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Now 30% OFF in the Crochet Spot Store, this pattern is for a simple cat bed that can be styled in 4 different ways! Try all the different styles and let your kitty choose which ones he/she likes the best. The cat is crocheted with super bulky weight yarn making the project quick to work up and thick and sturdy for your furry friend. The bed is also design so that it can easier be slipped into the washing machine just in case it needs cleaning (be sure to choose a machine washable yarn).

Click here for 30% OFF!

Pattern is already marked down. There is no need for coupon codes. Log in, then add the pattern to your cart and check out. All purchases can be downloaded directly from your account once completed. Offer ends May 30, 2019.

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I’ve seem some really cute travel tissue covers for those mini packs of tissues. All of the patterns have been for sewing, though, so I wanted to try adapting it to crochet. And I’m pleased with the finished result! These travel tissue packs are useful for carrying in a purse or backpack, especially for those of us who have springtime allergies (those pretty flowers are worth it though). This was a quick and easy project that offers lots of opportunities for customization.

Skill Level:

Finished Size: fits travel tissues measuring approximately 4.25″ (10.7 cm) long, 2.25″ (5.7 cm) wide, and 1″ (3 cm) deep. This size is fairly standard for small packs of tissues.

Materials:
Medium Weight Yarn (approximately 50 yards) – I chose to use two colors.
Crochet Hook G (4.00 mm)

Gauge:
9 sc = 2″
10 rows = 2″
Gauge Swatch: 2″w x 2″h (5 cm x 5 cm) ch 10.
Row 1: sc in second ch from hook and in each ch across: 9 sc
Row 2 – 10: ch 1, turn, sc in each sc across: 9
Finish off.

Need help understanding the abbreviations and symbols? Check out the crochet abbreviation chart.

Crochet Pattern: Travel Tissue Cozy
Note: This pattern is worked in a combination of rounds and rows. I chose to work Row 23 and 24 in a contrasting color, but you can use any color sequence you like.
Row 1: ch 21, sc in second ch from hook and in each ch: 20 sc
Row 2-12: ch 1, turn, sc in each sc across: 20 sc
Round 13: ch 1, turn, sc in next 20 sc, turn to work across row ends, sc in end of each row for 12 sc, turn to work across starting chain, sc 20 across, turn to work across last edge, sc in end of each row for 12 sc, sl st to first sc: 64 sc
Round 14-18: ch 1, turn, sc in each sc around: 64 sc
We will now be working in rows again to form the flaps on the top, which are joined to Round 18 as you go. Your cozy should look like Fig. A in the following picture.

First Flap
Row 19: sl st into next st on Round 18, turn, sc in next 20 sc, leave rest of round unworked: 20 sc
Row 20: sl st in next 2 sts on Round 18, turn, sc in next 20 sc from last row: 20 sc
Row 21-24: Repeat Row 20. At end of last row, sl st to next sc on Round 18 and finish off.

Second Flap
Now we’ll repeat these last 6 rows on the other side to make the second flap.
Row 20: Skip 5 stitches on Row 18. Join to 6th stitch with a slip stitch. (This should be at the opposite corner where you started the other flap – see Fig. B.) Sc in next 20 sc from Round 18, leave rest of round unworked: 20 sc
Row 21: sl st in next 2 sts on Round 18, turn, sc in 20 sts from last row: 20 sc
Row 22-24: Repeat Row 21. At end of last row, sl st to next sc on Round 18 and finish off.
Weave in ends. Sew closed any gaps in the corners between the two flaps. Slide in a travel tissue pack and you’re ready to go.

Need help while crocheting? Feel free to leave a comment below and I’m happy to help!

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Here we are again, another Spring and I’m dreaming of strawberries. For some reason, though I have never been overly obsessed with strawberries, I always start adding them to my designs when Spring comes around. Perhaps it’s because the splash of red against the pleasing green is always a delight.

Not surprisingly then, I have a new design for you completely centered on the beautiful fruit: the Strawberry Favor Bag. Recently I designed the Carrot Favor Bag and had a great time visualizing how the natural greenery would look in a crocheted fashion. Then I thought, why not try the cinch bag idea with other fruit and vegetable designs?

The Strawberry Favor Bag is very easy to make. The bag is worked from the bottom up in simple crochet increases while the greenery is worked in a simple but unique stitch pattern to create the pointed leaves of the strawberry plant. Add little stitches of light green or yellow for the seeds and you’re ready to fill the bag with candy or trinkets to give as a gift!

Skill Level:

Finished Size: (laid flat) 6 1/2” (16.5 cm) wide, 7” (18 cm) long

Materials:
Medium weight yarn (approximately 45 yards of red, 20 yards of dark green, and a small amount of light green or yellow)
Crochet hook H (5.00 mm)
Yarn needle
Tape measure
Stitch markers

Gauge:
4 sc = 1’’
4 rows = 1’’
Gauge Swatch: 1’’w x 1’’h (2.5 cm x 2.5 cm) ch 5.
Row 1: sc in second ch from hook and in each ch across: 4 sc
Row 2 – 4: ch 1, turn, sc in each sc across: 4 sc
Finish off.

Need help understanding the abbreviations and symbols? Check out the crochet abbreviation chart.

Note: Pattern is worked in a spiral, so do not chain to start a new round and do not sl st to join to end the row. Use stitch markers to keep track of the start of a new round.

Crochet Pattern: Strawberry Favor Bag
Round 1: with red, make an adjustable ring, ch 1, 6 sc in ring: 6 sc
Round 2: * 2 sc in next sc, sc in next sc, repeat from * around: 9 sc
Round 3: * 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 2 sc, repeat from * around: 12 sc
Round 4: * 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 3 sc, repeat from * around: 15 sc
Round 5: * 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 4 sc, repeat from * around: 18 sc
Round 6: * 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 5 sc, repeat from * around: 21 sc
Round 7: * 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 6 sc, repeat from around: 24 sc
Round 8: * 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 7 sc, repeat from * around: 27 sc
Round 9: * 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 8 sc, repeat from * around: 30 sc
Round 10: * 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 9 sc, repeat from * around: 33 sc
Round 11: * 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 10 sc, repeat from * around: 36 sc
Round 12: * 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 11 sc, repeat from * around: 39 sc
Round 13: * 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 12 sc, repeat from * around: 42 sc
Round 14: * 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 13 sc, repeat from * around: 45 sc
Round 15: * 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 14 sc, repeat from * around: 48 sc
Round 16: * 2 sc in next sc, sc in next 15 sc, repeat from * around: 51 sc
Round 17 – 22: sc in each sc around: 51 sc
Round 23: * sc2tog, sc in next 15 sc, repeat from * around: 48 sc
Round 24: change to dark green, sc in each sc around: 48 sc
Round 25: * sc in next sc, ch 1, skip next sc, repeat from * around: 24 sc
Round 26 – 28: * sc in next sc, ch 1, * repeat from * around: 24 sc
Round 29: * sc in next sc, skip next ch-1 space, (dc, ch 1, dc, ch 1, dc) in next ch-1 space, repeat from * around: 48 sts
Round 30: * sl st in next sc, 3 dc in next ch-1 space, ch-2 picot, 3 dc in next ch-1 space, repeat from * around: 56 sts, not counting picot
Finish off.

Cinch Straps
Cut 2 – 28” strands of dark green yarn. Lay bag flat with seam directly in back and place two stitch markers one either side of Round 24. This will be where your straps are placed. Thread yarn needle with one of the green strands and weave in and out of the stitches, starting at one stitch marker and ending at the same stitch marker. (I weave in intervals of two stitches). Do the same with the other strand, only start from the other side so that you end opposite of the other strap.

Stitching Seeds
Use a good length of light green or yellow yarn and thread the yarn needle. Make random stitches around the bag from the inside out to represent seeds.

Note: When weaving the strands through the stitches be careful not stitch into the other strand or the stitches themselves, or this will keep the bag from cinching properly and ruin your strands.

Let me know if you have any trouble while crocheting, I’ll be glad to help!

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Now 30% OFF in the Crochet Spot Store, this pattern uses double crochet stitches to work up quicker. No need to worry about the spaces created from taller stitches, each stitch is linked together to create a solid fabric. This sock pattern is crocheted from the toe up to the leg in one piece so you can try it on as you go. It is extremely adjustable, since it can be crocheted with any weight of yarn for any foot size you can imagine, from babies to adults, it’s all possible! You can adjust the length of your socks from ankle socks to knee highs. This pattern is not written in a conventional manner, it is like a tutorial with photos that you can follow as you crochet.

Click here for 30% OFF!

Pattern is already marked down. There is no need for coupon codes. Log in, then add the pattern to your cart and check out. All purchases can be downloaded directly from your account once completed. Offer ends May 16, 2019.

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I absolutely love watching pigeons and I’ve wanted to crochet one for what seems like forever. But the colorwork is tricky, so I went with a solid color to start, and the finished bird ended up looking like a dove. While researching for this pattern, I learned that doves and pigeons are both part of the Columbidae family, which explains why they look so similar. So this pattern is really a two-in-one, depending on the colors you choose. The bird can stand on its own and is about the size of a real dove or pigeon, but much more cuddly. I hope you have as much fun with this pattern as I did designing it.

Skill Level:

Finished Size: Approximately 8″ (20 cm) long from beak to tail, 6″ (15 cm) tall

Materials:
Medium Weight Yarn (approximately 50 yards for bird color and 5 yards for beak/leg color)
Crochet Hook G (4.00 mm)
Polyfil stuffing
Plastic safety eyes (around 8 mm works best)
2 pipe cleaners (chenille stems)
Hot glue or craft glue

Gauge:
Rounds 1 – 2 of wing measure approximately 1.75″ (4.5 cm).

Notes:
Pattern is worked mainly in unjoined rounds. Use a stitch marker to mark the first stitch of each round to keep your place.
Due to the pipe cleaner feet and safety eyes, dove is not suitable for small children.
A Magic Ring is used to start each piece. Alternatively, you may substitute (ch 2, 6 sc in second chain from hook) if that’s easier for you.

Need help understanding the abbreviations and symbols? Check out the crochet abbreviation chart.

Crochet Pattern: Amigurumi Pigeon or Dove

Body:
Round 1: with main color, make a magic ring, ch 1, 6 sc in ring, place marker: 6 sc
Round 2: 2 sc in each sc around: 12 sc
Round 3: (sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc) around: 18 sc
Round 4: (sc in next 2 sc, 2 sc in next sc) around: 24 sc
Round 5: sc in each sc around
Round 6: (sc in next 3 sc, 2 sc in next sc) around: 30 sc
Round 7: (sc in next 4 sc, 2 sc in next sc) around: 36 sc
Round 8-14: sc in each sc around
Round 15: (sc in next sc, sc2tog) 6 times, these decreases form the top of the dove’s body, place a marker for reference, sc in remaining 18 sc: 30 sc
Round 16-21: sc in each sc around
Round 22: (sc in next 3 sc, sc2tog) around: 24 sc
Round 23-28: sc in each sc around
Round 29: (sc in next 2 sc, sc2tog) around: 18 sc
Round 30: sc in each sc around
Firmly stuff body. Add more stuffing as you finish the last two rounds.
Round 31: (sc in next sc, sc2tog) around: 12 sc
Round 32: sc in each sc around

Tail
Do not finish off. Sc in next 2 sc. Then fold the open edge of Round 32 together. We’ll be crocheting the two sides together by inserting the hook through both layers. Ensure that your crochet hook is at the edge of the tail before starting (look at the marker from Round 15).
Row 1: sc closed with 6 sc
Row 2: Turn. The wrong side of the feathers will be facing up. (ch 8, dc in fourth ch from hook and in next 3 ch, hdc in next ch, skip first sc of join, sl st into next sc): first feather made. (ch 9, dc in fourth ch from hook and in next 4 ch, hdc in next ch, sl st into next sc): second feather made. (ch 10, dc in fourth ch from hook and in next 5 ch, hdc in next ch, sl st into next sc): third feather made. Repeat second feather and first feather, which brings you to the end of the row. Finish off: 5 feathers.

Beak:
A dove’s beak is usually a light pink-orange color, while a pigeon’s is usually darker.
Round 1: with contrasting color, make a magic ring, ch 1, 4 sc in ring: 4 sc
Round 2: (2 sc in next sc, sc in next sc) around: 6 sc
Round 3: sc in each sc around: 6 sc
Round 4: (2 sc in next sc, sc in next 2 sc) around: 8 sc
Sl st to next sc and finish off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Head:
Round 1: with main color, make a magic ring, ch 1, 6 sc in ring: 6 sc
Round 2: 2 sc in each sc around: 12 sc
Round 3: sc in each sc around
Round 4: (sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc) around: 18 sc
Round 5-12: sc in each sc around
Round 13: (hdc in next 2 sc, 2 hdc in next sc) 3 times, sc in remaining 9 sc: 12 hdc, 9 sc. (These hdc form the front of the neck. Place a marker for reference.)
Round 14: sc in each st around: 21 sc
Round 15: (sc in next 3 sc, 2 sc in next sc) 3 times, sc in remaining 9 sc: 24 sc
Sl st in next sc and finish off, leaving long tail for sewing.
Attach beak and safety eyes using the marker from Round 13 for guidance. I found it easiest to attach the eyes, stuff the head, and then sew on the beak. They should be attached between Rounds 5 and 6.
With a yarn needle, sew head to body. The front of the neck should touch Round 2 of the body, and the back of the neck should touch about Round 11-12.

Wings (make 2):
Round 1: with main color, make a magic ring, ch 2, 12 dc in ring: 12 dc
Alternatively, ch 3 and make 12 dc in third chain from hook.
Round 2: ch 2, turn, (2 dc in each of next 9 dc, (2 hdc in each of next 2 dc, 2 dc in last st, sl st to first dc: 20 dc, 4 hdc
Row 3: ch 2, turn, dc in first dc, hdc in next 6 sts, dc in next st, Leave the rest of the stitches unworked: 8 stitches
Row 4: ch 2, turn, dc in next 6 sts, dc2tog: 7 dc
Row 5: ch 2, turn, dc in each dc across
Row 6: ch 2, turn, dc in next 5 dc, dc2tog: 6 dc
Row 7: ch 2, turn, dc in each dc across
Row 8: ch 2, turn, dc in next 4 dc, dc2tog: 5 dc
Row 9: ch 2, turn, dc in next 3 dc, dc2tog: 4 dc
Row 10: ch 2, turn, dc in next 2 dc, dc2tog: 3 dc
The right wing and left wing have a different final round. It creates a wing that points ever-so-slightly up. If you’re making a pigeon, you may wish to switch the left and right wings so they point slightly downward instead, which seems to be more accurate to pigeons.

Right Wing
Ch 2, do not turn. Rotate to work along side of wing. Make 2 dc into the end of each row. When you reach the beginning circle, work into the unused stitches (there are 16 of them) as follows: (dc in next dc, 2 dc in next dc) across. When you reach the other side of the wing, continue making 2 dc into the end of each row. At the end, you’ll have 3 stitches left from Row 10. Skip 1, make 5 dc into next dc, skip 1, and sl st into first dc. Finish off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Left Wing
Ch 2, turn. Working across Row 10, skip 1, 5 dc in next dc, skip 1. Now you’ll work along the side of the wing. Make 2 dc into the end of each row. When you reach the beginning circle, work into the unused stitches (there are 16 of them) as follows: (dc in next dc, 2 dc in next dc) across. When you reach the other wide of the wing, continue making 2 dc into the end of each row. Sl st into first dc. Finish off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

The last round is the Right Side of the wing. Sew the wings to the dove, leaving the final round loose to provide some texture. You may find it easier to attach the wings after making the legs.

Legs
Pantaloons (make 2)
These are the feathered part at the top of the feet.
Round 1: with main color, make a Magic Ring, but don’t pull it tight. Ch 1, 6 sc in ring: 6 sc
Round 2: 2 sc in each sc around: 12 sc
Round 3: sc in each sc around
Sl st to next sc and finish off, leaving long tail for sewing. There’s no need to stuff these.

Feet (make 2)
Please see photos for reference.
Bend a pipe cleaner/chenille stem in half. Use the non-folded end to form three toes pointing forward and one pointing backward. It’s not a scientific process; just do what looks right to you.
Insert the folded end through the hole at the bottom of a pantaloon. Then, insert the pipe cleaner into the bottom of the dove. It should be able to stand on its own. I found this easiest with the pipe cleaners inserted at approximately Round 18 on the body with about 6 stitches between them.
Carefully sew the pantaloon to the dove. Use craft glue to secure the leg in place so it doesn’t slip out. There will only be about one stitch visible between the two legs after the pantaloons are sewn down.
Use beak-colored yarn to wrap around the pipe cleaner, hiding it from view. It helps to place a small amount of glue on the end of the toes so the yarn doesn’t slip off. Hide the yarn ends in the pantaloons.

Need help while crocheting? Feel free to leave a comment below and I’ll help you out!

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Everyone has a little hippie in them, am I right?

At least, that’s what I tell not-so-hippie-inclined people. However, whether you go for the hippie/boho style or not, this headband is the perfect choice. Wear it either way you like: across the forehead, for an eclectic look, or over the head, for a more traditional look (see picture below).

What is great about this pattern is that it utilizes taller crochet stitches. (See post, How to Crochet Tall Stitches) The headband is worked in separate circle motifs, from large to medium and small, and then sewn together. A light border is worked over the band of sewn circles to bring it all together and simple ties are attached to the ends for easy wearing.

Ready to give it a try?

(Kudos to my sister for looking smashing in the headband! Doesn’t her long, thick hair just fit perfectly?)

Skill Level:

Finished Size: Main strip measures 3” (8 cm) wide at widest circle x 11” (28 cm) long, with ties to fit any head size

Materials:
DK or Light Weight Yarn (approximately 40 yards)
Crochet hook E (3.50 mm)
Yarn needle

Gauge:
Small Circle pattern measures 1 ½” in diameter

Stitch Notes
This pattern is worked with tall stitches:
Quadruple Treble crochet (Quadtr)
Triple Treble crochet (Trtr)
Double Treble crochet (Dtr)
Read more about tall stitches at How to Crochet Tall Stitches

Need help understanding the abbreviations and symbols? Check out the crochet abbreviation chart.

Crochet Pattern: Dewdrop Boho Headband

Large Center Circle (make 1)
Round 1: make an adjustable ring but loop yarn over finger four times, ch 6, 28 quadtr, sl st in first quadtr: 28 quadtr
Round 2: ch 1, (do not turn), * (sc, ch 2, sc) in next st, sc in next st, repeat from * around, sl st in first sc: 42 sc
Finish off.

Medium Circle (make 2)
Round 1: make an adjustable ring but loop yarn over finger four times, ch 4, 26 trtr, sl st in first trtr: 26 trtr
Finish off.

Small Circle (make 2)
Round 1: make an adjustable ring but loop yarn over finger four times, ch 3, 24 dtr, sl st in first dtr: 24 dtr
Finish off.

Sewing Circles
With a yarn needle, sew Medium Circles to either side of Large Center Circle evenly, overlapping the larger circle on the medium circle just a bit. Sew Small Circles to sides of Medium Circles evenly, overlaping as before.

Border
Join yarn on circle strip at the very end of a Small Circle, ch 3, dc in same st, * ch 3, sc in a couple of sts down (you can skip 2 sts and work in third st or you can just eyeball it like I did), and repeat from * till you reach the other side, work 2 dc in very end and repeat from * to * until you reach the beginning ch-3, sl st in ch-3.

Tie Strands
Cut 4 strands of yarn measuring 34 inches each. Attach one to each dc at the very corners like you would a tassel.

Alternate Ties
Or if you prefer, sew a length of ribbon or elastic to the band.

If you have any questions or problems while crocheting don’t hesitate to leave me a comment so I can help you out!

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Now 30% OFF in the Crochet Spot Store, this pattern is for a lightweight and classy spring scarf. With an open work pattern this scarf would be a great addition to your spring wardrobe! The scarf is long enough to wear in a tied fashion around your neck and wide enough to drape over your shoulders. It looks great tied like an ascot with a light jacket and a t-shirt!

Click here for 30% OFF!

Pattern is already marked down. There is no need for coupon codes. Log in, then add the pattern to your cart and check out. All purchases can be downloaded directly from your account once completed. Offer ends May 2, 2019.

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A few months ago my dad asked if I could crochet juggling balls, and I was happy to oblige. They were easy and fun to make especially with this colorful sock yarn I had in my stash. I filled them with rice to make them heavy enough for juggling balls. Since juggling balls are easy to misplace I made a mesh bag to keep track of them. My dad was delighted with his Christmas present, which now lives on his desk at work much to the amusement of his coworkers, who sometimes stop by to juggle. Why not make a set for someone you know who could use a new hobby?

Skill Level:

Finished Size: Juggling balls are approximately 2.5″ (6 cm) in diameter, bag is approximately 7.5″ (19 cm) long unstretched.

Materials:
Super Fine Weight Yarn (approximately 150 yards): I used a self-striping sock yarn to give the juggling balls stripes without manually changing colors.
Crochet Hook D (3.25 mm)
About 1/2 cup of rice per juggling ball (alternatively, poly pellets can be used)
Old nylons, tights, or socks to hold the rice so it doesn’t poke through the crochet
Optional: 2 beads with large holes to decorate the ends of the bag drawstring

Gauge:
Rounds 1-5 in juggling ball measure approximately 1.5″ (4 cm) in diameter. Gauge is unimportant as long as the fabric is tight and doesn’t have holes in it.

Need help understanding the abbreviations and symbols? Check out the crochet abbreviation chart.

Note: Both the juggling balls and the carrying case are worked in a continuous round without joining. Use a stitch marker to mark the first stitch and move it up with each round.

Crochet Pattern: Juggling Balls
Round 1: ch 2, 6 sc in second ch from hook, place marker: 6 sc
Round 2: 2 sc in each sc around: 12 sc
Round 3: (sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc) around: 18 sc
Round 4: (sc in next 2 sc, 2 sc in next sc) around: 24 sc
Round 5: (sc in next 3 sc, 2 sc in next sc) around: 30 sc
Round 6: (sc in next 4 sc, 2 sc in next sc) around: 36 sc
Round 7: (sc in next 5 sc, 2 sc in next sc) around: 42 sc
Round 8: (sc in next 6 sc, 2 sc in next sc) around: 48 sc
Round 9: (sc in next 7 sc, 2 sc in next sc) around: 54 sc
Round 10: (sc in next 8 sc, 2 sc in next sc) around: 60 sc
Round 11-20: sc in each sc around: 60 sc
Round 21: (sc in next 8 sc, sc2tog) around: 54 sc
Round 22: (sc in next 7 sc, sc2tog) around: 48 sc
Round 23: (sc in next 6 sc, sc2tog) around: 42 sc
Round 24: (sc in next 5 sc, sc2tog) around: 36 sc
Round 25: (sc in next 4 sc, sc2tog) around: 30 sc

Insert filling:
Place the toe of a nylon or sock into the juggling ball, then fill it with rice. The amount of rice depends on how firmly you want the ball to be stuffed. It’s best for it to be a bit squishy but still fairly heavy. When it’s stuffed, cut off the nylon and tie the end into a knot to seal the rice inside. Stuff the knot into the body of the juggling ball, then continue crocheting. It may feel awkward to finish the last 4 rounds, but just take your time and it will work.

Round 26: (sc in next 3 sc, sc2tog) around: 24 sc
Round 27: (sc in next 2 sc, sc2tog) around: 18 sc
Round 28: (sc in next sc, sc2tog) around: 12 sc
Round 29: sc2tog 6 times: 6 sc
Sl st into next sc and finish off.

Carrying Case
Pattern is designed to fit 3 juggling balls.

Round 1: ch 4, sl st to first ch, (ch 6, sc in ring) 5 times, ch 3, dc in ring forming a sixth loop, place marker into this last loop: 6 ch-6 spaces
Round 2: (ch 6, sc) 2 times in each loop around, move marker up with each round: 12 ch-6 spaces
Round 3: *ch 6, sc in next loop, (ch 6, sc) 2 times in next loop, repeat from * 5 more times: 18 ch-6 spaces
Round 4-19: (ch 6, sc in next loop) around: 18 ch-6 spaces
Round 20: (ch 4, sc in next loop) around: 18 ch-4 spaces
Round 21: ch 2, 3 dc in each loop around, sl st in first dc: 54 dc
Round 22-23: ch 2, dc in each dc around, sl st in first dc: 54 dc
Finish off.

Drawstring
Make a chain as long as you’d like the drawstring to be. My chain was about 12 inches long. Sc in second ch from hook and in each ch across. Finish off. I tied a bead onto each end. Simply weave the drawstring between the ch-6 loops of Round 19 and 20 to cinch the bag closed.

Need help while crocheting? Feel free to leave a comment below and I’d be happy to help! Juggling help, on the other hand, I’m afraid I can’t help you with…my knowledge stops at crochet.

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Are you familiar with tall stitches in crochet? You know, the ones that seem to have no name past treble crochet (tr)? When I was learning to crochet I fiddled around with the lengths of crochet stitches but never actually used them in a pattern.

Recently I realized even after all this time I still hadn’t crocheted much with tall stitches. I thought it was about time I delved into that area of crochet to find out more about it.

Do you have any questions about crocheting tall stitches? Keep reading to find out!

What are Tall Stitches?
Technically, I don’t think there is an official definition for tall stitches in crochet. However, it does imply above average crochet stitch lengths. For some they may be those without definable names. For others they may be stitches taller than double or treble crochet.

The main point is, they do have names and it’s not terribly complicated to figure them out. And what’s more, there is only one basic method for making all of them.

How to Crochet Tall Stitches
Basically the number of yarn overs you make will predict the length of your stitch. You yarn over once for a double crochet and twice for a treble (or triple) crochet. Yarn over three times for a double treble crochet and four times for a triple treble crochet. As you do with double crochet and treble crochet, simply yarn over and work through two loop intervals until you no longer have any loops on the hook. Do you see the pattern? No matter how tall you choose to make a stitch, this basic method of yarning over so many times to start and working off two loops at a time is all you need to know.

Here are a couple of collages of the triple treble crochet stitch to show you what I mean. Follow this same pattern for each and every tall stitch.


But what do you call them once you’ve made them?

What to call them?
Let’s assume for this post that tall stitches are those after double crochet. Here is a list of their names and how many yarn overs they require. You may or may not be acquainted with the first few.

Treble (or triple) crochet – 2 yarn overs
Double treble crochet – 3 yarn overs
Triple treble crochet – 4 yarn overs
Quadruple treble crochet – 5 yarn overs
Quintuple treble crochet – 6 yarn overs
Sextuple treble crochet – 7 yarn overs
Septuple treble crochet – 8 yarn overs
Octuple treble crochet – 9 yarn overs
Nonuple treble crochet – 10 yarn overs
Decuple treble crochet – 11 yarn overs

— Avoid Saggy Stitches
There is one thing to take note of: the taller the stitch the harder it is to keep it looking neat. For example, in the first picture above the darkest blue swatch which consists of septuple treble crochets became hard to handle and unruly very easily. If you work them too loose then by the time you are making that last yarn over and pull through you will have a very saggy stitch. My best recommendation is to work the loops close together and not let a lot of space between them.

Tip: I hold my hook with a pencil hold but I have found that using a knife hold for taller stitches better gaurantees a neater stitch.

You can refer to the list above or figure it out for yourself with this handy formula.

— Finding the Name/Number of Yarn Overs
Notice the name of the stitch in direct relation to the number of yarn overs. A great reminder for recalling the number of yarn overs per stitch is by simply adding one to the name of the stitch. For example, if you have chosen a triple treble crochet stitch you can add one so that triple would be quadruple, or translated to 4, meaning yarn over 4 times.

Formula for finding the number of yarn overs:
Name of stitch + 1= # of yarn overs

This works in reverse as well. If you have crocheted a stitch with 8 yarn overs and are trying to figure out what it’s called, simply subtract one from the yarn overs and figure out its latin name (in this case, Septuple).

Formula for finding the name of the stitch:
# of yarn overs – 1= name of stitch

With this method you can figure out both the name and the number of yarn overs for stitches as long as you can make. Although I tend to need a lesson in latin numbers before advancing beyond decuple (10).

What are they used for?
These stitches are not very well known today because most modern crochet patterns do not use them. This begs the question, when are they used then?

Perhaps the most I have seen these taller stitches used would be in patterns with crochet thread. Such as Irish Crochet Lace, crocheted Antebellum Dolls, and crocheted Doilies.

Of course, there are other ways to use these unique stitches, such as lacy crochet stitch patterns for breezy sweaters, delicate wraps, scarves, and you name it.

Ready to give it a go?
Truly there is no end to what you can make with tall stitches. Be inventive and give it a go! One thing I’ve noticed, no matter how much you know about crochet, there is still more to learn.

Have you enjoyed this post? Be sure to share your thoughts in the comments below!

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