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       At The Conversation Alice Whitmore finds Australia's taste for translated literature is getting broader, and that's a good thing.
       Of course it is !
       (And it is noteworthy that several Australian publishers have leapt ahead of US/UK publishers with some translations -- which speaks for them (and, alas, against the prevailing US/UK scene, which gets to a lot, but continues to have huge gaps .....)
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       At the Atlantic Council Hossam Abouzahr considers Standard Arabic is on the Decline: Here's What's Worrying About That.
       I hope to hear/read some debate about this.
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       An interesting piece by Vana Manasiadis in The Spinoff, the co-editor of Tātai Whetū: Seven Māori Women Poets in Translation (see the Seraph Press publicity page) offering A manifesto for a true bilingual literature
       She suggests that -- certainly in this case --:
So translation is really all about reclamation, freedom of movement, equality. It evens the territory and levels the hierarchies.
       Well worth a look.
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       In the South China Morning Post Victoria Burrows explains Why China loves Jane Eyre, whether as a feminist manifesto, a history of colonialism or just a simple children's bedtime story.
       Yes, apparently Jane Eyre -- 简·爱 -- is big in China -- really big.
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       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of Murata Sayaka's Akutagawa Prize-winning bestseller, Convenience Store Woman, due out in English shortly from Grove Press (US) and Portobello Books (UK).

       Interesting title-variations among the translations -- the French simply went with the abbreviated Japanese word for convenience store from the original, Konbini; the Germans, without the convenience of convenience stores, with the reasonably fitting Die Ladenhüterin (essentially: 'the shopkeeper' (f)) -- but I have to say, I'm not entirely sure about the feel of the Italian: La ragazza del convenience store .....
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       The Crime Writers' Association has announced its longlists in various categories, including the CWA International Dagger.
       Last year's winner was Leif GW Persson's The Dying Detective; of this year's finalists, only Pierre Lemaitre's Three Days and a Life, in Frank Wynne's translation, is under review at the complete review (though Three Seconds by Roslund and Hellström is too -- a precursor to their longlisted-title, Three Minutes ...).
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       In The Guardian they suggest The next Elena Ferrante ? The best European fiction coming your way.
       Quite a few of the titles 'coming your way' will only do so in 2019, while several of these authors are quite well established in English -- notably Juli Zeh, with half a dozen books out in English translation. But the selection includes Daša Drndić's Belladonna, so there's that.
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       The most recent addition to the complete review is my review of John Nathan's new biography of Modern Japan's Greatest Novelist, Natsume Sōseki, just out from Columbia University Press.
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       In the Jakarta Globe Diella Yasmine profiles Max Lane on How Not to Get Lost in Translating Pramoedya Ananta Toer.
       Pramoedya remains the best-known Indonesian author -- and certainly deserving of a large international audience. (I read the Buru-quartet before starting this site, which is why it isn't under review here; it was, of course, recommended in my The Complete Review Guide to Contemporary World Fiction.)
       Disappointing to hear:
Though Pram's books have now been translated into 42 languages, they still remain largely unread at home. According to Lane, this is because Indonesia is the only country in the world that does not teach its own literature in the classrooms.
       A shame -- Pramoedya's, and much other local writing, is something that they should take pride in and foster.
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       The winner of the ridiculously well endowed undergraduate writing prize -- worth US$63,711 this year --, the Sophie Kerr Prize, has been announced at Washington College, and it is Caroline Harvey.
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