Loading...

Follow CADENCE HEALTH | Health Coaching and Nutrition .. on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
​Corinne Blight - Graduate shares HER STORY.
As a Health Coach & certified Group Fitness instructor. The perfect combination of health and fitness. Corinne shares her primary goals, time of study at Cadence Health, and how it re-awakened her love for helping and inspiring others.
" The thing that drives me the most in my own Health/ Fitness career is the belief that I truly can inspire and empower others to lead their best, most healthy & LIMITLESS life possible!" ​
1. Given where you are in your life now, and your vision of the future, can you share with us what it is that drives you most?
The thing that drives me the most in my own Health/ Fitness career is the belief that I truly can inspire and empower others to lead their best, most healthy & LIMITLESS life possible! This belief makes me want to create amazing Health & Nutrition programs, teach amazing fitness classes and essentially inspire others to just be their best (and have fun whilst doing so! 😊)
2. We’d love you to share with us the key vibe that led you to choose to study with Cadence Health.
There were so many reasons why I chose to study with Cadence Health! The standout reason (and the reasons I tell anyone who asks me) is the genuine support you receive from staff and other likeminded students in the Cadence Health community. Before I even started I could just tell how genuinely caring the staff were and how eager they were to see me succeed. I wasn't let down and throughout my entire time studying with Cadence I was so supported. I still send through questions and ask for advice to this day & I'm an Alumni 😊
3. Can  you describe to us in a few words where you feel you are in life right now, and describe something from your studies that influenced this? 
I'd say I'm on the path to exactly where I need to be going. I feel like since studying with Cadence Health I re-awakened my love for helping and inspiring others, and my drive to continue working in the Health & Fitness industry. I definitely know I want to continue coaching clients individually, but as well, venture into corporate health, group fitness presenting & lots of other things (so many to list!).
4. Once you graduated, what influenced your choice of business direction? And, can you share a few of your current business goals?
When I finished studying my Advanced Certificate of Human Nutrition with Cadence Health I was also in the process of completing a range of Group Fitness certifications. So, concurrently I became a Health Coach and certified Group Fitness instructor. The perfect combination I think! With both these and my Certificate 3 & 4 in Fitness my business (Limitless Fitness & Nutrition) centres around Nutrition Coaching with clients, corporate organisations as well as inspiring through making physical activity fun. My primary goal  is to start presenting on nutrition and healthy lifestyle choices at Corporate workplaces, I think this is a really important place where we need to make healthy lifestyle choices that last for lifetime. In addition, I really want to increase the scale of the Group Fitness classes I teach, and bring them to more people in Australia & the world #dreambig! 😉
Words by: Corrine Blight
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
The bacteria in our gut play a key role in digestion and overall health and wellbeing. So, how does this bacterial composition impact our health, and what exactly is a healthy gut microbiota?
What is the gut microbiota?
Inside our digestive system, tens of trillions of microorganisms and at least 1000 different species of bacteria have made a comfortable home for themselves. This incredible collection of microorganisms – such as bacteria, viruses, and yeast in our digestive system – is known as our gut microbiota.
 
Research into the area of our microbiome is showing us our knowledge is still in it’s early stage, while the two most dominant bacteria in the gut are Firmicutes and Bacteroides (representing some 70-75%) there is an increasing diversity of what is termed 'phyla' being uncovered.
​So, what is the gut microbiome then?
The terms microbiome and microbiota are often used interchangeably, but they have different meanings. The gut microbiome is the name for the genes inside the cells of all the microorganisms in our gut combined. No two gut microbiomes are the same – but, there are certain combinations of microorganisms in our gut microbiota that are common in most people. 
​What does our gut microbiota do?
While many of us associate bacteria and viruses with illness, the microorganisms in our gut microbiota aren’t invaders – they’re actually extremely valuable colonisers.  Here’s why - The microorganisms help us to digest foods that we’re otherwise unable to digest. They do this by turning all those non-digestible carbohydrates – such as resistant starches, cellulose, pectins, and gums – into energy and absorbable nutrients.
 
These nutrients benefit us – but impressively, they’re also used by the bacteria themselves to grow and flourish. Speaking of nutrients, our gut microbiota produces valuable vitamins – such as vitamin B12, thiamine, riboflavin and vitamin K, which is essential for the clotting of our blood.

And if that’s not enough, our microbiota also protects us from other bacteria that can cause disease. It does this by producing what’s known as bacteriocins, which are antimicrobial substances that stop pathogenic bacteria from growing in our gut. There’s a growing body of evidence suggesting that, in addition to supporting gut health, the microbiome may be important for other areas of health, such as immunity. Specifically, the microorganisms in our microbiota may be able to support the development and function of immunity by ‘training’ the immune system to tolerate non-harmful microorganisms and react to harmful pathogens.
​How does our gut microbiome develop?
Remarkably, our gut microbiome starts to develop as soon as we’re born. Even in the first hours after birth, babies are picking up useful microorganisms from their environment. As we come into contact with new people and foods, the microflora mix in our gut continues to grow and adapt to the available nutrients in our diet. A baby’s gut microbiota, for example, has microorganisms that help digest the sugars (oligosaccharides) in milk. When babies begin to eat solid foods, their gut microflora will also start to contain microorganisms involved in digesting sugars (polysaccharides) in solid foods. When we’re about one year old, our gut microflora is already much more diverse than when we were born. It continues to develop as we eat more solid foods and explore the world around us.
 
Around age three, the composition (the specific microorganisms) and diversity (the different kinds of microorganisms) of the gut microbiota is similar to that of adults and stays relatively stable throughout adult life. However, as we move into old age, we begin to lose some of this stability and the composition of our gut microflora changes again. This change doesn’t necessarily affect our health – though some researchers suspect that, in some cases, it could contribute to health issues in our gut.
​What does a healthy microbiome look like?
So, what exactly is a ‘healthy’ gut microbiome? It’s a question more and more researchers around the world are investigating as they strive to understand how an unhealthy gut microbiome may cause – or be linked to – disease and poor health. Identifying the characteristics of a healthy microbiome is a challenging task, though – especially as each of us seems to have a unique microbiota that is constantly evolving. Still, researchers have proposed that a healthy microbiome has the following three characteristics:
  1. Highly diverse with many different types of bacteria – the more, the better.
  2. Free of pathogenic microorganisms – the type that can cause an infection.
  3. Resistant and resilient – meaning that, after a gut infection, our gut microbiota can recover and return to a healthy state.
​What can change our gut microbiome?
One significant factor that can affect the microbial mix in our gut is antibiotic use. Antibiotics don’t just kill pathogenic bacteria – they kill all bacteria in their path. This means that, when we take antibiotics, the beneficial bacteria in our gut will suffer, too. While these changes in our gut microflora are usually only temporary, not everyone’s gut microbiome recovers immediately. Some people may take a few weeks, or even a whole year, to recover fully.
 
Another huge factor affecting the microflora in the gut is our diet – specifically, our long-term dietary habits. Long-term, established habits may actually change the type of microorganisms in our gut. In one study, researchers found that a diet high in carbohydrates was linked with a high amount of Prevotella bacteria in the gut microbiome. On the other hand, diets high in protein, especially meat, were associated with a gut microbiome rich in Bacteroides bacteria.
 
Whether these changes in our gut are healthy or may cause disease is another million-dollar question that researchers are now investigating. It's also not yet clear how a high carbohydrate or protein diet actually changes the microbial mix in our gut.
Researchers are learning more about specific behaviours, though. Prevotella bacteria, for example, can use carbohydrates to grow which might give these bacteria a head start when compared with other bacteria that can’t use carbohydrates to grow. This head start might also mean Prevotella bacteria also outgrow others. So, while scientists are constantly learning more about how eating can change the microorganisms, they’re still investigating whether these changes actually help or hinder our health.
 
Short-term changes in our diet can affect our gut microbiota, too. In one small study, people who changed their diet to meat, egg and milk drastically changed their gut microflora. Within just five days, these peoples’ gut contained more bile-tolerant bacteria and fewer bacteria that metabolise plant polysaccharides. Unfortunately, researchers don’t yet know exactly how specific aspects of our diet interact with our microbiome. Still, the emerging research suggests that we may one day know how to modify our diets to ensure a healthy microbiome and ultimately maintain or improve our health.
Want to learn more about the GUT and how it affects our health? Click the link below to enrol to our newly released unit - Trust your GUT: Gut Health and the Microbiome
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
​Earlier this year, the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) released an updated report on the effects of diet, nutrition and physical activity on cancer. One of the 10 recommendations for cancer prevention was to:
 
Limit consumption of ‘fast foods’ and other processed foods high in fat, starches or sugars.”
The report makes further mention that the foods to avoid are potato chips, white flour products (breads, pastries, cakes) and confectionary; and recommends that we include plenty of wholegrains, fruit, beans, and non-starchy vegetables in most meals. No big surprises here, but a few questions. Why the mention of starches in particular, and why are they being snubbed with sugar and fat? If they’re in vegetables aren’t they good for us? And, do we need to eliminate them all? If your own cogs were turning with any of these questions then you’re not alone. 'Starch 101’ coming right up!
​What is starch?
Starch is a complex carbohydrate and is the storage form of energy for plants. Starch is common in plant foods including cereals, root vegetables and tubers, beans, and peas. As such, starchy foods that appear most commonly in our diets would be rice, pasta, bread and starchy vegetables like potato and sweet potato.
 
Now, a wee bit of starch science is necessary here… Nothing to scary, so stay with us. Different food sources will contain starches in differing structures and as such, they will be digested differently. Amylose and amylopectin are the two major polysaccharides that make up a starch molecule. Amylose is a long, mainly unbranched chain of glucose units, which we digest slowly. Amylopectin is highly branched, and is broken down more quickly therefore creating a rise in blood glucose and insulin levels. Starch molecules are usually made up of more amylopectin than amylose. 
​So, are there good and bad starches?
Kind of… Starches are processed differently depending on their use and while starches do pack a punch in terms of carbohydrate content, they also contain important vitamins, minerals, and contribute to our intake of all-important dietary fibre. Legumes for example, contain high levels of starch but are also an important plant-based protein that contains vital nutrients and contributes to the feeling of satiety (fullness).
 
To really understand the effect starches have on our body, we need to look at refined starches and resistant starches.
Refined starch
​Refined starches are grains that have had their super nutritious husk removed, and as such have lost much of their health promoting properties. White rice is a good example of a refined starch, whereas brown rice is non-refined as it still has the outer husk intact. As a result, brown rice is higher in dietary fibre and also higher in amylose. Remember that amylose is broken down more slowly and helps keep us fuller for longer without inducing an insulin spike like simple carbs do.
 
Refined starch is super common in the typical Western diet and features strongly in processed foods, particularly products made from white wheat flour. We’re talking breads, pasta, pizza, and baked goods. These are the starches we want to avoid! They often accompany high amounts of fat and sugar in processed foods, are cheap and convenient, and as a result are contributing to the global increase in overweight and obesity. When the cancer prevention guidelines are telling us to limit starches, they’re mainly talking about refined starches. High body fat is a risk factor for several cancers, as well as metabolic disorder. 
Resistant starch
Resistant starch is starch that ‘resists’ digestion in the small intestine and continues to the large intestine where it is fermented in the same fashion as fibre. It is higher in amylose than amylopectin, which is why it is digested more slowly.

Resistant starches (RS) have several health promoting properties. Like fibre, it contributes to faecal bulk, and improves insulin sensitivity. Resistant starch can aid in weight loss through promoting satiety and reducing the caloric intake. When resistant starch is fermented in the colon, the short-chain fatty acid butyrate is produced which may aid in the prevention of colon cancer. Resistant starch feed our microbiome (healthy gut bacteria), the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are believed to prevent pathogens from taking hold, improve nutrient absorption, and aid immunity.
There are three types of RS:
  1. Physically inaccessible – can't be broken down by digestion, some found in legumes, whole and partially milled grains and seeds
  2. Type 2 resistant granules – resistant to digestion, contains high amount of amylose, found in corn, fruit, potatoes, hi-maze RS products, and some legumes
  3. Type 3 Retrograde – When some RS containing foods are cooked the starch is altered making it more resistant to digestion, found in cooked and cooled potatoes, bread, rice and cornflakes
  4. Type 4 Chemically modified – manufactures have isolated RS (often from corn) via a chemical process producing an essentially synthetic RS for use in commercially produced foods such as bread, biscuits and so on, you’ll sometimes see it as ‘Hi-Maize RS’.
 
It seems we can tolerate up to about 40-45 g/d of RS without it upsetting tummies. Too much and we can get bloating, gas and diarrhoea, the ratio of the various RS can have an influence too. Ideally RS is best consumed when it is in a solid form and part of a meal. Seems about 20 g/d is dandy for most of us, which is no sweat to gain if you eat a diet rich in whole foods or plant-based diet

Some examples of high resistant starch foods are:
  • Unprocessed and uncooked oats is one of the best sources
  • Puffed wheat cereal
  • Muesli
  • Pumpernickel, rye and sourdough bread
  • Lentils and beans
  • Seedy grainy breads
  • Crackers
  • Banana (particularly unripe) and plantains
  • Cooked and cooled starchy vegetables (potato, yams and sweet potato)
Tips for the optimal starch inclusive diet
  • Avoid the high amylopectin/ refined starch foods such as white breads, cakes, and white pasta.
  • Opt for starches higher in resistant starch/amylose like wholegrain products, and legumes.
  • In your next smoothie throw in some raw unprocessed oats.
  • Revolve the above smoothie with an unripen banana smoothie the next day.
  • Use lentils to thicken stews and casseroles.
  • Alternate your bread preferences.
  • Still include primarily non-starchy vegetables in your diet such as leafy greens, broccoli, eggplant, carrots and zucchini. Increasing essential nutrient intake and reducing energy density is cancer protective.
  • Avoid processed foods. They are often high in fat, refined starches and refined sugar. Furthermore, processes such as heating can change starch structures so that they become higher in amylopectin. 
If you’re interested in the WCRF report, the whole document including the cancer prevention guidelines can be viewed here-
https://www.wcrf.org/sites/default/files/Summary-third-expert-report.pdf
Words by Iydi Willis
Nutritionist and Health Education Consultant
Edited by Leanne Cooper
Registered Nutritionist, mother of two, author, educator, presenter and nutrition consultant.
IS NUTRITION YOUR PASSION?
Why not jump into our free sample class, no catches, no hassling, actual content from our Certificate of Human Nutrition course that pathways to the Advanced Certificate of Nutrition & Health Coaching as well as degrees in nutrition, naturopathy and health at Endeavour College

Or why not start today. It’s no coincidence you have seen this blog, call the office on 02 9400 9759, mention this Starch Blog and get a 10% discount on the Certificate of Human Nutrition (not in conjunction with other offers). Keep your eyes out for our specials via our social media pages @cadencehealthcourses.
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
It begins with a niggle, that shoulder that just doesn't rotate as well as the other, the one you can't sleep on with a full degree of comfort. You figure you'll work on it, stretch a little longer, a little deeper into the stretch at yoga, you forget its deteriorating and showing no signs of improvement, it's easy to forget, to adjust to after all that time. 
In the beginning
​You lift a weight, pick up something heavier than you would normally, your arm compensating so it's at a weird angle. Soon you notice a twinge, increasingly it deteriorates until you've put it off for months. The thought of going to get it checked is just a bother. Until you realise if you can't change the gear shift in the car it's probably not going to get better. 
Getting it checked out
Off you go, physio once a week, it takes 3 days to get passed the pain it puts you in, but you've waited too long and now you're serious about sorting it out. Religiously, you do your exercises because in ignoring it you've put yourself in this position. Or have you? 
The shoulder is a full on injury now. You can't sleep at night, you can't use the arm at all, the discomfort is now out right pain. You decide to try something new, dry needling, apple cider vinegar, supplement after supplement, nothing, nothing works. Take a break, stop moving it, doesn't help, but doesn't make it worse. 
It's a what?
'I've had one like that', 'a friend of mine had a frozen shoulder too'. A what? Frozen shoulder... Noooo, no, no,no. Not me. This is an injury. Ok, now this is serious, let's see a specialist. Scans, 'bursitis with calcific foci...'. Oh yes there is, it is an injury. Maybe all I need is a steroid injection? Check out the research, oh gawd not a great success rate and may weaken the tissue, hmmm, no definitely want something with better odds than that. 
Let's see what the specialist says about my injury, I have a couple of weeks to get some positive movement. Magnesium to encourage tissue to reabsorb calcium, anti inflammatory (natural of course) in the form of a supplement with Salix alba (natural aspirin) and keep up my fish oils. The pain ebbs back to discomfort, but clearly exercise is not the go, ouch!
Off to the lovely specialist who we have a sporting connection to. Brief test and check the range of movement and pain, 'yes frozen shoulder'. No! Shut the gate!!! Bugger! Really? Are you sure? I do yoga every night? Are you sure.... groan. 
So what have I learnt?
​I've learnt that;
1. the shoulder is the least most stable joint in the body.
2. that if you have a niggle, be seen by a physio who specialises in shoulders.
3. if the treatment you get makes your shoulder worse, then stop, before you end up in capsulitis.
4. the supplements seemed to have helped because a frozen shoulder freezes
It's frozen. It then unfreezes on average over 12 months, I was on the down hill run at about 6 months. The specialist suggests that it's progressed through the stages quickly. 
What worked for me?
But my big find was Bowen treatment. Wow! It was the single treatment that has led to the biggest improvements. It seems to me that Bowen is about waking up a muscle and surrounding inflamed tissue to disperse inflammation. 
At 8 months I'm getting good nights sleep, I can sleep on my back for a while now and partially on my tummy, I've almost got my arm range of movement to 90 degrees (from about 45) and the nerve pain down my arm is barely there. Bowen Therapy has been the relief of pain that I needed.

Don't just settle for one treatment if you aren't getting the results. Do your research and be willing to try new things. Only you know your body and what it needs. 
Words by...
Leanne Cooper
Mum, Registered Nutritionist, Author, Founder and Director of Cadence Health
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
​Nature has given us the beauty of fruit, vegetables, herbs and spices to name just a few. Nature was intended for us to survive and thrive on. Herbs and spices are full of antioxidants and phytochemicals (non-nutritive plant chemicals that have protective or disease preventive properties. They are non-essential nutrients, that is we don’t require them to survive but these chemicals in recent research demonstrate that they can also protect humans against diseases). 
Why eat herbs and spices?
Recently, I have had an inflammatory issue that's been ongoing for a while. After I did much research I decided to make my own teas using a range of herbs and spices that act as an anti-inflammatory. I must say its working wonders! So this just proves to me herbs and spices can in fact give us that boost we need.
Herbs and spices are so easy to use. You can add them to soups, teas, baking, meat, meals and so on. Different herbs and spices can be used for different reasons or simply as a flavouring, thus reaping the benefits of including them in your diet.

Here is a list of a few of the main ones widely used with many health benefits. Fresh is best but ground can be used as well. The benefits will also depend on what you use and how you use them. Be mindful of daily safe consumption amounts and allergies. Sometimes too much of a good thing can be too much.
Cardamom
​This sweet, pungent spice is in many pumpkin spices mixes. It’s known to soothe an upset stomach and provides gastrointestinal protection. Lab studies show it may also help fight inflammation, lower blood pressure, and play a role in preventing the growth of cancer cells. “Of all spices, cardamom is especially high in minerals like magnesium and zinc,” says Professor Moreno from the University of Nutrition in Miami. (Manganese, being a mineral that helps the body form connective tissue, bones and sex hormones). It is also crucial for normal nerve and brain function, carbohydrate metabolism, fat metabolism, calcium absorption and blood sugar regulation. 
This spice is also widely used as a digestive aid and a natural breath freshener amongst the people of India. 
Curcumin
Curcumin is the main active ingredient in Turmeric. It has powerful anti-inflammatory effects and is a very strong antioxidant. It also helps detox the liver and improve brain function. Turmeric is what gives curry the yellow colour. In order to absorb Turmeric the best way is by encapsulating it in lipids (fats) or combining it with Piperine (the substance in black pepper). 
Curcumin research has shown it can help alleviate pain and improve function in people with osteoarthritis of the knee. There’s also evidence that Curcumin may help reduce joint pain and swelling in people with rheumatoid arthritis. It is also said to have properties to protect against cancer. 
Using Turmeric has been shown to help with inflammatory disorders, including arthritis, tendinitis, and autoimmune conditions.
Cinnamon
​Cinnamon is sweet, low in calories and sugar free. Lab studies show that it also may help with inflammation, fend off free radicals that can damage your cells, fight off bacteria, and even protect against conditions that affect your brain or nervous system, like Parkinson's disease or Alzheimer's (Moreno). 
It can also lower blood sugar levels, reduce heart disease risk factors and has large amounts of other health benefits.
Garlic
​Garlic is a plant in the Allium family (onions). Ancient history shows the main use of garlic was for its health and medicinal properties. Garlic can combat sickness and the common cold, it can reduce blood pressure and cholesterol, lower risk of heart disease, help prevent Alzheimer's and Dementia, improve athletic performance, detox heavy metals from the body, help maintain blood circulation, enhances the immune system and improve bone health. 
It can even help people with arthritis or fibromyalgia. Garlic must be cut or crushed as the properties are found within the clove.
Ginger
​Possible health benefits include relieving nausea, loss of appetite, motion sickness, and pain. The root or underground stem (rhizome) of the ginger plant can be consumed fresh, powdered, dried as a spice, in oil form, or as juice.
Dr. Axe says, the health benefits of ginger are largely due to its antioxidants, anti-inflammatory properties and content of therapeutic compounds. It helps fight fungal infection, protects against stomach ulcers, helps ease menstrual pain, may inhibit cancer growth, regulates blood sugar, relieves joint and muscle pain, lowers cholesterol, improves brain function and  blocks bacterial infections.
Basil
(Holy Basil) There are about 35 varieties of basil however Holy Basil is the most known for its health properties. Basil can help by being anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and contains powerful adaptogen — meaning it helps the body to respond to stress and fight disease. 
Proven benefits are:
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Antioxidant
  • Cancer-fighter
  • Pain-reducer (analgesic)
  • Fever-reducer (antipyretic)
  • Diabetes-preventer
  • Liver-protector (hepatoprotective)
  • Blood vessel-protector
  • Anti-stress solution
  • Immune-booster 
  • And more! 
  • It can even help people with arthritis or fibromyalgia
Parsley
A readily accessible herb available all year through here in Australia that’s easy to grow. It has a more bitter taste so I often use in place of salt.
Parsley not only provides a beautiful garnish but many healing properties. It is a rich source of antioxidants, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, folate and iron. Many a research has showed it helps prevent cancer, including prevention of skin cancer and decrease tumour size. It’s also beneficial for maintaining a healthy heart, preventing diabetes, increasing bone strength and protection against rheumatoid arthritis. 
If you're taking blood thinners, seek medical advice first due to the high Vitamin K content.
​If you have any health concerns definitely see your doctor but wow, the benefits of including these in your everyday diet is amazing! 
So easy to include and oh so tasty!
Words by Lisa Norman, one of our lovely Cadence Health students in our Professional Certificate of Meal & Menu Planning
Check out Lisa's amazing business pages:
Website: Run and Reps
If you enjoyed this blog, check out our Kitchen Medicine unit.
You'll discover the healing power of plants and how different foods effect our body all in one unit!! 
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Tips from InnerFit Nutritions' Amanda Martindale
Like many, I happily overindulged over the warm summer months with more than usual ciders and champers, overflowing cheese boards and flavoursome fish and chips on the beach! Did I regret it? Not even once! While I am a keen advocate of healthy eating and feeding and fuelling your body with optimal nutrition, I am also all for balance and moderation. I happily shared many a time over the summer with friends eating and drinking things that I knew weren’t the best for my body, but made special memories at the same time. This to me is just as, if not more important, than worrying about how many cups of veges I ate during the day, or how many burpees I needed to do to burn off that second wheel of Camembert! As we transition into cooler months, with less sunshine and more rain, it’s a time to give the body a rest and some nurturing to see us through the winter, healthy and happy.
​The Winter Reset
​As the ciders are substituted for red wine and champers for hot chocolates, so do the foods we eat. BBQ’s and salads often turn into roast meats and veges and slow cooked curries and stews. Its easy to eat fewer fresh raw veges during the cooler months, as we reach for more warming dishes. Winter is notorious for illness and you’d be lucky to escape the colder months lurgy free. Below are a few tips and tricks to help boost your immunity, reducing the incidence of colds and flus that spread like wild fire.
1. ​Continue to Drink Water
While this is no easy feat when it’s cold and dreary outside, drinking plenty of water during the cooler months is just as important as when we are in the peak of summer. Water keeps you hydrated, assists in detoxification, and lubricates the joints. If cold water isn’t going to cut it, pour yourself a glass of warm water and squeeze in some lemon juice and apple cider vinegar. This will also help to kick start your digestion and wake up your liver. So drink up so you can get up outta bed!
2. Drink Herbal Teas and Broths
While it’s easy to whip on the coffee machine and brew up a heart starter a few times a day, nurturing your already shattered adrenals is super important over the winter months. Treat these few cold months of the year as a rest for your nervous system by laying off the coffees and drinking some calming and detoxifying herbal teas. Licorice root tea is your adrenals best friend, tonifying and relaxing them after a long hard summer. Dandelion is great for the liver and helps with detoxification. Broths are also beneficial and easy to drink during the winter months. They are nutrient dense, loaded with healing compounds such as gelatin, collagen, proline, glycine and glutamine. The benefits include improving the health of joints, boosting the immune system, helping to treat leaky gut and reducing inflammation. 
3. Continue on the Wholefood Journey
Just because the weather has cooled down, doesn’t mean you have to let go of all the hard work you have done staying fit and healthy over the summer. Remember, fresh wholefoods contain a variety of the essential vitamins and minerals your body requires to perform at its best. Enjoy warm salads with roasted root vegetables and cooked meat, lightly steam veges, get your slow cooker out and create aromatic curries and stews that contain plenty of hearty veges. There are endless recipes available that are simple and easy to prepare, that are loaded with vegetables.
4. Supplementation
While I prefer wholefoods over supplementation, the winter months call for the use of supplementation more so than ever. Unfortunately, our soils no longer provide the nutrient levels of decades ago due to poor farming practices, and industrialisation. As such, there is a high proportion of our population who have significant mineral deficiencies. Zinc and Magnesium being the 2 biggest problems. Studies has shown that zinc is required to boost immunity so therefore, those with deficiencies will often suffer when winter strikes. Foods rich in zinc include meat, liver, seafood (especially oysters and shellfish) nuts and seeds, and wholegrains. Magnesium is required for over 300 essential enzymatic reactions in the body, from nerve conduction, and muscle relaxation to energy production. Foods rich in magnesium are leafy greens, legumes, wholegrains, nuts and seeds, meats and cocoa. (Yes you can eat your chocolate with your red wine!) As always, consult with your health care professional regarding the use of supplementation.
5. Vitamin C
The antioxidant powerhouse. Vitamin C has been used for years worldwide to “prevent” colds and flus. Studies have shown that by supplementing with vitamin C, you reduce the chance of contracting colds and reducing their duration. Foods high in vitamin C include blackcurrants, berries, citrus fruits such as oranges and lemons, capsicum and peppers. Again check with a qualified practitioner before taking any supplements to ensure they are right for you.
6. Get your Fermenting on!
​Fermented foods have been in the spotlight for some time now and it’s no wonder! Numerous studies have proven that the bacteria present in fermented foods are beneficial to our gut microbiome and therefore our overall health. Enjoying a variety of fermented foods means that you increase the diversity of the strains of bacteria that populate your gut. As such, the bacteria are responsible for the generation of serotonin, the feel good neurotransmitter, and a variety of b vitamins. Since the gut is responsible for 70-80 % of immunity, there’s never been a better time to add fermented foods to your daily diet. Preparing your own fermented foods and beverages is super easy, and something everyone of any age can do. You just need a few basic kitchen utensils and tools and you are on your way. Search online for sauerkraut, kimchi, kefir and yoghurt recipes and get creative in the kitchen.
7. Exercise, Exercise, Exercise
​Yes, that means getting out of bed early before work if you have too! While it is easy to stay in bed snuggled up and listen to the rain on the tin roof, exercise is still very important in the winter months. When the weather makes you feel a little dreary, exercise is shown to increase energy and improve your mood by pumping your body full of endorphins. It’s also great for circulation, meaning your hands and feet will stay warm and toasty. Also, what better excuse then to catch up with friends when there’s nothing else to do in the rain!
8. Wash your hands!
​Seems like a no brainer, however, washing your hands during the winter months is vital to keeping you fit and healthy. With the prevalence of colds and flus high during the cooler months, the spread of illness is encouraged with poor hygiene. Wash your hands after sneezing, coughing and blowing your nose- Simple!
​As you can see, the above recommendations are all easy and quick to implement, and don’t cost the earth. It’s about being mindful and prepared, ready to tackle winter head on!
Words by...
Amanda Martindale
Nutritionist, Mother, Owner of InnerFit Nutrition
Advanced Diploma of Nutritional Medicine 
Diploma of EFT Tapping Techniques
Level 1 Precision Nutrition Exercise Nutrition
Advanced Diploma Applied Science
Check out our Super Foods course to learn about those powerful antioxidants!!
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
As many young women, for years I never felt completely confident in my own skin. Always comparing myself to friends, working towards an ideal that was just unrealistic, hoping to change parts of my body that really could never be changed. Luckily I never let this get in the way of life, I have always enjoyed being out there and have lived a very positive life so far, but if I think back over many of the good times, they are spotted with thoughts of self-doubt, with distractions of how I felt regardless of how I looked to everyone else.

For my 30th birthday, I decided that from that point on I wanted to just have the good times and leave behind the negative thoughts, so I come to this realisation ...
Guest blog by Labrini Kianidis.
Our bodies look their best when they feel their best
Let’s be real, by investing time and effort into health and wellness, we reap the benefits from the inside out. This doesn’t mean that our hopes and dreams of the perfect model body will come true but if we can accept that in reality, we will only ever have the opportunity to look the best version of ourselves, and not someone else, this can be a profoundly positive feeling.

I realised that over the past few years I’d been working towards this very thing and decided it was time to pull it all together, here’s that journey.

Working out
I shifted my focus. Where for years, I used to work out for the sole purpose of reaching an unrealistic goal, I started working out to feel good, gain strength and endurance. I stopped weighing myself altogether and started focusing on building muscle tone, which of course improved my shape, posture and ultimately how my body looked and felt as a whole. Instead of slogging away on a treadmill for an hour, I found workouts that challenged me and kept it interesting, and in time I tried more varied exercises and pushed myself to do well-rounded workouts. Going to the gym is now something I look forward to (most days) and is a fixed part of my routine. But if I get bored I simply don’t go. I’ll walk or practice yoga instead or just take a day off and it is what it is.
Intuitive eating
Food and nutrition is where it began for me several years ago. I adopted cleaner eating habits and built my knowledge of nutrition after seeing a Naturopath to help with problems a doctor couldn’t solve. I began to understand the effect food and nutrition has on our bodies, and how vital that really is.

I’m lucky that I come from a family that has always eaten well and I grew up with the sensibility of knowing what good food is and our meal times were centred around family and culture. I never struggled with eating, and never really took dieting too seriously but throughout the years went back and forth through stages of omitting this food group or that, or dropping weight for a holiday or event and not giving my body what it really needed. Learning to eat intuitively with the knowledge of what a varied healthful diet is, was a turning point. I now know what fuels my body the best, what to eat to feel my best and to just relax about food.

I am by no means the perfect eater, I enjoy sweets and a fry up and am no stranger to a drink. But I don’t apologise for that, I eat clean 90 per cent (ok...80%) of the time because that’s when I feel my best, and the times that I don’t, I just learnt to enjoy that too and the whole eating thing has become a no-brainer.

Knowing my style
A word on style, I have for years worked in fashion and eventually found that the values of the industry no longer aligned with my interests and beliefs and ultimately I decided to move on. But for a long time, I felt the pressure to dress in trends regardless of how they fit (or didn’t fit) my body type. Naturally, this changed as I matured and eventually, I just gave up on trying to force certain styles. Some things simply aren’t made to suit every body type and as I went on I just accepted that. I learnt what suits me, what I feel confident in and shows off my best features and now I have a strong sense of personal style and I really enjoy getting dressed.

Being forgiving of myself
This was probably something that took me the longest to understand and it hasn’t been until started studying coaching and nutrition, that I’ve gained an appreciation for how incredibly complex and wonderful our bodies and minds really are. Over recent years I’ve gone through some very stressful times and unfortunately, that manifested physically, at times taking a toll on my health and wellbeing.

While we all have stressors and this is a normal part of life, I’ve begun to realise that the less time and energy you give to stress the less hold it has on you. I decided just to give myself a break from over thinking and over worrying and essentially to just not sweat the small stuff. Our bodies do so much for us every day, the best gift I can give to myself is to just be a little more forgiving. I think this has been the biggest challenge and something that I have by no means mastered but can have such a meaningful effect on our self-esteem.
No one is perfect
I don’t feel in any way that I’m perfect. I have many flaws and like everyone I have my down days and moments I wish I could change things, but I have learnt to just have those moments and then move on. I keep reminding myself to focus on what I love about myself and what others love about me too and how important it is to prioritise those thoughts over the bad ones. And finally to never stop pushing myself and to just improve a little every day.
About the author
Labrini Kianidis
Originally from Melbourne and now living in Hong Kong, I’m an ex-fashion creative, studying Health Coaching & Nutrition. I’m a firm believer that wellness should be flexible and realistic, that everyone’s picture of health is different and unique. My aim is to break down the ideal of perfection that's associated with the industry and make nutrition just a little less intimidating. You'll find stories of wellbeing and digestible ideas on nutrition, health, fitness, natural beauty and finding balance in life at Because Wellness.
Nutrition & Health Coach in training
Studying Bachelor of Food & Nutrition
www.becausewellness.com
Instagram
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Like many, I happily overindulged over the warm summer months with more than usual ciders and champers, overflowing cheese boards and flavoursome fish and chips on the beach! Did I regret it? Not even once! While I am a keen advocate of healthy eating and feeding and fuelling your body with optimal nutrition, I am also all for balance and moderation. I happily shared many a time over the summer with friends eating and drinking things that I knew weren’t the best for my body, but made special memories at the same time. This to me is just as, if not more important, than worrying about how many cups of veges I ate during the day, or how many burpees I needed to do to burn off that second wheel of camembert!
As we transition into cooler months, with less sunshine and more rain, it’s a time to give the body a rest and some nurturing to see us through the winter, healthy and happy.
​The Winter Reset
​As the ciders are substituted for red wine and champers for hot chocolates, so do the foods we eat. BBQ’s and salads often turn into roast meats and veges and slow cooked curries and stews. Its easy to eat fewer fresh raw veges during the cooler months, as we reach for more warming dishes.
Winter is notorious for illness and you’d be lucky to escape the colder months lurgy free.
Below are a few tips and tricks to help boost your immunity, reducing the incidence of colds and flus that spread like wild fire.
1. ​Continue to Drink Water
While this is no easy feat when it’s cold and dreary outside, drinking plenty of water during the cooler months is just as important as when we are in the peak of summer. Water keeps you hydrated, assists in detoxification, and lubricates the joints. If cold water isn’t going to cut it, pour yourself a glass of warm water and squeeze in some lemon juice and apple cider vinegar. This will also help to kick start your digestion and wake up your liver. So drink up so you can get up outta bed!
2. Drink Herbal Teas and Broths
While it’s easy to whip on the coffee machine and brew up a heart starter a few times a day, nurturing your already shattered adrenals is super important over the winter months. Treat these few cold months of the year as a rest for your nervous system by laying off the coffees and drinking some calming and detoxifying herbal teas. Licorice root tea is your adrenals best friend, tonifying and relaxing them after a long hard summer. Dandelion is great for the liver and helps with detoxification. Broths are also beneficial and easy to drink during the winter months. They are nutrient dense, loaded with healing compounds such as gelatin, collagen, proline, glycine and glutamine. The benefits include improving the health of joints, boosting the immune system, helping to treat leaky gut and reducing inflammation. 
3. Continue on the Wholefood Journey
Just because the weather has cooled down, doesn’t mean you have to let go of all the hard work you have done staying fit and healthy over the summer. Remember, fresh wholefoods contain a variety of the essential vitamins and minerals your body requires to perform at its best. Enjoy warm salads with roasted root vegetables and cooked meat, lightly steam veges, get your slow cooker out and create aromatic curries and stews that contain plenty of hearty veges. There are endless recipes available that are simple and easy to prepare, that are loaded with vegetables.
4. Supplementation
While I prefer wholefoods over supplementation, the winter months call for the use of supplementation more so than ever. Unfortunately, our soils no longer provide the nutrient levels of decades ago due to poor farming practices, and industrialisation. As such, there is a high proportion of our population who have significant mineral deficiencies. Zinc and Magnesium being the 2 biggest problems. Studies has shown that zinc is required to boost immunity so therefore, those with deficiencies will often suffer when winter strikes. Foods rich in zinc include meat, liver, seafood (especially oysters and shellfish) nuts and seeds, and wholegrains. Magnesium is required for over 300 essential enzymatic reactions in the body, from nerve conduction, and muscle relaxation to energy production. Foods rich in magnesium are leafy greens, legumes, wholegrains, nuts and seeds, meats and cocoa. (Yes you can eat your chocolate with your red wine!) As always, consult with your health care professional regarding the use of supplementation.
5. Vitamin C
The antioxidant powerhouse. Vitamin C has been used for years worldwide to “prevent” colds and flus. Studies have shown that by supplementing with vitamin C, you reduce the chance of contracting colds and reducing their duration. Foods high in vitamin C include blackcurrants, berries, citrus fruits such as oranges and lemons, capsicum and peppers. Again check with a qualified practitioner before taking any supplements to ensure they are right for you.
6. Get your Fermenting on!
​Fermented foods have been in the spotlight for some time now and it’s no wonder! Numerous studies have proven that the bacteria present in fermented foods are beneficial to our gut microbiome and therefore our overall health. Enjoying a variety of fermented foods means that you increase the diversity of the strains of bacteria that populate your gut. As such, the bacteria are responsible for the generation of serotonin, the feel good neurotransmitter, and a variety of b vitamins. Since the gut is responsible for 70-80 % of immunity, there’s never been a better time to add fermented foods to your daily diet. Preparing your own fermented foods and beverages is super easy, and something everyone of any age can do. You just need a few basic kitchen utensils and tools and you are on your way. Search online for sauerkraut, kimchi, kefir and yoghurt recipes and get creative in the kitchen.
7. Exercise, Exercise, Exercise
​Yes, that means getting out of bed early before work if you have too! While it is easy to stay in bed snuggled up and listen to the rain on the tin roof, exercise is still very important in the winter months. When the weather makes you feel a little dreary, exercise is shown to increase energy and improve your mood by pumping your body full of endorphins. It’s also great for circulation, meaning your hands and feet will stay warm and toasty. Also, what better excuse then to catch up with friends when there’s nothing else to do in the rain!
8. Wash your hands!
​Seems like a no brainer, however, washing your hands during the winter months is vital to keeping you fit and healthy. With the prevalence of colds and flus high during the cooler months, the spread of illness is encouraged with poor hygiene. Wash your hands after sneezing, coughing and blowing your nose- Simple!
​As you can see, the above recommendations are all easy and quick to implement, and don’t cost the earth. It’s about being mindful and prepared, ready to tackle winter head on!
Words by...
Amanda Martindale
Nutritionist, Mother, Owner of InnerFit Nutrition
Advanced Diploma of Nutritional Medicine 
Diploma of EFT Tapping Techniques
Level 1 Precision Nutrition Exercise Nutrition
Advanced Diploma Applied Science
Check out our Super Foods course to learn about those powerful antioxidants!!
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
​As a nutritionist and a Mum with high school kids, I often get asked questions on my beliefs and practices on food. The most common one: "Do I eat and serve healthy meals at all times?" To be honest, I don't. I believe in a balance.
Here are some of my personal tips to enjoy eating while staying healthy.
Love plants, add plants and eat plants in as many ways as you can!
​As Michael Pollan said, “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” I follow this everyday, for example, breakfast on a Monday morning will be a porridge of oats, mixed vegetables, seasoned with salt and pepper, served steaming hot. Warms the body on a cold Melbourne winter day and keeps us full for a good two-and-a-half hours.

I pack cucumber and carrot sticks in the lunch box, add cherry tomatoes for variety and sometimes will add mixed leafy greens. This routine seldom changes. ​What has this achieved? My kids eat veggies either raw or cooked without a fuss.
Recognise your hunger cues!
​This is a big one and is put to test every school holidays. My kids do eat more when they are at home buuuut they do get veggie and fruit platters along with the chips, cookies and chocolates. We have conversations on hunger which go something like this, Are you bored or just hungry? Can you play for a little while longer? How about a glass of water? Would you like to make yourself a snack? Often, these questions makes you aware of your hunger and leads to being more aware of your choices. Just as an aside, please do not leave it too late to eat, this will make you binge on food, which defeats the purpose!
Shall we get takeaway tonight?
​Yessss! I love Friday nights 'cause it is takeaway night. Could be anything, chicken and chips, curry or pizza. Can you make this healthier? Of course, add a salad! We generally skip the drinks offered and stick to water.

Takeaway is something that we all enjoy however adding salads and losing the sugary drinks can ensure it has a healthy kick to it too!
We eat food not nutrients!
​I cannot emphasise this enough. This was THE take home message from my nutrition studies. I have never forgotten this. We often hear discussions between popular figures which labour on the benefits of saturated fat, draw comparison between diets low in carbs and high in fats.....and so forth. The result is we get confused! What should we eat? Is this okay to eat butter or extra virgin olive oil?

The truth is, we eat food not one single nutrient, so it is more important to look at our overall diet. A standard diet plan sourced from the Internet will not factor in your personal likes/dislikes, culture, goals, beliefs, and limitations. Only a qualified nutritionist will deliver a personalised plan that ensures your enjoyment while keeping you healthy.
Words by...
Dr Jyothsna R Rao 
Mother, Nutritionist and Researcher

Bachelor of Science (Microbiology)
PhD in Physiology
Grad Cert Human Nutrition

​Want to learn more?
​Why not learn about eating habits via the short online course Early Childhood Nutrition: Birth to Adolescence

​Or go change lives and become a recognised Nutrition & Health Coach with our internationally accredited program.
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
For most of us meal planning is something we do to keep the wheels spinning on our household. Typically we are planning a week (or maybe two) of meals for the handful of people that we share a roof with. For me, my meal planning crash course began when I started cooking for several different families in their homes. Most of the time I would create a menu based on recipes I found on the web, write them on a piece of paper and then create my grocery list.
I would scour the internet, searching for recipes that looked tasty, jot down some ingredients and cross my fingers that I had everything I needed when I got home. That was my meal planning life prior to Plan to Eat. Sound chaotic and risky? It was.
Now, I have a bank of recipes that I can easily pull from and plan. I know that meal planning can seem overwhelming at first—it definitely was for me. Now, it is much more streamlined. I will log into my Plan to Eat account, place some recipes on the calendar, and head off to the store to get what I need. It’s usually not very complicated. Finding the recipes and planning them may all happen in a 20-minute time frame, before jetting off to the market.

Do you freeze up when it’s time to plan? Here are my top 5 sites that I import recipes from when I just don’t know what to make!
  1. Inspiralized
  2. Cooking Classy
  3. Skinny Taste
  4. Rasa Malaysia
  5. Love & Lemons

For myself, and many others, meal planning has become a profession. Our careers range from a health coach working with clients struggling with weight loss, to managing hundreds of meals served at a hospital. This is definitely a more recent opportunity for me, and I wanted to grow my knowledge so that I could plan more effectively and healthfully for my clients.

What meal planning knowledge do experienced meal planning professionals have
that newbies may not know yet?


Coincidentally, Cadence Health, a college which offers recognised Nutrition & Health Coaching programmes, approached Plan to Eat a few months ago, asking if we would be interested in partnering with them in their Meal & Menu Planning Course. They use Plan to Eat’s customizable program throughout their course to teach meal planning from start to finish because Plan to Eat allows students (and you!) to tailor plans to suit the specific needs of their clients or families. And I was thrilled when they asked if I wanted to take the class to gain some insight into what the pros know!

I just finished the class, passed the final test, and here are 5 key points that would help us normal people create more healthful meals and become better planners:


1. Restrictive dieting doesn’t work.
The class spends a period of time talking about restrictive dieting, which is typically eating less to lose weight, and how it is ultimately not helpful because it is not sustainable. Instead, the class focuses on eating a well rounded diet, which is sustainable. With that, the class shows you how to account for dietary needs or restrictions. For example, if you are dairy-free, you will still need to find good sources of calcium, potassium, and Vitamin D to fill in the nutritional gaps in your diet. That is a simple example of how to supplement a diet that has some limitations.
2. Food journals will tell us how we are doing.
Evaluate what you currently are consuming. If you are already planning with Plan to Eat, this is actually really easy. Take a look at your previous weeks or months plan. Are you eating too much starch? Too little protein? Not enough veggies? Over doing it with dessert or maybe eating too few calories? Take a look over your plan and evaluate what your needs may be. Work with what you already enjoy and make it delicious and healthful for you.


3. Eating a variety of foods is good for you. Food ruts are not.
I don’t know about you, but I can get stuck in a major food rut. I will eat the same meal everyday for a week. I will do this because I have a busy schedule and I find certain things quick and healthy or easy for me to grab. After a certain point, I usually decide that I should mix it up. It turns out that shaking things up and eating a wide variety of foods is really good for you. This may seem obvious for some of you, but I truly needed to learn this. Be proactive in making sure your eaters are getting a wide variety of foods and food groups in their daily diet. Not only does this aid in nutritional sufficiency, but it will help make meals even tastier.

4. Remember that you are not the professional (unless, of course, you are).
If you believe that you or someone that you cook for is sick or have a nutrition deficiency, be sure to take them to a doctor to diagnose them. Though we often want to treat our own ailments, drastically changing your diet can also be harmful to your health


5. Being healthy vs. being healthful
The biggest takeaway was learning to distinguish between being healthy and being healthful. Healthy can sometimes have a negative connotation, since so many diet foods are branded with that word and we are constantly bombarded with what is the next best food for our health. But being healthful is restorative; eating foods that are well balanced, inclusive, and filled with quality ingredients. Even the word makes me feel like what I am cooking is filled with good nutrients, sustaining, and more nourishing.  Focus on being healthful and you will be healthy.

Since I completed this course, I have learned how to better gauge the healthfulness of what I am planning for my clients and even for personal life. I consciously look over the details of the current months’ meal plan and check for repetition or imbalances. I will then create a new week of meals that compensates where the plan may be lacking and adjusts for specific needs. If my clients are requesting certain proteins or maybe even lower calorie meals, I make sure that those needs are taken into account.

In my personal meal planning, this has also affected the way I choose my meals. I am a runner and it’s vital to make sure to refuel after a long 7 or 8 mile run or even prepare for the next days workout. I use a food journal to keep tabs on my eating and my goals. I’ve really learned how to look at the bigger picture through the journal. The goal is to be healthy and nourished and Cadence Health helped me learn how tailor plans for my families needs, my personal needs and those of my clients.
Resources and A Note from Cadence Health

“After a great deal of research into meal planning options Cadence Health chose Plan To Eat as its preferred meal planning software. Hands down, it was the most flexible, functional and user-friendly option, and of course the service was excellent. So, you can imagine how thrilled we were when Plan To Eat’s very own Christopher inquired about our Meal & Menu Planning course for Riley. Most of our students are people who are very passionate about healthy eating and about changing people’s lives to improve overall wellbeing. One of the challenging aspects for food and health coaches in working with clients is not simply imparting healthy eating knowledge, rather it’s in providing strategies to encourage positive changes in eating habits; after all we all know that eating an apple is healthier than a cake, but the challenge is sticking with the apple for the long term. Tracking down companies like Plan To Eat for Cadence Health is part of providing training that offers tools for coaches, and students in general, to do their best for their clients and themselves.

If you are like Riley, and are keen to learn more about nutrition for you and your family, or if you are one of those people who wants to change lives then check out our internationally approved Certificate of Nutrition & Health Coaching or our general interest nutrition courses at www.cadencehealth.com.au.
Words by Rliey, an Alabama native who moved to Colorado after college. This artist turned chef, loves to cook, be outside, and take photographs. She finds beauty in simple things—and gets really excited about it. She is up for trying anything new and thrilling, and never misses an opportunity to laugh. She loves people and getting to hear their stories, so please share your cooking adventures with her!
Checkout Plan To Eat: www.plantoeat.com
Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview