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February 22, 2018 

LAFAYETTE, Colo.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The Stepping Stones Group, a provider of therapy and education solutions to children with special needs and autism in educational settings, today announced the acquisition and recapitalization of Cobb Pediatric Therapy Services, a provider of speech language pathology, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and school psychology services to school districts in the Southeastern United States. Stepping Stones is a portfolio company of Five Arrows Capital Partners, the North American corporate private equity business of Rothschild Merchant Banking. Financial terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

“We’re excited to announce the acquisition of Cobb Pediatric, an established company that has earned a great reputation among its customers and employees over the past 29 years”

Cobb Pediatric is headquartered in Cobb County, Georgia and serves schools throughout the Southeast. The company was founded in 1989 by CEO June Whitehead, a speech pathologist by training. Cobb Pediatric has been recognized as a top work place for the past six years including by The Atlanta Journal Constitution in 2017.

“We’re excited to announce the acquisition of Cobb Pediatric, an established company that has earned a great reputation among its customers and employees over the past 29 years,” said Anthony Rintala, Chief Executive Officer of The Stepping Stones Group. “June has built a strong business while doing tremendous, impactful work in the communities in which they operate. We’re pleased that Mark Norris, Cobb Pediatric’s President, will be continuing with us once the transaction closes as his deep experience will ensure that we can continue to build on Cobb Pediatric’s success and further expand The Stepping Stones Group’s footprint of qualified therapists across the country.”

Stepping Stones provides services to over 300 school districts and 42,000 children across more than 20 states in the U.S. The acquisition of Cobb Pediatric will further expand the company’s footprint to now span more than 25 states.

Ms. Whitehead added, “With Stepping Stones’ reach and expertise, Cobb Pediatric will now be part of a larger platform to empower even more schools and more therapists to help children with special needs reach their potential and lead fulfilling lives. I am thrilled that Mark will stay with the company and can’t wait to see what the future holds for The Stepping Stones Group.”

Stepping Stones has completed two previous add-on acquisitions in the past two years, acquiring AlphaVista Services in June 2016 and Staffing Options & Solutions in June 2017 to accelerate growth and gain access to new geographies across the U.S. Each operating division has retained its unique brand identity but operates under The Stepping Stones Group platform. Today, the Company’s offering suite includes Speech Language Pathology (SLP) and Occupational Therapy (OT) services with an increasing focus on School Psychology, Special Education Teaching, and Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA).

About The Stepping Stones Group

The Stepping Stones Group is a provider of therapeutic behavioral health services to a variety of public school districts and private learning centers. The company employs therapists in more than 20 states throughout the U.S. For more information about the company, please visit: https://thesteppingstonesgroup.com/.

About Cobb Pediatric Therapy Services

Founded in 1989, Cobb Pediatric Therapy Services has been providing a range of therapy services for children, including speech language pathology, occupational therapy, physical therapy and school psychology to school systems across the United States for 29 years. The firm currently serves school districts in 10 states across the Southeast. For more information on Cobb Pediatric Therapy Services, please visit: http://www.cobbpediatric.com.

About Five Arrows Capital Partners

Five Arrows Capital Partners is the North American corporate private equity business of Rothschild Merchant Banking (RMB), the investment arm of Rothschild & Co. With offices in London, Paris, Luxembourg, New York and Los Angeles, RMB has over $9 billion of assets under management. Like RMB’s European corporate private equity business, Five Arrows Capital Partners is focused on investing in middle market companies with highly defensible market positions, business models with a proven history of generating attractive returns on invested capital across economic cycles and multiple untapped levers for value creation. Sector focus of FACP is on healthcare; business services; and data, software & technology-enabled services. For more information, please visit: https://www.rothschild.com/en/merchant-banking/.

Contacts

The Stepping Stones Group LLC
Molly Shams
866-447-6916
molly@thesteppingstonesgroup.com

Rothschild Merchant Banking
Brunswick Group
Alex Yankus / Aziz Nayani
212-333-3810
ROTHSCHILD@brunswickgroup.com

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In case you needed another reason to finally buckle down and learn a new language, new research suggests bilingual brains actually age slower.

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh studied the brains of 835 native English speakers who were given intelligence tests in 1947 at age 11 and again when they were in their 70s between 2008 and 2010. (Via History Channel)

The study helps answer the question of whether learning a new language improves your thinking skills or whether individuals with better thinking skills are just more likely to become bilingual. The researchers say their findings prove the former. (Via YouTube / Edutopia)

As it turns out, the participants who knew two or more languages tested better than their peers in reading, verbal fluency and general intelligence. No negative effects were observed in either group. (Via Flickr / Shan Ran)

You’ve heard before that it’s easiest to pick up a new language during childhood. And while that may be true, these researchers say learning a language is good for the brain no matter when you start.

Dr. Thomas H. Bak: “In order to have the beneficial effect of bilingualism you do not have to be a born bilingual. Learning it later in life can also confer similar benefits.” (Via YouTube / ccacevideo)

The BBC quotes a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School who called the study an important first step. “This research paves the way for future causal studies of bilingualism and cognitive decline prevention.” The cognitive effects of learning foreign languages have been studied before. Research released last year suggested knowing two languages can delay dementia by several years. (Via USA Today) And another study said bilingual seniors have sharper brains and work more efficiently. (Via The Huffington Post) As for this latest study, the researchers say the strongest positive effects of bilingualism were found in reading and general intelligence. Annals of Neurology published the findings.

By Elizabeth Hagedorn
Video transcript provided by Newsy.com

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Staying organized while supervising graduate student interns can be difficult. When I get that email asking if I’ll supervise a graduate student, paperwork is the first thing that pops into my head! After that, it’s time. Do I have the time it takes to really give them what they need? I hate the idea that either of these reasons overwhelms us and would be the reason not to volunteer your time to supervise a student. As with everything, a little preparation can save you a lot of effort in the long run. Here’s a few tips from my experience!

Set up a routine with time built into your schedule. Protect that time. It’s meant to keep you from whizzing by a crazy week without giving direct feedback. Schedule 15 to 30 minutes and protect that time. Maybe it’s lunch or after school. Just make sure that if you have to change it – you tell your student and have them keep you accountable. Don’t let it get scratched and replaced by something else, never to be rescheduled!

Give yourself a set time to approve hours. I put it on my calendar for every Friday at lunch. This keep me up to date weekly, instead of waiting too long to recall our schedule!

Type out your expectations and review them the first week. This is give you time go over the expectations all at once, rather than mentioning things as they come up over the semester.

Create a folder of important documents that you use throughout the school year and continuously add to it. You can add to it even when you aren’t supervising! Then when you do start with a new student intern, you’ll have plenty of must-have documents or skills to talk about!

One of the things you’ll spend a lot of time doing, is providing feedback for therapy and treatment. My best advice for this is to utilize forms that make it easier. Create a system that make it easier on you and simplifies that feedback. Pick your format for feedback. I’m usually a paper person. I made a checklist of skills to give myself some direction for key areas I’m working on helping my intern grow in during the semester. I print this list and put copies on my clipboard. Every day, all I need to do is grab my clipboard and be ready to observe my student. When the day is done, I review it with my student and then have her make a copy and give me one back. Keeping a copy for myself lets me identify patterns and jogs my memory when it comes time to do the midterm and final feedback forms.

If you aren’t a paper format person, you can create the same checklist and save it as a PDF form. Open it on your iPad and write your notes there. Save a copy and email one to your student. Another option is to write notes into a shared google document. You can both edit the document and make notes into the shared document.

Shared from Jenna Rayburn Kirk, MA, CCC-SLP, Speech Room News

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Sensory-Friendly Santa Welcomes Kids With Special Needs

Shared from Disability Scoop

Ally Marotti, Chicago Tribune/TNS | November 30, 2017

Rian Bee helps his foster son Justin, 5, who has autism, as they meet Santa at Woodfield Mall in Schaumburg, Ill. (Nancy Stone/Chicago Tribune/TNS)

CHICAGO — Hours before Woodfield Mall opened on a recent Sunday morning, before workers turned on the holiday lights and the halls filled with shoppers, 4-year-old Liam Munnelly’s parents placed him on Santa’s lap.

Though Liam couldn’t talk back, Santa spoke to him, pointing at the decorations overhead. The little boy with the blue-rimmed glasses and red bow tie poked Santa’s belly and touched his beard, then smiled briefly at the camera before hurrying back to his dad.

Liam was born premature, has cerebral palsy, and likely doesn’t know who Santa is, said his mom, Erica Munnelly. But “it’s important to have the memories, to be able to look back and have the pictures,” she said.

Liam was Santa’s first visitor that morning at Woodfield Mall’s Caring Santa event, one of more than 375 sensory-friendly Santa events planned at malls and other locations nationwide this year by New Jersey-based Cherry Hill Programs and the advocacy organization Autism Speaks.

Families register in advance to see Santa and the visits take place before malls and stores open, to lessen any anxiety the sounds and sights of the season may bring. At Woodfield, the loud music and “Despicable Me 3” ads on seven screens that typically greet kids on their way to Santa were turned down.

For Liam, lights and sound are not an issue, Erica Munnelly said. “We just need the patience because muscle movements are hard for him.”

Cherry Hill, which provides the Santa experiences in malls throughout the U.S. and Canada, launched its sensory-friendly Santa programming in 2011. It has seen rapid growth recently, partially because of awareness and high demand, said Lisa Goring, chief program and marketing officer for Autism Speaks, which partnered with Cherry Hill about three years ago. This year, sensory-friendly Santa events are set to be held at more than 300 locations, up from 180 last year.

Autism affects an estimated one in 68 children in the U.S, according to Autism Speaks. One-third of those children are nonverbal, and for most, it will be a lifelong condition. There are many types of autism, and what is distressing for one person with the disorder may not bother another.

“We ask every family, ‘Are the lights OK? Is the sound OK?’” said Heather Lloyd, director of marketing and business development for Woodfield. “There’s already one family that has proactively said they can’t handle the flash.”

During the Woodfield event, each family was given 15 minutes with Santa, and provided with crayons and snacks when they arrived. Some families came in matching outfits; some children wore footed pajamas. Some children hurried through the Ice Palace, something like a giant snow globe lined with TVs, to get to Santa. Others lingered, playing in the fake snow that fell from above.

If a family stayed in one spot, another moved in front of them. If it took time for a child to work up the courage to approach Santa, he or she was not rushed.

“When you have a sensory-sensitive child or a special-needs child, you can’t (rush),” said Mickey Teply of Hoffman Estates, who attended the event with her daughter, son-in-law and their two foster sons. “It’s their time, not your time.”

Teply’s daughter and son-in-law are set to adopt 5-year-old Justin later this month, Teply said. Justin has autism and is nonverbal, and the patience taken with each family at the event makes an otherwise distressing experience enjoyable, Teply said.

Many of the Santas deployed to the sensory-friendly events receive special training on how to interact with children with autism and other special needs, said Ruth Rosenquist, Cherry Hill spokeswoman. “It’s really about letting the child and letting the caregiver take the lead,” she said. “The child will give Santa clues.”

The recent Woodfield event reached capacity with 40 families and another scheduled at the mall on Dec. 3 is full, Lloyd said. The time with Santa is free but photo packages start at $24.99.

For Woodfield, which is preparing for the busiest retail stretch of the year, the event doesn’t really make business sense, said General Manager Kurt Webb. It takes manpower to put on, and most families likely won’t stick around until the stores open to shop, as the hustle and bustle of holiday shopping can be distressing to the children. But the mall has done it for five years.

“Most things we do have motivation behind them to improve business,” he said. “This one is really about the families and the kids.”

If it wasn’t for the sensory-friendly event, it’s likely that none of Dawn and Tim Karlovsky’s four children — they have two sets of twins — would see Santa. Their son Lincoln has autism, and lines, especially those as long as the one to see Santa at a mall, make the 10-year-old anxious. The sights and sounds can be overwhelming, too, Dawn Karlovsky said.

“I’m not going to come and have memories with Santa and not bring him,” she said. “This way, (the kids) could all do it and it’s all a good experience.”

The family, from Fox River Grove, has attended the event for five years, Dawn Karlovsky said. It’s part of the holiday routine, which is helpful to kids with autism, and the routine has become tradition.

Part of that tradition is arranging themselves on the sofa next to Santa and posing for a picture before whispering their Christmas wishes. One of the Karlovsky kids wanted a Hatchimal, one asked for a gift card to GameStop. Lincoln, though, didn’t have any specific requests.

“It’s not even what he wants to ask Santa for,” Dawn Karlovsky said. “It’s just coming.”

© 2017 Chicago Tribune
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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The bravest new face on television is a Muppet that doesn’t say much. But she speaks volumes about life on the spectrum.
Shared from Smithsonian Ron Suskind

Before we get to the matters at hand—including the ways in which we humans judge one another and an energetic puppet with autism named Julia—let’s consider the current value of a piece of imaginary real estate known as Sesame Street. Since its launch in 1969, the show has often been kids’ first step into the world beyond their living room rugs, the common cultural campfire for 95 percent of preschoolers—about 200 million Americans—who watched the show as children.

And it is a place—an ingenious staging of reality. “Here, they created a street and a community that closely resembles what kids experience,” says Jeffrey D. Dunn, who arrived to run Sesame Workshop as CEO in 2014. “It’s not fantasy land, and it’s not a made-up, faraway place.” He pauses. “That’s one of the things that makes it so powerful.”

For years the show’s creators have been spicing up their alluring, hand-held curriculum of ABC’s and 1,2,3’s with lessons about life as it is. There has been standout content on marriage and death, on the families of those in the military, on hunger in America and kids with incarcerated parents, and there was an HIV-positive Muppet on the South African series.

But one of the most groundbreaking innovations in its long history of wondrous storytelling began in the late 1990s, when Leslie Kimmelman, then an editor at Sesame Magazine, noticed that she had company at work: other folks who had kids with autism. What was more, the characters that her colleagues crafted spoke powerfully to her son, Greg. At 3, he seemed to connect deeply to Sesame characters. “Mention Elmo, he’d turn to you,” she says. A naturally musical child, he watched episodes with glee, singing the songs. By age 5, he’d spent two Halloweens dressed like Elmo.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/team-sesame-street-created-character-autism-180967218/#ZBr28dhwJluroPp0.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

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Below, you will find information on the tactile sensory system and how tactile challenges to the sensory system can result in difficulties tolerating clothing textures. The strategies below are helpful tips for getting sensory kids to wear winter clothes.

Tips for Getting Sensory Kids to Wear Winter Clothes

The Tactile Sensory System is one of the earliest developed senses of the body. The skin is the largest and the most prevalent organ. The skin performs unique duties for the body. Most importantly, the skin protects and alerts us to danger and discriminates sensation with regard to location and identification. The sense of touch alerts us to both discrimination and danger. These two levels of sensation work together yet are distinctively important.

Tactile discrimination allows us to sense where on our body and what is touching us. With discrimination, we are able to discern a fly that lands on our arm. The second level of the tactile system alerts us to danger. It allows us to jump in response to the “fight or flight” response when we perceive a spider crawling on our arm.
When either of these levels of sensation are disrupted, tactile dysfunction can result. This presents in many ways, including hypersensitivity to tags in clothing, sensitivities to heat or cold, a dislike of messy play, difficulty with fine motor tasks, a fear of being touched by someone without seeing that touch, a high tolerance of pain, or a need to touch everything and everyone.The information received from the tactile system includes light touch, pain, temperature, and pressure. When the tactile system is immature or impaired, the brain can become overly stimulated with resulting poor organization and regulation of input. Children can then experience difficulty with behavior and concentration as a result.
When children with tactile discrimination issues need to wear winter clothing, meltdowns can result. The heavy winter coat is just not tolerable. Use the tips below to help sensory kids wear winter clothes.
Winter Clothing Sensory Strategies
Affiliate links are included in this post.

1. Layer! Use a compression garment under clothing. A simple lycra sun shirt can be a big help for some students when worn under clothing. Tight stockings or bike shorts can be worn under pants. Other ideas include:

  • An Under Armour shirt (this one has a crew neck to reduce a tight feeling around the neck.)

2. Utilize seamless undergarments (for girls or boys), clothing or seamless socks, or clothing with flat seams. These can be added under a layer of heavier socks or used in isolation.

3. Tighten or loosen shoe laces as prefered. A tighter shoe lace can provide compression through the feet.

4. Becoming overheated can be a big cause for a sensory meltdown or refusal to wear winter coats. Consider trying a fleece or lined sweatshirt instead of a puffy winter coat.

5. Cut labels from clothing. Don’t forget the gloves, hats, jackets, and coats!
6. Wear two layers of socks or try wearing socks a size smaller for additional compression through the feet and ankles. Try using a knee-high length in isolation or under a second pair of socks. This can help the child who isn’t able to tolerate socks slouching down inside shoes or boots.
7. Wash new clothing in hot water several times to loosen clothing textures.
8. Rub a thick cream such as aloe gel or cocoa butter on the body before dressing. Dry skin can cause itchiness during the winter months where dry heat is prevalent.
9. Provide a blanket in the car if a winter coat isn’t an option.
10. Use fabrics such as cotton, fleece, and flannel. Avoid polyester blends.
11. Wear full body zipper pajamas (made for big kids!) with or without a compression layer underneath.
12. Use a winter vest or removable sleeves to quickly adjust for temperature changes.
13. Use a poncho or a car seat poncho instead of a winter coat.
Taken from the OT Toolbox.com
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Board Certified Behavior Analysits (BCBA) needed for many location in California. 
Positions are both part-time and full-time in the school setting.  We also have some thru our Early Intervention division.
Benefited Employees will enjoy: 
  • Top Salary
  • Major medical, dental, vision and life. Plans include a choice of either Kaiser or Aetna.
  • Continuing education allowance of $450 a year plus unlimited online CEU courses through Allied Media.
  • Wellness Fund
  • ASHA/CA licenses dues of up to $375 per year.
  • Workman’s Comp.
  • 401 K saving plan
  • Flexible Spending Account
  • Short and Long Term Disability
  • Professional Liability
  • Early Intervention Options
  • Regional Managers
  • Free access to all Company sponsored CEU courses (MTC is a certified CEU provider in CA)
  • Working Advantage discount cards good for restaurants and other services
  • BeachBody discount on all health related products and more!
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Lafayette, Colorado – The Stepping Stones Group, a provider of therapy and education solutions to children with special needs and autism in educational settings, today announced that Michael (Mike) J. McGreal is joining The Stepping Stones Group (SSG) in the newly created position of Chief Corporate Development Officer effective Monday, September 10th.  

Under the ownership of Five Arrows Capital Partners, the North American corporate private equity business of Rothschild Merchant Banking, the company continues to invest in its leadership team to ensure focus and discipline as it experiences high rates of growth through strong organic market development and targeted acquisitions.  In this instrumental leadership role, Mike will drive the core market acquisition strategy and also contribute in the exploration of adjacent market acquisitions from sourcing through post-merger integration activities. Mike will report directly to Tim Murphy, CEO of The Stepping Stones Group.

Mike has over 20 years of experience in advising, leading and growing companies in the healthcare industry.  Prior to joining The Stepping Stones Group, Mike served as Chief Operating Officer for Ieso Digital Health, Inc. where he designed and developed the digital health organization’s infrastructure in the United States. Mike also served as Chief Operating Officer at Beacon Health Options (Beacon) from 1996 through 2014.  His leadership was instrumental as Beacon grew from a small regional managed behavioral health organization to a scaled-national player. During his tenure, Mike successfully executed and integrated three founder-lead acquisitions that expanded Beacon’s product and geographic reach, which will serve him well in his new role.  

“I am excited to have someone with Mike’s operating experience leading our acquisitions efforts.  Mike’s background and capabilities will make his discussions with target companies’ owners and executive teams tangible and authentic.  Most importantly, Mike and I have an established relationship having built Beacon together. I have full confidence in his capabilities,” said Tim Murphy, CEO of The Stepping Stones Group.

In addition to Mike’s responsibilities at The Stepping Stones Group, Mike serves on as an advisor to Ieso Digital Health and Workit Health.  He holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Finance from Framingham State University and a Master in Business Administration from Babson’s Franklin W. Olin Graduate School of Business.

About The Stepping Stones Group

The Stepping Stones Group is a leading provider of therapy and education solutions to children with special needs and autism in educational settings.  The company serves over 400 school districts and 60,000 students annually across 26 states. With over 30 years of experience, our team consists of over 1,200 educators and clinicians dedicated to delivering high quality therapeutic and behavioral health services.  The company is privately held by Five Arrows Capital Partners, the North American corporate private equity business of Rothschild Merchant Banking.

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Lafayette, CO, August 15, 2018 – Pediatric Therapy Services, LLC, who operates as The Stepping Stones Group, a provider of therapy and education solutions to children with special needs and autism in educational settings, has made the Inc. 5000, the most prestigious ranking of the nation’s fastest-growing private companies, for the third time. The Stepping Stones Group has earned the rank of No. 1840 on the 2018 Inc. 5000 list with a 244% three-year revenue growth rate.

“We are honored to be placed on this prestigious list once again,“ said Tim Murphy, CEO of The Stepping Stones Group. “ Our growth allows us to now service more than 60,000 children in schools across the United States with high-quality care.”

The list represents a unique look at the most successful companies within the American economy’s most dynamic segment—its independent small businesses. Microsoft, Dell, Domino’s Pizza, Pandora, Timberland, LinkedIn, Yelp, Zillow, and many other well-known names gained their first national exposure as honorees on the Inc. 5000.

 About The Stepping Stones Group

The Stepping Stones Group is a leading provider of therapy and education solutions to children with special needs and autism in educational settings.  The company serves over 400 school districts and 60,000 students annually across 26 states. With over 30 years of experience, our team consists of over 1,200 educators and clinicians are dedicated to delivering high quality therapeutic and behavioral health services.  The company is privately held by Five Arrows Capital Partners, the North American corporate private equity business of Rothschild Merchant Banking.

About Inc. 5000

For more information go to  www.inc.com/inc5000.

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LAFAYETTE, Colo., June 18, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — The Stepping Stones Group, a provider of therapy and education solutions to children with special needs and autism in educational settings, today announced that Timothy R. Murphy(Tim) is joining The Stepping Stones Group as Chief Executive Officer effective June 18th. Anthony Rintala will serve as President and Chief Operating Officer and report directly to Mr. Murphy. Under the ownership of Five Arrows Capital Partners, the North American corporate private equity business of Rothschild Merchant Banking, the company continues to invest in its leadership team to ensure focus and discipline as it experiences high rates of growth through strong organic market development and targeted acquisitions.

In his capacity as Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Murphy will focus his efforts at Stepping Stones on strategic planning and execution, board and investor management, financial performance, merger and acquisition strategies, human capital performance and relations, communications and culture. Mr. Rintala will have business development, marketing, recruiting, clinical operations, infrastructure and technology functions under his supervision.

“Five Arrows Capital Partners is thrilled to have Tim join Anthony and the Stepping Stones team,” noted Ari Benacerraf, Partner at Five Arrows Capital Partners. “As our inaugural investment in North America, we believe Tim’s leadership will be catalytic to our future success. We have partnered with Tim for the past decade and know first-hand his differentiated strategic and leadership capabilities,” Mr. Benacerraf continued.

Mr. Murphy brings a proven 25-year track record of leading and advising healthcare companies and organizations through growth and transformation. Most recently, he served as Chief Executive Officer for Beacon Health Options (Beacon) from 2007 – 2017. Beacon and its subsidiaries specialize in the management of mental health, substance use, and employee assistance program services for individuals dealing with behavioral health challenges with a focus on vulnerable populations. The company is a result of the merger between Beacon Health Strategies and ValueOptions in 2014. Beacon is the largest independent managed behavioral healthcare company in the United States with over $2 billion in annual revenue in 2017.

Before the merger, Mr. Murphy was President and then Chief Executive Officer of Beacon Health Strategies. A small, founder-owned company upon his arrival, Mr. Murphy and his leadership team developed and executed strategies that grew the company from $35 million and 140 employees to over $600 million and 1,400 employees, respectively, over seven years.

Prior to joining Beacon, Mr. Murphy served as the Secretary of Health and Human Services for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts under Governor Mitt Romney. In this capacity, he oversaw a $12 billion budget and approximately 22,000 employees who delivered programs and services through 15 state agencies to more than one million Massachusettsresidents.

His signature accomplishment during his tenure as Secretary was the development, passage, and early implementation of the landmark Massachusetts healthcare reform law. He was a principal architect of healthcare reform in Massachusetts. This pioneering approach gave each Massachusetts resident the opportunity to access affordable health insurance and improve the value of the healthcare delivery system. This reform law is credited with reigniting the national healthcare debate that resulted in the Affordable Care Act.

“I am excited to join Anthony and the Stepping Stones leadership team during this dynamic time for the company. Their quest to be the market leader in providing high quality therapeutic and behavioral services to school districts and communities throughout the United States is inspiring. As importantly, I am honored to be part of a company with the mission ‘to positively impact the lives of children in the communities we serve,’ which continues my passion to assist vulnerable populations,” said Mr. Murphy.

Anthony Rintala, President and Chief Operating Officer said, “It has been a tremendous honor to lead The Stepping Stones Group through its current phase of growth and success. I am incredibly proud of everything our team has accomplished together in just three years. We’ve enriched the lives of students and were able to expand our services and improve the quality of life for more than 42,000 children in more than 26 states in the United States. As we continue this important mission, I am confident that Tim is the right person to build on our momentum.”

Preceding his service in the Romney Administration, Mr. Murphy was a vice president in the investment banking division of JP Morgan. He provided strategic advice and arranged for capital raising on behalf of for-profit and not-for-profit healthcare service companies and organizations. Later in his career at JP Morgan, Mr. Murphy provided leading private equity firms with advisory and financing services on their acquisitions.

In addition to his responsibilities at Stepping Stones, Mr. Murphy serves as Senior Advisor to Beacon Health Options’ Board of Directors and as a board member for Addiction Campuses, a substance use disorder residential treatment facility company, based in Nashville, TN.

Mr. Murphy holds a bachelor’s degree from Merrimack College, where he served as a member of the college’s Board of Trustees from 2007 – 2016, including service as chair. He holds a master’s degree in public policy from Harvard UniversityKennedy School of Government. He was awarded an honorary doctorate degree from Merrimack College in 2014 for his contributions to public service.

Contact: Molly Shams, molly@thesteppingstonesgroup.com

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