Loading...

Follow Contemporary Art Daily on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Artist: Pamela Rosenkranz

Venue: Karma International, Zurich

Exhibition Title: Amazon Spirits (Green Blood)

Date: June 7 – July 14, 2018

Click here to view slideshow

Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of Karma International, Zurich. Photos by Gunnar Meier.

Press Release:

“My breath was taken away by this vision of Eden that presented such a contrast to the Darwinian stuffiness of the swamp. I hardly knew where to look, my gaze suddenly unable to take in the immense sky crossed by a string of fluffy clouds. The distant rumble of the river added to the vastness of the spectacle, its powerful pulsations seeming to extend the horizon.”

(Philippe Descola, The Spears of Twilight)

amazon.com, Inc is known for its all-encompassing product “portfolio,” whose breadth is depicted by a smiling arrow reaching from A to Z in the retail company’s logo. Among countless commodities on offer is a line called “Amazon Basics,” which comprises office supplies such as alkaline batteries, ergonomic chairs, and metal mesh waste baskets. Amazon Spirits shines a bright, strange light on such goods, via backlit replicas of architectural elements from Amazon’s work environment: monochrome panels ablaze with blue LED light mirror the small and high openings of the firm’s early warehouses, as well as doors used as desktops in its offices (a corporate storytelling gesture meant to evoke Amazon’s beginnings in a makeshift garage-as-headquarters).
Transparent foil from Amazon Basics packaging is scattered around the exhibition space, where it reflects green LED lighting, evoking a tropical forest’s enveloping greenery but in a stage set’s electric atmosphere. This dual effect brings to our attention how much hue—i.e., green or blue—is but one dimension of color, just a wavelength of light. Color is further defined by brightness and saturation—not to mention degrees of gloss and transparency, qualities dependent on the substance of matter. The Amazonian rainforest’s inhabitants tend to pay attention to these other characteristics of visual information, which speak of color as feel and function. The Candoshi people of the Peruvian Amazon, for example, seem to have no term for “green” as a category, but do describe green things as looking kamachpa, which refers to unripe fruit. The tendency to dissociate hue from object is useful in a specific context: consumerist manufacturing economies where reproducible objects come in different shades.

For the amazon.com customer navigating torrents of thumbnails, perceptual experience is narrowed to the constraints of a computer displaying a finite, internet-compatible palette. In this context, how could one describe a picture of an object as resembling unripe fruit? The screen-like windows and doors in Amazon Spirits remind us that a screen’s flat luminosity does interact with bodies—Rosenkranz’s glowing, “hot” blue feels vibrant like an animate species of color, like light made tangible. Whether in the shape of backlit canvases, beaming projectors, or a leaky battery pack’s spilled electrolytes, the exhibition explores energy through the motif of the overflow. Blood, that carrier of animal energy, appears in a transmuted form: both synthesised in a lab and alien to human eyes, Anemine is a new generation of medical products currently being developed as derivatives of the green-tinted blood of certain annelids found in the Amazon. This substance formulated to enhance perception is used to paint onto large, human-size sheets of aluminum. The green viscosity of the Anemine paintings unsettles our visual capacity.
The gallery is filled with a field recording of Amazonian activity brimming with the cries of myriad species, delivered by amazon.com’s virtual assistant Alexa—“who,” on the other hand, has a human voice, and a little red light to keep us company, like a reliable presence in a collapsing, deforested world. amazon.com’s ever-expanding universe of merchandise, devices and trademarks is now reaching beyond planet Earth, by dint of its latest, space exploration, project. Although its original design conjured up a capital A streaked by a serpentine, river-like streamer, the amazon.com logo no longer involves any meanderings. Its happy humanoid arrow now points upward, at techno-utopian things to come, embodying a brand, which Rosenkranz visualises as an “echo of a deep future.”

Link: Pamela Rosenkranz at Karma International

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 18h ago

Artist: Bettina Pousttchi

Venue: Buchmann Box, Berlin

Exhibition Title: Allee / Avenue

Date: April 27 – July 28, 2018

Click here to view slideshow

Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of Buchmann Box, Berlin

Press Release:

In the Buchmann Box Bettina Pousttchi (*1971 in Mainz, lives and works in Berlin) is showing new sculptures under the title Allee / Avenue, which start out from the artist‘s engagement with public space and its structures.

Street furniture, in this case protective tree-barriers, have been brought into a mobile, dynamic form by means of mechanical bending, pressing and twisting. Arranged in pairs or small groups, the tree bars worked in this way are mounted into a sculpture whose volume emerges purely from lines. The functional objects can be recognized easily, even in their changed form, and therefore reconstruct the forces to which they have been subjected. The works cannot be denied the occasional anthropomorphic reference, and so develop a dancerly and sequential quality in their mobility.

The moss or light green colour is reminiscent of camouflage or protective colouring, thus enhancing the optical merger of the individual parts into a self-contained form.

Bettina Pousttchi‘s works often refer to the urban and historical context of a given place. The artist recognizes latent possibilities in objects, places and situations and brings these to the fore in order to create something new; at the same time they reveal aspects of whatever they have been based upon, as Jeremy Strick from the Nasher Sculpture Center Dallas says in his essay “Urban Objects: The Sculpture of Bettina Pousttchi”. And he goes on to say: “Hers is an art where curiosity and imagination cross with research and deft manipulation, wherein the complex meanings of objects, places, and situations become a eld for the artist‘s action.”

Since 2009 Bettina Pousttchi has been realizing monumental, site-specific interventions into buildings in public space, which refer to the historical and urban context of the respective structure. In 2009/2010 the artist realized the photo installation Echo across the full façade of the Temporary Kunsthalle in Berlin, which was a reminder of the Palace of the Republic demolished there only a short time before. At the Schirn Kunsthalle in 2012, her site-specific photo installation Framework could be seen on the windows of the rotunda and the east wing, so referencing the changes in Frankfurt inner city‘s urban and social context.

For the monumental work The City Bettina Pousttchi covered the façade of Wolfsburg Palace with a photomontage of skyscrapers, which were each, at the time of their completion, the highest buildings in the world. She converted the Nasher Sculpture Center by Renzo Piano in Dallas into a Drive Thru Museum and so reacted to the specific setting of the museum, a former public car park, and to the social and urban structure of the city, which was constructed for automobiles.

Recently, works by the artist could be seen in a collaboration with Daniel Buren in Kunsthalle Mainz. In addition, over the last two years Bettina Pousttchi has enjoyed solo exhibitions in the Arts Club of Chicago, the Kunstmuseum St. Gallen, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and the Phillips Collection, both in Washington D.C., as well as previously in the Nasher Sculpture Center Dallas. Bettina Pousttchi will open her next project, a pavilion in front of the Neues Museum in Nuremberg called UNN (United Nations Nuremberg), on July 20.

Link: Bettina Pousttchi at Buchmann Box

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 1d ago

Artist: Helene Appel

Venue: James Cohan, New York

Exhibition Title: Washing

Date: June 22 – July 27, 2018

Click here to view slideshow

Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of James Cohan, New York

Press Release:

James Cohan will present Washing, an exhibition of new work by Helene Appel at the gallery’s Lower East Side location.  This is Appel’s second solo exhibition at James Cohan.

Helene Appel turns an incisive aerial gaze upon the humble sights of everyday life. She paints puddles of water, rumpled tea towels, swaths of netting, and drifts of sand at actual size on untreated linen—teasing out their intrinsic beauty in precisely rendered, uncannily illusionistic paintings that verge on abstraction. Yet Appel’s interest lies not in the trompe l’oeil effect, but in exploring the relationship between subject, surface, and the presence of the paintings in space. Painting, for Appel, is a negotiation between the subject’s demands for its own depiction and her considerable ability to meet those demands pictorially.

In this exhibition, Appel presents a new series of sand paintings that reaffirm her commitment to exploring the tension between faithful representation and the transformative possibilities in the process of painting. The sand paintings represent a departure from the isolated items Appel arranges on a tabletop in her studio to paint at actual size. Here, the aerial perspective and true-to-life scale of these canvases reflect the experience of the subject in its environment.

The visual slippage between the painted sand and the rough linen of the untreated canvas ground serves to refocus the viewer’s attention on the surface of the painting, and on the picture as a surface. Appel’s sustained interest in the representation of surface and transparency is also at play in her series of spilled water paintings. The edge of a puddle of soapy water is deftly communicated in only a few decisive brushstrokes of translucent white, while the soap bubbles within are intricately detailed.

Appel’s sophisticated use of pattern, texture, and perspective allows her to marry the Minimalist insistence upon the finite flatness of the picture plane to the artful illusionism of traditional still-life painting. This playing between genres denies viewers an easy read of her work, an elusiveness that is furthered by the movements across scale of the works including in the exhibition. The viewer must relate the paintings as individual objects within the gallery space.

Helene Appel (born 1976, Karlsruhle, Germany) attended the Hochschule für Bildende Künste in Hamburg and received an MA from the Royal College of Art, London. Her work has been the subject of solo exhibitions including: Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle, Munich, Germany (2017); Waves, The Approach, London, UK (2017); Washing Up, P420, Bologna, Italy (2016); James Cohan Gallery, New York, NY (2014); The Approach, London, UK (2013); Kaiserringstipendium, Mönchehaus Goslar, Germany (2011); and Dorothea Schlueter Gallery, Hamburg, Germany (2011). Select group exhibitions include: Kettle’s Yard at The Hepworth Wakefield, cur. Anthea Hamilton, The Hepworth Wakefield, Wakefield, UK (2016); Queensize – Female Artists from the Olbricht Collection, Museum Arnhem, Arnhem, Netherlands (2016); I Prefer Life, The Weserburg, Bremen, Germany (2016); CORALE, Centro per l’Arte Contemporanea Frigoriferi Milanesi, Milan, Italy (2016); Tutta l’Italia e silenziosa, cur. Davide Ferri, Reale Accademia di Spagna, Rome (2015); Salondergegenwart, Hamburg (2015); A Scene of Painting Today, cur. Marco Bazzini and Davide Ferri, Centro per l’arte contemporanea Luigi Pecci, Prato (2013); ÜBER DIE DINGE, Kulturstiftung Schloss Agathenburg, Agathenburg, Germany (2013); Lines of Thought, Parasol Unit, London, UK (2012); Augentäuschung, Kunsthalle Wilhelmshaven, Germany (2010); Beating The Bounds, Art Now, curated by Lizzie Carey-Thomas and Clarrie Wallis, Tate Britain, London (2009). Helene Appel lives and works in Berlin, Germany.

Link: Helene Appel at James Cohan

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 2d ago

Artist: Puppies Puppies

Venue: What Pipeline, Detroit

Exhibition Title: Andrew D. Olivo 6.7.1989 – 6.7.2018

Date: June 21 – July 22, 2018

Click here to view slideshow

Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of What Pipeline, Detroit

Press Release:

What Pipeline presents Andrew D. Olivo 6.7.89-6.7.18, an installation of new work by Puppies Puppies that refects on past trauma, the physicality of transitioning, and mourning the death of an old self.

Please listen to this song while reading this text.

Hi Andrew

It feels weird to talk to you like this
Pretending as if no one is listening to what I have to say to you.
It’s about time I said these things.

I know at times you’ve felt there was never going to be anything good in life and that it will always just feel like managing to get through
the days. I know you felt deeply sad very early on and never knew what to make of it.
I know you wondered what life would be like if the fght or fight responses weren’t always fring.

Andrew

I think you’re beautiful. All those people who made you feel like there was nothing beautiful about you they were wrong.
All those people who made you feel that femininity in a perceived boy was worthy of hell
were wrong
All those people who abused you verbally physically and sexually
they were wrong
all those people who made you feel less than in a moment’s notice
they were wrong
All those people that said racist shit to you and your family growing up
they were wrong
All the times as a child where you blindly trusted people older than you and they let you down or hurt you or tried to brainwash you
you weren’t in the wrong

I know at times you’ve prayed for a luckier life. A life flled with less trauma and more relaxing. A life void of having had a brain tumor.
An easier life in general.

I’m sorry I called you Andrew so much. I just know many of your memories are associated with this name or I guess Drew once you hit
a certain age.

Drew

as cheesy as this sounds please don’t forget you’re worthy of love

Don’t let the world make you think otherwise.
Please know you’ll eventually
see yourself as someone you can hug and kiss and say ily

Please know that life ahead won’t be void of more pain
but you’ll feel joy you never thought existed….

Know that I love you
And that you’re always with me
I see you I see your strength

Eternally yours
Jade

Works Cited

Lee Lozano as remembered by Stephen Kaltenbach, Disarticulated Skeleton, ca. 1968/2010, human skeleton

Diamond Stingily, Forever In Our Hearts, 2013
http://eggg.co/diamond/

Diamond Stingily, Love, Diamond, a reprint of the artist’s frst diary written as an 8 year old on the West Side of Chicago

Hans Haacke, Grass Grows, 1967

Gino De Dominicis, Annuncio Mortuario (Mortuary Announcement), 1969-1970

Link: Puppies Puppies at What Pipeline

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 2d ago

Artist: Tyler Coburn

Venue: Koenig & Clinton, New York

Exhibition Title: Remote Viewer

Date: April 20 – July 27, 2018

Note: A publication associated with the exhibition is available for download here.

Click here to view slideshow

Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of Koenig & Clinton, New York

Press Release:

Koenig & Clinton is pleased to announce our first solo exhibition of works by Tyler Coburn. The exhibition is comprised of a single-channel digital animation, a text, and an object designed in collaboration with architects Bureau V.

In 1969, conceptual artist Douglas Huebler teased the limits of photography when he announced his impossible desire to “photographically document the existence of everyone alive.” In October of that same year, the U.S. Department of Defense’s Advanced Research Projects Administration (ARPANET) made its first host-to-host connection between labs at U.C.L.A. and Stanford University. Ten years earlier, with help from the U.S. Air Force, the Central Intelligence Agency launched the CORONA project for the purpose of gathering Imagery Intelligence (IMINT) through photographic satellite reconnaissance.

Seen from our era of Big Data, machine learning, biometrics, and asymmetrical warfare, Huebler’s deadpan proclamation seems less quixotic than prognostic. After all, the ability to document the existence of every living person is far more plausible when the mechanisms of state and corporate surveillance are abetted by the intimacies of ‘selfie’ surveillance, in which unwitting users yield personal information through quotidian digital interfaces.

Eyes that traverse time zones through image feeds belong to bodies that can be geolocated through the very phones that host the feeds. Despite our attempts to transcend corporeality, we are ever more subject to both immaterial and material capture.

Are we viewing remotely, or are we being remotely viewed? Who is transmitting, and who is receiving? And how might the histories of remote viewing, automatism, and psychic scientisim inform how we’ve arrived at this moment?

Tyler Coburn received a BA in Comparative Literature from Yale University and an MFA from the University of Southern California. He served as a fellow in the Whitney Independent Study Program from 2014-2015. Coburn has presented installations, performances, and lectures internationally at: Centre Pompidou, Paris; The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Kunsthalle Wien; Kunstverein Munich; Hayward Gallery, London; South London Gallery, Para Site, Hong Kong; and Art Sonje Center, Seoul. Coburn participated in the 11th Gwangju Biennale (2016) and 10th Shanghai Biennale (2014). In 2018, he will participate in the 17th Tallinn Print Triennial and realize exhibitions and projects with Tensta Konsthall, Stockholm; Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Vienna; the Elizabeth Foundation of the Arts, New York; and others. Coburn is the author of two books: I’m that angel (2012) and Robots Building Robots (2013), published by the Center for Contemporary Arts Glasgow. His texts have appeared in e-flux journal, Frieze, ArtReview, Dis, Mousse, LEAP, and Rhizome. Coburn’s latest writing project, Ergonomic Futures (2016—), is an evolving website of short stories accessible at www.ergonomicfutures.com.

Remote Viewer was originally commissioned for Techne, a performing and visual arts production platform created by Theater Rampe and Künstlerhaus Stuttgart. As part of this commission, Coburn collaborated with poet Ian Hatcher on remote viewing workshops for the public. These workshops will be conducted later this year at Triangle Arts Association in New York.

Link: Tyler Coburn at Koenig & Clinton

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 3d ago

Artist: Cheng Xinyi

Venue: Antenna Space, Shanghai

Exhibition Title: Harnessing the Power of Wind

Date: June 8 – July 30, 2018

Click here to view slideshow

Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of Antenna Space, Shanghai

Press Release:

I met Christiaan, a very special man, in the spring of 2016, when I first moved to Amsterdam. We talked over coffee. He was in his fifties, with grey hair, he wore black-framed glasses, a casual black blazer and leather boots. He had just relocated to Amsterdam from northern Holland, where he and his husband had worked on a garden for the past ten years. Before that, he lived in a monastery for ten years, after leaving the theatre company he co-founded with a group of friends in Amsterdam. I told him I was a painter who’s fascinated by emotions, desires and power dynamics. He was so attentive during the conversation, it seemed as if I were the most interesting person in the world.

From then on, we met regularly. Sometimes we went for walks in a park. Sometimes we met in a museum or in my studio. Often we met for tea at his place. Christiaan lived by the Amstel River, on the top floor of an artist-owned house. His flat was minimalistic, painted in white and full of light. In the living room there were only one table and four chairs.

Klaas, his husband, lived in the second floor flat, right below Christiaan. It was decorated like an 18th century Dutch house: antique furniture, Persian carpets, silverware, glassware and paintings. There were always a bouquet of flowers and a bowl of fruit on the table.

Christiaan introduced me to Stijn, a beautiful young boy. He thought we would get along. Stijn studied textile at an art school and was interested in text and graphics. He was tall, thin, soft-spoken and sensitive. He had brunette and medium-long hair. He soon became my muse.

In the spring of 2017, Klaas started to have backaches and had to lie in bed. He was diagnosed with terminal lung cancer. Soon, he began his chemotherapy. Chrisiaan hustled between working at the theatre and taking care of Klaas. I visited them more often, sometimes bringing a few of my paintings, taking some of their old collections down and replacing them with mine – I imagined my paintings and myself were their “visitors.” Klaas loved the new paintings, especially “Julien”- about a bearded man having his hair washed by another man in a black latex apron.

I took videos of Christiaan, Klaas and the objects in their flats. Klaas liked to start his day sitting on the balcony, reading newspapers and smoking a cigar. He received guests in the afternoon, relatives, friends, and sometimes former lovers. He was always high from his painkillers. He seemed more mellow than usual and was always in a good mood.

When we talked, he kept the topics to gardening and sadomasochism.

Klaas also owned a house and a garden in the north of Holland. He had designed and worked on it for over twenty years, and he had planted over two thousand kinds of plants. Fourteen years earlier, he received a letter from a monk, who requested to visit the garden. Klaas invited him to stay overnight, and the man never left. That was Christiaan. They lived with animals, among them, Bosie – a dog named after Oscar Wilde’s lover, a peacock and a rooster. They hired young boys mowing the lawn and pruning the trees.

In late August, Klaas’s health deteriorated quickly. He started having difficulty breathing. Not long after, he decided to die by taking a lethal injection, surrounded by his former lovers and Christiaan.

A week later, Christiaan paid a tribute to Klaas by screening the Japanese film Departure at the EYE Film Institute. Klaas had chosen the film. After the screening a small group of friends took a boat from the museum to Klaas’ house through the canals. Wine and cheese were served. Christiaan had his arm around one of Klaas’ former lovers, whom Klaas had handed down to him, with the house. The man wore a checkered shirt and an exquisite pearl necklace. Christiaan was staring into his wine glass.

Link: Cheng Xinyi at Antenna Space

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 4d ago

Artist: Marie Angeletti

Venue: Atlantis, Marseille

Exhibition Title: Pour qui tu chantes?

Date: May 9 – July 21, 2018

Click here to view slideshow

Full gallery of images available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of the artist

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 4d ago

Artist: Toyin Ojih Odutola

Venue: Hood Museum, Hanover

Exhibition Title: Firmament

Date: June 8 – September 2, 2018

Click here to view slideshow

Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of Hood Museum, Hanover. Photos by Rob Strong.

Press Release:

Stories take center stage in Toyin Ojih Odutola’s drawings. She catches her characters at quiet moments captured from otherwise rich and complex lives. Short on specifics and long on allusion, the narratives she evokes suggest a wide emotional range. We are not meant to know exactly what takes place in these lives, but we are invited into their private spaces and we share an implied intimacy with many of them. Ojih Odutola allows us to peek, but not pry, into the lives of those who occupy her personal firmament. The artist establishes a compassionate confrontation between viewer and subject through the use of scale and through her extraordinary mark-making technique that draws us close to her surfaces. Many of the drawings are life-sized, some even full-length. This reinforces an uncanny sense that we share a space with her subjects; it also establishes an equivalence between viewer and subject.

Ojih Odutola’s signature drawing technique rewards close scrutiny. She creates small patches of color from carefully hatched lines to show skin; each plane works to delineate the exposed volumes of her sitter’s body. This technique is notably reserved for the depiction of skin; she draws clothes, furniture, and even the landscape in a looser, more broadly marked technique.

It is, after all, flesh that carries conceptual weight in Ojih Odutola’s work. It is dark, rich, and multi-hued, and her renderings are very detailed. The people she draws have lives, houses, family, friends, and responsibilities, but those factors are indicated loosely. In this way, she poses questions about how we construct conceptions of race and how those conceptions shape experience—both real and imagined. Her work is elaborate, provocative, poetic, and charged—simultaneously telling and asking.

This exhibition was organized by the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth, and generously supported by Kristy and Robert Harteveldt ’84 and Linda and Rick Roesch.

Link: Toyin Ojih Odutola at Hood Museum

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Contemporary Art Daily by Contemporary Art Daily - 5d ago
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Artists: Erika Ostrander and Christian Tedeschi

Venue: Reserve Ames, Los Angeles

Exhibition Title: Tour of the Artist’s House

Date: June 22 – 24, 2018

Click here to view slideshow

Full gallery of images, press release and link available after the jump.

Images:

Images courtesy of Reserve Ames, Los Angeles

Press Release:

Using the Avant-Garde Institute (Edward Krasiński’s home and studio) in Warsaw, Poland and 500 Capp Street (David Ireland’s “environmental artwork, social sculpture, and residence”) in San Francisco, California as a curatorial model, Reserve Ames presents Tour of the Artists’ House, guided tours of the house in Highland Park, Los Angeles where, until now, Erika Ostrander and Christian Tedeschi developed work.

Tedeschi moved into the home in 2009 when he began teaching in Los Angeles. Later Ostrander arrived and together they created a unique environment that gradually assumed its current state. Their work, situated throughout the interior of the house and surrounding property, includes large structures Tedeschi built to house his early resin sculptures.

Link: “Tour of the Artist’s House” at Reserve Ames

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview