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Installation view: Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, October 12, 2018–April 23, 2019. Photo: David Heald. © 2018 The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. 

Copyright © 2018 Chennie Huang
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Image courtesy the artist
Restricted use, please contact me
For title and detail see website
Before my diving into details to further examine Jen Mazza's deconstructions.  Please visit this website.

In addition, here is an essay about an experience of her previously done paintings (also included in this latest exhibition) and a short review of a group show she participated in at Jane Lombard Gallery.

Jen Mazza is currently showing her works on paper at C.G. Boerner (opening reception Jan. 24th).

Related book reviews.
Copyright © 2018 Chennie Huang
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For part 1, please click here.

CH: It is funny that you mentioned collecting physical newspapers, because I do the same with my Economist magazines.  I threw away all my other subscriptions, but for this publication that deals with analyses of global political issues, economic situations, technological changes, art and book ideas, keeping the issues feels like preserving cultural concerns that had once meant a great deal to our society.  But what you are doing is also quite personal aside from the larger issues we are facing today.  

BB:  I wholly relate!  Of course your subscription to The Economist probably gives you unlimited access to the digital archives, but somehow it’s not the same as having the stack of magazines at your disposal, right?  I now have the excuse that anything might be part of a future project, and it often is, but I’ve been doing this since childhood.  And again, as you point out, people collect for all kinds of reasons – absurd, sincere, and in some cases, for their livelihoods.  My partner Bill Santen’s video project “Low Tide,” in the exhibition, follows “scrappers” along the Bronx waterfront who scavenge abandoned boats for scrap metal, something he himself has done between freelance jobs, which brought him into a culture of collecting with vastly different motivations than mine.  

Becky Brown
Black and White , 2016
Pencil and collage on paper
Image courtesy the artist

I thought the New Museum’s recent exhibition “The Keeper” presented a fascinating range of collections and collectors, highlighting the range of forces that drive people to collect in compulsive ways.  I was deeply inspired by that exhibition and the questions it raised, and while we focused more on the artwork than the psychology of individual collectors in “King of the Cockroaches,” I hope the works and performances we showed push forward the conversation about collecting as a kind of artistic research




Becky Brown
Pleasant View, 2016
Mixed media on paper
Image courtesy the artist

CH: Last Thursday, you invited me to “King Of The Cockroaches” live performance and video program.  The title of this program which, you put together sounded appalling to me at first, as I imagined an enormously large pest sitting at a throne wearing a golden crown (unless anyone is a fan of cockroaches.)  In fact, the title draws from an ancient Arabic preservation myth.  Very interesting, please tell me about this.

BB: Yes, I realize the prospect of a “King of the Cockroaches” might be scary or even repulsive!  I came upon the phrase while researching preservation.  In thinking through the exhibition (which Bill and I conceived and then collaborated on with Daniel Lichtman and Jess Willa Wheaton), I began to connect the collecting interests of all four of us to the tradition of historic preservation – defined as the endeavor to “to preserve, conserve and protect buildings, objects, landscapes or other artifacts of historical significance.”  At one time in Arabic cultures, the king of the cockroaches was invoked as an appeal to nibble on and destroy ancient books and scrolls.



CH: I like your process of thinking behind putting together this show.  Because you are invoking the viewer to consider that those ordinary pieces of information also address other issues at stake.

BB: Definitely – I hope the works in the show operate on multiple levels at once.  Another significant element to me in Jess’s “Post-Grocery” series is the larger issue that groceries, along with other brick and mortar stores, are themselves under threat.  The shopping malls of the 1990s are now a rarity; Amazon just bought Whole Foods and Greenwich Village’s Bleecker street is now lined with empty storefronts.  While New York natives like myself might remember Food Emporium as a posh, often-overpriced market, it is still a piece of history that I am glad Jess has preserved – a symbol of the changing New York City streetscape, and the changing commercial landscape of 2017.


Installation view
King of Cockroaches at Hercules Art Studio Program
Image courtesy Becky Brown

CH: In this program, and for your piece “Community, 2017,” you recited as if reading from a list, various applications of the word “community” to social and cultural formations.  The result at times was comical and absurd, such as “why I am tired all the time community,” at other times alarmingly violent such as “the gun community.”  Does your interest in “community” reach beyond the linguistic value of the word?

BB: Thanks for noticing those particular quotes!  I’m always so interested in which fragments, or words or phrases, stick out to people, so I’m happy to know that that those two lingered in your mind.  The “Community” reading included two different kinds of found text.  The first is verbatim phrases with the word “community” that I have heard or read.  “The gun community” is one of these – probably in a news story about gun control advocates vs. “the gun community” who fight for 2nd amendment rights.  As with many of these, the agenda or identity of a given community can be obscured by the word itself.  “The sleep community” for example, is a mysterious phrase that on the one hand might include every living organism who sleeps, but in fact probably referred to people in the business of sleep, who research it and treat disorders related to it.  This is just one example of what I think happens when a word gets repeated and overused – it obscure meaning in the same way a word that we say again and again becomes abstract sound.  I suspect this is one of the darker underlying intentions (conscious or unconscious) on the part of our capitalist culture in harnessing a word like “community.”  

CH: Your work has involved experimentations with different mediums.  For the “Cockroaches” exhibition, you showed Board Meeting (2017, acrylic and collage on wood), Safe Keeping (shelf), (2017, mixed media installation), Black and White (2016, pencil and collage on paper), To Do List (2015) and A New Kind of Conversation, (2016; both pencil and ink on paper).  It seems you are not only working with different mediums but also working with different concepts.  What is the relationship between Board Meeting and Safe Keeping (shelf) for example?

BB: Indeed, I realize my work seems to move in many directions, and that relationships between projects, particular pieces, or even within a given work may seem mysterious.  I like that you zero in on Board Meeting and Safe Keeping (shelf) because these might represent the two most distant poles: one is a small painting, the other is a large sculpture; one uses nearly every color in the rainbow, mostly in the brightest saturations, while the other uses a limited range of muted colors.  But I think beyond these immediate differences, they have quite a bit in common.  Most significant, they both take real, everyday, recognizable subjects (people sitting around a table, laptop computers, a bottle of wine; shoes, fishing poles, kitchen utensils, a guitar, etc.) and make them abstract – or de-familiarized, alien – via simple, formal modifications and additive layers of paint.


Becky Brown
Board Meeting, 2017
Acrylic and collage on wood with frame
Image courtesy the artist

CH: I knew there must exist a link either conceptually or formally.  Thanks for explaining this.  Are you preparing for upcoming shows? 

BB: After “King of the Cockroaches” and my two-person show “Cognition-Stroll” (with Annette Cords) earlier this summer, I am ready to get back to the studio!  Annette and I designed a wallpaper to transform the space into an installation tracing the external and internal path of a “flaneur” (or its contemporary counterpart).  We also created a publication with a text by our friend Tatiana Istomina on the theme of “universal language” and organized the panel discussed “Collage City” featuring fellow artist Lisa Sigal, experimental radio DJ Gaylord Fields and professor of Global Studies Laura Y. Liu.  So along with the two performance programs for “Cockroaches,” it’s been a busy summer, full of different kinds of collaboration.  I’ve really enjoyed the opportunity to show different bodies of work, and to organize programs around questions and ideas I care about.  And it’s been an honor to work with so many great people!  Which also makes this a perfect time to return to the more solitary space of the studio.
Copyright © 2018 Chennie Huang
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Mary Corse (b. 1945), Untitled (White Multiple Inner Band), 2003. 
Glass microspheres and acrylic on canvas, 96 x 240 in. (243.8 x 609.6 cm). 
Courtesy Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles, Lehmann Maupin, New York; and Lisson Gallery, London. Photograph © Mary Corse

"Ideas define its form ... words are too deceptive."  -Mary Corse, "White Light," 1969

Although as the artist has pointed out that words are not the best way to describe her work, however, for those that are not familiar these words should aid as an introduction.

For decades, Mary Corse has been experimenting with painting light onto canvas.  Her practice is a combination of art and science.  If this does not make her stand out from her contemporaries of the West Coast Light and Space Movement of the 1960s, then her tenacious focus on exploring the two dimensional surface of painting sets her apart from artists such as James Turrell and Doug Wheeler.

Of her practice, Corse uses the two dimensional space to capture a certain quality of light that moves as viewers move within their physical space.  Her works are self-referential in the way that the paintings emphasize physicality and material.  Her investigation centers on the spatial relationship between object and space.  Corse's paintings are formal, their surfaces show almost no trace of the artist's hand.  Yet, there are gradient changes and brush marks that surpass the presentation of pure geometry.

From June 8th through November 25, the Whitney Museum of American Art presents Mary Corse: A Survey in Light.  It is the first museum survey devoted to the work of Mary Corse (born 1945, Berkeley, CA; lives and works in Topanga).  For the brilliant and ambitious artist, much of her work has not garnered the kind of attention she truly deserves, that is until now.


Mary Corse (b. 1945), Untitled (White Diamond, Negative Stripe), 1965. 
Acrylic on canvas, 84 x 84 in. (213.36 x 213.36 cm). 
Collection of Michael Straus. Photograph © Mary Corse


Mary Corse (b. 1945), Untitled (Two Triangular Columns), 1965. 
Acrylic on wood and plexiglass, two parts, 
92 x 18 1/8 x 18 1/8 in. (233.7 x 46 x 46 cm) and 92 x 18 1/16 x 18 in. (233.7 x 45.9 x 45.7 cm). 
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Michael Straus in loving memory of 
Howard and Helaine Straus  2016.6a-b

For a brief time in the mid-sixities, Corse did experiment with making sculptures yet she considered the process like making two dimensional works. In 1965, she made Untitled (Two Triangular Columns),  when viewed in person the flat surfaces in many ways are more similar to paintings than representing three-dimensional objects.  To explore visual perception of spatial relation, the artist built two pairs of identical triangular columns.  Rather than sculptures in the round, the artist focused on how the columns occupied physical space that could appear as straight lines dividing down a geometric plane.  Untitled (White Diamond, Negative Stripe), 1965  an acrylic work on canvas translates the same idea of a line dissenting a visual plane creating a negative space that separated it into two parts, thus creating new geometric shapes.

The result of these works examines the phenomenon of visual perception.  While the "White Diamond" contains two right triangles made by a line in the middle creating a negative space.  The "Columns" are like two flat rectangles representing a two-point perspective on two-dimensional drawing.

Mary Corse (b. 1945), Untitled (Black Earth Series), 1978. 
Ceramic, two tiles, 96 x 48 in. (243.8 x 121.9 cm). 
Courtesy Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles, Lehmann Maupin, New York; 
and Lisson Gallery, London. Photograph © Mary Corse

In 1970, Corse left her downtown Los Angeles studio moved to Topanga Canyon.  The region's rocky hills prompted the artist to experiment materials that were naturally occurring.  She manually modeled clay off a large flat rock found near her studio, then fired and painted using opaque black glaze.  This Black Earth series initiated around 1978 began her fascination with material and process.     As Corse herself referred to them as "earth paintings," they reflect an artistic period of returning to the earth after years of making ethereal White Light paintings.

Untitled (Black Earth Series), 1978 like the the light paintings has a reflective quality due to the metals contained in the material.  On this quality of the earth's natural metals' ability to catch light, Corse describes these works as the "transition between the white light consciousness and the heavy, earth-grounded" like subtle illumination.

This exhibition at the Whitney- Mary Corse: A Survey in Light is largely organized chronologically.  As the first image of this article shows, Corse continues to explore the theme of perception in light as both a subject and material.  In this regards, her interest aligns with that of the West Coast Light and Space movement.  However unlike the aforementioned artists who present the experience of light through the use of space, Corse presents the physical and metaphysical qualities of light through the use of two dimensional surfaces and thus creates a experience that defies the conventional notion of painting as just flatly pictorial.


White Light - Vimeo

White Light, 1969; 16 mm film transferred to video, color, sound; 9:10 min. 
Courtesy the artist; Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles; Lehmann Maupin, New York; and Lisson Gallery, London
Copyright © 2018 Chennie Huang
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Anna Boghiguian
Attack, 2017
Pencil, paint, and encaustic on paper
42 x 62 in (107 x 160 cm)
Private collection

During the 1960s, Anna Boghiguian (b. 1946, Cairo, Egypt) studied political science at the American University in Cairo then she went on to study music in Montreal, both would later inform her artistic practice.  When she realized she was losing her hearing that limited the prospect of pursuing music, Anna Boghiguian found freedom of expression in making visual art, for its immense capacity that surpasses the use of verbal language.  But more importantly, the artist found that the execution through the visual could elude from censorship.  Without hesitation and restrain, Anna Boghiguian's work traces histories of war, revolution, abuse of power, and the birth of global economy as the ultimate consequence of  imperialism and oppression of the government. 


Anna Boghiguian
Woven Winds: The making of an economy - costly commodities, 2016
Pencil, watercolor, ink and gouache on paper
13 cutouts; various dimensions 
Courtesy the artist and Sfeir-Semler Gallery, Hamburg/Beirut


Anna Boghiguian
Woven Winds: The making of an economy - costly commodities, 2016
Pencil, watercolor, ink and gouache on paper
13 cutouts; various dimensions 
Courtesy the artist and Sfeir-Semler Gallery, Hamburg/Beirut

Currently on view until August 19th, the New Museum presents the Armenian-Egyptian artist, Anna Boghiguian's first solo exhibition in its South Gallery.  There are 18 works produced from 2016-17 with the exception of Guilt Machine, a mixed mediums sculpture which was made in 2013. 

Tracing historical events that marked significant changes in the political and economic landscapes of nations such as the USA and the UK for example, Anna Boghiguian brings to light their catastrophic consequences and the inevitable social impacts on the present.  

In a series of works titled Woven Winds: The making of an economy - costly commodities (2016), Anna Boghiguian produced cutouts that narrates historic events of the 1845 Great Famine in Ireland and the cotton trade in 19th century US.  

For this series, the artist visually presents the immediate reaction to the unfortunately events at the same time the work reminds the viewers of their prevailing consequences.  In  "1845 Great Famine", it depicts a flock of immigrates leaving Ireland and sailing across the Atlantic due to the loss of the region's staple food that was further aggravated by an imposed law restricting foreign potato importation.  Anna Bothoguian penciled in words such as "Potato Famine 1845, Ireland" and on the sailing ship she made a line indicating it going across the Atlantic into the US, at the same time without being overtly literal.  What it does is that the work arouses the curiosity of the viwers of the full politic implications of the event, because a large portion of this story is only implied.  Instead, the artist presents us with an theater of these absurdly crude figures arranged like folk shadow puppets.


Anna Boghiguian
Woven Winds: The making of an economy - costly commodities, 2016
Pencil, watercolor, and gouache on paper
11.6 x 16.4 in (29.5 x 41.8 cm)
Private collection

Another part of Woven Winds: The making of an economy- costly commodities (2016) presents the history of cotton trading that led to slavery and civil war in 19th century USA.  While the piece brings to light the racial injustice and the turning of black humans into a form of commodity driven by the seduction of greed, it is also a story recounted with as much poetic artistic execution as the subject allows.  These drawings are figurative but not true to life, the colors are vibrant but without lurid contrast to suggest violence and death.  Rather, her color scheme resembles illustrations in children's story books, leaving the moral of the tale implied.  It is this odd combination of subtle poetry and gruesome facts of history that makes Anna Boghiguian's work fascinating if not intimidating.  


Anna Boghiguian
Exhibition view:  “The People's People,”  Sfeir-Semler Gallery, Hamburg
Courtesy the artist and Sfeir-Semler Gallery, Hamburg/Beirut
Photo:  Volker Renner

"The History of Loom" also has works based the artist's more personal experience and views on the nature of being human. For example,  the motif of ear persistently comes up in Anna Boghiguian's work.  For this exhibition at the New Museum, the artist had written text on the gallery walls, and one of them says: “The Ear has histories and peoples, music and dance, and the Rituals that unite the Cosmos. The Brain searches for the Truth, the mouth recites what the Brain has sent to the mouth and with the Tongue, words take shape.”

This statement relates her's fascination with senory organ and how their functioning allow us adapt to society.  Echoing the artist's own experience of losing her hearing (as she told the audience during a conversation with Hans Ulrich  Obrist hosted by Castello di Rioli Museo d'Arte Contemporanea in 2017), Brains I and Brains II both made in same year, show a process of seeking correlation between the ear (hearing) and the brain (thinking).  In these drawings, the artist's intertwining lines wrapping around soft shapes that resemble ambiguous flesh and body parts.  They present the existing struggle between what is heard and what is processed by the brain.  As the intertwining lines of small veins and passages of knowledge overlap and extend, the information must go through several filters and blockage.  


Anna Boghiguian
Brains I, 2017
Mixed media on canvas
50.3 x 38.5 in (128 x 98 cm) 
Private collection

Anna Boghiguian 
Brains II, 2017 
Mixed media on canvas
50.3 x 38.5 in (128 x 98 cm)
Courtesy the artist and Sfeir-Semler Gallery, Hamburg/Beirut

Anna Boghiguian once said that she was more interested in the meeting of the minds than actually meeting the person.  In many ways, her work is not easy and the crude and child-like markings are deceptively naïve.  Her work requires knee observation and reflection then, one could meet the artist's mind and come to appreciate it.  The historical references in the individual works are for viewers undeterred by the raw appearance of these images.  From a life time (since 1970s) of traveling, artist Anna Boghiguian presents a view of the world through her lens and through allegorical tales that remind us to be wary of the seduction of greed and power. 

"The History of Loom" is on view at the New Museum until August 19th.  
Copyright © 2018 Chennie Huang
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Timotheus Tomicek, Cloud, 2018
Image courtesy the artist and SEA Foundation, Tilburg, Netherlands

Opened on Sunday the 18th of March at SEA Foundation, a not-for-profit / artist-led organization in Tilburg of the Netherlands is a solo exhibition of Austrian artist Timotheus Tomicek curated by Eline Kersten, who is also an artist herself.

A few days prior to the opening, Riet van Gerven of the foundation told me about this project, and I was immediately intrigued by the artist's mission to combine science and art.  To truly understand and appreciate the works in the show, we should hear from the artist and the curator directly.  So we all sat down to talk about it.

Timotheus Tomicek, Half a Life, 2018
Image courtesy the artist and SEA Foundation, Tilburg, Netherlands

CH: You are working with a very interesting idea, in the sense that you are combing ideas in science with art.  How do you reconcile these two disciplines in your work? Philosophically and physically?

Timotheus Tomicek: There was no need to reconcile these disciplines, in my point of view, I see them not only as connected but even aiming in the same direction toward the question of where things come from, where they go, and how they transform. 

CH: For those who are not familiar with the t1/2 (half-life) principle, if thought that it only being something to do with radioactive decay, how do you conceptually disintegrate it via your work?

TT: Everything has a middle and therefor another half. This is the claim of the exhibition. It can be seen spiritually, physically, and even metaphorically.

Stalactites grow very slowly, for example, while flies are moving extremely fast but they have a very short life span. The question of when the half of something has arrived or has happened, it is hard to determine especially when the extremes (that define the outside borders of the middle) are not predicable, like birth and death.  

CH: How is addressing the notion of time and space interesting to you? They are an inescapable part of life, yet one could also live obliviously as if they never exist.

TT: I see time and space like the left and right side of a brain (don’t know which one belongs to which side) and I believe they need each other to exist.  As soon as you experience the different seasons that show up each year, it is hard to assume that time doesn’t exist.

Timotheus Tomicek's latest installation
Image courtesy the artist and SEA Foundation, Tilburg, Netherlands

CH: How important is the visual versus the conceptual?

TT: They are both of the same importance.  Exactly like"two-halves" that (in the best case) are equal in size and weight

CH: Are you happy about this solo-show?  What are you most happy about and what aspect you wish could have been better?

TT: When I realize an exhibition, I try to transform an idea (some call it concept) into reality. I don’t want my "happiness" to play a big role in this process.  So, if I'm not happy about the solo show as such, still I'm happy if somebody is inspired by the show. A solo show feels good when it truly arrives at the audience.

Timotheus Tomicek, Fickende Fliegen, 2018
Image courtesy the artist and SEA Foundation, Tilburg, Netherlands

CH: How did you discover Timotheus Tomicek’s work?  What about it struck you at first?

Eline Kersten: This is a funny story since we met while Lindy Hop dancing in London in June 2016. Only after we finished the dance, we got into a conversation and I found out that he is an artist.  We exchanged email addresses and arranged a meeting for the next day in a bookshop, where he gave me his own artist book "Hit or Miss". Afterwards, we stayed in touch and met up at Frieze Art Fair in October that year, where we stumbled upon one of Sigmar Polke's radioactivity pieces.  This encounter marked the start of our collaboration. 

It was the humor of "Hit or Miss" that struck me at first.  His book is made with great sensitivity for graphic design, paper choice as well as the placing and documentation of the individual works.  Furthermore, the interlinking conceptual threads throughout the book immediately grabbed my attention.

CH: How did you get involved with SEA Foundation and how have you appropriated the space for this solo exhibition?

EK: I approached SEA Foundation when they launched an open call. 

Taking into the consideration that SEA Foundation used to be housed as a shop, we wanted to make use of the shop window and its interaction with the outside.  We did this by placing a work in the window that should be experienced from the street.  During the installation period we noticed that many pedestrians stopped to observe the work.  In some cases, the work has become a catalyst for dialogues with passersby.

CH: What has been the most rewarding part of organizing this project?  What has been the least enjoyable, or maybe difficult?

EK: It has been most rewarding to experiment with the installation of the exhibition in situ.  We did not plan the whole show in advance, but found out on the spot what worked and what did not.  Additionally, it was wonderful to work with an artist who challenged me as a curator to contribute with artistic input.  On the downside, having unfixed roles also brought particular difficulties, such as defining parameters for the involvement of the works and maintaining a conceptual concentration.  In that sense it was at times challenging to provide the necessary curatorial guidance.

Installation view
Image courtesy the artist and SEA Foundation, Tilburg, Netherlands

CH: When you see it finished, is it how you had envisioned before it’s materialized?

EK: I anticipated it to end up as a different exhibition.  Because our approach was organic and process-based from the beginning, the result was never a foresight yet open ended, and the result of a collaborative experience.

CH: Is there anything else behind the title of this exhibition besides that it refers to the innate concepts of the Tomicek’s work? 

EK: The title "Half a Life" has several dimensions. With it, we try to wrap our heads around the abstract phenomenon of radioactivity. This resonates in many different forms and symbols throughout the show, such as in the “invisible” yellow cloud or in the installation "Vérité/Réalité". On a more humanistic level, "Half a Life" is also a celebration of life itself, which is shown in the HD video work "Wesel", for example. This was further highlighted by the happening of when Timotheus and his partner got pregnant and gave birth to a daughter over the time span of the preparation of this show.

Installation view
Image courtesy the artist and SEA Foundation, Tilburg, Netherlands


CH: What’s it like working with each other? Would you say you are partners or counter-partners?

TT: Our way of working was very much like a ping-pong game.  When Eline Kersten came up with an idea, I just played the idea with another idea back to her, and something grew out of that was the result.  This felt very organic and fruitful. I see our show "Half a Life" as a collaborative project.

EK: I would say we are collaborators, in the sense that we made this exhibition together.  Timotheus challenged me to intervene in his work artistically, which put me in a very interesting position.  We oftentimes agreed, but also sometimes disagreed. The best decisions were made in crisis.

CH: Has either “time” or “space” affected both of your works (as artist and as curator) through this project? 

TT: It would be a miracle if this wasn’t the case!  Since we spent a lot of time developing "Half a Life", space did manifest itself in form of the actual exhibition at SEA Foundation!

EK: Everything has changed over the time span of our preparation- we both moved house, Timotheus back to Vienna after his residency in London and I moved to the Netherlands after graduating from the MFA in Curating at Goldsmiths University.  We also both arrived at a new stage in life, Timotheus became a father and I entered the post-graduation limbo.  Since we were geographically apart, we had to employ a new communication strategy to prepare the exhibition over distance.  to these events analogously, we developed our exhibition concept while actively considering the changing circumstances and new inputs.

Installation view
Image courtesy the artist and SEA Foundation, Tilburg, Netherlands

SEA Foundation is a Dutch not-for-profit, artist-led organization in Tilburg the Netherlands established in 2011.  Over the past few years SEA Foundation has became known as an umbrella label for solo exhibitions, art projects, exchanges and publications.  From 2013 they also run an Artist in Residence program – AiR Tilburg. This program attracts professional artists, curators and writers to residencies that include bespoke mentoring.  

All the activities in SEA Foundation is fueled by visual arts.  The team members transgress the boundaries between art disciplines and always put the context and the idea before the medium.  SEA Foundation aims to be a cultural catalyst in the working lives of art professionals.

Copyright © 2017 Chennie Huang
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