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https://www.marthastewart.com/996426/terracotta-candle-pot

 

1. a small porous clay pot as a container

2. a wick (any wick will do apparently) secured with the same wax she's making the candle with

3. and way off center too

4. tape ? to keep hot wax from pouring out the bottom hole. OMG Who wrote this segment??
5. And worst of all, sharing this "tutorial"  with her enormous viewing audience.
 

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Has anyone tried this wax, maybe even blended with a softer container wax for candles?  I just cannot get over how beautifully creamy, smooth white it is and firm (not greasy).  I know it was made for votives and there are other wax blends such as 4786 and CBL 129 that are VERY hard and can be used for containers so just a thought.  

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I’ve been buying my 4630 wax on Ebay because it’s the cheapest retailer I’ve found. Here is the link if you’re interested: https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2380057.m4084.l1313.TR12.TRC2.A0.H0.X46.TRS0&_nkw=4630+wax

 

I’m a little concerned because I’m in the middle of testing wicks with this wax (I’m a chandler newbie, this is the first ever wax I’ve played with) and I haven’t found anything that wicks well with it yet. I heard this was a good newbie wax (easy to work with, great throw), but I’m not getting that. Is it possible my wax may not be true 4630 after all? Or am I just so new that I’m overestimating my ability to wick it quickly? 

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Do you have a preference? Does one work better for “foodie” scents than the other? 

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Hello everyone. I ran across a YouTube video made by a “retired candle scientist”. The information he gives is VERY informative and helpful if you want to make your candles better, and as safe as possible. For me, I'm always looking at ways to better my product. Hope this interests you, and I hope this wasn’t already posted.  Happy candling..😊

Candle Testing. Test Safely and Accurately, from 1st burn to end of life. - YouTube

 

 

 

 

 

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I made an 8oz tins @ 7% with 4630. It is a bit lite on the HT, but it burns perfectly. What are the chances that making the same candle with 8% FO would give me better HT and not completely ruin my perfect burn? I’m leaning towards making twice as many candles and burning two at a time, but I thought I should ask.  

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From the beginning of my candle making journey I believed that if I could understand the chemistry of scented candles it would all be easy. Well today I ran smack into the wall known as organic chemistry. In my college chemistry classes we always referred to organic chemistry as voodoo chemistry. What I do know is that your wax and the carrier oils for your aromatics are all molecular chains of hydrogen and carbon atoms, while your aromatic molecules are rings of hydrogen and carbon atoms. As for the bonding of these molecules in a candle I have no idea, but if I could understand the bonding I might be able to improve my process. Unfortunately I suspect the unknown additives in the wax has a lot to do with the bonding. Combine that with the hundred million other things that could be going on when you mix several hydrocarbons together and clearly I will never understand it. So I’m moving this one to my bucket of things I don’t know that I’m never going to know. Apparently understanding candle chemistry ranks right up there with understanding women.

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I am a huge fan of anything glow in the dark, or UV reactive. Even though I've just started making candles, I came into it with knowing I wanted to create candles that glow with any light, or have UV reactions. I've make some test batches which have all turned out pretty darn well. I remember when I was a kid, I saw drip candles that had different colors, and were UV reactive......probably from Spencer's Gifts 😛 Black on the outside, and as it dripped, multiple colors would come out as it melted. 

That is one of the types that I plan on making. There seems to be a couple different methods to get that result.....such as make individual sticks and put it into a bottleneck, or dipping each layer.

I haven't made a drip style one yet, only a single layered mold. Surprisingly, they've turned out well 🙂 The only issue that I'd like to fix is the even distribution of the powder in the wax. It mostly settles towards the bottom, as well with glitter, because I assume it's just too heavy to float in hot wax. The end results are ok, but not exactly what I'm going for.

The only thing I can think of is the stir it in as it cools to just above hardening. That way it doesn't have time to settle towards the bottom.

Has anyone else used glow/UV powders, or glitter? What do you suggest? Has anyone make UV reactive drip candles? Or.....anything similar? I'd really like to see what you came up with and any advice you may have 😄❤️ 
 

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Hello all, I live up north and am trying to make container candles that can be shipped via transport truck in below freezing temperatures. I am working with 8oz clear glass tumblers, IGI Parafflex 4630A as my base wax, and 8% FO. As you may have guessed, I am having issues with the wax pulling away from the glass after sitting in the freezer for a while. I have been experimenting with different additives like petrolatum and soft microcrystalline but I haven't had consistent success across my testing. Maybe 1/4 of the candles I make will randomly survive numerous freeze/thaw tests but most of them pull away/form spots after 1 or 2 trips to the freezer. I mostly would like to know if anyone believes this is an achievable task or if anyone has had consistent freeze/thaw success with their glass containers.

Any advice, ideas, or stories would be very much appreciated.

Thanks  

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