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I’ve just invested research and development time in updating and fusing key components of our workshops and retreats into a new two-day workshop. Periodically we step back and review the latest research, draw from our experience, and enhance our development tools and approaches.

The Leading Edge is a new workshop to help leaders struggling with how to help their teams and organizations boost effectiveness. Many leaders feel they can’t do much to change behaviors and culture. But overwhelming research shows that’s not true. Leaders have a major impact on “the way we do things around here.” A team or organization’s culture ripples out from its members and leaders. The single biggest key to transforming a team or organization’s culture starts with its leaders defining and developing their behaviors.

Teams and department/divisions with exceptionally strong leaders build thriving peak performance local cultures even if the bigger culture they’re part of, and leader they report to, are weak. Organizational culture exists simultaneously and independently at three levels: the unit/team, department/division, and entire organization, and those micro or main cultures can be enriched at any level.

Nine elements especially stand out from this latest review of best leadership and team/culture development practices:

  1. Lead, Follow, or Wallow – highly effective leaders make critical choices to proactively change, grow, and develop rather than being changed
  2. Strong Leadership Cuts Through the Management Maze – team/organization performance is dramatically improved when good managers learn how to become great leaders
  3. Yield of Dreams – highly effective leaders tap into this infinite and renewable energy source
  4. The Heart Part – courageous conversations, two-way communications, and openness, come from, and expand, trust
  5. Coach Diem – outstanding leaders seize key coaching moments to up everyone’s game
  6. Making Teams Work – too often managers build a “scream team.” Extraordinary leaders build dream teams by boosting collaboration, cooperation, and coordination
  7. Three Core Questions Defining Your Team or Organization’s Culture – too many vision/mission/values statements are lifeless gibberish and generate a high “snicker factor”
  8. Hitting the Shift Key – the best leaders and teams act on their understanding that their culture ripples out from what they do, not what they say
  9. Setting the Culture Compass – failing to map a route through the many swamps and sinkholes of team and culture change are why 70% of these efforts die out

Rate yourself on this checklist. How’s your leadership? How’s your leadership team?

You can get more information on our newest public workshop at The Leading Edge: Boosting Team and Organization Culture. Join me here in the center of the universe (which is, of course, Waterloo Region) in April and we’ll help you (and your team) sharpen your leading edge.

The post Nine Essentials to Honing Your Leading Edge and Boosting Team/Culture Performance appeared first on The Clemmer Group.

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The leading edge of an airplane wing is critical to slicing through the air and directing airflow around the wing to create lift.

Leaders form the leading edge of their teams or organizations. He or she shapes everyone’s energy and behaviors. Highly effective leaders and outstanding leadership teams create powerful lift. Their teams and organizations soar.

Less effective leaders and weaker leadership teams form misshaped or dull leading edges creating a drag that reduces lift. Their teams/organizations may get off the ground, but they sputter and sometimes stall.

The most dangerous — often deadly — leaders and leadership teams slice and slash their teams and organizations. Mostly with good intentions and little desire to hurt anyone, these leaders and leadership teams are usually ignorant of the bleeding edges they’ve created and the damage they’re doing.

On the Bleeding Edge

On the Leading Edge

Pushing and Punishing Engaging and Enabling
Rules, Policies, and “Snoopervision” Trust, Openness, and Modeling Core Values
Performance Management: Rank, Spank, and Yank Collaborative Coaching and Constructive Feedback
Search for the Guilty and Who Went Wrong –
“Blamestorming”
Search for Root Causes and What Went Wrong – Fostering Teamwork
Partial and Piecemeal Change Programs Integrated and Aligned Processes and Development Systems
Fixated on Fixing Weaknesses Building and Leveraging Strengths
“Motivating” and Manipulating Behavior Inspiring and Energizing Extra Effort
Overloaded, Overwhelmed, and Crazy Busy Strategic Focus on Leveraging Time

Are you and your team on the bleeding or leading edge? How do you know? According to whom?

Tomorrow we publish my January blogs in the February edition of The Leader Letter.  In this issue you’ll find links to our time assessment quiz and results from others who have used this reflective tool to look at whether they’re soaring, sinking, or slicing their teams/organizations.

Competency models can be a leading edge that lift leadership development efforts. Or not. A badly designed and poorly used competency model can be a bleeding edge that cuts confidence and performance. Watch Joe Folkman’s archived webinar to learn about the five factors that make or break this developmental tool.

And this could be your lucky issue. Learn about Richard Wiseman’s insightful research on how we can develop a lucky edge.

I hope my blogs are giving you insights and edges to lift your development efforts to greater heights.

The post How Leaders Cause Their Teams/Organizations to Sink or Soar appeared first on The Clemmer Group.

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Is your team/organization overloaded with many priorities and conflicting activities? Does your team/organization load new projects and goals on top of existing workloads without rigorous “stop doing” pruning to make room for them?

These are the two biggest problems emerging over the last few months of work with our Strategic Use of Time Assessment. The survey asks 14 questions covering 7 deadly time traps. Hundreds of leaders have taken the survey online (click here to access it) or in CEO Forums where I’ve facilitated discussions on Leveraging Leadership Time.

After tallying scores for all questions, the average total has participants in the category of “Time is Slipping Away – you’re getting sucked into daily busyness and not investing your time strategically.”

In today’s highly reactive and crazy busy world it’s way too easy to allow the daily deluge coming at us — e-mails, meetings, problems, or phone calls — to control our time. This sucks us into playing trivial pursuit. That sets up a stress spiral; we’re not using our time strategically so we have more fires to fight which means we have less focus on leveraging our time which means we have even more fires to fight and we’re even less strategic….. So our days spin ever more wildly as we chase our tail in faster and faster circles.

Does your team regularly take time away from daily operations to reflect and refocus? Does your team periodically ask what we should keep doing, stop doing, and start doing/do more to increase our effectiveness?

These two questions are from the second biggest problem identified in our time assessment. They describe the time trap of working “in” versus “on” the team. As our organizations spin ever more quickly, many teams allow their priorities to be badly distorted. Things that matter most — team dynamics, touchy moose-on-the-table issues, key priorities — are often crowded out by things that matter least — crisis du jour or technical problems better solved by those closest to the action — and the team spins round and round.

Our time assessment and discussions are part of a new two-day workshop I am designing. The Leading Edge: Transforming Team and Culture Performance session draws from and condenses thousands of keynotes, workshops, and retreats we’ve delivered across a wide range of industries and organizations. Google leadership and culture or search Amazon for books on these topics and you’ll be overwhelmed by theories, “secrets,” 7, 10, or 12 steps, personal experiences, fables, and such. But the big question is what works — based on evidence and practicality. This two-day workshop is designed to update, consolidate, and translate proven principals into action. And it’s right here in the center of the universe; my hometown of Kitchener, Ontario! Click here for more details.

Is it time for you and your team to take back your time?

The post Are You and Your Team on the Bleeding or Leading Edge? appeared first on The Clemmer Group.

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Competency models can provide a central framework for defining the skills and behaviors essential to an organization’s success. A well-built competency model provides a strong support structure for leadership development, talent, and performance management. A robust competency model outlines the behaviors needed to create the organization’s desired culture.

But how effective is your competency model? Does it clearly and effectively identify the skills and behaviors that enable everyone at all levels to be more effective? Many don’t. Less effective competency models fall into these traps:

  • Complexity – different competencies for different levels and different behaviors for the same competency too often confuse and confound.
  • Unconnected to results – many nice-to-do competencies don’t reliably predict outcomes like engagement, turnover, profitability, sales, safety, and other key outcomes.
  • Vague targets – an effective competency model helps everyone find their development sweet spot at the intersection of his or her passion, organizational need, and competence.
  • “Smooshing” – to simplify their models, some organizations are combining several competencies (sometimes positive and negative) to form one competency.
  • Missing competencies – some models focus on interpersonal or leadership behaviors and missing critical skills like getting results, technical expertise, or problem solving.
  • Improving everything – 3 to 5 relevant, results-oriented competencies can be leveraged to boost performance to the 90th percentile.

These are some of the common pitfalls and traps of competency models that Joe Folkman will address in his 45 minute (no charge) webinar 5 Factors in Effective Competency Models on January 31 at 11 am PT, 12 pm MT, 1 pm CT, and 2 pm ET.

Joe is a leading expert in psychometrics or measuring psychological factors with nine books he’s authored or co-authored. He’s spent over 30 years working with AT&T, General Motors, General Mills, Wells Fargo, Yale University, and many other global leaders on competencies and leadership development. And he’s a really nice guy!

Join Joe’s webinar to learn from his extensive research and experience with competency models distilled into 5 key factors.

Click here to register.

The post Webinar: 5 Factors in Effective Competency Models appeared first on The Clemmer Group.

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Luckily, I caught Richard Wiseman in a radio interview late one night on my way home from the airport. When I got home, I immediately looked him up on the Internet and ordered his book. Wiseman is Professor of the Public Understanding of Psychology at the University of Hertfordshire in the United Kingdom. He’s been extensively studying luck over a number of years by interviewing and running experiments with very lucky people who seem to lead charmed lives and very unlucky people who seem to have their own black cloud following them around.

His findings are further proof that we make choices to wallow in and create our own bad luck, or lead ourselves toward attracting “lucky” breaks in our lives.

In his book The Luck Factor: Change Your Luck and Change Your Life, Wiseman outlines four principles he has found define lucky people. Through his “luck school,” he’s retrained up to 80 percent of the unlucky to reverse their fortunes and attract good luck. His four principles involve key elements of leading:

  • engage others in conversations and social interaction;
  • listen to your intuition and trust hunches;
  • develop positive expectations about the future; and
  • strengthen resilience and persistence to eventually turn bad luck into good.

These few excerpts of his luck research further illustrate the magnetic power of the energy force fields we choose in framing, explaining, and acting on the good and bad events in our lives:

  • “My research revealed that the special kind of expectations held by lucky and unlucky people had a huge impact on their lives. The unique way that lucky people thought about their future was responsible for them being more effective than most when it came to achieving their dreams and ambitions. Likewise, the unlucky expectations held by unlucky people resulted in them being especially ineffectual at getting what they wanted from life.”
  • “Lucky people see any bad luck in their lives as being very short lived. They simply shrug it off and don’t let it affect their expectations about the future. Unlucky people are convinced that any good luck in their lives will only last for a short period of time, and will quickly be followed by their regular dose of bad luck.”
  • “Luck was not a magical ability or a gift from the gods. Instead, it was a state of mind: a way of thinking and behaving. People are not born lucky or unlucky, but create much of their own good and bad luck through their thoughts, feelings and actions.”
     

A funny thing about luck: the harder we work the more we seem to have of it.

The post Just my Luck: Choice More Than Chance Determines Our Circumstance appeared first on The Clemmer Group.

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A few years ago, I ran into an old colleague I hadn’t seen for a while. Our short conversation confirmed just why I hadn’t seen him in a while. I greeted him with, “Hey Phil. How’s it going?” His response was, “Oh, you know; same crap, different day.” He then proceeded to proudly pile up the most recent crap in his life and invited me to wallow in it with him.

Our world does have lots of crap. There’s plenty of injustice, inequality, and unfairness. The crap that hits the fan in life is often not evenly distributed. But we can decide whether to stand in it or not. We decide if we want today to be crappy or happy. If we walk around with our “crap glasses” on, we’ll see lots of it. The more crap we look for, the more crap we see. The more crap we see, the more we look for. Author, speaker, and psychologist, Peter Jensen calls this “opticalrectumitis,” which he loosely translates as “having a shi…(crappy) outlook on life.”

The American Heritage Dictionary provides these definitions of the glasses we can choose to wear:

Pessimism

  1. A tendency to stress the negative or unfavorable or to take the gloomiest possible view.
  2. The doctrine or belief that this is the worst of all possible worlds and that all things ultimately tend toward evil.
  3. The doctrine or belief that the evil in the world outweighs the good.

Optimism

  1. A tendency to expect the best possible outcome or dwell on the most hopeful aspects of a situation.
  2. The doctrine that this world is the best of all possible worlds.
  3. The belief that the universe is improving and that good will ultimately triumph over evil.

Scientist, journalist, and author, Matt Ridley’s book, The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves lays out a powerful argument in nearly 500 pages of meticulous research for how much better our world has become — and how the good is speeding up.  He writes, “I am a rational optimist: rational, because I have arrived at optimism not through temperament or instinct, but by looking at the evidence… the world is as good a place to live as it has ever been for the average human being.”

19th Century historian and politician, Thomas Babington Macauley, once asked “On what principle is it, that when we see nothing but improvement behind us, we are to expect nothing but deterioration before us?” We’re surrounded by prophets of doom spreading the pessimism plague. It’s a deadly disease that’s now well proven to reduce our happiness and well-being.

Ridley’s research led him to conclude, “For 200 years pessimists have had all the headlines, even though optimists have far more often been right. Archpessimists are feted, showered with honors and rarely challenged, let alone confronted with their past mistakes…. if you say catastrophe is imminent, you may expect a McArthur genius award or even the Nobel Peace Prize.”

Charities don’t raise money and journalists don’t get their stories on the front page by focusing on what’s going well. Good news is no news. Which is why “the media go to great lengths to search even the most cheerful of statistics for glimmers of doom.”

Tomorrow we publish my December blogs in the January issue of The Leader Letter. To help you get real and kick off your new year on notes of optimism and positivity, face the positive facts in this issue countering the endless stream of negative “news.” You’ll also find year end reflections to begin your new year. This is a good beginning point for looking at the strategic use of time for you and your leadership team. And you may find a few seasonal lessons from Scrooge with help in reflecting and planning how to make the best use of the year ahead.

The post Facing Reality: Are you a Rational Optimist or Unrealistic Pessimist? appeared first on The Clemmer Group.

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Our world has never been in better shape or more prosperous. But you’d never know it by reading the news.

“A lot of people look at the news these days and think that the world is falling apart,”. Bill Gates says: “I have a different view. I think the world has never been better — more peaceful, prosperous, safe, or just. And I’m on a mission to prove it.” He goes on to explain, “Headlines, in a way, are what mislead you, because bad news is a headline, and gradual improvement is not.” Now there’s fake news.

Our New Year’s blog on how the world is getting radically better has become our most inspiring and favorite to research and produce. This tradition started four years ago with “A Dose of Reality: Our World is Dramatically Better. The following year we reported “Despite Dire Headlines the World is Getting Much, Much Better. Last year we added to our long and growing list of positive facts with “Beyond the Doom and Gloom: Over 65 Ways Our World Keeps Getting Better.

Here’s just some of the latest evidence to add to what’s now almost 100 facts showing that our world is relentlessly and exponentially getting better and better and better:

How’s your glass? Is it half full or half empty? We can focus on what we have and enjoy it. Or we can focus on what we don’t have and be miserable.

Resolve to face the facts this year. Life is very good and rapidly getting even better.

Click for More Positive Facts:

The post Don’t Get Dragged Down by all the Negative News: Life’s Better Than Ever appeared first on The Clemmer Group.

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The comedian Phyllis Diller once joked, “What I don’t like about office Christmas parties is looking for a job the next day.” Hopefully, you’re not in that situation during the Holidays!

This is a great time of year to step back to see if we’re caught in the speed trap. As the pace of life keeps accelerating, it’s way too easy to race faster without zooming out on Google Maps to see where our little blinking blue dot is headed. Are we on the right road?

The Irish poet, William Butler Yeats, wrote, “We can make our minds so like still water that beings gather about us, that they may see their own images, and so live for a moment with a clearer, perhaps even with a fiercer life because of our quiet.” Numerous studies show that the most effective leaders and organizations pause periodically to look at the direction they’re heading. Like an artist painting on a canvas, we need to stand back to get perspective. Are the individual brush strokes coming together to paint the picture we’ve been envisioning?

There are many Holiday movies to remind us of life’s bigger picture and purpose. In “Have a Purposeful Holiday for a Wonderful Life“, I wrote that one of my favorite holiday movies (and one of the highest rated at Internet Movie Database with a rare 8.6/10 by over 300,000 people) is “It’s a Wonderful Life” (if you’re not familiar with the movie, click here to watch a trailer). The main storyline of the movie is George Bailey’s agonizing journey toward realizing he’s living his life purpose. “Have a Purposeful Holiday for a Wonderful Life” includes links to resources on finding our personal purpose.

Purpose and meaning are vital elements to creating our own wonderful life. There’s a major shift in business schools, organizations, and society toward balancing purpose and profit. “Profit is a Means Not an End“, discusses this and the “good company” research showing how business success has shifted in our “worthiness era.”

Reflecting back helps us to better look forward. “Thoughts That Make You Go Hmmm on…A New Year” provides pithy insights to help you. Such as avoiding the trap; “a New Year’s resolution is something that goes in one year and out the other.”

Happy New Year!

The post Year End Reflections: Looking Back to Better Move Ahead appeared first on The Clemmer Group.

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One of my cherished holiday traditions is watching various movie versions of Charles Dickens’ much-loved classic, A Christmas Carol. Once our grandkids become old enough (a major highlight of this year was all three of our kids each had a baby), I’ll be able to watch my favorite version, The Muppet Christmas Carol, with them.

So, I was especially delighted to discover and read Les Standiford’s book, The Man Who Invented Christmas, when a new movie by that title was just released this month. I thoroughly enjoyed learning about the difficulties Dickens had in publishing what he called “his Ghostly little book” to “haunt their homes pleasantly.”

Having had similar difficulties with established publishers, I could understand why Dickens decided to self-publish A Christmas Carol in December of 1843. The book got his career and finances back on track, while reinvigorating and popularizing Christmas traditions first in Victorian England and then North America.

There are many life and leadership lessons we can draw from Scrooge the “…squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous, old sinner” as he goes from “Bah, Humbug” through a series of “aha” experiences. Here are my top five:

1. Reflection and Renewal
If we don’t step back periodically to review the path we’re on we could be rudely awakened. While it’s highly unlikely ghosts will haunt us in the night, many problems that keep us awake could have been avoided. The greatest danger today is we’re so swamped by daily trivialities — e-mails, phone calls, meetings, firefighting — that we lose sight of longer term personal issues like our health, relationships, finances, or well-being.

When crazy busy managers don’t invest in skill development, team building, or culture change, scary bad times lurk in the shadows and things will eventually go bump in the night.

2. Leadership is Habit Forming
The ghost of Marley, Scrooge’s old business partner, shows up wearing a long chain. He explains, “I wear the chain I forged in life… I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it.” The habits of highly effective leaders skillfully forge chains that pull their teams and organization’s forward. Less effective managers shackle themselves and others.

3. Profit is a Means Not an End
Scrooge is notorious for his relentless pursuit of profit. The main lesson of the tale is when Scrooge awakens to his naked greed and learns to use his wealth to help others. While some might quibble with Dickens’ moralizing, positive psychology research shows that pursuing “the good life” and its materialism — along with the mounds of debt it often brings — is a root cause of our soaring depression and suicide levels.

That same research shows those who are most fulfilled and flourishing often transcend materialism toward a deeper sense of purpose and connectedness. But a business that doesn’t generate profit won’t be around long to do much good. We need both profitable purpose and purposeful profit.

4. Boost Engagement with Caring and Results
After Scrooge has his life-changing Christmas Eve experience, he enthusiastically sets out on a new pathway to personal growth on Christmas Day. When he gets back to work what would you suggest he do to increase his clerk, Bob Cratchit’s, workplace engagement?

In his entertaining and insightful Forbes column, Lead Like Scrooge: The Surprising Research Results, Joe Folkman draws from his leadership assessment research to show that just increasing concern and consideration for Bob won’t work. “Nice” leaders who create warm and fuzzy workplaces and feel-good teams that don’t deliver results create mediocre engagement levels. The best and most engaging leaders also bring out extra effort with high standards and stretch us to higher achievement levels.

5. Leverage the Power of Appreciation and Celebration
The Ghost of Christmas Past takes Scrooge back to his first job working for Old Fezziwig. They see everyone enjoying a raucous workplace Christmas party with music, dancing, food, and beer. As the ghostly visitors watch the merriment the Ghost points out how just a little bit of money was spent on this celebration, “A small matter, to make these silly folks so full of gratitude.”

“‘It isn’t that,’ said Scrooge, ‘he has the power to render us happy or unhappy; to make our service light or burdensome; a pleasure or a toil. Say that his power lies in words and looks; in things so slight and insignificant that it is impossible to add and count ’em up: what then? The happiness he gives, is quite as great as if it cost a fortune.'”

Which lessons ring true for you as you prepare to ring in the New Year?

Standiford observes, “Millions of ordinary people continue to experience Scrooge’s impossible transformation in one form or another. Some of them will learn of the story of the industrialist who heard Dickens deliver one of his public readings and ran out of the hall on the spot to purchase turkeys for all his employees for Christmas. Odd, a few might think, I got a turkey from my boss just today.”

Happy Holidays!

The post From Bah! to Aha! Five Leadership Lessons from Ebenezer Scrooge appeared first on The Clemmer Group.

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Imagine a large jar filled to the brim with golf balls. Is it full? What if marbles were slowly poured in as the jar was shaken until no more could be added? Now is it full? How about sand being trickled into the jar as it’s vigorously jiggled? When the sand reaches the brim is the jar finally as full as it could possibly be?

Now dump all that out and start over with first adding the sand, then the marbles, and finally trying to stuff in all the remaining golf balls. You won’t get every one in.

If we start with the big things — our top or strategic priorities — and then fit our daily tasks around them, we’ll make much greater progress on what really matters. This is much more effective than allowing the sands of minutiae to fill in enough of our limited time that we can’t fit in our most important work.

We all start with exactly the same amount of time. Why is it that the best leaders and top teams get so much more done than their counterparts? Poor leaders are often the ones complaining loudest about their lack of time. The title of a study of 500 leaders in Harvard Business Review warned, “Beware the Busy Manager.”

Highly effective leaders and teams use their time much more effectively. They’re more strategic with this vital resource that — unlike money — can’t be borrowed or banked for future use. When we spend a day we lose a day.

Time is running out. Another year is winding down. As Father Time gets ready to turn things over to his fresh, young replacement, it’s a great time to take stock with a look back and prepare for the New Year by setting our priorities — choosing the big balls we want to ensure we’ve put first into our limited space.

We have an assessment to help you and/or your team. Our quiz on Strategic Use of Time Assessment is built around what we’ve found to be the 7 deadliest time traps for leaders:

  1. Highly Reactive and Crazy Busy
  2. The Acceleration Trap
  3. Low Culture/Capacity Development
  4. Poor Monkey Management
  5. No Time for Coaching Skill Development
  6. Working in Versus on Your Team
  7. Falling Down the Meeting Sinkhole

You can use our Strategic Use of Time Assessment to look at your personal use of time. It’s evolved from our leadership team retreats and workshops to help leadership teams assess their strategic use of time. So, if you’d like to have your leadership teams complete the assessment and tally up the responses, let us know and we can arrange this complimentary time check for you. You can review the results as a team to discuss how you can better leverage your time to ensure your key priorities all fit into the time you have available next year. We’ll send you a list of resources to help you deal with any time traps you and/or your team may have fallen into.

So was that imaginary jar completely full after adding first the golf balls, then the marbles, and finally the sand? Not quite. You could pour a beer or two over everything and fill the jar to the very top.

This proves that no matter how busy you are, you can always find time for a beer.

Cheers!

The post It’s That Time of Year: How Strategic is Your Use of Time? appeared first on The Clemmer Group.

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