Loading...

Follow Compound Interest | Explorations of everyday chemi.. on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Nickel is element 28 in our International Year of the Periodic Table elements series. One of a select number of magnetic elements, it’s found in many of the coins of various currencies, and is also found in the heating elements in your oven and toaster. Nickel is one of those elements that you encounter a […]
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Dorothy Hodgkin was born on this day in 1910. She’s famed as one of only four women to have won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and the only British woman to have done so. This graphic takes a look at the work that earned her the prize. View more posts on chemistry history on the […]
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Element 27 in our International Year of the Periodic Table series is cobalt, found in pigments, jet engines, and used in the sterilisation of medical equipment. If you’re ever dabbled in painting or pottery-making, you may have come across the shade cobalt blue. It’s, as the name suggests, a blue pigment which is both used […]
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

There are 118 elements in the periodic table – but they’re not all made in the same way. This graphic looks at some of the processes which generate elements in stars, and how the elements they can’t make are made by humans. View the full graphic on the C&EN site.
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Here’s the monthly summary of chemistry stories that have hit the news. This month features news on the observation of the universe’s first molecule in space, a new method for making graphene using hair removal wax, and more! Larger summary images for each item are provided below, along with links to articles and studies for […]
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Element 26 in our International Year of the Periodic Table series is iron – found in our blood, on the Red Planet, and also responsible for our own planet’s magnetic field. Blood’s red colour comes from the iron-containing haemoglobin. It’s not just the colour of blood that haemoglobin contributes; it’s also responsible for ferrying oxygen […]
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Element 25 in our International Year of the Periodic Table elements series is manganese, found in railways, our bones and enzymes, and drinks cans. Manganese is added to steel to strengthen it. This steel is then used for railway lines, safes, and prison bars. There’s more interesting science on the reason leaves on railway lines […]
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Element 24 in our International Year of the Periodic Table elements series is chromium. It’s the element that gives rubies their colour and is also responsible for the characteristic yellow colour of school buses. The colour of many gemstones is due to the presence of impurities. In the case of rubies, which are composed of aluminium […]
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Element 23 in our International Year of the Periodic Table elements series is vanadium. Vanadium is found in some steels to improve their hardness and is also behind the yellow blood of some animals. Steel used to make tools such as wrenches and drill bits often have vanadium added in small amounts. This increases the […]
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Element 22 in our International Year of the Periodic Table series is titanium. A key component of many sunscreens, titanium is also found in the parts of the International Space Station, as well as in artificial joints. Titanium dioxide is a key component of sunscreens. Nanoparticles of titanium dioxide absorb and scatter ultraviolet light, preventing […]
Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview