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Think about the first job that you ever got. How did you get it?

If you were a teenager, you might have filled out a paper application, even showing up in person to do so. Then you probably met with someone and scheduled an interview. If it was post-college or even later in life, you might have (if you’re old enough) have responded to an advertisement in a newspaper, sending in a resume, cover letter, and references—while you then sat and waited to hear from someone about an interview.

Of course, a lot of that has changed. While you can still find jobs that require you to fill out a paper application, most of the time now that process—even for professional positions—has shifted to the internet.

People fill out information about themselves online. They even look for jobs online. And while their parents or their grandparents may have found that one job and tuck with it for decades, today’s employees change jobs about 12 times in their career, which translates into a new position about every four years. Things just aren’t the same.

Like we mentioned, that change has affected all parts of the job search. As a human resources professional, you used to have to wade through stacks of resumes or even scroll through a rolodex. And now, everything might come to you online. But while that might sound confusing or frustrating, what’s changed for the better is the use of technology in order to do some of the work for you.

Now when potential candidates apply for a job, artificial intelligence can do an initial sort for you and figure out if they even have some of the basic skills that are necessary to fill the position.

If not, you won’t even have to look at them. In fact, some experts are predicting that in the future, artificial intelligence will do much more than simply sort through skills.

They’ll be able to “read” a resume in order to make some predictions about the suitability of a candidate for a job. They’ll also be able to identify candidates that perhaps you hadn’t even thought of. So what does that mean for job seekers and human resources professionals (and their companies) alike?

This graphic offers some insights about what the future of job hunting (and finding the perfect candidate) may look like in the coming years and decades.

The post How Connected Society Helps Companies and Job Hunters Connect appeared first on CareerMetis.com.

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As you’re looking for a job, you might see companies that try to attract you with benefits like health insurance and on-site gyms. While these are great, the best thing you can possibly do for your long-term health is find a position that gives the flexibility to work outdoors.

According to Business Insider, 86% of Americans are stuck behind desks all day. Many of those that work at a desk are recorded sitting for over 13 hours per day between their work and home life. Over time, sitting all day in an indoor environment damages the health of workers, leading some health experts to call sitting indoors the “new smoking.”

One way to combat the dangers of a office lifestyle is to take your work outdoors. An outdoor environment exposes you to nature and encourages you to move about and stay active. There are a number of reasons why you should consider ditching your chair for your next job.

The Dangers of a Desk Job

Studies show that sitting all day at a desk increases your risk of heart disease by over 60% and type II diabetes by over 110%. Prostate and breast cancer is 30% more likely among desk workers, while the risk of colon cancer can increase up to 50% for those to sit at a sedentary job for 10 years or more. Prolonged sitting also gives you a higher chance of gaining weight, fat, and cholesterol.

When you’re working indoors, you’re more likely staring at an LED screen all day. This can impact your eyesight over time and lead to retina cell damage. Being indoors also exposes you to more bacteria and pollutants that are present in closed environments and office equipment. The lack of natural light and fresh air also contributes to more depression and stress, which in turn affects your happiness at work and the bottom line of your company.

Why You Should Work Outdoors

Research shows that those who spend time outside have greater energy and a 12% reduction in stress hormone cortisol. Exposure to the open air also improves sleep, with those who work outside getting an average of 46 minutes more quality sleep. And of course, sunlight is a natural source of vitamin D and helps prevent seasonal depression. Many offices don’t provide workers with enough natural light.

Thus, working outside can not only help you live healthier, but also provide you with more productivity and relief. In the infographic infographic below from BigRentz, tthere are several science-backed reasons to ditch your chair and take your work to nature.

How to Take Your Work Outdoors

Of course, not all companies can allow outdoor work. However, there are many practices companies offer that still allow you to reap the benefits of nature. Try looking for companies that do things like walking meetings, group exercises outside of work, and outdoor lunches.

While you might not be outside your entire day, these activities provide that change of scenery and environment that your body needs to maintain its focus and health.

Another thing to look for are companies that provide the flexibility to work from home or outside of the office. This allows you to set up your own outdoor workspace.

Along with wifi, cell phone data tethering, anti-glare shade, and outdoor seating, you will be able to complete your work while using nature to improve your productivity and happiness.

While you’ve likely heard that you should avoid sitting inside all day, perhaps the science-backed health benefits of the outdoors (and the dangers of the desk life) will inspire you to take action.

Ultimately, your workplace happiness should be your first priority — nature provides a place for you to do that and find success in your career.

The post The Benefits of Having a Job Outdoors appeared first on CareerMetis.com.

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Construction is a great career, and one that will always need new workers. There are new homes, offices and public buildings being built around the UK every day, and thousands of construction workers working on these projects.

If you are thinking of getting into the construction business, or you are interested in working in construction, here are a few things you may not have known.  

1) Safety Comes First

In the construction business, workers need to remain safe at all times. They are dealing with heavy machinery, heavy objects, and they are on their feet all day, in all kinds of weather conditions. That’s why companies like engelbert strauss have designed waterproof work boots, as well as a whole host of other safety gear with construction workers in mind.

Their safety boots, as just one example, are essential for comfort and protection and come with anti-slip bottoms. Construction workers can keep themselves both protected and dry from as little as £10.99!

If you run a construction company, it’s wise to note that construction workers should always have their boots and other safety equipment supplied for them by their employers, but if you are self-employed you need to ensure you look after yourself; this starts with your feet.

If you need some work boots for construction, either at work or even in your own home, take a look at this collection.

In addition to the workwear, it’s also vital that a risk assessment is completed on the area in which you will be working and that all workers are fully trained on how to work with machinery, work at heights etc.  An NVQ is the minimum qualification a worker should hold prior to working on-site.

2) The Early Bird Gets the Worm

Construction workers are awake long before most other tradesmen. However, while many construction workers get to work early, this also means they get home earlier than the rest of us. This is for many reasons, including avoiding traffic, especially if they are building in a large city.

The less people around them on the roads and streets, the easier and safer it is to do their job. The average construction worker will get up at around 4:30am and get home for 2:30pm, as long as the weather conditions are good. When the weather is bad, their work can take a whole lot longer.

3) Construction Workers Need to Be Strong

This one probably goes without saying, but as a construction worker, you will be lifting a lot of heavy items. Although strong does not need to be listed on your resume, you need to be ready for some heavy lifting. This means your health as a construction worker is seriously important and you need to understand the importance of correct manual handling at work.

One of the biggest risks with this job is straining yourself, and although you could be fully protected in your outfit, if you are not lifting properly, you could end up out of work for a very long time.  Training is again key here.

4) Construction Doesn’t Have a Dress Code

This is mostly true, although you do have personal protective equipment you must wear, but other than this, you can dress as comfortably as you like. When working in construction, the older the clothes, the better. This means getting out of bed in the morning is a little easier, as you can throw on your comfortable jeans and t-shirt and head out for a day’s work.

As you are working in all kinds of weather conditions and working around a lot of dust and dirt, whatever you wear will inevitably end up dirty. You may be given overalls to wear to protect your clothes to a certain extent, and hard hats, boots and other protective gear is a must when on site.

5) Construction Doesn’t Just Mean Building Houses

Although the first thing people think of when they think of builders is those that are constructing a new housing estate nearby, there are so many jobs in the construction sector. This article has mostly focused on those on the front lines, but there are hundreds of other jobs out there. In construction you can be responsible for building many things, including boats and roads.

Other construction jobs include window fitters, plumbers and architects. This means if you have a particular skill-set, such as design or engineering, you can still work in this industry.

Construction is a well-paid career and one that is great for many. Although the starts may be early, if you can manage it, you will receive a good wage for what you do. You also get to drive past the new builds you have helped make a reality, and there aren’t many people who can say they have assisted in building a family’s new home!

It may be hard work, but if you are protected with the right gear, and can deal with the rain the UK brings, construction work may be the career path for you.   

The post 5 Things You Didn’t Know About Working in Construction appeared first on CareerMetis.com.

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Have you seen The King’s Speech? It’s based on a true story about King George VI’s brave feat in public speaking. He sought the help of a speech therapist to help him overcome his stutter. In the end, he was able to confidently deliver a monumental speech for his people in the midst of war.

So how does one conquer their fear of public speaking? Of course, it’s through ample preparation and practice. No magic potion will transform you into a successful presenter overnight.

When you were in school, presentations were in the form of such as class reports or your thesis defense. As a professional, your presentations progressed into team meetings, client reports, training sessions, sales pitches, and more.

This goes to show how vital it is for your professional and personal growth to have great presentation skills. If you want to further your career and climb to the top of the corporate ladder, being an effective speaker is a valuable asset.

Make sure to arm yourself with everything you need beforehand, including a well-researched and engaging topic. Next, consider the materials you have at your disposal (i.e., audio-visual aids, speakers, projector, LED screen, laptop, etc.). And finally, don’t forget to prepare an effective icebreaker or other interactive exercises to keep your audience interested and engaged.

When it comes to creating slideshows, remember to keep everything straightforward. Don’t go overboard with animations and text. Audiences like it when they can just scan or skim slides that don’t have too much going on.

Remember: you’re there to tell a very important story. Keep a casual and conversational (yet professional) tone so as not to bore your audience. Make sure that you speak clearly so everyone in the can hear you. Don’t rush as it may appear that you don’t care whether you conveyed the right message or that you’re uncomfortable.

Most importantly, just breathe. The final moments before you walk up to the podium will be nerve-wracking. It’s normal, and everything will flow nicely once you command the floor.

Don’t beat yourself up too much when you stutter or fumble during a presentation. Getting good at it takes time. Even prominent figures like Mark Zuckerberg had to learn from one hard-hitting blunder to get better at this skill. Now, when he speaks, the whole world listens.

Here, we’ve got an infographic guide that illustrates a few tips that can help you nail your next presentation. With preparation and practice, you, too can become a successful presenter who can make your audience listen in awe. 

The post 15 Preparations You Should Do to Be A Successful Presenter appeared first on CareerMetis.com.

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For Episode 114 of The CareerMetis Podcast, we will be hearing from a returning guest Robert McGuire.

This interview is part of  the “Freelance Career Expert Series“.

GUEST INTRODUCTION – ROBERT MCGUIRE

Robert McGuire is a business owner from New Haven, Connecticut. He operates the McGuire Editorial Content Marketing Agency in which he helps B2B and SaaS companies create and implement effective content marketing strategies.

He also takes on the role of editor for the Online Gig Economy Forum Nation 1099, which helps solopreneurs find answers  to questions about their businesses.

Coming from a background in journalism, as well as marketing work for non-profit organizations which helped him see the evolution into the content marketing era. It was this type of work that eventually opened up a path to create his current content marketing agency and become involved in the “Gig Economy” 

EPISODE SUMMARY

1. Robert and his team at Nation1099 have recently been gathering and analyzing any and all data they can find relating to the freelance workforce.

2. The landscape of freelancing has changed quite a bit since the old euphemism of being between jobs. With more people choosing to freelance and remain freelancing as a career option, there have been some interesting facts coming to the surface about the people who do so.

3. After addressing the growth of the freelancing sector, and his thoughts on where the trend is going, Robert explains why employers are missing out on a huge percentage of talented workers. He also shares that freelancers aren’t happy with gig-matching services.

4. Robert also shares his suggestions on how a freelancer can be more successful.

5. Robert also discusses why freelancers tend to plateau in their earnings, and provides some examples of what gets over that obstacle.

QUOTES
  • “The full time freelance workforce in the US is growing 3x faster than the workforce over all”

  • “Out of all freelancers, the share of them who actively chose it is on the increase”

  • “Self employed, as a group, is bigger than any other employer in the US”

  • “Putting up job ads and job descriptions is like blowing a whistle that this population cannot hear”

RESOURCES

To learn more about Robert McGuire you can visit his blog . You can also connect with him on LinkedIn and Twitter.

To learn more about the Gig Economy, Freelancers should check out the amazing resources at Nation1099.

Intro Music provided courtesy of Accelerated Ideas (www.accelerated-ideas.com). Soundtrack – Siren Kickback

Ending Music provided courtesy of Accelerated Ideas (www.accelerated-ideas.com). Soundtrack – No Need to Rush        

The post #114 – Freelance Career Expert Series – State of Freelancing with Robert McGuire appeared first on CareerMetis.com.

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It’s happened to all of us at one time or another in organizational life; we’ve been dealt a bad hand and have had to suffer the negative consequences of a decision that someone else has made. 

It might be a promotion that someone else got, a project lead role that was given to a colleague, a developmental lateral move you were refused or the media spokesperson assignment for a major company announcement that was given to someone else.

A decision was made that you had virtually no influence over; one that was clearly not in your best interest. One that sets you back and removes privileges you worked hard and long to earn.

You could whine and snivel about your sorry misfortune, but you’re not likely about to change the decision; you either have to live with it or leave the organization and find opportunities elsewhere.

Here’s how you might be able to hang in and live with it.

1) Look at the bigger picture

Do your research on why the decision to not give you the opportunity was taken. 

If it were a tactical call, it was likely that you lacked the immediate skills and experience necessary to fulfill the new responsibilities you would have to assume.

If it were a strategic call, it could be that the game plan of the organization required a different background than you have or a record of practical accomplishments in an area that you are lacking.

At one point early in my career I lost the competition for a supervisor position in the data marketing department. My track record was devoid of strong data achievements so the opportunity was given to someone else. 

I was disappointed but when I took a step back and took a broader perspective of the decision, I still wasn’t happy about it but at least I was able to understand it.

It wasn’t personal; I was necessary collateral damage. 

As a post script to this story, six months later a new role came up in marketing that I was more than qualified for. I won the contest and it led to further marketing promotions. 

2) Look long term

Always keep the long term first and foremost in mind. 

Short term set backs are a way of life for individuals who choose organizational life. Your immediate misfortune does not represent the end of your career. 

I know that we live in a world of immediate gratification but sometimes this can punish you and your long term potential. 

If your career planning horizon — and your expectations — are unrealistically short be prepared for more disappointment than you should endure.

I suffered a setback through a corporate merger and was demoted from the executive leadership team. It would have been easy to tell them to p*ss off and leave, but I chose to do what I thought was the right thing for me and my family in the long run. 

I stayed and 1 year later was assigned the president position in our internet company.

The good news is that short term setbacks always leave the doors open for more opportunities. Make the right call with your long term interests in mind.

3) Take the punch

Show your resiliency when you lose. 

Be that person who can take the punch, learn from your misfortune, move on and continue to make a valuable contribution to the goals of the organization. 

Stand apart from others who choose to stay in defensive retreat and be the victim. 

The thing that people remember is not that you lost, but HOW you lost — that you were elegant and gracious in defeat, and that you sincerely congratulated the winner and talked up the importance of achieving corporate goals rather than dwelling on the injustice that has been given to you personally.

The ability to take a short term punch and recover to seek other opportunities is a proven recipe for success. No one ever gets to their ultimate destination on a single silver bullet.

Your immediate misfortune is most certainly an opportunity in disguise — “look for the pony”

4) Ask your mentor 

On the way to your cave, seek guidance from a mentor who has, no doubt, experienced similar issues in their time. You need a third party perspective on your issue; someone who can introduce some objectivity.

An it makes no sense to absorb all the pain of defeat by yourself. You’ve invested your time and energy in finding the right mentor so use them.

Express your feelings, ask for advice and listen.

5) Zip it!

Keep your mouth shut! Take a deep breath, retreat to your safe place and think about what happened before you go public with your opinion of the decision that went against you.

It is always tempting and hard to resist, but avoid the acrimonious conversations with colleagues about how unfairly and poorly you’ve been treated. 

Uncontrolled spontaneous reaction generally results in you saying things that are ill thought through and that you will regret. 

You don’t want your personal brand to be tainted with whining and sniveling; you want to be known as that person who can take the high road in the face of adversity. 

If you regress to your child state, your attitude will be seen as a negative and you will probably be overlooked for future opportunities once the crisis has past.

If you start your career with the expectation that you will always be treated in the way you expect, you will be sorely disappointed. And you will no doubt crash and burn when it happens and you’re not prepared.

You must accept the fact that you will be screwed over — in your mind — sooner or later but if you follow these simple suggestions you will not only rebound from your misfortune, you will go on to experience a successful and rewarding career.

The post How to Live with a Decision that Screws You? appeared first on CareerMetis.com.

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Getting a degree is an incredibly rewarding experience that’s increasingly necessary for success in the corporate world. More people than ever graduate with bachelor’s degrees each year, inspiring fierce competition. With the rising cost of living and decreasing job security, many turn to entrepreneurship to ensure their own success and follow their dreams.

However, the same question posed by companies applies: do you need to go back to school to ensure your success?

There are many things to consider before going back to school to get an advanced degree. Starting a small business requires intangible skills like confidence, drive, and vision, as well as technical proficiency in accounting and marketing. Some may find that learning these concrete skills is difficult to do outside of a classroom.

Determining if getting an advanced degree is right for you will depend on how much you already know, how quickly you learn, and how much money you have. Here are some pros and cons to consider:

Pro: Networking Opportunities

Arguably one of the largest benefits to getting an advanced degree in business is being surrounded by like-minded individuals and people who can mentor your progress.

The people you meet can very easily become your business partners, backers, or clients. Becoming friends with others in a graduate program will be incredibly beneficial to your future business.

Pro: Resume Boost

It’s no secret that employers will pay more for higher credentials. On average, those with a master’s will earn more in their lifetimes than those with only a bachelor’s degree. While your plans may not include heading back to the traditional 9 to 5 anytime soon, this is still something you may want to take into account.

Pro: Practical Knowledge

Of course, what you actually learn in classes when you go back to school is also a huge benefit. You’ll have the chance to learn and practice concrete skills like accounting and payroll, as well as public speaking and management. This is a great chance to pick up the skills necessary for running a business, especially if you struggle with teaching yourself.

Con: Lack of Real-World Experience

While taking classes on how to lead employees and manage a team provides some insight into how to succeed as a business owner, nothing beats the experience gained from learning hands-on. The intricacies of being a leader and motivating others are like learning a new language: it’s best done fully immersed.

Con: It’s Expensive

The cost of going back to school is about the same as starting a business, sometimes even more. If you’re already in debt or will be after you finished your second degree, you should carefully consider all your options. Having debt may set you back when starting your business, as banks are more likely to see you as a risk.

Con: It Takes Time

Even if you can completely clear your schedule, an advanced degree is going to take several years. If you’re working part or full-time on top of that, it can take even longer. Taking time can be a good thing if you’re unsure what you want your business to be, but it can also sap the novelty out of a great idea.

Getting an advanced degree may be the right option for you if you don’t mind the cost or time it requires and you learn very well in a classroom environment.

Everyone’s paths to entrepreneurship will be different, so don’t feel like you have to do something because it’s socially acceptable. If you’re still uncertain about whether you should go back to school, take a look at this helpful infographic by Fundera that summarizes what you need to know:

The post Do You Need an Advanced Degree to Ensure a Successful Business? appeared first on CareerMetis.com.

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