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We’ve done something totally new and different for us — wrote an eBook! Does that sound crazy or what?!?

Believe it or not, this eBook practically started writing itself years ago when we started Clover Meadows Beef. At that time, we started having conversations with you — our customers and blog readers.

That’s when we realized that you want more than a good steak. You want to know things that only a cattle farmer can answer like…

  • How to make sense of beef cuts and the best way to cook each cut
  • Why some beef cuts are tender and others are tough
  • How to cook a steak to perfection every time
  • When to get bone-in versus boneless steaks
  • When to use a rub versus a marinade
  • How to decipher beef labels and lingo
  • How a steer’s diet can change the flavor of steaks

So, we decided to compile the answers to all of the questions we’ve received over the years, and we turned it into this eBook — An Essential Guide to Beef: A Cattle Farm Shares How to Purchase & Prepare Beef

From my (Jessica) perspective, this is the book I wish I had before Matt and I got married. It’s no secret that I grew up in typical subdivision in the suburbs. Before meeting Matt, I was confident cooking chicken, fish and pasta, but my beef skills were limited to browning ground beef for tacos or ordering a steak at a restaurant. After we got married, I quickly realized that I needed to learn how to cook more than ground beef. I started on a journey to learn all I could and read dozens of beef cookbooks trying to make sense of all-things-beef. I never found a one-stop-shop-beef-book like this one — it’s the book I desperately needed at that time!

This ebook isn’t a traditional cookbook with lots of recipes (although it does have quite a few recipes). Rather, it’s a guidebook that explains how to get your desired results out of each cut of beef.

We hope it will give you tips and tricks that will be practical, easy to apply and ultimately guide you to being more confident as you cook beef.

You can get An Essential Guide to Beef: A Cattle Farm Shares How to Purchase & Prepare Beef on our store. And here’s a sneak peak at a few of the pages.

The post eBook: A Cattle Farm Shares How to Purchase & Prepare Beef appeared first on Clover Meadows Beef.

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No matter what your cooking level, there are a few kitchen tools that will save you lots of time in the kitchen. The trick is knowing which kitchen tools you really need so that you don’t have a cabinets full of gadgets collecting dust.

In our opinion, there are only a few essential kitchen tools for cooking beef. Here are our go-to favorites.

  1. Cast iron pan. We have two cast iron pans and they can do just about everything. We like them because they heat evenly and don’t cool down when we add beef to them, which makes them ideal for searing and browning. Plus, they are oven-safe so it’s easy to go from the stove top directly to the oven.  A cast iron pan will last forever if you season it well and treat it with a little TLC. 
  2. Digital Meat Thermometer. A good meat thermometer will improve how you cook beef more than any other kitchen tool. You may think you know when beef is done based on cooking time or color, but a thermometer is the only way to guarantee that your beef is done to the appropriate temperature. Our all-time favorite inexpensive meat thermometer is the ThermoWorks ThermoPop. It’s small, fast and accurate, and has a long probe that makes it easy to test roasts.
  3. Kosher Salt. Beef needs to be seasoned; it’s that simple. When salt is added to beef, it breaks down the beef’s muscle protein, draws moisture to the surface of the meat, and has a hydrating effect. Ultimately, salting a steak before cooking creates a juicier steak. There are different types of salt, but we prefer Kosher Salt because it has large, coarse granules that cling to the beef when seasoning. The large grains also make it easier to pinch and sprinkle.
  4. Chef’s Knife. There are all different types of knives, but if we could only pick one, we would choose a Chef’s Knife. In our kitchen, we use the Wusthof Chef Knife, but you may have another brand you like. Whatever knife you use, make sure to keep it sharpened.
  5.  Wood cutting Board. A good wood cutting board is sort of like a cast iron pan – it’s an investment but will last a life time with a little TLC.  There are three main types of cutting boards: wood, plastic and bamboo. We prefer wood since it’s better on knives and will keep them sharp longer. 
  6. BBQ Grill Tool Set. There are dozens of BBQ grill tool sets on the market. Since we primarily grill beef, we always look for long handled tongs and a long handled spatula. If you have a BBQ grill tool set that has a grilling fork, we recommend not using the fork because it’ll pierce the meat and cause you to loose flavorful juices.

We participate in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. See our disclosure policy for more details.

The post 6 Essential Kitchen Tools for Cooking Beef (& you probably already have them) appeared first on Clover Meadows Beef.

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Clover Meadows Beef by Matt & Jessica @ Clover Meadows.. - 3M ago

No matter how well you cook a steak, in order for it to taste good it needs to be seasoned beforehand. That’s where salting steak comes in. We know salt and beef may not sound like a common combo, but the two go together just like peanut butter and jelly, burger and fries, and bacon and eggs. 

Salt & Beef

When salt is added to beef, it breaks down the beef’s muscle protein, draws moisture to the surface of the meat, and has a hydrating effect. It ultimately creates a juicier steak.

In our opinion, once beef is cooked, it’s tough to tell what type of salt you used. However, before cooking the beef, it’s very easy to tell and some salts are easier to apply than others.

Types of Salt

There are many different types of salt such as table salt, kosher salt and sea salt. Think back to your high school science class and you probably recall that in its most basic form, salt is sodium chloride, NaCL. The thing that makes all of these types of salt different is the texture, shape and processing.

Kosher Salt is our go-to salt when salting steak or roasts. We like it because it has large, coarse grains and the large granules cling to the beef when seasoning. The large grains also make it easier to pinch and sprinkle. The two big brands in this space are Morton and Diamond Crystal. We like both but we have noticed that the crystal size is very different between the two brands.

Table Salt is sea salt that has been mined from underground salt deposits. If you pour some out of a salt shaker, you’ll see that it looks like tiny, uniformly shaped crystals. Table salt is more heavily processed and often includes iodine that the human body needs to maintain healthy thyroid.

Sea Salt comes from evaporation of ocean water or water from saltwater lakes. Typically, there is very little processing of Sea Salt and it is also more expensive. Sea Salt can often be used as a “finishing salt” because of its appearance and because it leaves a salty pop of flavor on food.

How much salt to use when salting steak

When salting steak, it’s recommend to use ¾ teaspoon to 1 teaspoon per pound of beef. Salt a minimum of 1 hour before cooking, and be sure to apply the salt evenly to the front, back and side of the beef.  If you struggle with applying it evenly, here’s a trick — season from about two feet above the steak, just like you see chefs do on TV. 

Do you have other questions on how to cook beef or are you looking for a beef recipe? Let us know. We’re here to help!

We participate in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. See our disclosure policy for more details.

The post Salting Steak appeared first on Clover Meadows Beef.

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Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, we will receive an affiliate commission at no extra cost to you. All opinions are our own and we only recommend products that we truly believe in.

We once heard that cooking beef without a good thermometer is like driving a car without a speedometer, and we couldn’t agree more.

A good meat thermometer will improve how you cook beef more than any other kitchen tool. It’s a must have in any kitchen.

In case you’re thinking, but what about DIY touch-test methods to check for doneness? Yes, we know they’re out there and we’ve talked about them before. However, a thermometer is the only way to guarantee that your beef is done to the appropriate temperature. In our kitchen, we always test our beef with a thermometer and we recommend that you do the same.

What to look for in a digital meat thermometer:

Meat thermometers have numerous features, but there are three that are must-haves that we always look for.

  1. Is it digital? There are two common types of handheld thermometers – digital and dial face. Go with digital. They’re easy to read and they register temperatures faster. Ideally, your thermometer should be able to read the temperature in 5 seconds or less. Why that fast? Because a few extra minutes on the grill is the difference between serving a medium steak or well-done steak.

It’s also important to keep in mind that when cooking beef, the temperature will continue to rise after being removed from the heat. This is called carry-over cooking, and is why professional chefs recommend removing the beef from heat when it’s 5-10 degrees below the serving temperature.

2. Does it have a long probe? You want a probe that’s at least 4 inches long so that it can reach the center of a larger roast.

3. Is it splash proof and/or water resistant? We’re messy cooks. Water-resistant thermometers are easier to clean and are less likely to be damaged while cooking.

How to use a digital meat thermometer:

The beauty of most meat thermometers is that they’re extremely easy to use out of the box. You probably won’t need to read directions. However, the key to an accurate reading is to place the thermometer in the correct location in the beef, and that’s up to you.

When checking the temperature, place the probe in the thickest part or center of the beef, not touching bone or fat. For thinner cuts of beef like steak, remove the steak from the heat and insert the thermometer through the side into the center.

Checking for accuracy and calibrating:

There are two ways to check the digital meat thermometer’s accuracy: ice water and boiling water.

For the ice water method, fill a large glass with ice. Then, add cold water to the glass and stir the ice mixture. Immerse at least 2-inches of the thermometer’s probe into the water and wait 30 seconds before reading. Make sure the probe doesn’t rest against a chunk of ice while taking the reading or it could read inaccurately. The final reading should be 32 °F.

For the boiling water method, put at least 4-inches of water into a pot and bring it to a full, rolling boil. Immerse at least 2-inches of the thermometer’s probe into the water and wait 30 seconds before reading. Make sure the probe doesn’t come in contact with the pot or it could show a higher temperature. The final reading should be 212 °F.

The best meat thermometer:

There are lots of thermometers on the market, but we do have a personal favorite.

Our all-time favorite inexpensive meat thermometer is the ThermoWorks ThermoPop. We originally discovered the ThermoPop because it was inexpensive (about $30) and it received so many top ratings from cooking sites like America’s Test Kitchen. We decided to give it a try and we’re so glad we did. It’s small and easy to carry around, fast and accurate, and has a long probe that makes it easy to test roasts. The ThermoPop is our go-to thermometer.

Since we knew we were working on this thermometer post, we reached out to the team at ThermoWorks to see if we could test the Thermapen Mk4. It’s a professional-grade thermometer that is the highest-performing kitchen thermometer around. We’ve only been using it for a little while so far, but we could immediately tell why everyone raves about it — it’s an amazing thermometer. Not only is it fast and accurate, but it’s incredibly simple to use. All you have to do is swing the probe out from the body and it automatically wakes up and starts reading temperatures. When you stick the probe in beef, it reads temperatures in under 3 seconds.

Whether you choose the ThermoPop or the Thermapen Mk4, you can’t go wrong.

Beef doneness temperature chart

Now that you know all about thermometers, let’s talk about doneness. There are two really important things to remember when testing for doneness.

First, the only way to tell if beef is done is by the internal temperature, not the color or the cook time.

Second, the temperature of cooked beef will continue to rise as it rests. Remove beef from heat when the thermometer reads about 5-10°F lower than the desired doneness.

The temperatures in this chart are final doneness, so you need to pull your beef off the heat about 5-10°F before these temperatures are reached.

Do you have other questions on how to cook beef or are you looking for a beef recipe? Let us know. We’re here to help!

The post Is it done yet? Why every kitchen needs a digital meat thermometer and the best meat thermometer appeared first on Clover Meadows Beef.

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Clover Meadows Beef by Matt & Jessica @ Clover Meadows.. - 4M ago
Bull Auction: How We Choose Bulls for Our Farm - YouTube

Note: This post has lots of agriculture terms that you may or may not know. As a refresher, here are some quick definitions – “cows” are the moms, “bulls” are the dads, and “calves” are the kids. A “cow-calf operation” is the most popular type of cattle farm in the U.S., and it means a farmer owns a cow herd that lives on the farm year-round and the goal is to have a calf every year that can be sold for income. Want more in-depth info about these terms? Check out this previous post about raising grass fed beef.

Buying a bull is a really big deal for any cattle farm for several reasons. Since we were at a bull auction a few weeks ago and because it’s been awhile since we’ve talked about bulls, we thought we would share why it’s such a critical purchase for a cattle farm and what we look for in a bull.

Why buying a bull is important for a cow-calf farm

First, and this may seem really obvious, you can’t have a calf if you don’t have a bull. Since our farm is a cow-calf operation, we rely on our cows having calves every year and that takes a bull.

Second, bulls are expensive. The bull sale we were at had individual bulls being sold between $3,000-$13,000. And sometimes, bulls go for much more. The record was recently set at $1.51 million for an individual bull.

Third, and most important for our farm, 65% of the genetic makeup of a calf comes from the bull, not the cow. When we buy bulls, we are trying to naturally improve the genetic potential of our herd.

It’s all in the DNA

If you’ve read this far, you may be wondering about that last sentence. What does “naturally” and “genetic potential” really mean?

On our farm, “naturally” is just what it sounds like. Our bull and cows mate in a wide open field. We won’t go any deeper into a birds and bees conversation here – you get the idea!

What’s the genetic potential? It’s the expected characteristics of the calf, such as its future weight, ribeye size and fertility. We know talk of genetic potential may sound crazy, but it’s similar for humans too.  For example, an Olympic athlete is more likely to have a child with natural athletic ability. It’s all in the DNA.  

With cattle, we can estimate future characteristics because of something called Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs), which is genetic data available on purebred bulls.

There are a variety of ways to look at EPDs, and every cattle farmer does it differently based on what he wants his herd to be. On our farm, our goal is to produce the highest quality beef so we look for things like high marbling, ribeye size, and growth (how big the calf will become). Other farms may select for things like milk production or feed conversion (how much feed it takes for 1 lb of weight gain).

Sample EPD Chart
Why do we buy bulls instead of raising them?

We like to purchase at bull auctions hosted by farms that specialize in raising bulls. There are several reasons we do this, but one of the most important is so that we don’t have inbreeding in our herd, which can cause genetic problems in the calf.

How would inbreeding be possible? Keep in mind that on a cow-calf farm like ours, we have a herd of cows that stay on our farm their entire lives (about 10-12 years), and they have a calf every year. If we raised one of their male calves to become a bull on our farm, that bull would begin to do its “job” in about 2 years when it was mature.

If that bull were let in to the field with our herd of cows, there would be a high probability that it would breed its mom, sibling, or even child. We eliminate this possibility completely by buying bulls from other farms that specialize in raising bulls, and that gives us new DNA in our herd.

If you have more questions about how we raise our cattle or if you’re interested in purchasing grass fed beef, let us know!

The post Bull Auction: How We Choose Bulls for our Farm (Video) appeared first on Clover Meadows Beef.

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Clover Meadows Beef by Matt & Jessica @ Clover Meadows.. - 5M ago

Don’t you just love easy recipes? If yes, this bierox recipe is for you.

Anyone — and yes, that really means anyone — can make these. Your guests will think you spent lots of time in the kitchen, but you’ll know that you only spent about 20 minutes making these yummy meat-filled rolls.

In case you’re not familiar with bierox, they’re a blend of ground beef and cabbage and it’s served in fluffy bread. They’re the perfect handheld food.

Typically, the hard part of making bierox is the dough. However, this recipe skips that steps and uses store bought dough. The result is a yummy meat-filled roll in half the time.

Bierox
Ingredients
  • 1 lb ground beef
  • 1 cup chopped onions
  • 2 cups shredded cabbage
  • 1/4 tsp allspice
  • 1 tbsp flour
  • 1 bag frozen dough rolls (white or wheat) found in the freezer section of grocery
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 cup grated pepper jack cheese (optional)
Instructions
  • Fry onions and hamburger in skillet until no longer pink. 
    Add cabbage and season and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring frequently to keep from scorching. If needed, add 1 tablespoon of water if too dry. 
    Remove skillet from heat to cool.
    Meanwhile, using the dough balls that have been thawed according to package directions, spread dough balls out into hand one at a time. 
    Fill each individual dough ball with heaping tablespoon of hamburger and cabbage filling. If desired, sprinkle grated cheese over mixture. 
    Pinch ends of dough tightly together.
    Bake on a greased cookie sheet at 350 degrees for 15-20 minutes. 
    Best when served hot. 

Looking for another recipe with grass fed beef? Here are some other beef recipes.

The post Bierox appeared first on Clover Meadows Beef.

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Clover Meadows Beef by Matt & Jessica @ Clover Meadows.. - 5M ago

There are some beef cuts I never dreamed of cooking. Oxtail is one of them, and I probably never would have if it wasn’t for this blog.

Because of questions from our customers about how to make oxtails, I started researching it. I found several recipes, and have found that most people either love oxtail or have never heard of it. It is a common ingredient in traditional dishes from Italy, South America, China, Spain and Indonesia, but it’s not as common in the U.S.

If you’re one of the people that have never heard of it, let me catch you up. Oxtail is exactly what it sounds like — the tail of a steer or cow.

If you stop and think about cattle in the field, you know their tails are almost always moving. That means that oxtail is a very well-used muscle. When cooking oxtail, most of what you cook is bone, and the meat surrounds the bone. The beef around the bone is tougher and very well-marbled — this is a nice way of saying it’s very fatty, and some chefs even call it gelatinous.

Oxtail requires a very long cooking time because it’s so fatty. I found this original oxtail stew recipe on simplyrecipes.com, and modified it slightly. It took me all day to make, and I think it would have been even better if I stretched it out over two days. However, it was worth it in the end. I now understand why oxtail stew is so popular. If you’re feeling daring and want to try something new. Give this recipe a try.

If you happen to be one of our customers that is purchasing a quarter, half or whole beef, let us know if you’re interested in the oxtail. There’s only one oxtail per animal, so we make it available on a first-come-first-serve basis with those you’re cow-pooling with. If you want it, let us know!

Oxtail Stew
A hearty stew made from braised oxtails
Keyword: oxtail
Ingredients
  • 3 lbs oxtail
  • salt and pepper
  • olive oil
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 celery rib, chopped
  • 1 large carrot, chopped
  • 3 cups beef broth
  • 1 cup red wine or grape juice
  • 3 cloves garlic (peel on)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • pinch thyme
  • parsley
For the stew:
  • 2 carrots, cut in 1-inch pieces
  • 2 parsnips, cut in 1-inch pieces
  • 2 turnips (or rutabagas), cut in 1-inch pieces
  • olive oil
  • salt and pepper, to taste
Instructions
  • Prepare oxtails by patting dry with paper towel and season with salt and pepper. 
  • Heat 1-tablespoon olive oil on medium high heat in Dutch Oven or heavy-bottom stock pot with lid. Place oxtails in Dutch Oven and sear on all sides until golden brown. Be careful to not overcrowd oxtails in the pot or they won’t sear. Remove oxtails to plate. 
  • Add chopped carrots, onions and celery to pot and cook until onion is translucent. 
  • Add oxtails back to Dutch Oven, along with whole garlic, stock, grape juice/wine, bay leaf, thyme and 1/2 tsp salt. Bring to a simmer, and then reduce heat to low. Cover and cook until meat is fork tender — this will likely take at least 3 hours, and could take up to 8 hours.  When beef is tender, remove the oxtails from the Dutch Oven and skim fat from the top. If you’re making this ahead, you could also place the pot in the refrigerator and let it chill overnight. The next day, scrape off the fat and reheat. 
  • Heat oven to 350 F. Toss carrots, turnips, and parsnips in olive oil and salt and pepper, and place in a roasting pan. Roast vegetables until they’re cooked through and lightly browned, approximately 1 hour. Set aside.
  • Next, strain the liquid from the Dutch Oven. Pour the cooking liquid through a mesh strainer. Discard the solids (vegetable and any bits of oxtail). Return liquid to pot and simmer until reduced by half. 
  • Add roasted vegetables to Dutch Oven, and the oxtails. Prior to adding the oxtails, decide if you’d like to serve them bone in or not. If bone-in, simply add the oxtails to the Dutch Oven. If not, you can remove the meat from the bone by using a fork or it may be easier to use your hands. 
  • Heat on low for approximately 45-minutes to one hour. Serve with chopped parsley. 

Looking for another recipe with grass fed beef? Here are some other beef recipes.

The post Oxtail Stew appeared first on Clover Meadows Beef.

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Clover Meadows Beef by Matt & Jessica @ Clover Meadows.. - 6M ago

Dear Three Bean Crockpot Chili,

You’re the answer to our cold-weather cooking dreams. All you ask for is a little time and you give the most wonderful, comforting, snuggle-in-for-the-night dinner. Even our toddler likes you because you’re so mild and easy-going. We’ve enjoyed you so much that you have an open invitation to stop by our house at any time.

See you soon,

Clover Meadows Beef

Three Bean Crockpot Chili
Ingredients
  • 2 pounds ground beef
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 Tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 cup onion, chopped
  • 1 cup green bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 can black beans, rinsed and drained (15 ounces)
  • 1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained (15 ounces)
  • 1 can kidney beans, rinsed and drained (15 ounces)
  • 1 can diced tomatoes with mild green chiles (10 ounces)
  • 1 can no salt added tomato sauce ( 8 ounces)
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder (more if you like more heat)
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 2 bay leaves
Toppings
  • cheddar cheese, grated
  • red onion, chopped
  • sour cream
Instructions
  • Brown the ground beef in a large, deep skillet over medium-high heat. Break the beef into pieces as it browns. 
    Drain all liquid from pan. 
    Add tomato paste, onion, bell pepper and garlic. Cook until vegetables have softened. 
    Transfer ground beef mixture to a slow cooker, and add 1 cup water, black beans, kidney beans, chickpeas, tomatoes, tomato sauce, cumin, chili powder, paprika, garlic powder and bay leaves. 
    Cover and cook on high for 5 hours.
    Discard bay leaves prior to serving. 
    Top chili with desired toppings. 

Looking for another ground beef recipe? Here are a few you may like:

The post Three-Bean Crockpot Chili appeared first on Clover Meadows Beef.

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Clover Meadows Beef by Matt & Jessica @ Clover Meadows.. - 6M ago

We’re often asked, what’s our favorite beef recipe. We like food too much to pick just one. However, there are a few common characteristics that are true of all of our favorite foods — they’re all simple to make, they use fresh ingredients, and they taste good.

This Lemon Pepper Flank Steak fits those characteristics perfectly. It only has five ingredients, and as a bonus, the ingredients are things we always have on hand in our kitchen.

So, that’s how this Flank Steak recipe was added to our personal favorites list. If we ever find another flank steak recipe we like better, this one may get moved down a position. But for now, this recipe holds the #1 spot for flank steak at our house. Give it a try and let us know what you think!

Lemon Pepper Flank Steak
This quick and easy flank steak recipe only has 5 ingredients and it’s broiled, which makes it the perfect steak to make anytime of the year. 
Ingredients
  • 2 Tablespoons coconut oil, melted
  • 2 Tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 Tablespoon lemon pepper seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon garlic salt
  • 1 1/2 pound flank steak
Instructions
  • Preheat oven to broil on high. 
    Combine oil, lemon juice, lemon pepper seasoning and garlic salt in a bowl. 
    Rub mixture over flank steak.
    Place flank steak on a broiler pan.
    Broil 10 minutes on each side or to desired doneness (use a meat thermometer to check desired doneness).
    Let beef rest before serving.
Notes
A note about flank steak — Flank steak comes from the underside (abdomen). It’s a very distinct piece of beef because it has grains that run the length of the cut. It used to be a very inexpensive cut of beef, but it’s become very popular, and more expensive. Flank steak should always be sliced across the grain.

Are you looking for another beef recipe to try? Here are some beef recipes from our kitchen.

The post Lemon Pepper Flank Steak appeared first on Clover Meadows Beef.

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We were honored to attend the 48th annual Missouri Governor’s Conference on Agriculture and receive the Missouri Farm Innovation award. The award recognizes individuals that strive to innovate their farm or ranch, give back to their communities, commit to land stewardship or stand as a great example for future generations.

Governor Mike Parsons and Director of Agriculture Chris Chinn present the
Missouri Farm Innovation award to Matt and Jessica Hardecke

While at the conference, we also got a glimpse of some of Missouri’s leading agriculture products. Here are a few numbers that we found interesting that we thought we’d share. All bullet points are from the 2019 Missouri Grown magazine.

  • Missouri’s agriculture industry contributes approximately $88.4 billion to the state’s economy each year.
  • There are 99,171 total farms in Missouri, and those farms cover 28.2 million acres across the state
  • 378,232 jobs are provided by Missouri agriculture
  • Missouri is home to 2.2 million beef cattle and ranks within the top 10 nationally according to recent U.S. Department of Agriculture.
  • In 2017, Missouri farmers planted 3.4 million acres of corn, produced 552.5 million bushels of corn grain, and sold $1.6 billion cash receipts*
  • Soybeans are Missouri’s number 1 crop in both number of acres and value, with more than 5 million acres planted throughout Missouri each year.
  • Missouri is home to around 3.4 million hogs.
  • Missouri is 4th in the U.S. for turkey production. The turkey industry supports over 12,000 jobs.
  • Missouri farmers in the Bootheel harvested 297,000 acres of cotton in 2017.
  • Missouri ranks 10th in the nation for broiler chickens (chickens raised for meat)

*cash receipts: Defined by the USDA Economic Research Service, cash receipts refer to the total amount of crops or livestock sold in a calendar year.



The post Missouri Governor’s Conference on Agriculture & Missouri Crops appeared first on Clover Meadows Beef.

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