Loading...

Follow Construction Specifier on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
The 2019 North American Copper in Architecture (NACIA) award winners are announced.
Photo courtesy CDA

The Pablo Center at the Confluence in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, by Holzman Moss Bottino Architecture is the recipient of the 2019 North American Copper in Architecture (NACIA) award in the ‘New Construction’ category.

The award recognizes excellent uses of copper and copper alloys in residential, educational, and government buildings. From a new copper clad university building seeking Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) accreditation to a restored 100-year-old copper roof, ten buildings earned a spot among the awards.

The annual awards program highlights craftsmanship, attention to detail, and architectural vision.

“The 2019 winners display a great balance of innovative wall cladding structures and historical restoration projects, which is very indicative of the architectural trends we are seeing across North America,” said Stephen Knapp, the director of the strip, sheet, & plate council for the Copper Development Association (CDA). “Copper is truly one of the most versatile and sustainable building materials available. As the green building trend continues, we expect to see the material increasingly utilized to achieve various certifications and environmental goals.”

All submissions are judged and reviewed by a panel of copper and architectural experts based on building design, use of copper and technique throughout the project, copper installation, and when applicable, historic renovation.

Other winners in the ‘New Construction’ category include the Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute C in Tempe, Arizona, by ZGF Architects, Coolidge Corner School in Brookline, Massachusetts, by HMFH Architects, Gap Cove House in Rockport, Massachusetts, by Ruhl Studio Architects, Hidden Path Residence in Shelter Island, New York, by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, Lamplighter School Innovation Lab in Fayetteville, Arkansas, by Marlon Blackwell Architects, and Midtown Center in Washington D.C., by SHoP Architects.

Winners in the ‘Restoration’ category are Dartmouth College’s Baker Tower in Hanover, New Hampshire, Steeples Square in Dubuque, Iowa, and the Hispanic Society of America Museum and Library in New York, New York.

The post Copper architecture award winners announced appeared first on Construction Specifier.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
A Vancouver, British Columbia developer proposes the world’s tallest wood tower.
Image courtesy Perkins + Will

A Vancouver, British Columbia developer has proposed a mass timber, Passive House skyscraper that could be the world’s tallest wood tower.

Delta Land Corporation is working with architect Peter Busby from Perkins + Will to design the 35 to 40-story Canada Earth Tower with the aim of setting a new benchmark for environmental performance and human health and well-being.

The British Columbia government recently changed its building code to allow for wood buildings up to 12 stories, and the Canadian federal government is expected to do the same next year.

Canada’s Earth Tower will:

  • use locally manufactured and processed mass timber, as well as engineered wood such as cross-laminated timber (CLT)/glue-laminated timber (GLT)/dowel-laminated timber (DLT);
  • use a hybrid technique that will use reinforced concrete elevator cores to provide lateral stability to the structure, while engineered wood columns and composite floors will comprise the structure of the occupied spaces;
  • demonstrate fire and structural safety in a challenging urban seismic environment;
  • aim to set a new benchmark for sustainable building performance and wood construction, with an ultimate goal of lowering greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; and
  • leverage occupant benefits through exposure to mass timber.

The post Revealing designs for the world’s tallest hybrid timber tower appeared first on Construction Specifier.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Shorb Tower, a nine-story patient tower at the Methodist University Hospital (MUH) in Memphis, Tennessee, is now complete.
Image courtesy HKS Architects

A nine-story patient tower at the Methodist University Hospital (MUH) in Memphis, Tennessee, is now complete. The 41,806-m2 (450,000-sf) tower was constructed on top of the already existing emergency department of the hospital.

The Shorb Tower is part of the hospital’s campus expansion project that also includes a 700-space parking plaza.

“The new Shorb Tower represents our commitment to provide the best care to patients in the community and our dedication to the future of medicine,” said Richard Kelley, vice-president, corporate facilities management for Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare. “This is one of the largest transformational projects in the history of the Memphis Medical District and will allow us to continue to attract top medical talent to join our outstanding team.”

The hospital will consolidate its transplant services into a two-floor outpatient comprehensive transplant institute in the new tower. The new tower will also include cardiology, blood and marrow transplant, and oncology services. The expansion allows for a 36 percent increase in intensive care unit (ICU) capacity and a 20 percent increase in the hospital’s operating room capacity. The next phase of the project includes 8733 m2 (94,000 sf) of renovations to existing patient and operating rooms.

Construction services company Turner Construction used state-of-the-art laser scanning technology to scan each of the 70 patient bathrooms to ensure the floors are properly sloped so water does not pool.

To modernize the look of the campus, most of which is made of red brick, the building has a dynamic glass system on the exterior of the tower giving a new identity to the hospital’s main entrance.

Memphis firms Self+Tucker Architects and Archimania worked with Dallas-based HKS for the project. Bernhard TME provided mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) services and Memphis-based Allen & Hoshall served as the project’s structural and civil engineer.

The post Tower expansion creates new identity for Tennessee hospital appeared first on Construction Specifier.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Sir David Adjaye-designed new luxury high-rise tower tops off in Lower Manhattan, New York.
Photo © Chris Coe. Photo courtesy Optimist Consulting

A new luxury high-rise, designed by architect Sir David Adjaye has topped out in New York City. The 66-story tower rises more than 244 m (800 ft) to the sky and makes a bold architectural statement and is a unique addition to Manhattan’s skyline.

“In defining the design for 130 William, I sought to celebrate New York City’s heritage of masonry architecture, referencing the historical architecture once pervasive upon one of the city’s earliest streets,” said Sir David Adjaye. “130 William evokes the past, but it also has a forward-looking design, which explores the new possibilities of urban, vertical living.”

In collaboration with architect Hill West, Adjaye was inspired to craft a building that pushes away from the typical commercial feel of glass, and instead, embraces the city’s history of classic stonework and lofts that once populated Lower Manhattan.

The building’s exterior features a custom hand-cast façade with rhythmic, large-scale arched windows and bronze detailing.

The tower has 242 residences, ranging from studio to up to four bedrooms. The residences incorporate interior finishes made of materials sourced from around the world, and are framed by oversized bronze arched windows. Wide-plank white oak flooring underfoot enhances warmth throughout the suites.

The post David Adjaye-designed new lux tower tops out in Manhattan appeared first on Construction Specifier.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
The team of OMA and KOO is the winner of an international competition to design an innovative ‘Center for the Arts’ on the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) campus.
Photo courtesy UIC

The New York-based firm OMA and Chicago-based KOO has been named the winner of an international competition to design an innovative ‘Center for the Arts’ on the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) campus. The center will serve as a gateway between UIC and the world and as a destination for innovative arts and cultural production.

The three finalists were chosen from an international pool of 36 teams that responded to a public request for qualifications. The final decision by the selection committee was reached in consultation with university, college, and school leadership.

The finalists were tasked with producing designs that not only represent the innovative work of the schools in the College of Architecture, Design, and the Arts (CADA), but also contribute to UIC’s mission as an urban public university.

The center will be located on the northwest corner of UIC in a currently vacant location. Visible from the three expressways as well as from downtown Chicago, the OMA/KOO building will be a prominent landmark that bridges the West Loop and campus.

Shohei Shigematsu, a partner of OMA, said the design was inspired by the campus’ original designer, Walter Netsch, by reinterpreting his principles to conceive ‘a unique flexibility’ for the concert hall.

“We are honored to be awarded this project that will serve as a new cultural anchor for the students of UIC and the city of Chicago,” said Shigematsu. “Our design focuses on fostering dialogue between performance and the public—the new building will be a connector between the city and UIC’s urban campus.”

As a public, urban hub for performance and gathering, and a home for the School of Theatre and Music, the project required an 8175-m2 (88,000-sf) building with a 500-seat vineyard-style concert hall and a 270-seat flexible mainstage theater, as well as instrumental and choral rehearsal halls and theater production shops. Also included are supporting facilities, a donor lounge, a small café/jazz club, and exhibition space.

OMA/KOO’s concept design proposes two towers—a student tower facing the campus and opening to a performance park along a nearby bridge, and a public tower looking to the cityscape and opening to a Phase One screening plaza. Large ramps flow from the street to an “accessible topography of performances” on the second level, connecting the outdoor and indoor performances spaces, including the concert hall between the towers, and the Phase Two mainstage theatre. Production spaces line the ground floor.

The center has a translucent, tent-like roof with embedded photovoltaics stretching from and between the towers, covering the concert hall and the mainstage theatre. The colors of the performance space volumes would shine through the translucent areas.

Jackie Koo, founder of KOO, said feedback from the users during a midterm project review was helpful in guiding their design. She said she was particularly impressed with the “high level” of architectural thinking she found in the work of the other proposals.

“It is a great honor both as an UIC alumna and as an architect practicing in Chicago to be part of such an important cultural project,” Koo said. “We wanted our design to transparently showcase the pedagogy of CADA and how UIC is a school that succeeds at educating future creative leaders while being accessible to all.”

The post Architects chosen to design Chicago university’s arts center appeared first on Construction Specifier.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
The Florida headquarters of Carrier has achieved Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum v4 certification.
Photo courtesy Carrier via Twitter

The global headquarters of Carrier, a provider of HVAC, refrigeration, fire, security, and building automation technologies, the United Technologies Corporation (UTC) Center for Intelligent Buildings, is one of the first commercial buildings in Florida to earn the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum v4 certification.

“Earning LEED Platinum certification is a significant achievement, as sustainability is a core value of our organization and our portfolio of products,” said Bob McDonough, president, Carrier. “We designed the UTC Center for Intelligent Buildings to push the boundaries of sustainable building design and provide our employees and customers with a model of what is possible when Carrier’s best technologies are deployed in green buildings. Earning LEED Platinum is a testament to what can be accomplished when advanced building technologies are integrated into intelligent building design.”

Another benefit of LEED certification is employee productivity and well-being. The UTC Center for Intelligent Buildings was specifically designed to COGfx standards—indoor air quality (IAQ) specifications found by Harvard University researchers to double occupants’ cognitive function test scores compared to a conventional building environment.

The post Carrier’s Florida HQ earns LEED Platinum v4 appeared first on Construction Specifier.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
The Mennica Legacy Tower, a highly anticipated commercial high-rise in Warsaw, Poland, has topped off.
Photo courtesy Goettsch Partners

The Mennica Legacy Tower, a commercial high-rise complex by architecture firm Goettsch Partners (GP) has topped out in a growing district of Warsaw, Poland.

The complex is divided into a 35-storyy tower on the southeast side of the site and a smaller 10-story building on the west side. The project adds more than 65,000 m2 (700,000 sf) of Class A office space and also includes a conference center, fitness amenities, street-level retail, and four levels of underground parking.

Designed by GP with Epstein as architect of record (AOR) and structural/mechanical, engineering, and plumbing (MEP) engineer, the tower is constructed for nearly column-free floor plates to allow larger lease spans and flexibility in tenant workplace. Outside, tenants and visitors are welcomed at street level by the tower’s three-story lobby, enclosed with a transparent, cable-supported glazing that blurs the boundary between the lobby and outside. The tower core is clad with large stone slabs accentuating the solid mass of the core, in contrast to the lightness of the building’s lobby.

“The two buildings are designed to be integrally linked with the large urban plaza,” says James Goettsch, FAIA, chairman of GP. “Our goal was to create an architectural composition that offers a unique sense of place, to enhance the public realm of Warsaw.”

The complex features sweeping rounded corners at the south that open to the large public plaza and define the main pedestrian pathway between the two buildings. The tower mass features rounded corners on the northeast and southwest sides helping to reduce the visible length of the east and west facades; on the opposite corners, the tower incorporates a strong vertical edge.

The southeast and northwest corners are further highlighted by slightly recessed vertical slots breaking up the building’s mass. The southeast corner of the tower steps in three-floor increments outward as it rises, opening the slot to the sky and creating a profile that becomes a glowing beacon at night. A sloping screen wall at the building’s top enhances the profile and integrates roof terraces into the overall massing. The textured, saw-toothed façades reinforce the rounded corners and give the enclosure an ever-changing appearance as one moves through the complex.

The post Poland skyscraper blurs the boundary between the interior and exterior appeared first on Construction Specifier.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Installed Cylent Assurance Clips attached to resilient channels.

Keene Building Products is excited to introduce a new clip for enhancing the acoustic performance of ceilings and walls. Cylent Assurance Clip, developed and marketed exclusively to Keene, is a patent pending resilient channel vibration clip. The clip has been engineered to dramatically reduce low and high frequency noise transfer in ceiling/wall assemblies, many of which are used in modern multifamily construction.

Cylent Assurance Clip is different than anything else on the market due to the ability to work with any type of resilient channel, including both Hat and RC-1 channels. Other vibration isolation clips on the market today are limited in their application.

Close-up view of an installed Cylent Assurance Clip attached to resilient channel.

Cylent Assurance Clip is uniquely designed to extend the length of the point of contact with the framing member and the channel. This significantly reduces vibration transfer across wall/ceiling assemblies and creates greater performance with sound ratings. Another benefit to the design is that it prevents the most common installation error, short-circuits.

Keene’s Cylent Assurance Clip is the perfect choice for projects where noise is a concern, allowing architects and builders to dramatically improve the sound transmission class (STC) and impact isolation class (IIC) ratings of wall/ceiling assemblies. The product also provides both builders and architects peace of mind that the completed project will perform as expected.

Keene Building Products
877-514-5336
info@keenebuilding.com
keenebuilding.com

The post Dramatically reduce noise in ceiling/wall assemblies appeared first on Construction Specifier.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Hyatt Centric Portland, a boutique lifestyle hotel, tops off in Oregon’s capital city.
Photo courtesy Sera Architects

The Hyatt Centric Portland has topped off in Oregon’s capital city. The 11,919-m2 (128,299-sf), full-service lifestyle hotel offers guests a connection to the city’s core.

Sera Architects is the design team working on the project alongside developer and design-builder Mortenson.

The 15-story boutique lifestyle hotel will offer 220 guest rooms, approximately 279 m2 (3000 sf) of meeting space, and a destination restaurant and bar. The lobby will be reflective of Portland with multimedia art displays.

According to Sera Architects’ website, the hotel is focused on place-based design highlighting Portland’s deep craftsman history and its interaction with the landscape. The exterior embraces this concept by creating a woven series of moves between the vertical and horizontal components of the building, inspired by the historic basket weaving techniques of the Tanner Springs neighborhood. This weaving, combined with the distinct geomorphic façade—which mimics the basalt colonnades of the surrounding area—emulates an urban forest, playing with the changing daylight to create a unique experience throughout the day.

“Our focus with the Hyatt Centric brand is to serve up share-worthy experiences in popular destinations around the world,” said Patrick McCudden, senior vice-president of capital strategy, Hyatt. “Portland is an exciting and vibrant city and we are excited to help visitors discover its hidden treasures.”

The hotel is slated to open in January 2020.

The post Hyatt Centric hotel tops off in downtown Portland appeared first on Construction Specifier.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Construction chemicals company Prosoco has acquired Construction Tie Products.
Photo courtesy Prosoco

The Kansas-based manufacturer of construction chemicals, Prosoco has acquired Construction Tie Products (CTP) to expand its product offerings in the new construction and restoration masonry markets.

CTP has manufactured masonry restoration anchors and wall ties since 2005. With staff members possessing more than 30 years of masonry construction and restoration experience, CTP has marketed its system of products to architects, engineers, contractors, and owners.

CTP’s operations, products, staff, and branding will continue with no interruptions in service to customers.

According to Prosoco, this acquisition gives them a more complete system to offer to mason and restoration contractors who already use its cleaners and protective treatments for restoration and new construction. Additionally, it further rounds out Prosoco’s suite of products required to complete energy retrofits of existing buildings.

“Both companies promote construction of new and preservation of existing masonry buildings,” said David Boyer, president of Prosoco. “This acquisition expands Prosoco’s technical expertise and product offering in both market segments.”

“In addition to both being family-owned, Prosoco and CTP have very similar core values,” said Steve Getz, owner of CTP. “We share the same interests in building and restoring masonry structures with high-quality products. We are proud of the business that we have grown, and excited to watch it continue to thrive as it moves forward under Prosoco’s leadership.”

The post Prosoco acquires Construction Tie Products appeared first on Construction Specifier.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview