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The stark report of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in Incheon, South Korea last week highlights the need for a new UK Environment Act to give legislative backing to coordinate all Government strategies alongside changes in the way we all act.

The highly anticipated IPCC report released on Monday 8th October shows that tough global rules and regulations are needed, alongside changes to the habitual ways in which we eat, heat and meet as individuals.

As the UK prepares to leave the EU, the Society is focussed on ensuring that the UK’s environmental protections do not diminish, but are instead, enhanced. The need for a new Environment Act to give legislative backing to relevant elements included within the EU Withdrawal Act and the overall outcomes of the 25 Year Environment Plan (25 YEP), alongside the creation of a new governance body outside of the EU, is evident. We should also use the IPCC report as a stark reminder of the challenges we face in the UK, and globally. This requires harmony in delivery between the 25 YEP and other government policies, such as the Industrial, Clean Growth, Road to Zero and Transport Strategies.

By the midpoint of the dates considered by the IPCC to be the current estimated time frame for the critical global 1.5°C temperature increase (2030 – 2052), we will be approaching the end of the 25 YEP. We will have almost completed the move away from avoidable plastics, we should all be on the verge of driving very low emission vehicles and we will be making widespread use of electricity generated from energy sources with low carbon emissions, particularly those that are renewable.
By adhering to the 25 YEP, and implementing the plans set out by the forthcoming Environment Act, the UK will be heading in the right direction to avoid the 1.5°C rise so feared by the IPCC. The Society believes that the Environment Act will be key to the success of the 25 YEP. For this reason, the Society is supporting the efforts of the Broadway Initiative, which is developing ideas and proposals for how to make the ambition for enhancing the environment a reality over the longer term. Broadway members include senior representatives of organisations from business, NGOs, professional bodies, and policy thinktanks and nationally recognised environmental, legal, regulatory and governance experts.

The Society also expects that despite the massive challenge for us all, the green economy, which will deliver these outcomes, will increasingly provide business opportunities and jobs. It is therefore vital that these themes are backdrops to Green GB Week starting on the 15th October 2018 and that there will be ‘joined up’ government to meet the challenges and deliver the benefits.

Dr Emma Wilcox, Chief Executive of the Society, said that “In meeting the challenges set out by the IPCC report and delivering on the opportunities, contributions from skilled and committed professionals with proven competence is critical. Chartered Environmentalists and Registered Environmental Technicians will meet their responsibilities and lead the way in business, education, policy, science and beyond.”

For more information on the Broadway Initiative, visit www.iema.net/broadway 

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Work of Common Ground celebrated at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park

The Nick Reeves Award for Arts and the Environment is awarded annually by CIWEM’s Arts and Environment Network, in association with the Centre for Contemporary Art and the Natural World (CCANW), in recognition of an outstanding contribution in the field of environmental arts.

The Award celebrates an artwork, project or field of activity by an artist (or group) that has contributed innovatively to CIWEM’s vision of “putting creativity at the heart of environmental policy and action”. This high-profile award recognises excellence in work by arts practitioners, or environmentalists engaging with arts practices, whether well-established or newly emerging, in the UK or elsewhere in the world.

The 2018 Award has been given to Common Ground, a long-established UK charity based in Dorset. It is an innovative grassroots organisation that collaborates openly to reconnect people with nature and inspires communities to become responsible for their local environment.

A landmark retrospective exhibition of the organisation’s work was shown this year at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Founded in 1983 by Sue Clifford, Angela King and Roger Deakin, Common Ground features ‘local distinctiveness’ at the heart of its initiatives with artists and communities, through campaigns such as Apple Day, Parish Maps, New Milestones, and Trees, Woods and the Green Man.

Special commendations in the 2018 Award round were also given to the exhibition “Ecovention Europe: Art to Transform Ecologies 1957-2017”, guest curated by Sue Spaid at the Museum Het Domein in Sittard, The Netherlands; and to The Branch, an ecological art lab and pocket farm in Osaka, Japan, designed and built by Patrick Lydon and Suhee Kang.

Gracie Burnett, Artistic Director of Common Ground said:

“Common Ground are beyond thrilled to have been awarded the annual Nick Reeves Award for Arts and the Environment, recognising the vital and important work Common Ground has done over many years”.

Dave Pritchard, Chair of the Arts & Environment Network said:

“Common Ground have shown remarkable persistence and dedication over decades to a highly distinctive championing of subtle but profound aspects of intangible cultural heritage about place and human interaction with the natural environment. Their clever and versatile weaving of art through this mission has elevated it beyond campaigning, or celebrating, or publishing, to be instead a creative voice for shared feelings amongst communities and society at large”.

Clive Adams, Director of CCANW said:

“I’m delighted that this year’s Award goes to Common Ground – it is richly deserved. I first met Angela and Sue in the mid-Eighties when, along with the Artangel Trust, they had commissioned a young Andy Goldsworthy to create some of his first ice and snow works on Hampstead Heath. A little later, during their New Milestones Project in Dorset, they inspired a new generation of other sculptors to create more lasting work in the landscape which expressed our sense of history, our love of place and the natural world”.

The 2019 Award will open for entries in Spring 2019. Stay tuned for updates at www.ciwem.org/awards

ENDS

For press and communications enquiries, please contact Sarah Farache, Press and Communications Officer on 020 7269 5820, E:  sarah.farache@ciwem.org.

Notes to Editors

  1. CIWEM, The Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management, is the leading independent Chartered professional body for water and environment professionals, promoting excellence within the sector. www.ciwem.org
  1. CCANW, Centre for Contemporary Art and the Natural World, is an educational charity which uses the arts to create a new understanding of our special responsibilities within nature. In recent times it has been working internationally and across disciplines. www.ccanw.co.uk
  1. Common Ground was founded in 1983 by Sue Clifford, Angela King and the writer Roger Deakin. It seeks imaginative ways of engaging people with their local environment. www.commonground.org.uk 
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EqualEngineers is launching its first survey investigating masculinity in engineering in time for World Mental Health Day (10 October 2018), a first-of-its-kind for the sector. The survey will be open for 5 weeks, closing on 16 November 2018.

Engineering and technology in the UK is a predominately male profession, with men comprising over 89% of the workforce. Many diversity efforts pivot on getting more women into engineering.

This survey will explore if the culture of engineering is affected by the stereotype of what an engineer looks like, and how men are expected to behave. Do men feel included or excluded in the push to increase diversity? Could a more diverse profession benefit both women and men?

Suicide is the biggest killer of men under 50, with male construction workers 3.7 times more likely to take their own life. Are men able to be open about their mental health challenges, or is the stigmatisation too great? Does this manifest itself as a macho culture in the workplace or on-site which prevents an inclusive culture?

This survey would like to know your views and opinions – the real ones, not the ones that you feel that you should express. We expect respondents to give us their real answers, not just the “right” answers.

The survey is the brainchild of Dr Mark McBride-Wright, Managing Director of EqualEngineers, who set the company up after years of working in the sector and seeing not only the challenges that the lack of diversity can bring, but also the risks posed to health, safety and wellbeing. Being a gay safety engineer himself, and setting up networking group InterEngineering for LGBT+ engineers gave him the drive to set up an organisation covering all aspects of diversity.

Mark says:

“For me, inclusivity in the workplace is a health and safety issue. Not being able to be open about who you are, because of attitudes and lack of diversity around you can lead to mental health issues and decreased wellbeing. In construction, for example, an industry where suicide rates among men are more than three times the national average, more needs to be done to ensure that commitment to these issues goes much further than token inclusion policies.

My hopes for this survey is to capture the voice of men in the engineering and tech industries, individuals who perhaps feel excluded from the focus on diversity and inclusion efforts of organisations. We need to rapidly overhaul the way in which we approach culture change programmes within our industry, and we need to ensure everyone feels included, and is able to find their voice as part of the diversity narrative.”

Ian Childs, Executive Manager, Morson International says:

“As the UK’s No.1 Technical Recruiter, Morson engages with a huge engineering community. Our business has taken great strides to improve the diversity of our contractor population, doubling the number of female engineers we employ. Now it’s time to look deeper and assess how these cultural changes affect the workforce as a whole. The stigma around mental health keeps too many people silent. Safety is paramount in many of the sectors that we operate in and whilst employers take great strides in protecting their people from physical harm, the same effort is now needed to address mental ill health. We are pleased to be supporting EqualEngineers in this study.”

Initial results from the EqualEngineers Masculinity in Engineering Survey will be reported on International Men’s Day on 19th November.

For more information, visit http://bit.ly/EEMasculinitySurvey.

To take survey directly, visit https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/EqEngMasculinitySurvey.

–          Ends –

Interviews with Mark and exclusive thought pieces available for publication – contact Mark onmark@equalengineers.com or 07877089036.

Notes to Editors

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The Journal of Flood Risk Management Outstand Paper Award recognises a valuable contribution to flood risk management using well-structured research and strong, well-argued conclusions.

Smith, Q. Liang, P. James, and W. Lin have won the prestigious 2017 Outstanding Paper Award for their paper on “Assessing the utility of social media as a data source for flood risk management using a real‐time modelling framework”.

The paper uses social media-based research to identify areas which are likely to have been affected by flooding. It takes a modern approach to research and shows the effectiveness of using sites such as twitter to help with science and research. The framework was tested with information generated from analysing Twitter posts made during two floods in Newcastle upon Tyne in the summer of 2012.

It addresses an important and current research gap, extracting and using information from real-time public posting on social media to model urban flooding and facilitate better management and mitigation of flood risks.

Three papers were also highly commended for their valuable and innovative research towards flood risk management. These were:

  • Diakakis, M. and Deligiannakis, G. (2017), Flood fatalities in Greece: 1970–2010.
  • Scorzini, A. and Frank, E. (2017), Flood damage curves: new insights from Italy.
  • Surminski, S. and Eldridge, J. (2017), Flood insurance in England – an assessment of the current and newly proposed insurance scheme in the context of rising flood risk.

Dr Paul Samuels, Editor in Chief of the journal said “The winning and highly commended papers can be used as examples for other authors; they all cover important aspects of flood risk management within the scope of the journal, and are well structured and written, with appropriate summaries and well-argued conclusions”.

These papers are free to view on the Journal website here.

ENDS

For any press and communications enquiries, please contact Sarah Farache, Press and Communications Officer on 020 7269 5820, E:  sarah.farache@ciwem.org.

Notes to Editors

  1. Journal of Flood Risk Managementprovides an international platform for knowledge sharing in all areas related to flood risk. Its explicit aim is to disseminate ideas across the range of disciplines where flood related research is carried out and it provides content ranging from leading edge academic papers to applied content with the practitioner in mind. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/1753318x
  2. CIWEM, The Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management, is the leading independent Chartered professional body for water and environment professionals, promoting excellence within the sector. ciwem.org
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Photo by David Vig on Unsplash

The Mayor is inviting Londoners, schools and local community groups to apply for 49,000 free trees as part of a mass planting of 75,000 trees over one weekend later this year. The event is being organised by the Mayor of London as part of his plan to help make the capital become a National Park City.

Sadiq has partnered with the Woodland Trust, which will provide 24,000 trees free of charge for Londoners to plant in their gardens, with a further 25,000 trees being offered to community groups and schools across the capital, in partnership with community charity The Conservation Volunteers.

The trees being given away include field maple, birch, hazel and hawthorn saplings, all attractive garden species that are great for wildlife and easy to plant and will be planted over the weekend of Saturday 1 and Sunday 2 December to help mark National Tree Week.

London’s trees help improve air quality by removing 2,241* tonnes of pollution from the air every year, and save an estimated £126M in costs to society associated with pollution. They remove the equivalent of 13 per cent of PM10 particulates and 14 percent of NO2 emitted by road transport, as well as storing carbon and creating habitat for wildlife.

The Mayor is working with partners across London to make the capital a National Park City and as part of this he is committed to maintaining and expanding the capital’s impressive ‘urban forest’ of eight million trees.

Today London’s Deputy Mayor for Environment and Energy, Shirley Rodrigues, visited the Loughborough Estate in Lambeth, the Woodland Trust to help plant trees in the estate’s new community orchard. The project is run by the estate’s management board and is bringing residents together to plant 32 trees on green spaces around the estate, part funded by the Mayor of London’s Community Tree Planting Grants.

The Deputy Mayor for Environment and Energy, Shirley Rodrigues said: “The Mayor is determined to make London one of the greenest cities on the planet and Londoners have the chance to roll up their sleeves and help make this happen by applying for nearly 50,000 free trees. Whether it’s in gardens, parks or greening our housing estates, one of the best things we can all do to help make our city greener and healthier is to plant a tree, and I hope as many people as possible will take part in London’s biggest ever tree planting National Park City weekend.”

The 24,000 free trees for Londoners to plant at home are being delivered in partnership with the Woodland Trust and the Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy, who are supported by Sainsbury’s. The Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy is an international forest conservation initiative that marks the Queen’s lifetime of service to the Commonwealth and unites the 53 member states in saving and protecting the Earth’s forests.

Woodland Trust Chair, Baroness Young, said “We are delighted to be working with the Mayor of London to offer Londoners the opportunity to strengthen the Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy. Trees are at the heart of our community. They add character to our streets, and provide a host of benefits for people, wildlife and our urban environment. Urban trees are important for us socially and culturally, they greatly enhance the places where we live and work, raise families, socialise and relax, and from which we draw identity and pride.

“Their stature and beauty make them the defining elements of urban spaces. They cast shade in the heat of summer, provide shelter from the rain and wind, help to keep the air clean and breathable, support wildlife, and add value to the culture and economy of our towns and cities. “

Demand for trees is expected to be high so Londoners wanting a tree pack (of two trees to plant at home) have from now until the 5 November to apply, whilst community groups and schools with the space to plant at least 50 trees have until 22 November.

There are plenty of ways for Londoners to get involved in the Mayor’s tree planting including:

 

  • Apply by 5 November at www.london.gov.uk/plant-a-tree for free tree packs to plant in gardens. Tree packs will be delivered to successful applicants’ homes by the end of November.

 

  • Organise tree planting events in local communities, by applying for a free pack of 50 trees to brighten up local green spaces and playgrounds. Community groups can apply for up to 50 free trees for their events by going to london.gov.uk/community-trees

 

  • There will also be online advice on tree planting including how to plant a tree, where you can plant it and how to care for it at www.london.gov.uk/trees

 

ENDS

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September saw the Agriculture Bill laid before Parliament, followed shortly by the release of an accompanying policy statement. Combined these set out the Government’s current proposals for the future of food, farming and the environment, which DEFRA ran a consultation on earlier in the year.

Initial reactions to the Bill were mixed, with environmental NGOs reacting positively to the landmark shift from area based payments to payments for environmental delivery, whilst the NFU voiced their disappointment that food production was not adequately covered.

Overall the bill should be welcomed. However, there are uncertainties surrounding funding, productivity support and supply chain transparency to be resolved. Current wording also allows flexibility in the delivery of environmental benefits, this gives the Bill longevity but it also means that delivery will be dependent on interpretation.

Anticipating the potential for Brexit to cause disruption in Parliament, it seems that relying on ministerial interpretation for environmental delivery is not satisfactory. Putting Brexit aside, this Bill looks to set out a strategy for many years in which time there will certainly be ministerial changes.

Section 1- environmental delivery

The Bill’s main achievement from an environmental point of view is, as mentioned, the shift from area-based payments to payments for environmental delivery. Benefits that the Secretary of State can choose to pay for, under the new Environmental Land Management (ELM) scheme, are stated in sections 1 and 2 of the Bill.

“(1) The Secretary of State may give financial assistance for or in connection with any of the following purposes—

(a) managing land or water in a way that protects or improves the environment;

(b) supporting public access to and enjoyment of the countryside, farmland or woodland and better understanding of the environment;

(c) managing land or water in a way that maintains, restores or enhances cultural heritage or natural heritage;

(d) mitigating or adapting to climate change;

(e) preventing, reducing or protecting from environmental hazards;

(f) protecting or improving the health or welfare of livestock;

(g) protecting or improving the health of plants.

(2) The Secretary of State may also give financial assistance for or in connection with the purpose of starting, or improving the productivity of, an agricultural, horticultural or forestry activity.“

This provides a lot of flexibility to cover important water issues under subsections a, d, and e. For example, measures to protect against drought can fit into protecting the environment, adapting to climate change and protecting from environmental hazards. However, this is my interpretation which is not supported by the policy statement and highlights why we need more detail around types of measures that might be supported.

Funding issues

We also need to understand how delivery will be financially supported, including; the basis of valuation, how much public money is likely to be set aside to support the Bill’s ambitions and how public and private funding sources will be combined.

In the past agri-environment schemes have operated on an income forgone model, paying the cost of carrying out the prescribed measures and a small profit element. As we shift to a public money for public goods delivery model we would like to see the payment model move to one which recognises natural capital values.

Although not everybody approves of allocating financial values to assets that are in some cases priceless, we accept the use of comparable values as a pragmatic approach to getting environmental impacts and delivery considered.

Whilst the Bill provides no detail on how values will be determined, the policy statement talks of “valuing environmental benefits appropriately” but doesn’t expand further so this is a clear area where more information is needed.

Another small missing detail is a summary of the funding DEFRA will have to support environmental delivery under the new scheme. The Government has promised the same level of funding will be continued until the end of the Parliament, which at the time of making the announcement was expected to be March 2022. This might seem slightly less likely now than it did then. Even so, funding to 2022 would not see farmers to the start of the new scheme, intended to be “fully up and running” by 2025.

Without any indication of long term funding levels that will be made available to support agriculture it’s hard to assess the Government’s level of ambition for environmental delivery and productivity improvements.

The policy statement did give some certainty on payments during the transition, providing a table of reduction percentages to be made depending on claim size. We are pleased to see that reductions are being made across the board to encourage all farmers to prepare for Brexit, something many other consultation respondents also requested.

The policy statement also provides against another of our consultation response requests, a commitment to look into developing private sector funding through exploring the scope for public-private finance partnerships. The development of private funding is key for the longevity of financial support for the sector given that the Treasury already appears reluctant to commit to funding beyond the end of this parliament.

We have certainty. Or do we?

Having covered flexibility in the potential for environmental delivery, two further areas of flexibility stand out.

  1. The agricultural transition period.

This is seven years starting with 2021. Great, certainty.

But wait, it can be extended. For an unknown period. More than once! As long as the transition period has not already ended.

Neither the Bill or the policy statement give detail on the circumstances in which an extension would be appropriate, so we can’t judge whether this will be used to provide useful flexibility or act as an open invitation for extension requests. However, extension is subject to the affirmative resolution procedure, so would be executed through a statutory instrument approved by both Houses of Parliament which provides accountability.

  1. Support during exceptional market conditions.

In addition to the environmental measures and productivity improvements, clauses 17 and 18 add the ability for the Secretary of State to make a declaration that there are exceptional market conditions and give financial assistance.

S.17(2) describes exceptional market conditions, stating that they will exist where,

“(a) there is a severe disturbance in agricultural markets or a serious threat of a severe disturbance in agricultural markets, and

(b) the disturbance or threatened disturbance has, or is likely to have, a significant adverse effect on agricultural producers in England in terms of the prices achievable for one or more agricultural products.”

Anybody else think that just sounds a bit like Brexit…? Another area where a bit more detail would be helpful.

There are a range of further areas that we need extra detail on too. We welcome productivity support as we need farmers to be profitable to enable them to use sustainable practices that can be more expensive in the short term. It would be good to understand better what productivity support DEFRA has in mind.

We also welcome the ability for the Secretary of State to require supply chains to provide information for the purposes of “promoting transparency or fairness in agri-food supply chains”, “minimising adverse environmental effects of activities connected with agri-food supply chains”, and “minimising waste arising from activities connected with agri-food supply chains”. We’d like more detail on how farmers will be supported in using the information to improve practices and profits whilst minimising impacts on consumers to prevent demand building for cheaper environmentally damaging imports.

The House of Commons EFRA Committee is currently running an inquiry on the Bill and given the uncertainty I’ve outlined briefly here, I have a feeling there will be some interesting evidence sessions.

CIWEM is planning to respond to the inquiry. If you are a member and you would like to discuss to the Bill please contact me at sarah.anderton@ciwem.org.

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The Co-op has announced an end to single-use plastic. It will see around 60 million plastic carrier bags removed in a phased rollout and replaced with an environmentally-friendly alternative. The move is part of a new hard-hitting ethical strategy to be launched later this week by the Co-op, which will tackle plastic pollution as well as food waste, healthy eating, saving energy and trading fairly.

The blue-print sets out how the Co-op will ban single-use own-brand plastic products and reduce its overall use of plastic packaging within five years and stop using hard to recycle materials, like black plastic.

And as part of the commitment, lightweight compostable carrier bags, which can be used to carry shopping home and then be re-used as food waste caddy liners, will be rolled out to almost 1,400 Co-op food stores, initially in towns, cities and villages where the bags are accepted in food waste collections*.

The Co-op’s pledge on plastic will see all its own-brand packaging become easy to recycle by 2023. It has promised to use a minimum of 50% recycled plastic in bottles, pots, trays and punnets by 2021.

All own-brand black and dark plastic packaging, including black ready meal trays, will be eliminated by 2020.

The Co-op’s initiative to ditch single-use plastics will see it increase recyclable packaging and materials. Almost three out of four products that the Co-op makes are now widely recyclable, which accounts for 95% of its products when measured by weight. It has reduced hard to recycle plastics, such as pizza discs, sushi bases and cooked meat packaging but promises to go further. Its reductions in plastic use, combined with its new pledge on carrier bags, is the equivalent to 125 million plastic water bottles** being taken out of production.

Jo Whitfield, Retail Chief Executive, Co-op, said: “The price of food wrapped in plastic has become too much to swallow and, from today, the Co-op will phase out any packaging which cannot be reused.

“The first step to remove single-use plastic, will be to launch compostable carrier bags in our stores. They are a simple but ingenious way to provide an environmentally-friendly alternative to plastic shopping bags.”

She added: “Our ban on single-use plastic is central to our new ethical blue-print. The Co-op was founded on righting wrongs, and we first campaigned to stop food fraud. Now we face huge global challenges and have created a recipe for sustainability to source responsibly, treat people with fairness and produce products which have minimal impact on the planet.

“We can’t do it alone, which is why partnerships are key to our plan.”

The Future of Food report will be unveiled at a supplier conference on Thursday 27 September 2018 and will set out Co-op’s vision to tackle a range of topics including food waste, Fairtrade and energy. It has been developed to meet the UN’s sustainable development goals to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all by 2030.

The Co-op already sources 100% renewable energy for its stores, but will go on to tackle greenhouse emissions through its logistics operations. In addition, Co-op will reduce energy, water and waste in its supply chain.

It will continue to campaign for the rights of workers in its supply chain, having raised the issue of modern slavery, and will raise funds to bring clean water to communities in developing countries.

The plan’s major pledges include:

  • Banning single use plastics by 2023
  • Cutting greenhouse emissions
  • Tackling food waste
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Powerful imagery from the 2018 competition has been released, an effective catalyst for positive change

Winners announced! The captivating and thought-provoking photographs from The Environmental Photographer of the Year provide an insight into how our planet is looking in 2018.

This year, the competition received entries from 89 countries. They provide an insight into the current state of our environment and the livelihoods of people around the world.

These photographs remind us that we all live on the same planet and that the actions we take affect others around us. The emotive response they trigger from spectators makes them a powerful catalyst for positive change. They are also a reminder that there is always hope, and happiness to be found, even during the hardest of times.

The winning images of the 2018 competition are below.

“End Floating” by Saeed Mohammadzadeh, Iran, winner of Environmental Photographer of the Year Prize 2018. The photo shows a ship sitting in salt in the Urmia Lake in Iran. Climate change is intensifying the droughts that speed up evaporation in the region. The lake has also been suffering from illegal wells and a proliferation of dams and irrigation projects causing it to reduce significantly in volume. Noxious, salt-tinged dust storms inflame the eyes, skin, and lungs of residents in surrounding areas.  The drying up of the river, is destroying local habitats, due to the extreme salinity levels of 340 grams per litre, which is over eight times saltier than ocean water.

“Dryness” by Chinmon Biswas, India, winner of Changing Climates Prize. A child is found sitting on dry land where the land is cracked and has scaled due to lack of water. Long dry spells can cause the ground to remain open underground even after they have visibly sealed on the surface.

“And life rises” by Younes Khani Someeh Soflaei, Iran, winner of Built Environment Prize. A woman and her little daughter are standing next to their damaged items recovered from the rubble of their house in Sarpol-e Zahab, following the devastating earthquake that hit the region in 2017 and killed over 600 people. A destroyed Mehr Residential Complex can be seen in the background.

“Bulrush” by Ümmü Kandilcioğlu, Turkey. Winner of the Sustainability in Practice Prize. The photograph shows a worker making straw from the reeds for a living.

“Happiness on a rainy day” by Fardin Oyan, Bangladesh. Winner of the Young Environmental Photographer of the Year. Bangladesh’s children are fond of a rainy day. They love to bath and play in rain. The country is flat and occupied by the huge Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta, and is therefore exposed to floods, especially during monsoon season.

CIWEM’s vision is to build a safer and more sustainable world.

Terry Fuller, CIWEM Chief Executive and judge of the competition said,

“There is a finality about this year’s winning image that I find chilling. The water once used for many purposes has gone and the decaying state of the ship suggests that the water will not return. Why was this ship left stranded? Did the owners not know or believe that the water levels were declining, or did it happen so quickly that they did not have time to adapt?”

The competition is proudly sponsored by Olympus, a global, leading manufacturer of optical and digital precision technology.

Georgina Pavelin, Marketing Manager at Olympus UK, and judge of the competition said,

“I’ve judged many photo competitions and the level of work entered to this competition is fantastic; it was a tough day, not only in selecting winners from some excellent entries but also in such varied and emotional subject matters.”

Five photographs were also highly commended for the important environmental message they portray as well as the high quality of photography.

  • “Boulmigou The Paradise of Forgotten Hearts” by Antonio Aragón Renuncio, Burkina Faso
  • “Not in my forest” by Calvin Ke, Malaysia
  • “Save turtle” by Jing Li, Sri Lanka
  • “Floating life on river under pollution” by Tapan Karmakar, India
  • “Urban life in Singapore” by Thigh Wanna, Singapore

ENDS

For any press enquiries or to receive copies of the photographs, please contact Sarah Farache, Press and Communications Officer on 020 7269 5820, E:  sarah.farache@ciwem.org.

Notes to Editors

  1. CIWEM, The Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management, is the leading independent Chartered professional body for water and environment professionals, promoting excellence within the sector. ciwem.org
  2. Olympus UK, global, leading manufacturer of optical and digital precision technology. olympus.co.uk
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Signing of MOU at World Water Congress in Tokyo

CIWEM and the International Water Association (IWA) sign official collaboration bringing together more than 20,000 members across 139 countries to work together to resolve the greatest challenges that face our world.

Yesterday officially marked the beginning of a collaboration between The Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) and the International Water Association (IWA). The signing took place at the World Water Congress in Tokyo.

The partnership spans across both organisations’ activities and services, including membership, events, publications, training and policy.

It is an exciting global venture which will bring a number of increased benefits to members of both organisations, as well as a growth in the number of international development opportunities. Together they have presence in over 70% of the world’s countries.

One major challenge that the world faces is to ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all, UN Sustainable Development Goal 6. In order to meet this, the world needs more water professionals. This partnership works to contribute to this goal and will enable us to more quickly reach a world in which water is respected and used wisely.

Members of both organisations will be able to work towards CIWEM’s unique Water and Environmental Management Chartership (C.WEM) and professional registrations in engineering, science and the environment.

Kalanithy Vairavamoorthy, executive director of the International Water Association said,

“We are happy to announce cooperation and partnership at the 2018 IWA World Water Congress & Exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. Partnership and cooperation is critical for successful water management. Water professionals of all shapes and shades are needed to provide solutions to the water problems the world is facing. With the IWA membership dedicated to work with the full water cycle, and engaged to pioneering technologies, to research and implementation, we strongly believe that being partners is strongly supporting our sector.”

Terry Fuller, CIWEM chief executive said

“This collaboration expands the breadth and depth of our global community of individuals and organisational partners. It creates unrivalled opportunities for the professional growth our

members by learning from, and contributing to, innovation in the water and environmental sectors. Our business and academic partners will also benefit from increased exposure of their organisations to those that they most wish to form a relationship with.”

Dual membership will become available for all members from later on in the year. Further information will be provided on the CIWEM and IWA websites.

CIWEM and the IWA seek a world in which we all manage water and the environment sustainably, and will build a community of professionals with the experience to lead this endeavour.

ENDS

For any press and communications enquiries, please contact Sarah Farache, Press and Communications Officer on 020 7269 5820, E: sarah.farache@ciwem.org.

Notes to Editors

1. CIWEM, The Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management is the leading independent Chartered professional body for water and environment professionals, promoting excellence within the sector. www.ciwem.org

2. The International Water Association is the largest international network of water professionals working towards a water wise world, with members in more than 130 countries. Its work focuses on developing solutions for water and wastewater management. As a knowledge hub for the latest science, technology and best practice in the water sector at large, the IWA works to place water on the global political agenda and to influence best practice in regulation and policy making. http://www.iwa-network.org/ 

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A new season of films launched today featuring seven young engineers working in a range of industries, from blockbuster films to disaster relief. These films form part of the next phase of the #ThisIsEngineering campaign to give more young people from all backgrounds the opportunity to explore how they could follow what they love into a varied and fulfilling engineering career.

Season two builds on the first five films in the campaign with seven new role models showcasing a greater variety of engineering jobs, impacts and educational backgrounds. The films bring to life engineering that we rely on every day, engineering that entertains, and engineering that saves lives, and communicate the excitement of roles in start-ups and newer fields of engineering, as well as large engineering companies and more established engineering disciplines. The engineers featured are:

  • Ala Hammad, 25, is a Civil and Tunnelling Engineer with a passion for the vast buildings and structures we use every day, and…for all things beauty too. Not what you might imagine when you hear the word ‘engineer’, Ala applies her creativity to both areas, working on incredible infrastructure projects, like Crossrail and High Speed 2, by day, and keeping up to date with the latest fashion and beauty trends in her spare time.
  • Alan Proud, from Newcastle, didn’t want to sit in a classroom or behind a computer. He likes working with his hands and being creative and so his job as a Senior Orthotics Technician making custom braces and splints is perfect for him.
  • Bethan Murray is 25 years old and grew up in Manchester. She left home at 19 to start an engineering degree apprenticeship with Rolls-Royce in Derby. She then became a Production Manager, responsible for the team that strips down and rebuilds aircraft engines for aircraft helping make flying safe for thousands of people.
  • Dr Enass Abo-Hamed, from Palestine, is an activist, business woman and entrepreneur. She co-founded H2GO, an engineering company developing new ways to store clean energy at the age of just 28. She completed a PhD at Cambridge University, after taking undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in applied chemistry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
  • Joshua Macabuag, from Romford in Essex, didn’t know much about engineering when he chose to study it at university. This started him on a journey that would take him to earthquake and tsunami zones around the world, to use his skills as a structural engineer to help people affected by natural disasters.
  • Sonya Teich loved drawing and making up stories as a child, and she also loved maths. Bringing together these two interests seemed impossible until she completed a degree in Engineering and Computer Science, and landed her first job working for Disney Animation as a Visual Effects artist. Now Sonya works as a Lead Effects Technical Director at Framestore in London, managing a team of visual effects artists.

#ThisIsEngineering was created in response to significant demand for engineering talent in the UK – according to the latest EngineeringUK figures the annual shortfall is up to 59,000 – and narrow public perceptions of engineering and engineers. The campaign will help to reset the conversation about engineering, appealing to young people’s passions for subjects such as sport, technology and design, and illustrating through social media that the profession is diverse, challenging and creative.

The campaign launched in January this year and the first series of films have been viewed more than 16 million times by teenagers on social media. A survey of more than 1,200 young people before and after the campaign launch indicated a 41 per cent increase in the number of teenagers who said, after seeing the campaign, that they would consider a career in engineering.

#ThisIsEngineering is led by the Royal Academy of Engineering, in collaboration with EngineeringUK, and with the generous support of corporate partners. More information about the campaign is available at www.ThisisEngineering.org.uk.

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