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Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 11h ago

Artist: Rosa Aiello

Venue: Lodos, Mexico City

Exhibition Title: Seduction

Date: May 9 – June 20, 2019

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Full gallery of images, press release, and link available after the jump.

Images:

Video:


Rosa Aiello, The Coquette, 2018, HD video, stereo sound, 24:32 (excerpt)

Images courtesy of Lodos, Mexico City

Press Release:

One new wall shows itself to be vulnerable, partial, and temporary, while the other new wall is a solid block.

The story is: the cardboard bent and tore when we carried it 12 blocks on the roof of a cab. We had tied it on with plastic string that cut into its sides. The cardboard also shows where the car antenna pressed into it, where it bent back in the wind when we drove too fast, where our hands held it up to mount it, where I pressed my greasy face to it, where we tried to screw it into the steel supports and it ripped.

Perpendicular is a wall that looks permanent and unaffected. It just is, and appears to have come into being long ago, nothing to do with hands that make traumas (which are stories). It is a mistake to think that such ahistorical production is possible. Like not thinking that people built this solid-looking wall in late April 2019, and it took five days. Not thinking that when she acts violently (physically, psychologically, emotionally) she may do so because she has been threatened, or is in a situation so precarious that she can’t imagine any way to be with the violence other than to be in the cycle of reproducing it.

Mechanisms of seduction are formal. They may involve giving a lot at first and then withholding, holding up, suggesting, rewarding, deferring. Any way there is narrative to it. I used to think forms themselves could be “bad.” But now I see that any sequence, corner, attachment, gap, detour, barrier, while it may serve forces that wish to exploit, manipulate, violate, and deceive, does not in essence do any of those things.

“Bad” or not depends on the particular sequence of events and the prevailing conditions that lead to the action or construction. The same person performing the same set of actions, but given a different name (“the coquette,” “the victim”), will be perceived differently. Two different people performing the same set of actions may be punished differently. This is about how the story gets told, and about how people get treated according to structures of power that are historically rooted.

All of these works have followed from other works, or have existed in different contexts:

  • The Coquette has been shown twice alongside a work called The Prude, both of which are adaptations of stories from Patricia Highsmith’s Little Tales of Misogyny.
  • The Victim is derived from working materials for an in-progress short film about the conditioning of girls through pain. This film project is collaboration with Mackenzie Davis.
  • Suspense is related to a work called Progression, a photo series about how suburban architecture featured in Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony and structured the sequence of events of her assault. I made Progression for Joins 2-person show with Patricia L. Boyd.

Rosa Aiello (b. 1987, Hamilton, Canada) is an artist and writer. Her works have been shown at various institutions and galleries, most recently, Cell Project Space, in London, The Southern Alberta Art Gallery, in Lethbdrige, Bureau des Réalités, in Brussels, and Kunsthalle Zürich, in Zurich. Her video works are part of the public collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art (New York), and of the Centre George Pompidou (Paris). Her writing has been published in Triple Canopy, CanadianArt, Art Papers, and F. R. David, and she has recently published a book of short fiction with Publication Studio Guelph.

Link: Rosa Aiello at Lodos

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

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Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 15h ago

Artists: Timothy Yanick Hunter, Eileen Isagon Skyers, Eve Tagny, Qualeasha Wood
, Curtia Wright

Venue: Cooper Cole, Toronto

Exhibition Title: A Complete Change of Form Into A More Beautiful Or Spiritual State

Curated By: Timothy Yanick Hunter

Date: May 10 – June 8, 2019

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Full gallery of images, press release, and link available after the jump.

Images:

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Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 1d ago

Artist: Raque Ford

Venue: 321 Gallery, Brooklyn

Exhibition Title: 6 Obsessions

Date: May 17 – July 13, 2019

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Full gallery of images, press release, and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of 321 Gallery, Brooklyn

Press Release:

321 Gallery presents 6 Obsessions, an exhibition of new work by Raque Ford.

The show comprises two wall works made from black acrylic. Spanning the length of the gallery, they are derived from the artist’s ink drawings and hand-written texts. After digitally scanning these pages, Ford reassembles the drawings and writings into revised sequences, finally translating the digital files through a laser-cutter. The resulting shapes and text are enlarged and then etched into pieces of black acrylic, preserving their gesture while giving them a mechanically precise edge.

I wanted to write this story about my mother, how she’s the Devil, but I feel so conflicted. To show her as a villain means that I am a villain. I am just her creation. How can I be something different than what she is? It’s really a story about how I am the Devil or her spawn and that we are the same. How far removed am I? How can I not be judged? Where do I start? Describe me. I am the Devil’s daughter.

An evil person to me is just a complicated one.

It’s hot. It’s the summer and we’re visiting family in Arkansas. I hate Arkansas. It’s where she’s from. It feels like the smallest town I’ve ever been to. We’re driving in a rental car. You can’t get a direct flight to where she’s from because it’s in the middle of nowhere. I could almost see how it used to look beautiful here. There are a few old bath houses that are grand in their design. I’m told my grandfather worked at one, but now they’re just old and empty. Coming here makes me think that this must be where all the evil things happened to her and made her who she is. The South is what turned my mother into the Devil.

She might be the Devil but she always promised to protect me. I get lost in thought wondering if I’m supposed to dislike her or love her. When people think of the Devil they think of red, evil, Satan, the Fallen Angel who dared to want to be God. Full of pride and vanity, then became a fallen angel. Pride and vanity run deep in our veins. I would stare in the mirror for hours trying to see myself outside myself.

The last time I saw my mother was at a Chinese restaurant downtown. I sat patiently at our table and she busted in the tiny restaurant like a fucking tornado. She had a ton of bags with her and enough frazzled energy she could’ve knocked the building down. That was her typical way of entering a room. I too have the ability to emit an aura of energy one can feel about five feet before actually touching me. I like to imagine I can control it better than her. That I can turn it on and off and use it to my advantage, but I’m not entirely sure that I can.

I get up and say, “Hi mom, do you need any help?” and try to tone down her energy by forcing out calm waves. We don’t do well unless I release this calm energy like a microwave or a pheromone or something. Only one of us can be the one letting out our red hot intensity. It’s not rage or some built up anger, it’s more animalistic. It’s like our true inner feral being. It’s like we’ve been hypnotized into acting like just two normal women but with a snap or a clap we can turn back into our true forms—our feral forms. She would turn into the devil and I would be the Devil’s daughter. Like one of her fallen angels. I’m her spawn. But we are hypnotized and dress like appropriate woman for the most part. You wouldn’t know at first glance what we really are.

My calm energy works. She’s soothed, we catch up, and she dotes on me.

I know it’s wrong to say my mother is the Devil, but she really is. It’s not her fault and you shouldn’t feel bad. She’s from the South—it was bound to happen. And as the Devil’s daughter I am no Antichrist, but I am ready to rule the world.

– Raque Ford, 2019

6 Obsessions is the artist’s first solo presentation with 321, and her fourth overall with the gallery.

Raque Ford (b. 1986, Columbia, MD) is a Brooklyn-based artist. Solo shows include My Biggest Fan (CAPITAL, San Francisco, CA); con•fi•dence (Williamson and Knight, Portland, OR); Karafun (The Fort, Brooklyn, NY); Carolyn (Shoot the Lobster, New York, NY); It’s All About Me, Forget About You (Species, Atlanta, GA); That Which We Call a Rose by Any Other Name Would Smell As Sweet (Soloway, Brooklyn, NY); and Raque (Welcome Screen, London, UK); Recent two-person and group exhibitions include Retrograde (Deli Gallery, Brooklyn, NY); Soul is a four letter word, Museum Gallery (Brooklyn, NY); and In Practice: Fantasy Can Invent Nothing New (Sculpture Center, Queens, NY). She is the recipient of the 2017 Louis Comfort Tiffany Biennial Award, was awarded a residency at the International Studio and Curatorial Program (Brooklyn, NY), and was a resident at S1 (Portland, OR). Ford graduated with a BFA in painting from Pratt Institute and received her MFA in Visual Arts from Rutgers Mason Gross School of the Arts.

Link: Raque Ford at 321 Gallery

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

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Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 2d ago

Artist: Ulrich Wulff

Venue: Nino Mier, Los Angeles

Exhibition Title: Black Elk Speaks

Date: May 11 – June 22, 2019

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Full gallery of images, press release, and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of the artist and Nino Mier, Los Angeles

Press Release:

Nino Mier Gallery is pleased to present its first exhibition of new works by Ulrich Wulff, titled Black Elk Speaks. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, May 11th from 6 to 8:30 pm at the 1107 Greenacre Avenue, Los Angeles location.

In my upcoming exhibition at Nino Mier Gallery, I am showing a full circle of four large oil paintings, accompanied by ten small pencil drawings.

All of these artworks are figurative, more precisely portraits. The painted heads are hovering on monochrome backdrops, assembled in three confrontations and one individual portrait. The heads are each composed of distinctively modified color fields, and the energetic, yet thinly applied repetition of brushstrokes flattens the background and creates a smooth, at times specular surface, surrounding the humanoids like the sea, in which we all reflect, yet never fully identify.

The set of paintings in this exhibition is marked by acute color-form-contrasts and simplified figurative elements, that partly resemble comic strip images. The clown- type appears again – an old acquaintance, who inconsistently lingers in my imagery since the turn of the millennium. The clown is not only a metaphor for the artist and the social outsider (see e.g.: Heinrich Böll: Ansichten eines Clowns [The Clown]) but at the same time an image of the “real” man. Paradoxically it needs masking and role-playing to expose the “true” man in the context of an abstraction process. Thereby the distinctive marks of the clown become independent as autonomous elements. His round nose appears in the image space as a “free- floating” ball, his extended eyelashes stretch like feelers or antennae to an intensified perception.

Within the varied subjects a duality always appears: usually two figurations stand opposite each other, meeting and watching each other with the potential of contact. Or it is a matter of a “mutiple I” that communicates with itself. The stereotyped figurations shown in profile view leave the viewer outside – he is just a witness of what is happening.

The title of this exhibition is borrowed from a book of interviews with a Holy Clown of the Oglala Lakota, named Black Elk, who was active during the Ghost Dance Movement, and beyond. The characteristic of these clowns, the so-called Heyoka, was to behave contrary to everyone’s everyday practice. Thus, every situation is rebound to its original potential, the source of all that is, where the Wakinyan, the Thunderbeings of the West, dwell, and that only the holy man can perceive and translate.

By questioning the rules of a society through humor, they redefine the purpose of life in a group, from merely being organized as a secular machine towards happier goals, maybe even towards fulfillment.

Ulrich Wulff

Ulrich Wulff (b. 1975) has recently been the subject of solo exhibitions at venues that include  Galerie Bernd Kugler, Innsbruck (2018); Freddy, Harris, NY (2017); and Truth and Consequences, Geneva (2017). Among his group exhibitions are Peanuts, Eighteenth Gallery, Copenhagen (2019); It Ain’t Though, Ortloff Artspace, Leipzig (2019); You Have Everything To
Learn, Truth and Consequences, Geneva (2018); Lob Des Schattens, Marc Straus, NYC (2017); Back to the Shack, Meliksetian Briggs, Los Angeles (2017); and A Shape That Stands Up, Hammer Museum (Off-Site), (2016). Wulff lives and works in Berlin.

Link: Ulrich Wulff at Nino Mier

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

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Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 2d ago

Artist: Stano Filko

Venue: Emanuel Layr, Vienna

Exhibition Title: MULTIMODAL GOOGLIFICATION OF COSMOLOGY-ORIENTED DIAGRAMMATIC EXPERIMENTATIONS OF STANO FILKO

Curated By: Boris Ondreička

Date: May 3 – June 15, 2019

Note: A text associated with the exhibition is available here.

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Full gallery of images and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of Emanuel Layr, Vienna

Link: Stano Filko at Emanuel Layr

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

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Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 3d ago

Artists: Julien Ceccaldi, Nicolas Ceccaldi, Trisha Donnelly, Bruno Pelassy, Vivian Suter, Danny McDonald / Mended Veil

Venue: Air de Paris

Organized By: House of Gaga

Exhibition Title: 20 Years Later (A Sentimental Education)

Date: April 17 – June 15, 2019

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Full gallery of images, press release, and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of Air de Paris

Press Release:

Twenty years is the time that has passed since Fernando joined Air de Paris to do an internship. A Sentimental Education: it is the story of a young man, he must have been eighteen(1), this romantic and sensitive anti- hero who arrives in Paris where lead by a coup de coeur he finds himself a rich new world that he barely understands, filled with questionable characters (like himself), where he negotiates (or dialogues) with past and future revolutions and his own desire.

This double title of novels(2) was composed at eight hands by Air de Paris and House of Gaga as an exquisite corpse and could become the chorus of a song. House of Gaga is the name of the gallery later founded by Fernando Mesta with José Rojas in Mexico City (and now also in Los Angeles). And before Air Paris moves to Komunuma in Romainville, this is a community we wanted to celebrate.

(1) Dalida, Il venait d’avoir 18 ans, 1973
(2) Twenty Years Later, Alexandre Dumas, 1845 Sentimental Education, Gustave Flaubert, 1869

Link: Group Show at Air de Paris

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

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Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 3d ago

Artist: LaKela Brown

Venue: 56 Henry, New York

Exhibition Title: Surface Possessions

Date: April 18 – June 16, 2019

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Full gallery of images, press release, and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of 56 Henry, New York

Press Release:

“I want a girl with extensions in her hair / bamboo earrings / at least two pair”

 – LL Cool J, “Around the Way Girl,” Mama Said Knock You Out, 1990

56 HENRY is pleased to present Surface Possessions, an exhibition of new work by LaKela Brown. The show will be open from April 18th through June 16th, 2019.

On view in the gallery is a group of eight plaster reliefs that register the forms of gold teeth, bamboo hoops, door knocker earrings, and heavy rope chains. Using jewelry as a tool for casting, Brown makes impressions in the plaster, embedding the material with a series of references to hip-hop, 90’s music, and the culture in which she grew up. As Brown describes:

“In LL Cool J’s 1990 song ‘Around the Way Girl,’ he describes his ideal mate as “a girl with extensions in her hair / bamboo earrings / at least two pair.” This aesthetic was embodied by artists like Salt-N-Pepa, MC Lyte, and Queen Latifah, as well as the women that I lived with and around. Growing up it felt intrinsically understood that this style belonged to me, to black people. Door knocker earrings, rope chains, Egyptian royal pendants, gold teeth, and chicken heads are the motifs for this body of work because they are able to represent the desire, preference, aspiration, and presence of a particular blackness, without the body.”

Visually recalling Egyptian and Greco-Roman artifacts, Brown’s reliefs immortalize the forms of jewelry popularized during the heyday of Hip Hop, as well as other relics traditionally associated with African American culture. The works act as a sartorial archive of Brown’s personal tastes: the status symbols of her childhood—door-knocker earrings, rope chain necklaces, and gold-capped teeth—function here as semi-autobiographical abstractions, at once meditative and playful. Memorializing the material markers of wealth and aspiration, Brown’s sculptures encode the visual manifestations of hip hop culture as an important aesthetic phenomenon.

LaKela Brown (b. 1982, Detroit, MI) lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. Brown received her B.F.A. from the College for Creative Studies in 2005. In 2018, Brown had solo exhibitions at Reyes | Finn, Detroit, and Lars Friedrich, Berlin. In 2015, Brown had a solo exhibition with Jackie Klempay. Brown’s work was also featured in Classic Beauty: 21st-Century Artists on Ancient [Greek] Form at Providence College, and Readymades Belong to Everyone: Curated by Fredi Fischli and Niels Olsen at the Swiss Institute. In 2017, Brown was included in a group show at We Buy Gold in Brooklyn. Brown is currently on faculty at NYU and was a 2018 resident at Ox-Bow School of Art. Her work has been reviewed in Hyperallergic, Artforum and Contemporary Art Daily.

Link: LaKela Brown at 56 Henry

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

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Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 4d ago

Artist: Gene Beery

Venue: Fri Art, Fribourg

Exhibition Title: Gene Beery

Curated By: Balthazar Lovay

Date: May 4 – June 30, 2019

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Full gallery of images, press release, and link available after the jump.

Images:

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Artist: Rob Halverson

Venue: Fourteen30 Contemporary, Portland

Exhibition Title: ENTHUSIASTIC – REMOTEST – TREE

Date: May 11 – June 15, 2019

Note: A text associated with the exhibition written by Reza Negarestani can be downloaded here.

Click here to view slideshow

Full gallery of images and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of Fourteen30 Contemporary, Portland

Link: Rob Halverson at Fourteen30 Contemporary

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

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Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 5d ago

Artist: Josh Smith

Venue: David Zwirner, New York

Exhibition Title: Emo Jungle

Date: April 25 – July 19, 2019

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Full gallery of images, press release, and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of the artist and David Zwirner, New York

Press Release:

David Zwirner is pleased to present Emo Jungle, an exhibition of new work by American artist Josh Smith. On view in the gallery’s West 19th Street spaces in New York, the show marks the artist’s inaugural solo presentation with David Zwirner.

Since the early 2000s, Smith has developed a prolific and expansive body of painting that employs specific visual motifs as a means of exploring the potentiality of the painted surface. These visual forms, which include his name, fish, skeletons, leaves, and palm trees, among others, serve as unassuming structures through which Smith pursues his investigation of the medium, resulting in works that forthrightly present themselves to the viewer. Though fully realized as individual artworks, each painting serves as a stage in an ongoing, interrelated, and heterogeneous process of image production and experimentation, in which motifs, colors, and visuals are recycled, refined, and reimagined.

Emo Jungle features an array of new paintings by the artist, including several new “Reaper” paintings, part of an ongoing series that depicts the figure of death. Rendered in lush ribbons and fields of color, the blank, empty faces and shapeless cloaks of the reapers serve as genderless, formless ciphers for the viewer. These Reapers, several constituting the largest he has produced, are made additionally distinct by the unique border treatments that Smith applies. The borders allude somewhat to the artist’s interest in early American decorative wall stencils, as well as the serrated and perforated edges of postage stamps, which signify a kind of self-contained meaning or value.

Also debuting at the exhibition are paintings with entirely new motifs. One such group of works depicts a devil-like figure. Smith represents this character with a paintbrush, reaching to the corners and margins of the canvases, self-reflexively painting himself into the compositions. “Human Animals” are the focus of another series, which features primate-like creatures whose long limbs seem to stretch and determine the margins of the wide rectangular works. In another prolific new series, Smith explores the form of the turtle. In these paintings, the turtles’ shells morph into palettes—open-ended surfaces of endless possibility—where Smith mixes paint and experiments with facture and color. The group is presented in its entirety, uniquely installed in the gallery’s 519 West 19th Street space, so as to emphasize the similarities and differences between the individual works. Smith chose the turtle specifically because, as he states, “it’s a boring thing that I love.” Turtles, like the artist’s other motifs, remove the imperative to find meaning or be confounded by the artwork. “The meaning perhaps arises in the making,” Smith explains, “leaving the viewer something purely for their visual engagement. They don’t have to be burdened with the meaning. What they’re left with is purely for them. The viewer can love it; they can hate it, but they’re not going to walk up to it and feel dumb.”1 Throughout the gallery, Smith has installed groups of ceramic traffic cones, a form that extends his formal interests into the sculptural realm.

Smith will debut several new groups of monotypes that will be presented as part of an online Viewing Room. These unique monotypes, made through a refined printing process that involves pressing a painted plate against paper, constitute another mode through which Smith explores the nuances and possibilities of his imagery. The resulting works are intricate, variegated surfaces in which the pressed layers of paint interact with the material qualities of the various cotton and plastic papers he selects, resulting in diverse effects.

1 Smith, in conversation with the gallery, March 2019.

Josh Smith was born in 1976 in Okinawa, Japan. Smith’s father was in the US Army, and his family..

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