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On June 26, the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games Assessment Committee met to discuss:

Here’s our full presentation to the committee.

Culture and the Olympics Culture is one of three pillars of the Olympic Movement, along with Sport and Sustainability. It is central to the Olympic mandate:
  • Showcases the culture of the host city and nation.
  • Captures the opportunity of a global Olympic gathering to create intercultural exchanges, further intercultural understanding and promote the prospects for world peace.

If Calgary were to host another Olympics and Paralympics, there would be a culture component to hosting the Games. It would include events, programs and celebrations that showcase Calgary, Alberta and Canada’s culture to the world, including a focus on Indigenous people. These cultural experiences are one way a host city can help achieve its cultural plan goals and build excitement for the Olympic and Paralympic Games.


The culture component to the Olympics and Paralympics is generally a four-year program that begins with the flag handover ceremony at the previous Games’ closing ceremony. For the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, the ceremony will take place at the closing ceremony of the Beijing Games in 2022. Cultural programs during the Games are organized by the Organizing Committee, as well as by government partners and sponsors.

Starting in 2022, the following four years would see cultural events and programming underway, typically beginning with regional events. These events and programming gain momentum, concluding in an international Cultural Olympiad for 60 days, which takes place before and during the Games. It concludes at the closing ceremonies of the Paralympic Winter Games.

Culture events and programming could include many options:
  • School and youth programming
  • Ticketed events
  • Commissioning local artists for art or exhibits
  • Torch relay, events in the streets
  • Medal ceremonies
  • Concerts or shows
  • Community-based and initiated celebrations at the neighbourhood level

Culture events and programming would provide experiences for citizens and visitors outside the sporting events. They would also provide an opportunity to engage all Calgary communities.

Part of determining whether we should bid on the Olympic and Paralympic Games, is making sure a bid advances all five strategic priorities of Calgary's cultural plan:
  1. Maximize Calgary’s diversity advantage
  2. Grow Calgary’s cultural sector and creative industries
  3. Activate culturally vibrant neighbourhoods and districts
  4. Reinvigorate centre city as a culture heart of the city
  5. Conserve and celebrate Calgary’s built, natural and indigenous heritage

Funding sources and investing in the host city’s arts and cultureThe culture feature of an Olympic bid rests within the operational cost to host an Olympic and Paralympic Games. The operational costs are typically covered through a combination of funding sources: ticket sales, private sponsorships and government. They are supported through partners and sponsors, in addition to the events provided by the host committee.

Looking back at the ’88 Calgary Games, there were both sporting legacies, such as the Winsport facilities, Olympic Oval, Nakiska ski hill, and Canmore Nordic Centre, as well as culture legacies. Examples include construction of the Olympic Plaza, and major funding towards Arts Commons and many Calgary arts organizations, such as the Calgary Philharmonic, Calgary Opera, Alberta Theatre Projects and One Yellow Rabbit Performance Theatre.

As part of The City’s public engagement events, there will be opportunities for you to talk with us about Calgary’s culture scene and whether hosting an Olympic and Paralympic Games could fit with our city.

Public engagement It is important citizens have the opportunity to learn as much as possible about the bid process and the components of Calgary’s bid through the engagement process.

We are planning our public engagement to begin in September. Engagement opportunities will continue leading up to the vote of the electors, taking place in the fall.


Committee meeting recapsJune 19 meeting recap
June 12 meeting recap
June 5 meeting recap
May 29 meeting recap
May 15 meeting recap



For more information about the Olympic bid project, visit calgary.ca/OlympicBid.
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Citizen of the Year recipient J. Murray McCann with Mayor Nenshi
On June 13, 2018 we hosted the 23rd annual Calgary Awards to recognize deserving individuals, corporations, community groups and organizations. The recipients of the awards highlight the excellence of our community and recognize the significant contributions made by our citizens.

The list of 2017 Calgary Awards recipients include:

The Community Achievement Awards
  • Citizen of the Year – J. Murray McCann
  • Grant MacEwan Lifetime Achievement – Mary Rozsa de Coquet
  • Arts – Edmond Agopian
  • Commerce – Ian MacGregor
  • Community Advocate – Gail E. Simper
  • Community Advocate Organization – Distress Centre Calgary
    • Community Advocate Organization Honourable Mention – Children’s Hospital Aid Society
  • Education – Cynthia Joy Prasow
  • Heritage – Hugh A. Dempsey
  • Youth – Yuvraj Singh

Grant MacEwan Lifetime Achievement recipient Mary Rozsa de Coquet

The Signature Award
  • Brian Felesky

Signature Award recipient Brian Felesky with Mayor Nenshi and Councillor Davidson

The City of Calgary W.O. Mitchell Book Prize
  • Taylor Lambert – “Darwin’s Moving”

The Award for Accessibility
  • YYC Calgary International Airport – YYC LINK Passenger Shuttle

Congratulations to the recipients and thank you for helping Calgary to be a great place to make a living, a great place to make a life.

Watch the full awards ceremony and find out more about the awards at calgary.ca/calgaryawards

Thanks to sponsors of the Calgary Awards: Oil City Press Ltd., University of Calgary and Husky Energy. #yycawards
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The Calgary Stampede – synonymous with eating an entire bag of mini donuts, spontaneously yelling “yahoo” (not “yeehaw”) and suits replaced by cowboy boots. Whatever your plans may be, here’s how we can help you stay safe, giddy up n’ go.


Stampede week24 hour CTrain service

After a long day of Stampede fun, we’re here for you with 24 hour CTrain service. ‘Round the clock service begins the evening of July 5 and ends the late evening of July 15.

CTrain schedule during the Stampede:

  • Every five to eight minutes from 6 a.m. to 12:45 a.m.
  • Every 15 to 30 minutes from 12:45 a.m. to 5 a.m.
Discounted transit day passes

Discounted passes are available at 7-Eleven, Mac’s, Safeway, City Hall Cashiers and Calgary Transit Customer Service Centres. During the 10 days of Stampede, they will also be available through ticket vending machines located at CTrain stations for use on the same day.

Stampede transit day passes are valid for one full day (until 4 a.m. of the following day) between July 5 and 15. To validate the pass, scratch the day you are travelling prior to boarding a CTrain or bus.

The special price for adult day passes is $6.50 (reg. $10.50) and youth day passes are $4.50 (reg. $7.50).

Road closuresThere will be a number of road closures during the Stampede that may affect your commute.

Stampede Parade day
Parade day road and parkade closures, bus detours

Road and parking impacts on parade day will include several parking lot closures. If you’re coming to the parade, we encourage you to walk, bike or use transit to get into the downtown core.

Find a comprehensive list of bus detours and info on how to take transit to the parade on Calgary Transit's website.

Road closures and bus route detours become effective at 7:30 a.m. and end around 2 p.m.

Viewing the parade

We've reserved and will monitor eight accessible Stampede Parade viewing zones along the parade route for people with mobility challenges (canes, walkers, wheelchairs, scooters) and their friends and families.

Space is limited, so get there early. Look for barricades and signs. If space remains in the viewing areas after 8 a.m., they will be opened up to the public on a first-come, first-served basis.

The City in action
Street sweeper critters have been a Stampede tradition for nearly 15 years, bringing joy to parade goers and youth at the Children's Hospital that are unable to travel to the Stampede parade - the most rewarding event of the year, according to street sweeper operators.

Taxi, limousine and ridesharing

Plan your ride for when your boots are done scootin’.

Taxis, limousine and rideshare companies are regulated by The City of Calgary and have to meet City safety standards. Check the identity of both the driver and their vehicle before you get in. Find more tips on passenger safety here.

Find out more at calgary.ca/stampede.

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On June 19, the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games Assessment Committee met for the sixth time to discuss:
  • Sustainability
  • Public engagement update

Sustainability
Sustainability is part of Calgary’s potential bid, by both minimizing effects on our physical environment and making sure citizens and visitors can enjoy 2026 Olympic/Paralympic Winter Game venues for decades after the Games end. 


If Calgary chooses to bid on the 2026 Games, the event
needs to fit with Calgary’s vision: a great place to make
a living and a great place to make a life.


The International Olympic Committee (IOC) added sustainability to their Agenda 2020 strategic direction, which includes 40 recommendations on reducing the complexity and cost for a candidate city to host the games.






We strive to reach Calgary's vision everyday, with Council-approved strategies that map out Calgary’s future, how we build and shape our city and grow our economy:


Draft Sustainability FrameworkTo align with Calgary’s vision, plans, and strategies, Calgary 2026 created a draft sustainability framework, consisting of eight components. The draft framework is intended to be the foundation on which the potential 2026 OPWG bid will be developed. Some components of the draft framework support the development of the potential bid. Other components will be developed if we choose to bid and are chosen to host the 2026 OPWG. Collectively, the components represent a comprehensive approach to sustainability that is expected by the IOC.

If we can achieve a sustainable 2026 Games, the return on investment to Calgary could last for decades, including, but not limited to:
  • Increasing affordable housing
  • Improving recreation and community facilities
  • Lowering carbon footprints (both the 2026 Games and Calgary as a city)
  • Exposing Calgary to larger markets, including economic investment, job creation and increased tourism.

As Paris continues to plan for their 2024 Olympic/Paralympic Summer Games, we’re in a unique position to include their learnings and plans on sustainability into planning the 2026 OPWG, if we choose to bid and are chosen to host.


Public engagement updateWe want to hear from Calgarians and talk with you about your perspective on Calgary’s future, the 2026 Games, and whether or not there is a fit between the two. A procurement process is underway to hire an external consultant, who will lead and implement the public engagement program.

We are scheduled to have a more in-depth update at the June 26 assessment committee meeting.

Committee meeting recaps
For more information about the Olympic bid project, visit calgary.ca/OlympicBid.
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To help Calgarians get fit while building their social networks, The City of Calgary has joined the mobile app network PlayCity

“Recreation is the cornerstone of complete communities as it has a direct impact on the quality of life, well-being and resiliency of Calgarians,” says Heather Cowie, Manager of Calgary Recreation’s North and East Region. “Having our facilities listed on the PlayCity app aligns with our goal of breaking down social barriers with respect to sport and recreation activities.”

Developed by Calgarian Hafiz Mitha, PlayCity provides an easy way for adults at the same skill level to meet up locally and participate in a variety of sports. “There are so many amazing recreation facilities to check out in Calgary,” says Mitha. “I created the app to help build more diverse, connected and active neighbourhoods. PlayCity is an opportunity to meet new people, try new things and visit new sport facilities.”

The City has recreation and aquatic facilities in every quadrant listed on PlayCity. Users who download the app can connect with like-minded Calgarians to swim, work out and play a variety of sports at these athletic facilities.

The PlayCity mobile app is available to download for free on iTunes and Google Play.
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Aboriginal Awareness Week Calgary, which runs from June 18 - 22, is a week-long event that promotes pride, understanding, and awareness of Indigenous cultures, traditions, achievements and contributions to Canadian society. June 21, Indigenous Peoples Day, falls during Aboriginal Awareness week and is observed nationally, focusing on the uniqueness and value of First Nations, Inuit and Metis Indigenous culture in Canada. As part of the celebration, the Crowchild family and the Calgary Aboriginal Urban Affairs Committee (CAUAC) presented two annual awards yesterday — the Chief David Crowchild Memorial Award and Aboriginal Youth Award. These awards recognize and honour individuals whose significant and unique contributions have helped create bridges of understanding between Aboriginal and non-aboriginal communities.

The spirit of these awards is captured by the sentiments of the late Chief David Crowchild himself, who said, “I have never been a warrior but all my life I have tried to stand up for what was right and just, not only for my people but for those just conditions and laws that affect us all”.


The recipient of the 2018 Chief David Crowchild Memorial award is Shawna Morning Bull. Shawna has worked in business development for more than 20 years. During that time, her focus has been on facilitating economic development through various projects and business growth opportunities for the benefit of her community. “I am earnestly grateful for the recognition I have received for my work in the indigenous and non-indigenous communities surrounding Mohkinstsis (Elbow, where the river meets),” said Morning Bull, on learning she had won the award. During the ceremony, she acknowledged that she is continually empowered by the people who surround her by noting that her communities are a source of inspiration and strength.



These sentiments are shared by the recipient of the Aboriginal Youth Award, which recognizes a young person who participates in cross-cultural activities, has a strong commitment to achieving educational goals and encourages others to do the same, and who demonstrates leadership in their community and peer groups. This year the award was presented to Wacey Little Light. He too acknowledged the people who supported and inspired him, crediting his success to the guidance he received over the years. Wacey’s grandparents always highlighted the importance of community, and because of that, he strives to be a contributing member of all communities he is a part of, including the city of Calgary, The Siksika Nation, and The Iniskim Centre at Mount Royal University where he is a student.

Congratulations to this year’s award recipients and thank you for your contributions. Your efforts to improve cross-culture collaboration and understanding make Calgary a better place to live for everyone.

More Information:
Aboriginal Awareness Week Calgary
City of Calgary Indigenous Programs and Services
Calgary Aboriginal Urban Affairs Committee (CAUAC)
Aboriginal Awareness Week Opening Ceremonies - YouTube

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Five years ago, heavy rains fell on a melting snowpack upstream of our city, sending water rushing towards Calgary and other Southern Alberta communities. City officials issued a flood warning, declared a state of emergency and gave an evacuation notice for communities at risk. Evacuees and citizens whose homes and businesses were flooded faced trauma and loss.

Mike Eberhard, Kim Myers and Kathryn Hatch experienced flooding and evacuation. What they also have in common is a strong connection to their communities and their homes, and the desire to find a way to manage future flood risks.

After they completed work to remove the flood debris from their properties, they decided they were going to take steps to ensure if another flood happened, they would be prepared. Watch their exceptional stories to learn what actions they took, demonstrating remarkable determination and resiliency.

Flood Preparedness: Bowness - YouTube

Flood Preparedness: Discovery Ridge - YouTube


Building flood-resilient communities is a top priority for the City of Calgary. We cannot prevent river flooding but we are working with citizens, and our provincial and federal partners to reduce its impact. Together with the Province, we have committed more than $150-million towards projects that have reduced our risk of river flood damage by approximately one-third since 2013. We are working towards full implementation of our strategy, which includes a combination of measures at the property-, community- and watershed-level that all work together to protect Calgary against another flood the size of 2013.

Citizens have a critical role to play in preparing for river flooding and protecting their property. Calgary is most at risk of river flooding from May 15 to July 15. River flooding impacts all Calgarians – whether you live, work, commute or recreate along the Bow or Elbow Rivers, or in the city centre – it’s important for every Calgarian to understand their flood risk, be prepared and stay informed. Citizens can learn more at calgary.ca/floodinfo, search their address online to see if they are at risk from flooding, sign up for our bi-weekly flood readiness e-newsletter, download our Flood Readiness Guide and learn how to prepare a 72-hour emergency kit.
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On June 12, the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games Assessment Committee met for the fifth time to discuss the:

The assessment committee was introduced to Calgary 2026 (formerly Bid Corporation) Chair Scott Hutcheson. Serving the needs of citizens, Alberta and the Canada, Scott wants to establish a proper return on both a community (public good, value to Calgary and region) and financial (revenues) investment. Calgary 2026 is electing its board members this week, followed by hiring a CEO. 

Here’s a summary of the items discussed between Scott and committee members:
  • Scott is resigning from the boards he currently serves to prevent conflicts of interest. He will remain on Aspen Properties Board, as it is his day job. 
  • Recognizing Calgary 2026 is a separate organization, of which The City is one of six partners, the organization will ensure there is transparency. 
  • Transparency is most important to building trust with Calgarians. 
  • The bid needs to reflect Calgarians’ spirit; Calgary’s story, and the city’s and region’s aspirations. 
  • Calgary 2026’s working toward a diverse work team reflecting a mix of genders and generations, cultural backgrounds, indigenous peoples, and others.
  • Calgary 2026 is considering adopting Calgary City Council’s Code of Conduct, as its own. 
  • Under the current president (Thomas Bach) and new Deputy Olympic Games Executive Director (Christophe Dubi), the International Olympic Committee is forming a picture that shows the IOC safeguarding the uniqueness of the Olympic Games and strengthening sport in society, but implementing Agenda 2020, underway since 2015.
  • Calgary 2026 is planning a session between the Assessment Committee and the Canadian Olympic Committee (COC) and the IOC. 

City Secretariat update
Now that Calgary 2026 is operational, The City of Calgary and other orders of governments are establishing Secretariats. The City of Calgary’s City Secretariat will have eight dedicated work streams to keep Council and Calgarians informed: City building/programming, essential services, planning, reporting and risk management, communications, legal, finance, issue management, and research.

The City Secretariat will require funding, but the cost of this group is covered through The City’s already-approved Operating Budget. There is no extra cost to tax payers; the cost will be reported to Council for approval.

The City Secretariat acknowledges the local and global risk to Calgary. It is working to mitigate these and other identified risks, including working with other orders of government to review their respective lessons learned.

Bid Book Overview
The Bid Book is the document that Calgary 2026 submits to the IOC, if Calgary chooses to bid on the 2026 OPWG. It is the document that the IOC reviews when deciding on the host city. The book is made up of 132 questions; the answers making up the book.

The Bid Book is due to the IOC, Jan. 11, 2019.

Areas covered within the Bid Book:
  • Vision and Games Concept: Vision, Mission and Values of the Calgary 2026 OPWG; venues and locations, etc. 
  • Games Experience: Spectator/Local Community, Athlete, Media
  • Paralympic Winter Games: competition schedule, planning and Games delivery 
  • Sustainability & Legacy: aligning Games with City policies, Games benefit to current challenges, cultural concept, community development 
  • Games Delivery: operating budget including a Host Corporation, third party-review of operating budget, security, revenue streams, transportation, accommodation (including understanding role of short term rentals), food and beverage, medical and anti-doping (chartering samples to Montreal’s drug testing lab is estimated to be less costly than building a temporary lab in Calgary which could cost $20 million dollars) 
  • Guarantees: contracts with hotels; affordable housing sites, financial agreements for housing, Federal Government and Canada Olympic Committee endorsement, human rights and safety, anti-doping complying with World Anti-Doping Agency, etc. 

Benefits to the bid, without the 2026 OPWG
The Assessment Committee discussed the benefits to Calgarians of the work underway regardless whether or not the bid move forward. Some of these benefits include:
  • Information can be transitioned to the Opportunity Calgary Investment Fund (OCIF) board for their economic development, job creation and marketing plans to help boost Calgary’s economy; including, bidding on other large-scale events, from trade shows to sport competitions. 
  • Venue assessment: current status, required upgrades, new facilities
  • Accommodation
    • Processes for large bookings for events and conferences
    • Transportation network planning
    • Concepts for culture programming
    • International exposure through the bid process

Committee meeting recaps

For more information about the Olympic bid project, visit calgary.ca/OlympicBid
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On June 5, the 2026 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games Assessment Committee met for the fourth time to discuss milestone dates and the Games concept.

In addition to this week’s committee update, the Chair of the Bid Corporation (BidCo) was announced on Thursday, June 7, at the Olympic Oval, with Scott Hutcheson as BidCo Chair. BidCo will clarify the vision and details of a potential Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, and will develop a more accurate hosting cost estimate. BidCo will also produce a Bid Book, which would be submitted to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in January 2019, if all parties decide to move forward with the bid and the IOC selects Calgary to become a 2026 Candidate City.


City Team presentation and discussionMilestonesJune is an important month for Calgary’s potential bid on the 2026 Games. Here are some project milestones:

  • June 8-10: Canadian Olympic Committee (COC) Board meeting in Banff: Calgary Mayor and BidCo Chair attending.
  • June 19: IOC-Calgary bid team meeting in Switzerland. One City employees are expected to attend; the IOC is funding the trip.June 23: COC decides whether to endorse Calgary’s bid.
  • June 25: Regular Meeting of Council: government submission review.
  • June 30: Deadline to submit government submission: details the operating and capital costs of the 2026 Games; mission, vision and value of the 2026 Games; Games concept: venues and locations; governance; communications; Bid Corporation; risks and mitigation; and milestone schedule.
  • July-August 2018: Committee meetings continue, as required.
  • July-August 2018: Government submission analysis and multi-party agreement negotiations for 2026 Games cost to The City and the governments of Canada and Alberta.
  • September 2018: Multi-party agreement results, including cost of the Games and who is paying what amount.
  • October 2018: IOC formally invites cities to bid on the 2026 Games (candidature stage)
  • November 2018: Calgary plebiscite: citizens vote on whether or not Calgary should bid on the 2026 Games.
  • January 11, 2019: IOC deadline to submit Bid Book.

Draft Games conceptA Games concept is a preliminary proposal that:

  • Identifies venues for the majority of Olympic and Paralympic sports.
  • Identifies locations for these venues.
  • Confirms if and where these venues require upgrades, or if a new venue is required.

The IOC’s Agenda 2020 program sets out new expectations for how cities use existing and new venues:

  • Reducing cost of bidding on and hosting the Games.
  • Using existing facilities, regardless of location and seating capacity.
  • Ensuring new facilities are part of the city’s current plans and future needs (with or without the Games).

The closed portion of this meeting covered details of the current draft Games concept:

  • Detailed list of venues and operation status in Calgary and surrounding areas
  • Competition and training venues
  • Athletes village
  • Venues for ceremonies and celebrations


Committee meeting recaps
May 29 meeting recap
May 15 meeting recap

For more information about the Olympic bid project, visit calgary.ca/OlympicBid.
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We’re improving stormwater drainage in Woodlands, Woodbine, Cedarbrae, Braeside, Palliser and Pump Hill. In recent years, these areas have had an unusually high number of heavy rainfall events resulting in flooding. To better manage this stormwater, we are upgrading infrastructure across the southwest and installing dry and wet ponds.

Major improvements
  • A new dry pond at Southland Drive & Braeside Drive SW (March – August 2018) 
  • A new underground storm trunk in the median of 24th Street SW (June 2018 – Nov 2018) 
  • A new storm pond constructed in Bebo Grove day use area (2019 – June 2020) 
Secondary improvements (August 2018 & July/August 2019)
  • Proposed installation of inlet control devices (ICD’s) 
  • Replacement or upgrade of catch basins and manholes 
  • Storm sewer diversions 
  • Improvement of overland spill routes in the local neighborhood

New 24th street storm trunk diversion details
A new underground storm trunk will be installed in the median of 24th Street SW from Woodview Drive SW to Woodpark Blvd. SW and south into Fish Creek Provincial Park. 

Construction of the storm trunk diversion consists of excavation, underground piping, backfill and road restoration. Construction impacts will include:
  • Increased traffic on 24th Street S.W. (construction crews, trucks hauling materials to and from site)
  • Construction noise
  • Staged closures of 24th Street S.W. south of Woodview Dr. complete with detours. Access to the communities of Woodbine and Woodlands will be maintained through Woodview Dr.
  • Tree removal
  • Access road into Fish Creek Park will be closed to vehicles during construction of the portion of the storm trunk under the access road
The storm diversion will significantly reduce flooding that occurs along 24th Street SW and in the communities of Woodbine and Woodlands as the new trunk will be . During heavy rainfall, overall vehicle and pedestrian safety will be improved, traffic congestion reduced and emergency vehicle access unimpeded by flooding.

New Bebo Grove storm pond details
A new storm pond will be constructed in the Bebo Grove day use area of Fish Creek Provincial Park. The pond be a hybrid wet pond-wetland where wetland water levels will vary with the seasons and amount of rainfall. A new asphalt trail will be constructed around the south perimeter of the pond to connect with existing trails in Fish Creek. Construction will be ongoing throughout summer 2019 with landscaping to be completed in summer of 2020. 

Construction of the pond consists of earthworks (excavation and grading), underground piping and landscaping. Construction impacts will include:
  • Increased traffic to the Bebo Grove day use area of Fish Creek Park (construction crews, trucks hauling materials to and from site)
  • Construction noise
  • Access road and day use area will closed to the public for the duration of construction. Pedestrian and cyclist access will be maintained into and throughout the park.
The storm pond will allow for storage of stormwater during rain events and improve the quality of the water discharged to Fish Creek by separation and settlement of suspended solids. Newly created picnic areas and lookouts surrounding the pond will provide spaces for park users to enjoy the improved aesthetics of the Bebo Grove area and the wet pond will attract more bird and wildlife species.

About the Woodlands Woodbine Community Drainage Improvements (WWCDI) programThe above projects are a result of the WWCDI program, launched in 2010 to mitigate flooding in areas throughout the city. Drainage studies were undertaken to come up with solutions to areas that were frequently hit by flooding caused by extreme rainfall events in older areas of the city. When a drainage study is completed, a set of solutions are developed to mitigate flooding in the area. Solutions can be a combination of adding additional storm drainage pipes, increasing the size of drainage pipes and adding storm ponds to help mitigate flooding.

These drainage improvement projects aim to reduce the chance of flooding from 20% down to 2%. This brings the system up to a level that is current to City of Calgary servicing standards.

Learn more about each of these projects and stay up to date at calgary.ca/wwcdi
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