual reality and skew them a bit to make them little off kilter. Right now though my biggest surrealism inspiration has been the greek director Yorgos Lanthimos.

The majority of your current work heavily involves water colors and gouache. Why is this your preferred media to work with?

Well after years of experimenting with a lot of materials, watercolors just felt the most natural to me. There’s a different kind of resistance that paper gives me, and my hand just has a natural way of working the technique. It’s kind of a thrill when painting with water based paints because they’re VERY unforgiving and it’s sort of like a quick flawed sprint, but with a dose of careful pacing and intuition the paintings come out all right. You can’t rely on over-working and layering the paints like you can with oils.

Where does your interest in editorial illustration come from?

Editorial is one of a few commercial markets I learned about in school that really stood out to me. It gives me a chance to take a brief story and challenge myself with the task of creative problem solving. I love all sorts of visual cover art that compliments a story and it’s also a readily accessible sort of “foot in the door” market.

You spoke about having an interest in exploring the themes of psychology, chaos, and astronomy. Could you tell us more about why you explore these themes. 

I don’t want to get too heady but it’s cuz all that woo woo stuff is so juicy

Abstracted human figures are heavily present in your work. Could you tells us more about your use of the human figure?

Well to begin with I was always a huge fan of technically anatomical drawings and sketches. I’m obsessed with human anatomy and all the nuances. When I was at community college I had a number of fantastic drawing teachers who helped me develop the ability to deconstruct the shapes and forms of a figure and then piece it all back together. Once I learned how to draw the human form I was excited to use these tools and go places with my art that I never could before. So after years of practicing and getting a solid understanding, I began experimenting with human form to make unusual compositions.  Objectively we are all walking, breathing, and pulsating oddities. I can’t stop think about how mysterious we are and I want to push that mystery further and create new organic reactions.

What projects are you currently working on?

There’s a pretty fun promotional piece I’m making for a peer and good friend from school. It’s a great feature film project in the works and this is sort of an interpretive graphic to assist in the pitch. I will also be working on refining my commercial illustration portfolio.

Do you have anything exciting coming up in this new year?

I don’t have any dates or events planned at the moment but in general I will be expanding my portfolio and looking for more collaborative opportunities around the city. I’ve been putting it off but I really want to dip my toes in the waters of Atlanta….that sounds weird…whatever….thanks for the opportunity Jose! Let’s get this grain!

We look forward to following Justins creative growth and are excited to see what he creates next. You can view more of Justins work here. You can also find on IG as @justincoelhoart

@justincoelhoart
467 followers

Justin Coelho José Ibarra

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