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Olympic Weightlifting Programs
Written by Nichole Kribs

The surge of CrossFit over the last 10 years has really pushed Olympic Weightlifting into the public eye and now has trainers and athletes alike incorporating Olympic Weightlifting into their training regime.

If you weren’t a football player in high school or somehow had an amazing coach or trainer who exposed you to Olympic Weightlifting at a young age then you are most likely fairly new to the sport.

However, CrossFit has helped make Olympic Weightlifting a popular choice for many who are looking to get stronger and improve their athleticism.

3 Benefits of Olympic Weightlifting (For Everyone)

There are many benefits of training the Olympic lifts that can help people of all ages become more athletic. Below are three main training benefits of the Olympic Lifts:

1. Improved Mobility

The Olympic Lifts require a great degree of mobility so those who regularly incorporate the lifts into their training program have improved mobility.

2. Improved Body Composition

Performing full body, explosive lifts will help improve a person’s body composition by building muscle while improving athleticism.

3. Improved Core Strength

It is shocking how much midline strength is needed for the Olympic lifts. Holding positions for technique work and finding stability with the clean & jerk and snatch all require a tremendous amount of core strength.

Benefits of Olympic Lifting for CrossFit

CrossFit helped popularize Olympic Weightlifting because CrossFit utilizes the Olympic Lifts for part of its training stimulus. Becoming proficient in the Olympic lifts will directly help you improve your training in CrossFit.

Not only will your strength improve with your Clean & Jerk and Snatch but you will also become more explosive and athletic as you become more proficient in your Olympic Lifting.

Are Olympic Weightlifting Programs Good for Beginners?

Yes, but be selective in what type of program you follow. The Clean & Jerk and Snatch are complex movements so it will take time to learn the proper technique to avoid injury. The best way to do this is to follow a program that puts emphasis on positional work for each lift and keeps the percentage low.

This way a beginner is learning exactly how each position of the lift feels and can create better body awareness when performing the lifts. Ideally, beginners will work with a coach who can provide hands-on coaching.

However, if you don’t have access to a coach at your gym then try our Invictus 3-Day Weightlifting Program.

What is a Typical Olympic Weightlifting Workout?

For a typical Olympic Weightlifting session, check out one of these examples from Invictus 3-Day Weightlifting sessions:

A.
Every 90 seconds, for 9 minutes (6 sets):
Power Snatch with a 2-second pause at knee x 1 rep

*Sets 1-2 @ 80% of 1-RM Power Snatch
*Sets 3-4 @ 85% of 1-RM Power Snatch
*Sets 5-6 @ 90% of 1-RM Power Snatch

B.
Every 90 seconds, for 9 minutes (6 sets):
Power Clean with a 2-second pause at knee + Power Jerk

*Sets 1-2 – 2 reps @ 80% of 1-RM Power Clean & Power Jerk
*Sets 3-4 – 1 rep @ 85% of 1-RM Power Clean & Power Jerk
*Sets 5-6 – 1 rep @ 90% of 1-RM Power Clean & Power Jerk

C.
Every 90 seconds, for 9 minutes (6 sets):
Front Squat

*Set 1 – 1 rep @ 85%
*Set 2 – 3 reps @ 80%
*Set 3 – 1 rep @ 90%
*Set 4 – 3 reps @ 85%
*Set 5 – 1 rep @ 95%
*Set 6 – 3 reps @ 85%

D.
Every 2:30, for 7:30 (3 sets):
Barbell Lunges x 5 reps each leg

Aim for 2 heavy working sets.

E.
Every 2 minutes, for 8 minutes (4 sets):
Glute Ham Raise x 6-8 reps

How Long are Olympic Weightlifting Cycles?

If you were to sign up for one of the Olympic Weightlifting Programs, like the Invictus 3-Day Program or the Invictus 5-Day Program, you can do it at any time.

You don’t need to jump in right at the beginning of a cycle but may need to adjust the percentages based on how familiar you are with the Olympic lifts. Depending on the cycle focus, an Olympic Weightlifting Cycle can range from 8-12 weeks as athletes need to follow progressions that slowly build in volume and/or load to peak for either a meet or to test their new 1-rep maxes.

Is Olympic Weightlifting in CrossFit Safe?

Yes, Olympic Lifting in CrossFit can be safe if a person has learned proper technique for the Olympic lifts. We’d encourage people who are just learning the Olympic lifts to avoid performing them in CrossFit workouts where intensity can be high until they can safely perform the lifts while under duress.

How to Spot an Olympic Weightlifting Friendly Gym

Looking to find a gym that is partial to Olympic Weightlifting? Most CrossFit gyms are Olympic Weightlifting friendly. If you are just looking for a gym to lift at then you can search for a CrossFit affiliate that has ‘Open Gym’ time or for a Globo gym that has the following:

  1. They have bumper plates (not metal plates)
  2. They have a designated platform(s) for lifting
  3. There are no signs saying you can’t drop barbells
Best Olympic Lifting Programs for CrossFit

The Invictus 3-Day Weightlifting Program is a great program for people looking to improve their Olympic Weightlifting while still training in CrossFit. The 3-Day Weightlifting Program provides 3 sessions per week that last 60-90 minutes.

Depending on a person’s schedule, they could either follow just the 3 sessions 3 times per week or they could add a short conditioning piece, along with the 3 Weightlifting sessions and follow CrossFit training the other 2-3 training days per week.

The Invictus 5-Day Weightlifting Program is also a great program for people who are interested in just focusing on the Olympic Lifts. This program offers 5 sessions per week that last 60-90 minutes and will help people improve in their Clean & Jerk and Snatch.

Invictus 3-Day Online Olympic Weightlifting Program

The program consists of technique drills and accessory work, as well as well thought out progressions to help athletes improve their lifts. The program will help athletes improve their weightlifting technique and become more efficient, which will allow them to break new personal records in their lifts.

The sessions can be added as a supplement to your current training program three days per week, or used as a stand-alone program. You will also have access to the Invictus Weightlifting Facebook group, where our coaches will answer questions about the programming and review video of your lifts when needed.

Jared Enderton, the coach for the Invictus Weightlifting Program, is a 1x CrossFit Games athlete, a 2x CrossFit CrossFit Regionals athlete, a former full-time Weightlifter at the Olympic Training Center, a USA Nationals Silver Medalist in the Clean & Jerk and a Strongman Competitor. The programs cost $39-$59 a month and you can register here.

The post The Invictus Olympic Weightlifting Program & Benefits appeared first on Invictus Fitness.

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Why Deload Week Should be the Best Week
Written by Ricky Moore

Most of us who are into Olympic lifting love it for a few reasons – we get to throw heavy weight above our heads; it makes us better for other explosive sports; and it is very technique-driven and therefore very challenging. There is always something to work on!

Even though it is very tempting to test that 1RM almost every day we lift, we must trust the process and not cave to that temptation, especially during “deload week” when our programming has us lifting waaaaaay less than we know we are capable of.

Keeping our egos in check and the above reasons in mind as we approach deload week can help us reframe its purpose, make the most of that time and make it the BEST WEEK!

Think More & Enjoy the Process

When you are working at 85+%, it is better to think less and trust your fundamentals and movement patterns. But deload week is a great time to focus on those fundamentals and the certain parts of your lift(s) you need to improve upon. This is maybe the best time to video your lifts to help yourself focus on working on whatever your “issues” are like staying on the mid-foot as long as possible in your snatch, for example. You’ll have more time to think about and practice what you need to do to become better.

Whatever skill work you need, you will have the opportunity to make real improvement when working at lighter loads so that when it’s time to go heavy again, you’ll have greased the groove for a more automatic lift at the heavier loads.

Give the Body Rest from the Volume & Intensity

You may feel invincible but you can’t go on lifting at those high percentages forever. Not only does your physical body need a little break every now and then, so does your central nervous system (CNS). Both can become worn down and even injured without the proper rest.

If you’ve been having nagging aches and pains, deload week is a great time to address those with some rest and self care. The week away from the heavy weights in itself will do a body good. But also make sure that a part of your deload week includes some sort of body maintenance, whether that be from you to yourself, or making an appointment with a body worker for that much-needed massage.

Lifting at percentages close to your 1RM can also take a toll on the CNS, which plays a huge role in us making our lifts. Your brain does a lot of calculating and thinking even when you aren’t aware it’s doing that – especially with the Olympic lifts. So if you’re feeling sluggish, you aren’t feeling super coordinated, you’re missing lifts you normally make, or you have a combination of overwhelming physical and mental fatigue, it’s time for a deload week.

Focus More on Accessory Work

Even the amazingness of Olympic lifting can have negative effects. The problem with training ONLY the lifts with no implementation of accessory work is wear and tear on the body. The constant loading of a heavy barbell on your joints can and will start to break a body down. What accessory work allows you to do is to increase the volume of training while at the same time taking the stress off a specific joint. Along with allowing an increased workload there are also a lot of options out there including sled work, rope pulling and farmer carries, to name a few. So, don’t worry, you can still move weight during deload week and accessory work is a great way to feel like you’re still getting in an awesome, and beneficial, session but without the toll on the body.

Deload week is time to think, improve and recover! And to get ready to bring it the following weeks!

The post Why Deload Week Should be the Best Week appeared first on Invictus Fitness.

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Banded Sotts Press - YouTube

Sotts Press for the Under-Mobile Athlete
Video by Kirsten Ahrendt

The Sotts Press is a great accessory lift to work on mobility – especially thoracic extension – and also stability as you hold your position. That is, unless, you don’t have enough mobility or stability to perform the movement as prescribed.

So what do you do if you find yourself in this scenario on Sotts Press day and you still want to give it a go? Coach Kirsten has just the modification for you! All you need to perform this version – in addition to the bar and rack you’ll already be using – is a medium sized band.

Setting Up & Executing Your Banded Sotts Press

  • Place your band at hip height on the upright portion of the squat rack.
  • While facing the post, step into the band and place it across the thoracic region (upper back). The purpose of the band is twofold: 1) It encourages thoracic extension – something that many athletes lack and one of the main reasons people can’t Sotts Press properly; and, 2) It allows you to sit back into the squat by providing a counterbalance.
  • Grab your barbell or PVC pipe and hold it in the front rack position.
  • Step back until there is tension on your band.
  • Lower yourself into the bottom of your squat. This depth could be different for everyone but the most important thing to remember is that you should be able to hold tension wherever your “bottom” is. This position should be active and difficult to hold.
  • Brace then press the barbell overhead while holding the bottom of your squat.

We love this way to make an awesome accessory lift accessible to everyone! If you’ve struggled with Sotts Press in the past or you want to add some much-needed mobility or stability work to your warm-up, give this version a go and let us see by tagging us @crossfitinvictus.

The post Sotts Press for the Under-Mobile Athlete appeared first on Invictus Fitness.

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Brush or bang? You decide.

Brush Up, Don’t Bang Out
Written by Sage Burgener

In our sport, there seems to be a lot of confusion surrounding the hips and what their exact role is in our lifts.

It is very common for people to be hip dominant lifters. They think that in order to create acceleration on the bar, they need to BANG the bar off their hips.

While there is absolutely contact of the barbell and the hips, we want to think about the contact being more of a BRUSH UP rather than a BANG OUT.

If our focus is on brushing the bar UP off the hips, that will help to create more of a VERTICAL acceleration on the bar rather than a horizontal one, which is generally the path the bar will travel when we think “bang”.

In addition to a more vertical bar path, thinking “brush” rather than “bang” naturally forces lifters to turn to their legs as their source of power. And when we’re using our legs as our source of power, we’re pushing STRAIGHT down through the floor with a ton of force. That straight down push creates an increase in elevation on the barbell, making the pull under and turnover SIGNIFICANTLY easier.

So, the next time you think about banging the bar aggressively off your hips…don’t.

Instead, pay respect to your legs, and the amount of work you’ve put into making them as strong as possible, and let THEM do the work! And, as a result, watch your elevation and acceleration of the barbell (in a vertical fashion) increase as brush the barbell up off your hips.

Also Check Out…

The Proper Starting Position For Olympic Weightlifting

Why the Burgener Warm-Up?

Repeat After Me – “I Will Pull Myself Under the Barbell”

The post Brush Up, Don’t Bang Out appeared first on Invictus Fitness.

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Brush or bang? You decide.

Brush Up, Don’t Bang Out
Written by Sage Burgener

In our sport, there seems to be a lot of confusion surrounding the hips and what their exact role is in our lifts.

It is very common for people to be hip dominant lifters. They think that in order to create acceleration on the bar, they need to BANG the bar off their hips.

While there is absolutely contact of the barbell and the hips, we want to think about the contact being more of a BRUSH UP rather than a BANG OUT.

If our focus is on brushing the bar UP off the hips, that will help to create more of a VERTICAL acceleration on the bar rather than a horizontal one, which is generally the path the bar will travel when we think “bang”.

In addition to a more vertical bar path, thinking “brush” rather than “bang” naturally forces lifters to turn to their legs as their source of power. And when we’re using our legs as our source of power, we’re pushing STRAIGHT down through the floor with a ton of force. That straight down push creates an increase in elevation on the barbell, making the pull under and turnover SIGNIFICANTLY easier.

So, the next time you think about banging the bar aggressively off your hips…don’t.

Instead, pay respect to your legs, and the amount of work you’ve put into making them as strong as possible, and let THEM do the work! And, as a result, watch your elevation and acceleration of the barbell (in a vertical fashion) increase as brush the barbell up off your hips.

Also Check Out…

The Proper Starting Position For Olympic Weightlifting

Why the Burgener Warm-Up?

Repeat After Me – “I Will Pull Myself Under the Barbell”

The post Brush Up, Don’t Bang Out appeared first on Invictus Fitness.

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Invictus Athlete, Paula Santos, cycling that barbell AQAP!

Rules of Thumb for Scaling Weight on Your Barbell in Metcons
Written by Michele Vieux

There are a couple rules of thumb when scaling weight for metcons. But before getting into those, I just want to put it out there that if you still learning movements – especially Olympic lifting – or are focusing on technique, then doing them for time usually isn’t the best idea because all that you’ve learned and the technique that you’re practicing goes out the window when you are racing the clock.

If this sounds like you, then I’d recommend doing your Oly work in Part A or in warm-ups for skill work so that you can take the time to focus on proper technique and mechanics. You can always substitute kettlebell swings, box jumps or something else explosive in metcons for these movements. Or switch over to our Fitness Part B, which has some great options as well.

If you decide that doing the barbell movements for time is safe and is going to help you reach your goals and need to scale the prescribed weight, then here’s the rules of thumb I’d recommend.

If the rounds have…

5 or fewer reps – 80-85% of your 1RM and these will likely not be touch-and-go reps unless you are extremely proficient with your barbell cycling. Rather, drop the bar each time and reset.

6-10 reps – 75-80% of your 1RM shooting for clusters of 2-3 at a time, if possible and safe. Some people may be able to do larger clusters but again, that will depend on your proficiency with barbell cycling.

11+ reps – 70% or less of your 1RM but you should be able to touch-and-go with them in clusters of 5 or more safely. If you cannot, then you should highly consider not doing the movement for time.

If you don’t know your 1RM because the movement is still too new for you, then you probably shouldn’t be doing this movement for time. This would be the perfect opportunity to switch to the Fitness workout or sub another movement.

Hopefully this helps you decide what weight to use in your metcons, especially if you aren’t able to complete them Rx with the prescribed weights.

Also Check Out…

Hooking for Time

Barbell Cycling Strategies: Ground to Overhead

The Pros & Cons of Counting Macros

The post Rules of Thumb for Scaling Weight on Your Barbell in Metcons appeared first on Invictus Fitness.

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Invictus Athlete, Kristin Holte, putting some heavy weight overhead.

10 Things to do to Improve Your Clean & Jerk
Written by Sage Burgener

#1: Breathe in, brace hard and use the lats that were graciously given to you. Failure to engage the lats will most likely result in an early arm bend or shift forward off the ground.

#2: Speaking of shifting forward, discontinue your day job at the strip club. It’s only teaching you to raise your hips up before your chest on your initial liftoff. The bar, your shoulders and your hips should all rise at the same time.

#3: The bar’s immediate goal is to pull you forward and down. Stay balanced on your whole foot through liftoff and do not let that bar pull you forward onto your toes. Side note: don’t OVER correct by shifting too far back on the heels either.

#4: You can NEVER jump too hard. Yes, you’ll need to adjust your power output according to how much weight is on the bar, but your drive should always be explosive.

#5: If your hips go out, the bar goes out. If your hips go up, the bar goes up. #micdrop More on the proper hip drive here.

#6: Leave the “dropping it like it’s hot” for the dance floor. Jump that bar up, and as it’s moving up, USE THE RESISTANCE OF THE BAR TO PULL YOURSELF DOWN AND AROUND THE BAR. At no point in your lifting career should you jump, drop/ dive, and then catch the barbell.

#7: Slow elbows = death. Your elbows will not just fall into place. You have to keep pulling them around until you feel them leading you up out of the squat.

#8: Moving into the jerk, relax your hands in your rack position to ensure the drive is coming from your body and not your arms. Then, breathe in strong, allow the bar to settle, and find the perfect positioning (straight up and down) and tempo on your dip. Slow is smooth and smooth is fast.

#9: Jump up, punch down. When you jump the bar up, it’s only going to get to a certain height. From there, you have to use that resistance of the bar to drive your body DOWN into your solid split position. Do not try and press the bar up higher.

#10: Your foot placement on the split will be easier to achieve if your primary focus is on keeping the weight directly over your hips. The bar needs to be stacked over your shoulders, which are stacked over your hips. If those three things are in a straight line (the bar, your shoulders and your hips), your footwork is probably (hopefully) solid.

Also Check Out…

Sticky Fingers – Transitioning From The Clean To The Jerk

How To Choose Your Tempo Off The Floor In Olympic Weightlifting

How Well Do You Know Your Feet?

The post 10 Things to do to Improve Your Clean & Jerk appeared first on Invictus Fitness.

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Invictus Athlete, Kristin Holte, putting some heavy weight overhead.

10 Things to do to Improve Your Clean & Jerk
Written by Sage Burgener

#1: Breathe in, brace hard and use the lats that were graciously given to you. Failure to engage the lats will most likely result in an early arm bend or shift forward off the ground.

#2: Speaking of shifting forward, discontinue your day job at the strip club. It’s only teaching you to raise your hips up before your chest on your initial liftoff. The bar, your shoulders and your hips should all rise at the same time.

#3: The bar’s immediate goal is to pull you forward and down. Stay balanced on your whole foot through liftoff and do not let that bar pull you forward onto your toes. Side note: don’t OVER correct by shifting too far back on the heels either.

#4: You can NEVER jump too hard. Yes, you’ll need to adjust your power output according to how much weight is on the bar, but your drive should always be explosive.

#5: If your hips go out, the bar goes out. If your hips go up, the bar goes up. #micdrop More on the proper hip drive here.

#6: Leave the “dropping it like it’s hot” for the dance floor. Jump that bar up, and as it’s moving up, USE THE RESISTANCE OF THE BAR TO PULL YOURSELF DOWN AND AROUND THE BAR. At no point in your lifting career should you jump, drop/ dive, and then catch the barbell.

#7: Slow elbows = death. Your elbows will not just fall into place. You have to keep pulling them around until you feel them leading you up out of the squat.

#8: Moving into the jerk, relax your hands in your rack position to ensure the drive is coming from your body and not your arms. Then, breathe in strong, allow the bar to settle, and find the perfect positioning (straight up and down) and tempo on your dip. Slow is smooth and smooth is fast.

#9: Jump up, punch down. When you jump the bar up, it’s only going to get to a certain height. From there, you have to use that resistance of the bar to drive your body DOWN into your solid split position. Do not try and press the bar up higher.

#10: Your foot placement on the split will be easier to achieve if your primary focus is on keeping the weight directly over your hips. The bar needs to be stacked over your shoulders, which are stacked over your hips. If those three things are in a straight line (the bar, your shoulders and your hips), your footwork is probably (hopefully) solid.

Also Check Out…

Sticky Fingers – Transitioning From The Clean To The Jerk

How To Choose Your Tempo Off The Floor In Olympic Weightlifting

How Well Do You Know Your Feet?

The post 10 Things to do to Improve Your Clean & Jerk appeared first on Invictus Fitness.

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Invictus Masters Athlete, and Firefighter, Justin Herzog doing cleans in his gear for charity.

You May Be (Emotionally) Unstable, but Your Lifts Don’t Have to Be
Written by Sage Burnener

The title of this blog post has VERY little to do with the actual content, but it’s catchy and I like it.

Because there is so much to focus on in the actual lifts, we rarely think about our feet and how they feel against the ground. And when we disconnect from our feet, it’s easy to disconnect from our legs. And if we disconnect from our legs, we’ve lost our main source of power and might as well just quit weightlifting all together (may be a bit dramatic).

I touched on this concept a bit in one of my earlier blog posts, “How Well Do You Know Your Feet”, but maybe “feeling your feet or feeling your legs” are cues that don’t seem to work for you.

If that’s the case, I challenge you to think about this: “the floor is your source of power and source of stability”.

How can we use the floor for STABILITY?

In the beginning of the lift, when we’re pulling from the ground, we spread our feet and use every inch of our shoe to push the floor away from us. Use the ground as a reference for how balanced you are on that initial liftoff. The initial liftoff will set you up for success or failure in the rest of the lift depending on how balanced you are.

But even more important, in terms of stability, is the end of the lift. When you pull yourself down and around that bar, whether it be on a snatch or a clean, how your feet land against the ground is a HUGE indicator for how tight you are going to receive that bar. If you land with soft feet, or if you aren’t paying attention to how the floor feels under your feet, you’re probably going to be wobbling around under that weight. Being shaky and loose under heavy loads is not an ideal situation for anyone.

On the other hand, if you think about the ground staying strong and steady under you, you can jump your feet out FAST and imagine your feet STICKING to the floor like glue. Really, really strong glue.

How can we use the floor for POWER?

One cue that I love that my dad uses all the time: “stay flat-footed as long as possible”. What he means by this is…until you have fully extended your body as much as it’s capable of extending (aka jumping ALL the way through your legs), you CANNOT stop pushing through the floor. Until you are up on your very very tip toes, milliseconds away from jumping your feet out into your landing position, you need to be pushing through the floor. This push through the floor is what is generating power into the bar.

To Summarize:

1. Off the ground, use the floor to stay balanced on your liftoff.

2. When you’re jumping and pulling, feel your feet pushing through the ground AS LONG AS PHYSICALLY POSSIBLE.

3. When you’re pulling under the bar and you’re about to land, connect with the floor and land firm in your feet. Use the ground to help you stabilize under that heavy weight! In other words, STICK IT!

Also Check Out…

Reclaim The Hang And Stop Lifting From The Floor!

Three Habits Of Great Lifters

How To Choose Your Tempo Off The Floor In Olympic Weightlifting

The post You May Be (Emotionally) Unstable, but Your Lifts Don’t Have to Be appeared first on Invictus Fitness.

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Invictus Masters Athlete, and Firefighter, Justin Herzog doing cleans in his gear for charity.

You May Be (Emotionally) Unstable, but Your Lifts Don’t Have to Be
Written by Sage Burnener

The title of this blog post has VERY little to do with the actual content, but it’s catchy and I like it.

Because there is so much to focus on in the actual lifts, we rarely think about our feet and how they feel against the ground. And when we disconnect from our feet, it’s easy to disconnect from our legs. And if we disconnect from our legs, we’ve lost our main source of power and might as well just quit weightlifting all together (may be a bit dramatic).

I touched on this concept a bit in one of my earlier blog posts, “How Well Do You Know Your Feet”, but maybe “feeling your feet or feeling your legs” are cues that don’t seem to work for you.

If that’s the case, I challenge you to think about this: “the floor is your source of power and source of stability”.

How can we use the floor for STABILITY?

In the beginning of the lift, when we’re pulling from the ground, we spread our feet and use every inch of our shoe to push the floor away from us. Use the ground as a reference for how balanced you are on that initial liftoff. The initial liftoff will set you up for success or failure in the rest of the lift depending on how balanced you are.

But even more important, in terms of stability, is the end of the lift. When you pull yourself down and around that bar, whether it be on a snatch or a clean, how your feet land against the ground is a HUGE indicator for how tight you are going to receive that bar. If you land with soft feet, or if you aren’t paying attention to how the floor feels under your feet, you’re probably going to be wobbling around under that weight. Being shaky and loose under heavy loads is not an ideal situation for anyone.

On the other hand, if you think about the ground staying strong and steady under you, you can jump your feet out FAST and imagine your feet STICKING to the floor like glue. Really, really strong glue.

How can we use the floor for POWER?

One cue that I love that my dad uses all the time: “stay flat-footed as long as possible”. What he means by this is…until you have fully extended your body as much as it’s capable of extending (aka jumping ALL the way through your legs), you CANNOT stop pushing through the floor. Until you are up on your very very tip toes, milliseconds away from jumping your feet out into your landing position, you need to be pushing through the floor. This push through the floor is what is generating power into the bar.

To Summarize:

1. Off the ground, use the floor to stay balanced on your liftoff.

2. When you’re jumping and pulling, feel your feet pushing through the ground AS LONG AS PHYSICALLY POSSIBLE.

3. When you’re pulling under the bar and you’re about to land, connect with the floor and land firm in your feet. Use the ground to help you stabilize under that heavy weight! In other words, STICK IT!

Also Check Out…

Reclaim The Hang And Stop Lifting From The Floor!

Three Habits Of Great Lifters

How To Choose Your Tempo Off The Floor In Olympic Weightlifting

The post You May Be (Emotionally) Unstable, but Your Lifts Don’t Have to Be appeared first on Invictus Fitness.

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