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Career Valet by Marcelle Yeager - 8h ago

How to Learn a Person's Motivations - YouTube

Skills can be taught. Motivations are inherent. Learn how to identify what drives a person to perform well at work so you can get the right person in the door.

The following questions appeared in Mike Michalowicz's book "Clockwork."

I personally think the 4th question will give you the most powerful and telling answer. My answer would involve a beach and writing...but I'm still thinking about it.

1. What are 3 favorite things you've done at work?

2. If you were able to have any job, what would you do?

3. Would do you see yourself doing in 10 years?

4. If you had all the money in the world, what would you spend your time doing?


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How to Write the Perfect LinkedIn Summary - YouTube

How to write the perfect LinkedIn summary.

In this short video, I answer some commonly asked questions:

- Should I use 1st or 3rd person?

- Should it be personal or strictly professional?

- What should it include? What questions should I be asking myself?

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If you’ve been ignoring that summary box on LinkedIn, get on it!

The summary allows a potential employer to get to know a side of you that is different from what is portrayed in your resume. In this little gem, you can show your personality, passions, and reason for choosing your career. You can even make it funny.

I prefer first person because it sounds like you are having a conversation with the reader. First, think about your audience, because if you are using LinkedIn to market your own business it is going to be different than if you are seeking a job. 

Start with your targets

You may have noticed that when you go to a person’s profile on the LinkedIn website, you only see the first three lines of the summary. Generally, 290-310 characters will be visible until you click “Show more.” Many managers and recruiters use the LinkedIn mobile app. They’ll see only about 150 characters.

Start strong. I recommend that you include the job title you aim for and skills you possess related to the job you want. From there, start to tell your story. Then they will be enticed to click “Show more.”

“Tell me about yourself”

Don’t tell your whole life story. Instead, answer that beloved (ha) interview question, “tell me about yourself” with a slightly personal angle.

Two of the questions we ask our clients to help frame their story are:

  • As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?

  • How did you get into your career field?

Answering these questions will help you create a thread through your experience to lead people to where you are today. For example, when I was young, I wanted to be a Russian teacher because my first language teacher was truly that incredible!

I also wanted to be a writer and own a business. As a kid, I wrote fiction stories and submitted them to publishers without much luck. I started a small business in my parents’ house called Just Things when I was 9 and sold small toys and candy to friends.

Fast forward to my post-college years: I used my Russian skills for many years in my early career, but I knew then that I did not want to teach. I got into communications because of my language skills, but my love of writing was also apparent to the hiring managers. Then I started Career Valet, where I write for clients and publications, and teach professionals how to brand and market their skills to get to the next level of their careers. Though each interest has manifested itself in different ways in my career, I’ve consistently applied my love of writing and business, and I’m teaching/coaching clients.

I didn’t even make the interest in teaching connection until I wrote this, so it shows you how powerful it can be to think about your own childhood and passions. This is of interest to employers, because they gain insight into your motivations and career choices.

Proof points

Once you have the personal story you want to tell, work on the content that shows you have what it takes to do well in a new organization.

  • What types of problems do you solve for an employer?

  • What do your colleagues and/or managers say about you (informally or formally)?

  • Identify 2-3 qualitative or quantitative accomplishments. It could be that you improved a process and saved colleagues’ time or increased collection time on accounts by 30%.

  • What gives you inspiration and energy?

  • If you’re looking to get ahead in your career, you probably feel that you have what it takes to advance. If so, show how you’ve demonstrated those qualities that will enable you to do so. For example, have you managed a project during a time of transformation and change? Do you train colleagues? Do you give presentations to external audiences? 

Our clients say that writing a summary is the hardest part of the LinkedIn profile because you need to draw a line from where you’ve been to where you want to go. If you take the time to consider your personal interests and professional accomplishments, you can weave together a unique story that will make employers not only click “Show more,” but invite you in for an interview.

Do you want a second opinion on your LinkedIn summary? Or do you want someone to write it for you? Let’s talk (it’s free!)

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Career Valet by Marcelle Yeager - 2w ago

How to Be Happier At Work - YouTube

How to be happier at work

You feel down about your job. Do you feel like your colleagues are smarter than you or perform better than you? The fact is: YOU got the job - you were selected for it.

That's right - YOU.

Figure out what is causing this negative feeling. If colleagues are bringing you down, remember this:

"Insecure people are extremely difficult to work for because they are preoccupied with being found out."
- "Expect to Win" by Carla Harris

Make sure you're not beating yourself up over other peoples' unreal expectations or your own.

Seek opportunities to show your strengths, and if that doesn't improve your situation, move on. 

In a toxic job? Let's talk (it's free!)
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How You Can Benefit from Remote Employees - YouTube

Despite the changing dynamics of the workforce, your company may hate the idea of remote work. If so, they're missing out, and eventually, they will have to hop on board the #remotework train.

Here are 3 easy ways your company can benefit from having remote employees:

1. There are likely prospective clients and/or strategic partners in the geographic area where the remote employee is located

2. It may be an opportunity for staff to take on new and different types of work

3. They may be willing to work outside of traditional office hours to support your team in different ways and meet tight deadlines

Are you ready to get your team on board?

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Career Valet by Marcelle Yeager - 3w ago

How to Be Successful in a New Job - YouTube

Starting a new job is exciting and a bit scary. The learning curve is steep and you feel like you're moving at a "rackabazillion" (my 5 year-old's scientific term) miles a minute.

HIT PAUSE. Take a moment to:

- Write down your goals in this new role and a timeline to complete them

- Speak with your manager about what you are expected to accomplish in the first 3, 6, or 9 months

Then, make sure you initiate a check in with your manager at 3 or 6 months.

- Share the goals you have completed, and tell them you want to make sure you're on track to get where you want to be by your review

Don't wait for your manager to do this! YOU are the best advocate for yourself.

Track your goals, ensure you're meeting them, and schedule regular check ins with your manager to get ahead.

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Career Valet by Marcelle Yeager - 1M ago

How Do You Protect Your Staff? - YouTube

Managing 101: Do you manage people? If so, do you enable them to do their best work?

If you're not handling problems at the upper levels to keep your staff out of the drama as much as possible, they may not be performing as well as they could be. As a manager, you should shelter them from the politics at the top.

Also, learn to recognize when things are tough at work or in a person's life and take action. You can encourage them to take leave and/or give monetary awards.

Their investment in you and your company will be priceless.


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How to Send a Personal Note on LinkedIn - YouTube

STOP! Before you click that easy-to-click, tempting blue "Connect" button on LinkedIn, check yourself.

Are you on the person's profile page?

If not, you will not be able to send a personal message when you click that "Connect" button.

Don't lose the opportunity to tell the person:
- why you want to connect with them;
- a short description of you; and
- that you would love their advice about X, or ask if they'd be willing to look at your resume.

SO FEW people write a personal note. That blue button is just too tempting.

Join the minority and send a personal note! You are almost guaranteed to get more responses and start conversations.

Schedule a free call
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Career Valet by Marcelle Yeager - 1M ago

Do you have an underperformer? - YouTube

Is someone on your team underperforming?

They may not be using their innate strengths and talents in their job.

Recently, several managers told me they moved someone who wasn't doing well into a different role and the person's performance took a 180 degree turn!

Look, you've invested a lot of time, money, and resources into training each of your staff members. Is there a role that is better suited to the underperformer on your team or elsewhere in the organization?

The employees that you help develop and align to the right roles will be invested in you and your company. That equals retention.

What step will you take to assess whether an underperformer is in the right job?

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Career Valet by Marcelle Yeager - 1M ago
Dealing with Job, Career, or Business Loss - YouTube

Closing a business. Losing a job. Ending a career.

These are major life events. I recently shut down my recruiting company, ServingTalent, and it was very difficult.

It was important to let myself grieve and reflect on what I learned from it. Here's what you can do:

- Give yourself time to grieve. 
- Set your emotions free.
- Ask questions to reflect on lessons learned so you can apply them when making future decisions.

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