Loading...

Follow Cloudpoint Geographics Inc. on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

A very popular and enduring request of the ArcGIS Online user community has been to have the ability to symbolize features based on data that’s stored as a related record. Well, Esri has listened- and released in a June 2018 update to ArcGIS Online the ability to use related records data like never before. We now have the ability to symbolize and manipulate our data in ways that we previously limited.

To utilize the ArcGIS Analysis feature, follow these steps:

  1. Log into ArcGIS Online and either create or open a previously created Web Map

  2. Select from the web map the layer in which a related record exists, and click on the Analysis symbol (as seen below)

3. Once the Analysis window opens, we now have the option to manipulate our data in several different ways based on the desired data analysis method.

4. For related records specifically, we’ll want to select “Summarize Data” and from the drop-down menu, select “Join Features”

5. Next, we’ll want to specify the input parameters. The “Target Layer” will be the layer that the related records are attached to. Likewise, the “Layer to Join to the Target Layer” will be the related record that will be symbolized.

6. Then we’ll finish filling out our parameters based on the desired related records end result symbolization. We’ll want to match the fields from our target layer to the join layer (these fields could the same fields on which the relationship class for the related record was built). Choose a one-to-one or a one-to-many join operation, name the result layer and where it will save the output layer to, the check the box “Create results as hosted feature layer view”

7. Finally, click the “Run Analysis” button at the bottom of the window, and a feature layer view will be generated that you then will be able to symbolize based on the related records attributes.

Want to learn more about ArcGIS Online or other solutions from Esri that Cloudpoint Geographics can assist in implementing? Contact us or visit www.cloudpointgeo.com.

Where. It Matters

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

ArcGIS Online currently does not support publishing group layers as hosted feature services in a web map. According to the Esri Community, that functionality is “In the Product Plan.” Without a concrete timeframe (User Conference in July? End of the year?) on when the functionality will be available, here is an alternate method to organize content in a web app: Use Multiple Layer Lists to group content in a Web App created in Web AppBuilder.


Create Web App
  • Start out with your web map, which has your layers in the table of contents. In the Share menu, click Create A New Web App, and choose the Web AppBuilder tab.

Organize Layers in Layer Lists
  • Choose a Theme, then click on the Widget tab. Click “Set the Widgets in this Controller.” Click the + to add a widget, and choose Layer List. The idea is to add a Layer List widget for each theoretical group of feature layers, such as Land Use, Basemap Layers, Stormwater, etc. See image below for instructions.


NOTE: The steps in this blog reference the Foldable Theme in Web AppBuilder, with the Header Controller ribbon at the top of the app. Some themes may have a slightly different look with the Header Controller, or not use a Header Controller.


Widget Groups
  • Once you have organized your layers, you can take it a step further and group your Layer List widgets. For example, if you have Layer Lists for Sanitary, Stormwater, Water Distribution, and Streetlights, you can group those Lists into a Widget Group called “Underground Infrastructure.”

To group widgets together, click and drag a widget on top of another to create a group. Rename the group as necessary.

Some Notes About Group Layer Lists
  • Keep in mind that any new layers added to your web map after creating the web app will be automatically added to ALL Layer Lists that you have created. Make adjustments to the Layer List groups as necessary.

  • In the Header Controller configuration, you can choose to either view the Widget Groups in a panel, or in a drop-down menu (see below).

Want to learn more about ArcGIS Online, Web AppBuilder or other solutions from Esri that Cloudpoint Geographics can assist in implementing? Contact us or visit www.cloudpointgeo.com.

Where. It Matters

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
What is ArcGIS Indoors?

ArcGIS Indoors is a map-based software application that enables property owners to manage all of their facilities across an entire campus in one, centralized, location. With Esri’s latest release of ArcGIS Indoors, their flagship mapping platform now offers a new solution to deliver improved strategic planning, facility operations, and workplace productivity not to mention a host of other benefits. Property managers and facility operations personnel looking for an interactive map-based solution to manage their campus and building data can take advantage of this technology to track and maintain information such as status, condition, inspection history, and asset information for all of their facilities.

How Does it Work?
  1. Develop a Strategy- Create a plan on what facility information will be collected and maintained or what data is already being collected and how that can be integrated. Data can easily be integrated into the system from your existing work order management system.

  2. Build the Maps- The next step is to acquire building floor plan information. This can consist of importing CAD drawings (2D or 3D) or contracting a geospatial firm to provide data collection services to quickly ramp up and prepare the data.

  3. Train staff- Enable staff members and managers to interact with the software and begin gathering facility information.

  4. Implementation- Users begin gathering data and carrying out tasks by inputting that into the software via mobile devices or web browsers.

What Else can it Do?
  • search map for people by name or room name

  • provide routing information to visitors or delivery services- requires Indoor Positioning System (IPS)

  • maintain fire escape routes and emergency plans

  • monitor office space, vacancies, and room availability

  • manage work orders for inspecting or replacing fixtures and equipment

  • analyze foot traffic patterns for high occupancy areas

ArcGIS Indoors is a complete system for indoor mapping used to create a connected workplace. It provides a common operating picture for executives, workplace services personnel, and other employees and visitors to understand, manage, and use their workplace environment. For more information on how we can help you implement an indoor facility management strategy, contact us or call 877-377-8124.

Contact Us


  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Have you seen all those clever and funny AWS commercials? For the normal GIS person adding yet another platform to learn and use can be a bit daunting. Don’t fret, we are not abandoning you, to put your mind at ease yes, we can handle that for you.


BUT
Commercial - Build on with AWS - YouTube
For those of you who are D.I.Y. Geogeeks; below are some tips.


There are only a few things you need do to make sure your EC2 instances can see each other for FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) requirements of ArcGIS Enterprise deployments.

  1. EC2 Instances MUST be in the same VPC & Subnet

  2. Set permissions for the Security Group

  3. Modify Hostfile to translate IP addresses

VPC & Subnet

VPC stands for virtual private cloud. It’s Amazon’s cloud-based networking structure. AWS allows you to create a domain and subnet. There’s a lot I don’t understand here (egress only internet gateways, peering connections, NAT gates, ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ ) but one thing is for sure; this is a requirement for your servers to even know each other exist. Our original EC2 instance was old enough that I had to convert it and assign it to a VPC and subnet. I just made sure that when I created my second EC2 instance I chose the same  VPC and Subnet (and thereby, same Availability Zone).

Security Group

Your Amazon security group is kind of like an additional firewall on your server. These security groups can be separate on each instance however for ease and one less variable, I use the same security group for both. Nonetheless, you have to enable ‘All ICMP-ipv4’ traffic for this security group. 

Edit The Rules and allow this protocol. **Note: At this point you should be able to use command line and ping the IP address of each instance from the other verifying that communication works. But since we are intending to use FQDN for installation of a web adapter, you need to edit the host file.

Windows Hostfile

This is a poor man’s Domain controller. Modifying this file will tell the server how to translate the IP address into the actual server name. It’s here: C:\Windows\System32\drivers\etc\hosts Edit that file and add your Private ip address. Open up in Notepad, add your IP address, and just hit save.


That’s It!
Now you should be able to look up and connect to these machines via UNC path (with a share) or the server name. Lemon-Squeezy.


Please Know: We can help with your AWS implementation, or just do it for you ;-)

Name * Name First Name Last Name Email Address * Subject * Message * Thank you!


  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Intro to Workforce for ArcGIS - YouTube
Workforce for ArcGIS is one of Esri's native GIS applications that allows you to take advantage of a streamlined work order management system that is built directly on top of your GIS platform. This tutorial provides a basic overview of the application both from the desktop browser as well as a mobile perspective.

Folks, I’m here to tell you that Workforce for ArcGIS will revolutionize the way you conduct business between field workers and office staff. When we speak of disruptability, this is a game changer. Especially since most organizations of this type already have some type of Esri GIS platform already in place. Today, I want to share with you my top three reasons why this application will completely change your way of conducting business.

  1. Real-time Communication

    With a web-based application, the interaction between office staff and field workers is instantaneous. When the remote worker makes an update on their mobile device it is reflected in immediately to the office staff. This includes examples such as, ‘On break’, ‘Not available’, ‘On my way’, ‘Can’t get to it today’. The dispatchers can then make immediate decisions on how to re-assign or re-shuffle the work load to other workers if need be.

  2. Time Tracking of Labor Hours

    We know that time is money, and this is the same thing whether you are working in the office or conducting onsite work at various locations in the field. When you have the ability to capture start and stop times for simple day-to-day tasks, you now have powerful, time-based data to build on. Use this information for performing cost estimates, billing customers, or budgeting for future work.

  3. Trust the Process….

    Another goal that managers often have is to ‘processize’ their workflows. This creates efficiencies and repeatable workflows that can be easily taught to others and even documented for future growth. With a solution such as Workforce for ArcGIS, you can now have a built-in process to execute work orders and have a complete history in your work order management. And oh yes, did I mention this is all integrated with your GIS? So you not only have time logging, but add location to that and the sky is the limit with the amount of decisions you can make from that information. Establish the process and follow it through to see tremendous success.

There is no doubt if you give this work order management application a solid try, you and your staff will both be hooked. Its ease-of-use is unmatched by any other offerings available and it automatically integrates with your GIS because it uses your GIS platform as the backbone. No more expensive modules to connect components to each other, or finagling with software vendors to unlock key software tools. This is straight out-of-the-box Esri technology and can be easily configured to work with your current ArcGIS Online account. If you are ready to launch your organization into a new era of real-time connectivity and a stream-lined work order solution, contact us about our Workforce for ArcGIS kickstart package or any of our professional GIS services.

Contact Us
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Chances are you or someone you know has used 9-1-1 in a life-threatening situation. It has happened in my family. All ended well because of an incredible number of caring people who are really good at their jobs. I got to meet some of them and am forever grateful for them. However, I will never meet the person who was there at the beginning of the call, the 9-1-1 dispatcher. Until I started working on 911 GIS data projects, I never gave the technology behind this system a second thought. Many times someone is able to give the location of the incident or person in distress. But what if something goes wrong during the phone call? Would the dispatcher have the tools to determine the person’s location when calling from a cell phone and quickly send the appropriate services? If a person is able to text but not speak would she be able to do so? This is a portion of what Next Generation 911 (NG9-1-1) can do for us.

Past, Present, and Future

According to the October 2018 Next Generation 911 Cost Estimate Report to Congress, the first call to 911 was made in 1968 and over 250 million calls were taken by 911 centers nation-wide in 2016. A lot has changed in telecommunications in that time frame, but unfortunately as a country we have not made it a priority to upgrade our 911 systems accordingly, until now.

Below is a snapshot of the progress states are making towards implementing NG9-1-1.

NG911 Progress Snapshot Across the U.S. from 911.gov

So much goes into transitioning a 911 system to NG911, from changing state policies to buying appropriate equipment to updating GIS data. This upgrade comes with a large price tag. There are a lot of variables and scenarios that costs were calculated for in the report to Congress, but we’re talking in the ballpark of $14 billion dollars nation-wide. Available funding varies widely by state, but generally first became available for call-taking equipment and is now starting to become available for GIS projects. Below are some of the funding opportunities available in Illinois and Iowa to help organizations prepare their GIS data for NG911.

Illinois

Illinois Statewide 9-1-1 Administrator just released the Notice of Funding Opportunity for FY20. In addition to funding for Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) consolidation and call handling equipment, there is $3.4 million dollars available for funding GIS projects. According to the Notice, the following is eligible:

GIS Projects that support creation, quality control and updates of the required GIS data layers in preparation for NG9-1-1 readiness by July 1, 2020. The required data layers, as defined in the Illinois NG9-1-1 GIS Data Standards, include road centerlines, address points, PSAP boundary, emergency service boundary and provisioning boundary layers. Strongly Recommended and Recommended layers as defined the Illinois NG9-1-1 GIS Data Standards are encouraged to be part of your project proposal.

Grant forms and more information can be found here.

Iowa

Iowa’s 911 Program FY19 GIS grants are incentive based. PSAP’s are required to upload their GIS data twice a year and are awarded grant money for data that meets minimum match/accuracy rates. The upload periods are July through December and January through June. Data can be uploaded multiple times within each period and an accuracy report is provided once each upload has been reviewed. Once the data meets the minimum requirements, the PSAP will receive $6,000 once per upload period.

Instructions for applying for a 911 grant in Iowa are available here.

Other Funding Opportunities

We will keep you updated on additional funding opportunities as they become available.

NG9-1-1 Data Audit

You might be thinking, “That’s great, but where do I start?”. Do you know what it will take to get your data up to the required standards? Do you need help determining the current state of your data? Cloudpoint offers an NG9-1-1 Data Audit service. This valuable service is intended to give your organization a complete picture of where your GIS data stands today with relation to the current standards and to give you a road map and cost estimate for meeting those standards in the future. You can contact us with questions or simply fill out the NG9-1-1 Data Audit Request form to receive a free quote for this service.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Esri will unveil the latest ArcGIS Online release in December 2018. One key change that you will notice is the introduction of User Types, an evolution from User Levels (Level 1, Level 2). Each User Type may have different capabilities and access to app bundles (What is that?)

The App Bundles are related sets of apps matched up to the User Type to provide the tools the user needs-Essential, Field, and Office. (See the bundles here.)

Here is a quick summary of the details of the 5 ArcGIS User Types:

  1. VIEWER

    The Viewer is formerly known as the Level 1 User. This User Type can view an organization’s private content, and has view access to the Essential Apps Bundle.

  2. EDITOR

    The Editor can view and edit data, and has edit access with the Essential Apps Bundle. This User Type can also add-on the Collector, Survey123, Workforce, and Navigator apps.

  3. FIELD WORKER

    The Field Worker has rights to collect and edit data, and manage fieldwork assigments. The Field Apps Bundle is right in this user’s wheelhouse, and they also have edit access with the Essential Apps. The Navigator app is a compatible add-on.

  4. CREATOR

    The Creator is equivalent to the Level 2 User. This User Type has numerous capabilities, including creating content, sharing content internally and externally, and administering the organization. The Creator has access to Essential, Field, and Office App Bundles; other apps such as Navigator, Business Analyst, Insights, Drone2Map, and Maps for Adobe Creative Cloud can be appended.

  5. GIS PROFESSIONAL

    The GIS Professional is the top of the line User Type, and includes the capabilities and apps of the Creator user…plus ArcGIS Pro Desktop GIS Software.

Here is a graphic, courtesy of Esri, displaying the comparison of the new ArcGIS User Types.

Some of the burning questions are…

  • How much do these User Types cost?

    The existing Level 1 and Level 2 Users will be moved over to the corresponding Viewer/Creator User Types with no change in cost. The cost for the newbies-Editor, Field Worker, and GIS Professional-have not been released yet. The Add-On Apps will have a cost, as well as the Non-Bundled Apps. Your Esri Account Rep might have more information.

  • Will my current Level 2 Users lose ArcGIS Pro once migrated to the Creator User Type?

    According to this GeoNet post, Level 2 Users with ArcGIS Pro migrated to Creators will maintain access to an ArcGIS Pro license. The post also suggests that ArcGIS Pro can be an add-on app-for new Creator users only. It appears Field Workers, Editors, and Viewers will not have access to ArcGIS Pro. More details will emerge as the release date approaches.

Need more information about ArcGIS User Types and how they fit the needs of your organization? Want to learn more about ArcGIS Online, ArcGIS Enterprise, or ArcGIS Pro? Please contact us at 877-377-8124 or visit www.cloudpointgeo.com.

Where. It Matters

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Cloudpoint Geographics Inc. by Cloudpoint Geographics - 9M ago
WOW, has it really been that long without a Bog?

Well Folks, sometimes busy is just too busy. While we are thankful for the work, We also want to keep you up to date with some of the things we have been doing. Below are a few random images from earlier this week when all the full-time staff attended the Illinois GIS Association annual conference in Lisle (Full Disclosure, I stole a few pics from Joe Arizia and Lucy Stanfield). Also, we wanted to have a location to post the presentations that Micah and Erin gave.








Survey123 Eureka!

Survey 123 is a fantastic (and Underutilized) tool. Micah gave an hour-long presentation and hopefully everyone learned some tips! Also, know all the promised Freebiees are on http://www.cloudpointgeo.com/survey123 Below is just the images of the presentation and here is a link to the PDF.





























  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Are you an occasional Esri software user that is needing to ramp up your game?  Maybe its been a couple of years since you dabbled with the GIS software and you have a project that needs a little geospatial touch.  One of the questions you may find yourself asking is "What is the difference between ArcMap and ArcGIS Pro"? 

ArcGIS Pro is the new ArcMap:  As Dave Ramsey likes to say "The paid-off home mortgage is taking the place of the BMW as the status symbol of choice", in the case of GIS software, ArcGIS Pro is taking the place of ArcMap as the desktop software of choice.  Yes, they can both read shapefiles and geodatabases but there is some additional functionality with the newer Pro version.  Below I have summarized my top 5 differences between these two Windows-based GIS software packages both created by Esri.

1. Editing feature services:  ArcGIS Pro has the ability to edit feature services on the fly.  ArcMap would allow you to view these services in a 'read-only' format, however, with Pro you can actually pull in these layers and edit them in real time (assuming editing privileges are enabled).  This can be really handy when making minor updates to layers hosted in a web map (ArcGIS Online or Arc Enterprise).

2. No more MXD's:  ArcMap uses a *.mxd file extension, similar to CAD's *.dwg format, however Pro uses an *.aprx format which allows users to have multiple maps within the same project.  This concept takes some getting used to but makes a lot of sense when looking at it from a project basis.

3. The Ribbon feel:  Remember when Microsoft Office made the switch to the 'ribbon' look with their menu items at the top of the page?  Well ArcGIS Pro clearly has the same 'ribbon' look and feel which can definitely appeal to the MS Office crowd of users.

 

4. No more Starting and Stopping the Editor:  Yes this is a big deal.  If you were a migrator from CAD to GIS, then you keep banging your head on your desk when trying to get used to clicking a button to start making edits to your map.  ArcMap required the user to begin an 'edit session' prior to making any changes to the data.  Now with ArcGIS Pro, users simple go to the edit menu and can begin selecting which tool they would like to use without having to start/stop or select which layer they want to perform edits on.

5. Schema changes: Now with ArcGIS Pro, the user has the ability to make schema changes to their data within the program itself without having to go through the ArcCatalog menu.  For example, when needing to rename a field or make adjustments to a domain, the user would need to go to the properties of the gdb file within ArcCatalog.  But with ArcGIS Pro they just select the layer and there is a new menu called 'Data' where they can make schema changes and save them to the database.

 

This is just a few of the many changes and improvements that you will see with ArcGIS Pro.  Although it will take a little time to make the transition, and yes, you will be a bit slower editing at first, I would encourage you to make the transition and use the wealth of information available on the web to help get you up and going.  If you are wanting to launch your organization into using ArcGIS Pro at the enterprise level and need more than a few online training sessions, contact us about our ArcGIS Pro Kickstart package.  Or visit our blog for additional information on software pricing for ArcGIS Pro.

Learn More
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Cloudpoint Geographics Inc. by Micah Williamson - 11M ago

There are two meanings here:

  1. You might be building your GIS as Shadow IT, know the pitfalls and realities.
  2. Beware your GIS 'clients' may be building Shadow GIS underneath you. 
Shadow IT

Is a real thing. It's talked about at conferences and even has a Wikipedia page. Essentially, it is when 'unofficial' tech infrastructure is built in parallel to the official IT department; sometimes sanctioned, sometimes not. GIS could exist as a Shadow IT in both positive and negative way.

Here is a likely (Local Government) Scenario; Your I.T. department is short-staffed and under funded. Good people, just not enough of them. You as a GIS Department head have funding to hire an outside consultant to come in and set up a small webserver and teach your staff how to maintain an ArcGIS website. Now you have a GIS website that your staff updates and maintains, project closed. This deployment is known and encouraged by the short-staffed IT and they are thankful for a good GIS Consultant to get it done correctly. This is best possible scenario and least invasive.

More nefarious is the unsanctioned secret project or the "Shhh! Don't tell I.T." collaboration. I avoid this. In fact, I have not met an IT department that I cannot work with. Our projects never get to that point.  

When building Your GIS project it is IMPERATIVE to involve your IT/IS/Programming/CIS/DP Department. I always ask "How's your relationship with IT?"  If it's not good, that's a warning flag. I can't understate the importance of a positive relationship with the tech guys.  If IT wants to torpedo your project, they can and might.  

"-But you don't understand My IT Department" Sure we do. 
"-But it's so much easier without them" At least in your mind
"-But they don't understand GIS" Give them a chance, Again. 
.:To Be Clear:.

In the past, I have been the consultant brought in because the IT department is understaffed, non-existent and/or underfunded. (This is a reality in Local Government)  Each time, I talk with and work with my client's IT, whether on staff or contracted. To make sure they know who we are, what we are doing, and that we know what we are doing.  It is very possible these overworked IT Professionals will be the ones patching your server, installing virus protection and creating an Active Directory  group of users for you. While we are creating a kind of Shadow IT out of GIS, a positive relationship with your IT Department is part of its success. 

Blessing 

Most of the time, IT is involved as much as their schedules allow. Once credit is established with a primary meeting, many times they give their blessing to a project and allow carte-blanche. I have no desire to ruin servers, steal data or install bloatware. They are just doing their job. Like a traffic officer giving you a ticket for a non-functioning license plate light (random hypothetical example). After winning them over, often I hear something like this from 'Difficult' IT guys: "I'm Sorry, it's not you, it's just we get blamed for everything here".  A simple smile and thank-you will go a long way.

Shadow GIS

It's also very important to keep this in mind. YOU could be the one that people are trying to avoid.

GIS is becoming ubitiquous and easy to do. Yup, there it is. GIS is becoming easy (there's another future blog post). So much so that other department heads can purchase an ArcGIS Online subscription & have a online GIS presence within an week. I've seen it happen, all to avoid the 'difficult' GIS person. 

Now, I know this might be a shock, but sometimes... there is a rare occasion... that you as a GIS professional... might be perceived... however incorrectly... as a nerd. Lets face it: projections, accuracy, databases, filetypes, layers, these are nerdy things we do. In this nerdy-ness be aware that non-GISers might find it difficult to relate to you. 

Most of the time, just knowing this will diffuse the issue and keep everyone under the same GIS umbrella. If not there are a few things you can do to continue to support an uncovered Shadow GIS operation and possibly bring the wayward department back into the fold:

  1. Smile. I have to remind myself of this All. The. Time. 
  2. Help. Condemning the action will not be effective. 
  3. Integrate. If something is done already work with them. 
  4. Congratulate. Everyone likes a pat on the back. 

Finding out about a operational Shadow GIS after the fact or during the setup can take a toll on your pride. Don't automatically assume it is because of you. There may be bad history or bad blood between higher-ups. You as a professional should act like one. Always give a pathway back to your Enterprise GIS. Never-ever hope for failure.

Good Luck! 

If you have questions, Drop US a line.  Name * Name First Name Last Name Email Address * Shadow IT Blog * Message *

Thank you! We'll  get back to you soon

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview