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2017 has been an eventful year and I've had the pleasure to meet a bunch of new people, make new friends, make new business partners, explore amazing landscapes, teach aspiring photographers and most importantly learn a lot about both business and myself.

My website CaptureLandscapes has got a lot of attention and I've been able to reach tens of thousands of aspiring photographers through my tutorials, eBooks and interviews with inspirational photographers. It's a humbling experience to be able to share my experience with such an amazing group of people.

Anyways, here's a recap of 2017:

January

Lofoten Snowstorms

There was no doubt that 2017 would be a year filled with adventures. Already in the first week I had gotten on a plane and found myself exploring the picturesque Lofoten in Northern Norway during the return of the sun. 

While I didn't see too much of the sun, I got to spend several nights under the Aurora Borealis and the white landscape was a treat to the eyes.









February

Winter Hikes

Even though February wasn't as adventures as some of the other months as I spent most it in an office, it was a month where I learned a lot.

I still was able to travel in the local area when the conditions where nice and I also spent some time testing my new DJI Mavic.

 





March

Winter's Coming to an End

In the beginning of March we got a bunch of snow which ment it was perfect conditions for snowshoeing. I particularely enjoyed snowshoeing in the winter storms and hiked to local areas I had never visited in winter before. 





April

All about the processing...

April will be the only month of the year where I don't include an additional set of images. While it was a month where a lot of interesting things happened, it was also a month where I wasn't able to spend much time behind the camera; no big travels, no good local conditions but a lot of processing and article writing.

I did manage to grab a few self-portraits while out testing my Vallerret Photography gloves, though!

May

A New Chapter

May was an exciting month for me. I built a bed in my car, packed it, and drove from Norway to Northern Spain, my new base for the next several months.

Rather than driving directly, I planned a few extra days in order to stop by and photograph several areas on the way. Once I was in Spain, I continued further down the coast to explore more of what this region has to offer.

I've spent much time in Northern Spain before but the next several months I had the opportunity to get to know it even better.






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In late August I had the pleasure of spending 10 days in the small but picturesque town of Ilulissat, Greenland leading a workshop for LofotenTours. The workshop itself was small and intimate with a group of only 3 people and lasted for a week, leaving me with 3 days to explore for myself before the rest came. 

With its approximately 4500 inhabitants, Ilulissat is the third largest city on Greenland. While there are roads, the distances are short and from one end of the road to the other, there are no more than 6 kilometers; meaning that the area we explore is relatively small.

Ilulissat

Scenic houses of Greenland's third largest town Ilulissat

Most of the photography is done within a short walk or taxi ride from the hotel and the main focus is the Kangia Glacier (the Ilulissat Icefjord). It's exactly this which makes Ilulissat such a unique place; the glacier goes into the fjord and covers it in majestic icebergs. 

While it's beautiful to explore this area (especially by boat), I left Greenland with mixed feelings. This is, without doubt, one of the most unique places I've explored and it was great fun but I couldn't help feeling somewhat sad about the situation over there. It was a conversation I had with our captain Kai that stuck with me and made me realize just how much Greenland is changing. 

It's one thing to sit behind a computer and read about climate change and global warming but it isn't until you actually visit a place affected by it that you understand the magnitude of it. Sure, I do see some of it in both Norway and Iceland but not nearly the same. 

 

Here are some of the scary facts Kai told me about the Ilulissat Glacier and life of Greenland: 

  • Within the last ten years, the glacier has doubled its speed. Today it moves at a speed of around 40 meters every 24 hours.

  • The glacier calves around 46 cubic kilometers of ice every year. If you melted this amount of ice, the resulting amount of water could cover the annual consumption of water in the USA.

  • The largest icebergs calved by the glacier are the size of 1.5 cubic kilometers of ice. This is the equivalent of 30 football fields covered by a layer of ice as high as Mount Everest. An iceberg of this size could supply the population of Denmark with water for almost seven years!

  • The temperature during winter used to be roughly -40c 20 years ago while today it rarely gets colder than -20c.

  • Today the highest icebergs are about 25 meters above the water – 10 years ago they were about 90 meters.

Hearing this from a person born and raised in this town and seeing myself just how quickly the glacier moves was frightening. Though it is beautiful to see the ice and scenery change almost on a daily basis, I couldn't help thinking about what that actually means.

I'm just happy that I've been able to visit this place and I can't wait to return again. Who knows, maybe future generations won't be able to see this for themselves...

The Huskies

Over to something more uplifting, I can't end this blog post without at least mentioning the Greenland Huskies. I think for some of the workshop attendees the husky puppies might have been a highlight of the trip. While the adult dogs are chained and kept in certain areas, the puppies and smaller dogs are free to roam the streets and it's not uncommon that they come up to you seeking attention. 

 

Five puppies stalked me on the beginning of my hike the very first day I arrived – and it wouldn't be the last I saw of them either.  Huskies are still important for the locals and while modern transportation vehicles such as ATV's and snowmobiles are more common, huskies are still the most reliable for hunting. 

Until recently, the husky population was, in fact, higher than the human population of Ilulissat. While it's not that many anymore, you can still see (and hear!) dogs all over town. 

Anyways, enough writing for now. Here are a few images from the trip:

(Stay tuned for a larger gallery release featuring Greenland images coming soon)











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I recently had the honor to be a guest at the Traveling Image Makers Podcast by travel photographers Ugo Cei and Ralph Velasco. It was a fun 40 minutes and we talked about subjects such as Long Exposure Photography, drone photography, why I moved from the picturesque Norway to the lesser known northern Spain and much more. 

If you want to learn more about me and my photography be sure to download the free episode of this podcast and tune into the interview. This was a fun experience and I'll be looking forward to attending more podcasts in the future! 

Listen to the interview here.

We spend a lot of time talking about Long Exposure Photography and my latest eBook The Ultimate Guide to Long Exposure Photography. In the interview, I also talk about some of the most common mistakes I see amongst beginning photographers who are just getting started with this interesting technique. These are mistakes I haven't talked about in the eBook but they are important to avoid if you really want to capture images that impress. 

Long Exposure of a beautiful lake right outside of Rondane National Park in Norway

I hope you enjoyed the interview. Be sure to let me know what you think and/or leave a review of the Travelling Image Makers Podcast on iTunes - I'm sure they would appreciate that! 

 

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It's that time of year again when I look through the images I've taken throughout the year in search for my favorites. This year's no different and while looking through my folders I realized that this was an incredible photographic year and I've captured a handful of images that I'm proud of. 

Before I post my best images of 2016 I want to share a few memories and experiences with you that I made through the year. I've had the opportunity to travel a lot this year and have been to Spain, Iceland, USA, Germany, Luxembourg, Belgium (plus a few minutes in France!) and Greece plus I've finally started to explore my own country, Norway, more than ever before. 

In the first week of 2016 I released my new website and platform CaptureLandscapes. Most of you already know what it is, but for those who don't: CaptureLandscapes is a website where you can improve your landscape photography. The response I've received has been overwhelming and today, a year later, thousands of users benefit from the website every month. 

During my travels I've had the pleasure to meet a lot of fellow photographers and photography enthusiasts. It's always exciting to meet likeminded people and it always fascinates me that two photographers can come up with completely different images from the same day.

I've also had the pleasure to work with some great companies and see my work displayed at large venues, such as Oslo Gardermoen Airport where a 12 meter wall displays one of my images. I've also become an official NiSi Ambassador and have worked with companies such as ThinkTank, Manfrotto and Nikon.

All in all it's been a great year and I'm excited to make 2017 even better! 

Top 16 Images of 2016

My first two favorite images are captured at a waterfall close to Hemsedal in Norway. I can't remember ever having two images from the same location in my best of the year summary but I guess there's a first time for everything. 

The first image was the result of rather detailed planning combined with a little exploring. Since it was my first visit I was not familiar with the terrain but I made sure to visit during the evening when the light would shine on the waterfall and, hopefully, light up the splash.

Climbing down to the river was a little sketchy since the surface was wet and slippery. However, as it normally is, the effort was well worth it.

Hemsedal, Norway

The second time I honestly didn't plan too much. I still knew when the optimal time of day was and since I'd already been there I knew the terrain better this time. The intent of the trip was to go exploring with Mila who was visiting from Spain but the camera would of course come along. As soon as I saw the light through the trees I excused myself and ran towards an advantage point to capture some shots before the light disappeared (luckily it lasted quite a while so after calming down I had the time to focus better).

Next, I have an image from a lake outside of Trondheim. This particular sunset I headed out with my friend and fellow photographer Grete Øiamo and I think it's safe to say that we both walked away with some solid shots.

Jonsvatnet, trondheim

I can't have a best of without including any classics, right? 

This year I've been to Iceland a couple of times and I've finally got the chance to revisit some locations that I haven't seen since I was a kid. One of these locations was the infamous Gullfoss Waterfall. While it's still an incredible location, I was most blown away by large amount of tourists. Yet, it is a classic that I do recommend visiting.

Gullfoss, Iceland

In the beginning of the year I set myself a few photographic goals and challenges. Taking advantage of "bad" weather was one of them. I feel that an image that doesn't have a blue sky or perfect sunset often tells a greater story. While on a road trip on Iceland with my friend Johannes Nollmeyer, we really struggeled with the weather from time to time, which resulted in some pretty interesting images. On this image we were battling strong winds and some serious hail. 

Vik, Iceland

In the beginning of the year I headed out to the south coast on Iceland hoping to capture some dramatic weather. In that, I succeeded. However, the image that stuck out the most in my opinion was this intimate shot from the cliffs at Dyrholaey. Personally, I really fell in love with the combination of light fog, rain, dark mood and powerful waves, which resulted in a rather atmospheric image. 

dyrholaey, iceland

One of the biggest challenges when photographing Iceland is to avoid being too influenced by the images you've seen before. Since it's such a beautiful place and so many great images from there, I really wanted to come back with something different. With this image I feel I was able to do so. 

The combination of colors was what made this one of my favorite images of the year.

jokusarlon, iceland

Well, that was a lot of Iceland wasn't it? Not that surprising since I've spend so much time there this year but let's look at some different places too. 

This autumn I had the pleasure of photographing Rondane National Park with Swedish photographer Peter Lundqvist. Ironically, it was my first time photographing autumn in Norway. Somehow autumn has always been a season for traveling but now I was finally able to stay in Norway. 

rondane, norway

Choosing between the image above and below was impossible for me. Even though they are captured the same week, they tell two completely different stories. Perhaps you can help me out, which one do you prefer? Let me know in a comment!

Rondane, Norway

I do love photographing with my drone, so here's a areal shot from this autumn too. Driving past those two red trees I knew I needed to take a flight!

Mysuseter, Norway

Standing at the edge of a 700 meter cliff is without doubt one of the most memorable moments of 2016. After a 11km hike in steep terrain it was an incredible feeling to sit down and enjoy such a beautiful view (with my feet hanging above a 700m vertical drop! 

To capture this image I placed my camera on the tripod, found my composition and used an interval timer to capture a series of images while I stood up and sat down on the edge. 

Trolltunga, Norway

Gaztelugatxe is one of my absolute favorite locations to photograph in the north of Spain. I've been there a couple times before but it wasn't until this summer I finally got some good conditions and an image I was happy with. Just don't ask me to pronounce the name of this spot!

gaztelugatxe, Spain

Northern Spain is quite different than the rest of Spain. The coast is dramatic and the weather is always changing. That's why I felt the need to include this image from Liencres I captured a stormy evening with my Spanish buddy Juan Amieva. Can you spot the bird watching us?

Liencres, Spain

In Germany my photographic highlight was visiting the Eltz Castle for sunrise. The moons position was perfect and with the sun just tipping above the horizon this image quickly became one of my favorite. 

Eltz Castle, Germany

After an hour waiting in the rain, the clouds finally became lighter and the sun let through. This evening at Litlefjellet in Rauma remains my favorite sunset of the year. Sitting here in peace and enjoying the quickly changing conditions was an incredibly strong moment. 

Rauma, Norway

My final image is this shot of Cabo de Faro Mayor in Santander, Spain. I've visited this location countless of times while living in Spain but it wasn't before a visit this year that I finally got the shot I wanted. The sunrise was beyond any expectations an the waves crushing on the cliffs was the little extra.

There you have it. These are my top 16 images of 2016. 

What's your number one favorite image that you captured this year? Please share it in the comments as I would love to see what you captured! 

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Autumn in the Norwegian Mountains

Autumn has quickly grown to become my favorite time of the year to photograph. Ironically, I've been traveling and unable to photograph the Norwegian Autumn the previous years. This year, however, I was determined to finally capture this beautiful season home in Norway. 

After days of paying close attention to weather and various webcams I headed up towards Rondane National Park with my friend and fellow photographer Peter Lundqvist. Admittedly, I was a bit sceptic if we had timed our travel good or not, as there wasn't much signs of autumn even on the way up the mountain. 

Just as started the last climb up the mountains the trees slowly started to show more sign of autumn until I all of a sudden was surrounded by orange trees. This was looking promising! 

The next days Peter and I spent hiking and camping in and around Rondane National Park. Weather was much warmed than either of us had predicted and we could comfortably hike wearing t-shirts, which is not typical for this time of the year in Norway! 

Since the weather was warm during daytime and cold during the night (occasionally a touch of rain too) we were treated with some incredible conditions each morning.

Here's a small collection of my favorite images from this years autumn in Norway: 









To see more images from this autumn visit my Autumn Gallery Page.

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NiSi Filters in Action

A little while ago I was contacted by NiSi Filters and invited to test their filter system. Since I'm always interested in trying and comparing various products I was really excited but also a bit skeptic. I've been using LEE Filters for many years now and honestly I haven't ever thought about using something else, even though LEE are known for their blue colorcast. I'm not sure if my skepticism was due to the fact I might find something better than what I have become a fan of or if it was because of the fact I didn't know much about NiSi from before. 

Within short time of the initial contact I was headed towards the post office to pick up my package from NiSi. The products I was given was: 

  • NiSi V5 100m Sysmte Filter Holder Kit + Filter Pouch
  • 77mm CPL
  • NiSi Nano IR ND1000 (10 stop) 100x100mm
  • Reverse IR GND8(.09) 100x150mm 

To be quite honest I haven't used a 10-stop ND filter in a while but I found this a great excuse to get back to the roots and go out play with minute long shutter speeds. 

Even though I've been overall very satisfied with my LEE Filter system, I was particularly curious on how NiSi had handled a few issues or limitations I had experienced with my current system. These included: 

  • Colorcast on 10 stop ND filter
  • Combining the use of square filters and a CPL
First Impressions

As I'm writing this I've been using the NiSi system for about 3 weeks. In this period I've been carrying both the LEE and NiSi system with me, even when hiking, so the question now is which one will I keep bringing with me? 

Packaging Holder System

I still can't decide whether or whether not I like the NiSi Filter Holder. It has one of the greatest functions I've ever seen in a holder, which I'll come back to in a bit, but it also seems just a little less solid than the LEE holder. That being said, I still haven't made a bad experience with the holder and it does seem to be more solid than what I originally felt when getting it some weeks ago. 

The biggest advantage with the NiSi Filter Holder is the little wheel that lets you adjust the circular polariser when using square filters. This is something I've been missing with my LEE system and I've never been able to use both a polariser and Grad Filter without vignetting on 16mm. The only option would have been to purchase a extra large CPL, buying an adapter and then stacking it on the outside of the square filters. 

You can place the CPL on the inside of the holder and easily tighten it by pressing the two wheels while twisting it around. When the CPL is tightened you can use the wheels to turn the CPL without having to take all the other filters off. This is for me the biggest advantage of the NiSi system. 

The are two slightly negative aspect I can mention about the holder, which is not particularly important in the big picture, but the slots to place the filters within are slightly too tight. On a couple occasions I've had to press, or pull, so hard that I've slightly changed the cameras position - which is a slight disadvantage when wanting to stack multiple images. I'm curious to see if it gets better once the system has been used more.  

Secondly the leather pouch/box the filter holder is in, is very big. Even though it looks beautiful and has a very smart magnet lid, it takes a lot of space in the backpack. When you carry around as much equipment as I often do space becomes limited. Since the CPL is placed in this box I still need to bring it with me.

NiSi Nano IR ND1000 (10 stop) 100x100mm

For those who are familiar with Lee's Big Stopper, you know of it's heavy blue colorcast. This was one of the aspects I was most excited to compare with the NiSi filters. 

cabin by the lake sunrise - taken with a 10 stop nisi filter

To my surprise, the NiSi's 10 Stop ND Filter was more or less neutral and I didn't see any signs of a colorcast. I've never used such a neutral filter and I was positively surprised when I saw the result. 

Its quality also seems to be good and admittedly I prefer it's pouch rather than LEE's metal boxes. I am curious to see, though, what happens with the pouch when I'm shooting by the sea and the filter is placed there with dirt on it.

Would I recommend the NiSi 10 Stop? Without a doubt, yes.  

Reverse GND

During the last year I've used a Reverse Graduated Neutral Density Filter from Singh-Ray, which has been of incredible quality and a filter that I had no intentions of changing out. When receiving the NiSi Reverse GND I had no expectations of it being as good as the more expensive Singh-Ray, but I was wrong. 

The Reverse GND feels solid, and just like the 10 stop, it doesn't have the slightest hint of a colorcast. I did, however, find its transition to be slightly harder than the Singh-Ray but this is not a problem as this is a filter that I won't use unless the horizon is mostly even. 

NiSi Reverse Graduated filter

Placing it in the filter holder slot seemed to be the only challenge but it's getting better the more I use it.

I find this to be a great alternative to more expensive filters and the quality is just as good. 

Would I recommend it? Yes.

Circular Polariser

As I mentioned above, the biggest advantage with the NiSi system is its integration between the holder and a CPL. Combining a CPL with a ND or GND filter has never been this easy. 

Since I wish to mention both the pros and cons it should be noted that if you only wish to use the CPL you still need to have the filter kit holder on - and you wont be able to use a lens cap. 

Early morning in the woods - nisi cpl used

When comparing my trustworthy (and much thicker) B&W CPL with the NiSi CPL I found NiSi to be slightly better at removing glare and unwanted reflections. Also it gave slightly more contrast, or "pop" as many refer to it, which is often desired when photographing woods or waterfalls. 

Even though it is slim and doesn't look nearly as solid as brands I've been using before it is of good quality and the results are impressive. 

Would I recommend it? Yes.

Summary

While I have only been using NiSi filters for some weeks now my impression is surprisingly positive. The filter quality seems to be good and they appear to be much more solid than I originally thought. It still remains to see if I'll have the same opinion in another couple of months but as for now, I can and will recommend the NiSi Filters. 

Taking long exposures without even the slightest hint of a colorcast is honestly really nice. It saves me a lot of time in post production and gives a nice, clean result. 

Note that this is my first impression. I will do another post in a month or two.

More pictures taken with the NiSi Filters





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It's been years since I last time visited Crete, the largest island in Greece. I have always tried to visit as often as possible since I have family who lives in its second largest town Chania. Unfortunately, I haven't had the opportunity to do it the last years but now it was finally time to get back to this warm and beautiful island. 

Rooftop sunset from Chania

Since I haven't visited Crete with the intent to take pictures before, I spent a while researching and looking for possibilities near the harbour of Chania. Since this trip would be a combined work & leisure trip (I had the pleasure of spending the week with Mila and some of my family) I decided to plan most of my photography locations within half an hour driving from our place. However, we still went on some great adventures and got to visit some small and beautiful villages.

A boat beneath the sunset in Chania

If there's one thing I learned after this visit to Crete, that I never really thought about before I became a photographer, it's that during summer each sunrise or sunset is more or less the same: cloudless. 

Non-photographers never understand when I complain about the lack of clouds but the truth is that photographing a sunset or sunrise, or in general, without clouds is boring most of the time. Clouds add extra depth to the image and is in my opinion often crucial. That being said, I found it to be a great creative challenge for myself to photograph in these conditions, as it's completely different then what I'm used to. 

The main objective photography-wise for this trip was to capture a series of stock images that will be used in magazines, websites, posters etc. Since most stock images will be used with text on them I aimed to keep the images minimalistic and with good space to insert text but still including enough to convey a story. 

Sunrise and silhouettes of cliffs located outside of Iraklio

Crete is a fun island to photograph and the local people are extremely kind. I can't wait to get back again (this time during spring or fall) and capture more of this beautiful place with my camera. 

Sunrise above Cretan villages

Sunset from downtown Chania

Contrasts by the harbour in Chania

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As many of you might have noticed, Instagram recently released their latest update Instagram Stories. My first reaction was rather negative, as it is a copy of Snapchat, but after giving it some thought I've come to the conclusion that this can be a great way to connect further with all of you. 

What is Instagram Stories?
With Instagram Stories, you don’t have to worry about overposting. Instead, you can share as much as you want throughout the day — with as much creativity as you want. You can bring your story to life in new ways with text and drawing tools. The photos and videos will disappear after 24 hours and won’t appear on your profile grid or in feed.
- Instagram Introducing Instagram Stories

As you can see it's very similar to Snapchat, in fact it's more or less the exact same thing. So how can this be a good update? 

I've been on Instagram for a long time and that's where most my followers are but on snapchat it took a lot of convincing from people around me before I decided to finally create an account a few months ago. Rather than spending time building a new audience on a different platform, I feel like Instagram Stories is a better option for me as I reach way more people in much shorter time. Yes, that means that for now I won't be using Snapchat anymore. 

How I'll Use Instagram Stories

Like I just mentioned, from now on I'll be using Instagram Stories rather than snapchat to share behind the scenes and other photography related stuff. Having this "all-in-one app" keeps it much easier for me. 

If you're following me on Instagram and you're interested in seeing my Instagram Stories this is what you'll get: 

Behind the Scenes

When I'm out travelling I'll bring you along on my adventures. This will be both when I'm photographing locally and when I'm out travelling to other countries. I'll show you the places I'm photographing, the places I'm travelling through, interesting things I see on the way and other things that are related to my photography and travelling. I'll also share some information of the locations and images I'm taking and explaining why I'm using that lens or filter. 

Tips & Tricks

Teaching others the fundamentals (or advanced techniques) of photography is something I really enjoy. That was also the reason I started CaptureLandscapes, a place where you can improve your landscape photography

In my Instagram Stories I'll share my best tips & tricks about both technical aspects of photography and post production. I'll tell you why I do what I do and how you can do the same. 

Question & Answers

I normally receive many questions from my followers on email and on different chats. The truth is that I unfortunately don't have enough time to answer all these questions, especially since many of them require long answers. So, to answer as many questions as possible I will do Q&As on Instagram Stories.

Simply send me a question directly on Instagram (as a DM) and I'll do my best to reply in a story. I'm aiming to answer at least one question each day, if I get that many questions, so the chances are high that I'll answer your question! 

Announcements & Special Offers

Every now and then I have some announcements to make. This can be related to upcoming trips, ebooks or products such as calendars and prints. When these announcements are made I'll also put together exclusive offers that are only given to my Instagram followers and that disappear after 24 hours. So, stay tuned! 

This is what you can expect from me on Instagram Stories. I hope you follow along and don't be afraid to send me some questions! 

If you want to learn how you can benefit from Instagram Stories be sure to take a look at my tutorial How to Take Advantage of Instagram Stories.

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Ok, so I've been spending the last 5 minutes reading through alpaca puns trying to find something clever to use as a tilte. Turned out that was a little harder than I though as most of them were just hilarious but not suitable as titles. 

The Alpacalypse is the result of alpacas taking over the world, which kind of felt like the scenario when I recently held a workshop in the south of Norway and we ended up close to Lista Lighthouse. This area is filled with cute alpacas that are doing nothing but enjoying life and smiling in the sun. Quite the apocalypse. 

I often refer to myself as a Landscape Photographer but the facts are I do consider myself an Outdoor Photographer as I also love photographing wildlife and other subjects. The landscape around Lista Lighthouse is quite spectacular and the workshop attendees walked away with some great images. Yet, we all agreed that we couldn't leave without taking a few images of the peaceful alpacas that were happy to be models for us.

Clearly the alpacas had recently visited the hairdresser so it's a good thing that the sun was out for a while. It seemed like they enjoyed the sun, as you can see on the smiling friend above!

I'm heading out for another one-to-one workshop now so I hope you enjoyed these images and now alpaca my bags. (I just couldn't resist using that one...!) 

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After spending one year in Santander, the northern coast of Spain has grown to be one of my favorite areas to photograph. Each time I visit I drive along the coast and occasionally into the mountains or forests. However, even though most locations are reachable within a few hours driving, Santander have many locations waiting to be photographed. Here's my top 3 photography locations in Santander.

3. Peninsula de la Magdalena

The Peninsula of Magdalena might be most known for it's majestic palace and adorable penguins but it's also home to a good variation of photographic opportunities. Not only are the penguins (and other animals) and the palace great subjects to photograph but there's also some hidden gems for us landscape photographers. 

Personally, I tend to spend most time around the Faro de la Cerda. This lighthouse is not nearly as much photographed as Cabo de Faro Mayor or Isla de Mouro. 

I find this location to be most interesting when it's high tide and preferably some waves crashing onto the cliffs beneath the lighthouse. 

It's not only Faro de la Cerda that is photogenic at this small peninsula though. If you walk towards the edge of Bikini Beach there's some great opportunities for seascapes. Both during high and low tide. 

2. Cabo de Faro Mayor

It's become a tradition to capture at least one sunrise at Cabo de Faro Mayor. Since it's only a 5-10 minute drive from where I normally stay in Santander it's one of the easiest and quickest places to visit.

During the last years I've developed a love-hate relationship to this location. Even though I've been there countless times, the weather has normally given me a hard time here. Actually, it wasn't until my last visit that I finally got a image that I was satisfied with. At last that conditions where good and I had a small window of great color and a good variation in weather. 

To get the best images I recommend walking past the lighthouse and explore along the cliffs. Be aware walking too close to the cliffs, though, as it's been many incidents with people falling, or jumping, into the rough waves. 

While this location is best for sunrise you might be able to get some good results during sunset too, if you go to the opposite side. 

If you have the time you should spend some hours exploring this area. It might be slightly limited in compositions but it's a beautiful area to walk around and perhaps even do a picnic!

 

1. Costa Quebrada

If you've ever visited northern Spain before you might have heard about Costa Quebrada or Liencres. This area is located in the outskirts of Santander (roughly 15 minutes driving) and has become my favorite area to photograph here.

Just like Faro de Cabo Mayor, visiting Costa Quebrada has become a tradition. In fact, I tend to always take my first sunset of the trip at this place. More specifically, I normally go to Los Urros or La Arnia to begin with. Even though I have been here many times and have a collection of good images from here I always enjoy exploring the area for new compositions and possibilities. I'm surprised that I still find them (even though it involves pushing myself further and further towards the rough waves)..

The Liencres area is good for both sunrise and sunset as it's impressive cliffs and dramatic seascape is in both edges of the beach.

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