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What if we told you there was a prevent-all for chronic and terminal ailments, like cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s?

That if you get enough of it, it will help regulate your appetite thus keeping you trim? That it will help keep pounding headaches and anxiety at bay?

AND that is 100% free and enjoyable.

Sleep. We don’t get enough of it, and now new science reports are emerging telling us that the cost of sleep deprivation is more than just a “groggy” morning in the office or a short temper. Sleep deprivation (and that means anything less than 7 hours a night) will make our lives shorter.

A Sleep Expert Weighs In

Why We Sleep: The New Science of Sleep and Dreams by Professor Matthew Walker (we can highly recommend it) does not offer any one answer to the perennial question “why do we need so much sleep?” However, it does certainly convince one to make a priority of getting enough shuteye.

According to Walker, we are living in a “catastrophic sleep epidemic” and governments should be taking this very seriously indeed. However, until that happens, Walker maintains that on an individual level we should have the same attitude towards getting enough shut-eye as one would have towards going to the gym (and if you are part of what we can assume is the majority of people, you will find hitting the hay a lot less gruelling!). We should be determined to set an 8-hour-a-night routine to rise and retire at exactly the same time every day.

Perhaps it sounds extreme, but according to Walker, once you are aware of the damage even one night of poor sleep can do it’s not hard to be convinced.

The Consequences Of Sleep Deprivation

The sleep expert asserts that after even one night of between 4 and 5 hours sleep our killer cells that attack cancer cells drop by a whopping 70%.

Our ability to fight the common cold is significantly reduced. He also confirms that sleep deprivation does contribute to weight gain (as we explored in a recent Bruno article here).

Drivers should also be wary; under five hours a sleep a night and you are 4.3 times more likely to be in a car accident. Reduce that to four hours sleep a night and that risk rises to a scary 11.5 times.

If you’ve ever been cranky after a late night this is because our amygdala (responsible for triggering anger and rage) is 60% more reactive after a bad night’s sleep.

Furthermore, Walker is convinced that good sleep is vital in the improvement of poor mental health, finding that those with bipolar disorder experience better mental health with good sleep.

A symptom of poor mental health is insomnia, however good quality sleep helps improve mental health so it’s obvious that the two go hand in hand!

Make Sure it Doesn’t Catch Up On You

Walker’s most concerning finding, nevertheless, is the link he makes between sleep deprivation and the onset of Alzheimer’s.

Put simply, Alzheimer’s is caused by a buildup of the toxic protein amyloid that kills brain cells. Thankfully, amyloid is naturally broken down during NREM or deep sleep. However, amyloid disrupts the ability to have deep sleep, which leads in to a very vicious cycle. The less deep sleep you have, the more amyloid builds up, so the less deep sleep you can gain, which leads to the further buildup of amyloid….

Throughout his book, Walker, unscientifically ponders the case of Ronald Regan and Margaret Thatcher who both famously took pride in operating on very little sleep, but both developed the disease in their later years.

Making Sleep a Priority

It’s certainly true that we live in a culture of “busy-ness”. Living in a society that expects us to stay past office hours at our desks and check our emails before we even get out of bed in morning, it can seem that sleep is for the weak. Increasing commuter times and the ability to work anywhere with an internet connection further blurs the line between work and play. No one wants to cut back on their leisure time or enjoying their family life, so sleep is often compromised.

However, it’s glaringly obvious that poor quality sleep equates to poor quality living.

If you’re struggling to get your eight hours a night, take a look at How to Get to Sleep, Fast!

The post Here’s How Sleep Will Save Your Life. appeared first on BRUNO Blog.

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Bigger is not necessarily better. Once we stop thinking about the drawbacks of a small space over a larger one, we make room in our minds to think creatively! Small nooks can really make the cosiest and comfiest of bedrooms.

Whether you want to revamp a spare room that has been left unloved under the burden of clutter for years; or you yourself have a teeny-tiny sleeping spot, we’ve got the tips and tricks to make the very most of a small space (that won’t break the bank either!).

 Shelves

Small rooms never have a lot of floor space, so make the most of your walls.

Get rid of the bedside table and install a few floating shelves instead. We love shelves because they prevent crowding your precious square footage.

Clever design

The less furniture you have in a space the roomier it will feel.

With furniture design becoming increasingly inventive and practical, there’s no need to crowd your room with a bulky wardroom and a clunky chest of drawers. Why not look to a bed frame with drawer storage built in? If you already have a bed, purchase some risers and store your clothing beneath.

.

Paint and Colour Palette

Paint your walls with lovely light shades that will make the room feel more expansive than it is.

Light shades  reflect light and can make a space feel more serene. Dark colours absorb light and only will make the room feel cramped.

You could also even have an accent wall that is a different  shade to the other walls to give the room an impression of space.

An important tip to remember here is to keep your colour palette simple. Strong colours don’t have much room to clash in a small space, so a limited colour palette will keep your room calm and inviting. 

The Only Way is Up

Again, we can’t stress the importance of using your wall space enough! If you have high ceilings you can use this vertical space to your advantage.

When decorating always be mindful to attract the eye upwards. This will draw attention to the height of your room.

Install the curtain rail a few inches above your window and invest in some longer curtains (although make sure they don’t touch the floor!).

You could also hang a picture or place some photos nearer to the ceiling. Even drawing inspiration from our point on shelves, you could place some of your favourite trinkets on high-up floating shelves.

Drawing from our last point on colour, painting the ceiling a different shade to your walls will encourage you to look up and give the impression of having a high ceiling even if you don’t, so break out your inner Michaelangelo!

 

Lighting is Everything

If you have a ceiling light, look for a nice lampshade that’s going to diffuse the light. Harsh, bright light draws attention to the angles and edges of your room. However, softer, more golden light blurs those corners bringing nice little shadows to the room, giving the illusion of – you guessed it – more space.

Invest in a one or two nice lamps instead of just relying on ceiling light to make the room feel very calm and soothing.

Also, fairy lights are not just for Christmas! They can really make a room feel cosy draped around a bed frame or window – this also creates an inviting and interesting focal point.

Mirror, Mirror on the Wall

This one is probably the oldest trick in book, but it’s still worth mentioning! Hanging a mirror on the wall opposite to your bedroom window will make your room brighter and give it the impression of space.

However, if your room is full of clutter then it might make you feel like you’ve twice as much mess as you do! Which leads us on to our next tip…

Declutter

Inhabiting a small space is an opportunity to declutter. A small space will feel even more cramped if it’s full of stuff. Some things like your bed-frame, mattress, curtains, etc. will be non-negotiable. However, things like clothes and shoes that do take up a lot of room – whether hanging up or strewn across the floor and other pieces of furniture – can be pared back.

If you need any decluttering inspiration try the KonMarie method.

We really feel that this is actually one advantage of occupying a small room as it can make you more mindful of what your purchase in the first place!

Reevaluate

A lot of people have desks in their rooms – students, we’re looking at you! – but this can be overwhelming in a small space.

Furthermore, blurring the line between a work space and sleep space  can make it hard to “switch off” at night. Making your bedroom just about sleeping will free your room of unnecessary furniture and make it a more restful environment to truly relax in.

The post Make the Most of a Tiny Bedroom appeared first on BRUNO Blog.

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Can you really sleep yourself beautiful?  It may sound cliché, but is no accident that the phrase “beauty sleep” is such a common expression.

If you want to stay looking your best, you’d better make getting enough sleep a priority! Here’s why…

Skin 

Cortisol, also known as the stress hormone,  can wreak havoc on our health if there is too much of it in our systems. This hormone is naturally broken down while we sleep. If we are not getting enough rest, our levels of cortisol rise.

High levels of cortisol contribute to an excessively oily complexion and skin breakouts. Too much of the hormone is also linked with the breakdown of collagen – vital in maintaining the skin’s elasticity. Furthermore, lack of sleep suppresses the immune system – so battling spots is even more difficult!

Poor quality sleep or a lack of sleep can cause dry and flaky skin. Sleep deprivation can promote “inflammation along with skin-barrier dysfunction, leading to a lack of hydration”.

A recent study conducted in Sweden concluded that sleep deprivation can result in an appearance “hanging eyelids, redder more swollen eyes, darker circles under the eyes, paler skin, more wrinkles and fine lines and more droopy corners of the mouth,”.  Not getting enough of that sweet beauty sleep will eventually lead to premature ageing – scary stuff!

Social Attractiveness

Another recent study conducted in Stockholm concluded that people are more likely to avoid sleepy individuals.

Interestingly, this study observed individuals suffering from partial sleep deprivation. So, we’re not taking about extreme levels of deprivation here! Rather people just getting about 4 hours a night – something which all of us find ourselves guilty of from time to time…

The study followed 25 Swedish college students who were photographed on two occasions. Once after two nights of having only four hours sleep and then again two days later after normal sleep.  The photographs were then shown to other people who were questioned on whether or not they would like to socialise with the subjects photographed.

The study revealed that people were more likely to avoid, or not be willing to socialise with the tired subjects.

Not only  are tired people more accident prone, our disease avoidance instinct hints to us that sleepy individuals are more likely to be carrying contagious illnesses.

It is also not too surprising the study found that its sleepy subjects were less inclined to socialise. Sleep deprived people are worse at registering the nuances like humour and irony in everyday interactions. So next time you’re slow getting the joke, make a note that it might be time for an early night!

Weight Gain

If you are trying to keep your weight down,  enough shut eye is just as important as your food decisions and your exercise regime.

A recent study in Uppsala revealed that the day after a bad night’s sleep, the body has higher levels of Ghrelin – the hormone responsible for telling the body to eat – and lower levels of leptin – the hormone which registers satiety. So, you’re more likely to experience hunger but not register when you are full!

Moreover, after a night of poor sleep, the participants of the study experienced between 5% and 20% reduction in their metabolism.  They also performed less physical activity and ate larger food portions (and found eating more pleasurable too).

So it really seems that counting sheep over counting calories is the way to go!

The post Beauty sleep – what’s in a name? appeared first on BRUNO Blog.

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Bruno Sleep Blog by Caroline - 6M ago

Maybe you’re a clean sleeper, with a whole host of rituals in place to ensure you get into bed at the right time and get a good night’s rest – good for you! Or perhaps you have no set routine and have been known to just roll into bed at some point during the darkest hours of the day, still wearing your make up and failing to take off your tights?

If you’re leaning towards the latter, listen up – you’ve got yourself stuck in an unhealthy habit that may be resulting in underperformance and stress. But there are a few easy fixes that can help, you just need to enforce some ‘absolute no nos’.

1. Do not check Whatsapp

In fact, do not check any type of screen. That includes your laptop, tablet, Kindle and mobile phone. The blue light emitted from these devices suppresses the production of the sleep hormone, melatonin and can prevent you from falling asleep. Ideally, you should not expose yourself to the blue light for up to two hours before bedtime, so ditch Netflix and treat yourself to a good book instead.

2. Put down that nightcap

A quick tipple or two may sound like a relaxing proposition, but don’t be fooled by that warm fuzzy feeling. While the sedative effects of alcohol enable you to fall asleep quickly it does not result in a truly deep sleep. Your sympathetic nervous system never really shuts down, which means your body wakes you up after just a few hours and you feel groggy the next day.

3. After dinner coffee

Actually, even after lunch coffee should be a no no, as it is suggested that no caffeine should be drunk after about 2 pm. Coffee has an interesting impact on the body, acting as a stimulant and delaying the rise of melatonin, that highly desirable sleep hormone. This is turn can impact your body clock – an internal mechanism controlled by the brain – setting it back by a whole hour and leaving you struggling to get to sleep. So while a morning cuppa is great to set you up for the day, avoid it in the afternoon at all costs!

4. Forgetting to draw the curtains

Don’t let any light creep into your room. According to sleep guru Arianna Huffington, any hint of light in your bedroom is preventing you from getting a restful, restorative night’s sleep. Try an eye mask for a quick-fix, but in the long term, you should invest in some heavy curtains or a black-out blind.

5. No more midnight snacking

Although scientists can’t agree on the best time to stop eating before bed, the general consensus is that 3 hours before bed is best. The body needs time to process the meal before falling asleep, to ensure your digestive system is not slaving away throughout the night. Sugar is a particularly bad food choice, so think twice before saying yes to that dessert if you’re planning an early night.

If the thought of implementing all of these changes at once is enough to make you lose even more sleep, try making them part of your routine one by one. Remember, it takes just thirty days to form a habit, and the benefits will last the rest of your lifetime!

The post Five Bedtime No Nos appeared first on BRUNO Blog.

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What do Sting, Gwyneth Paltrow and swashbuckling Pirates of the Caribbean star Orlando Bloom have in common?

They all practice meditation.

For the unacquainted, the word ‘meditation’ may conjure up images of tranquil halls, burning incense and chants of om. But this centuries-old practice isn’t just for yogis and the spiritually enlightened. Mindfulness meditation can be practiced anywhere, at anytime, and by anyone. What’s more, regular meditation has been proven to ease stress and anxiety, and is a natural sleep aid for insomnia.

Are you new to meditation and unsure where to begin? Relax. These simple meditation techniques are ideal for beginners. Build any of these exercises into your bedtime routine to calm your mind and encourage a deeper, more restorative sleep.

1. Listen to calming music

Music relaxation techniques have been shown to have a powerful effect on easing stress and reducing insomnia symptoms.

Start by making your bedroom a calm and peaceful environment. Clear away clutter and block out any external noise.

Find a comfortable position either sitting or lying on your bed and play soft, soothing music. It’s best to pick instrumentals with a calming pace, including classical, light jazz, and stringed tunes as well as nature soundtracks. Then simply close your eyes and focus on the melody and beat of the music.

2. Deep abdominal breathing

Whilst this exercise can be practiced at any time during the day, it’s particularly effective just before bed to help you fall asleep quickly and easily.

Lie on your bed and lightly rest your hands on your belly. Concentrate on breathing deeply into your abdomen. Bring your awareness to the way your hands naturally move up and down.

Focusing on this movement is very calming because it redirects your mind from busy thoughts and onto your body. The distraction helps to ease stress and worry, and brings your mind to a different place.

3. Guided imagery

A stressful day often leads to a restless night. To ease worries which are disrupting sleep, spend a few minutes imagining a calm scene. Clouds, the ocean, and mountains are common choices – although there are really no rules about what you should imagine, so long as it’s calming.

It’s ok if your mind wanders, too – simply draw your focus gently back.

You can also combine guided imagery with music relaxation and deep, abdominal breathing.

4. Practice mindfulness meditation using an app

Mindfulness involves taking time to be completely aware of your physical body and your thoughts, and letting go of worry or self-judgement.

To become experienced at mindfulness meditation takes practice, but that’s no reason to feel daunted. There are many apps with guided personal meditations that are perfect for beginners.

We highly recommend trying Headspace, buddhify or The Mindfulness App.

Do you practice meditation? What relaxation techniques work for you?

Sleep well!

The post Simple Meditation Techniques To Promote Better Sleep appeared first on BRUNO Blog.

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You know that post-lunch slump you get each day between 1pm and 3pm? That’s your circadian rhythm at work. It’s basically an internal clock ticking away in the background of your brain. Over a 24-hour period, your circadian rhythm cycles between periods of sleepiness and alertness – which is why it’s also known as your sleep/wake cycle.

Your circadian rhythm is regulated by exposure to sunlight. The morning sun triggers your brain to rouse you from sleep. Then when it gets dark in the evening your body releases melatonin: a hormone which makes you feel tired and ready for bed.

Although our circadian rhythm tracks the sun, this internal clock varies with each individual person. When your own internal clock is out of sync with your external clock (e.g. work schedule, lifestyle, social commitments), this throws out your circadian rhythm. This effect is described as ‘perpetual jetlag,’ because it’s as though you’re operating on a different timezone – you feel alert when you should be resting, and exhausted when you need to be awake.

Are you a night owl or a morning lark?

When your alarm goes off in the morning, do you:

A: Jump out of bed feeling energised and ready to take on the day?

or

B: Hit snooze at least 5 times and snatch as much extra sleep as possible?

If you answered A, chances are you’re a lark. You love to rise with the sun and eat breakfast within half an hour of waking up. Mornings are your most productive time of day, but by 10pm you’re ready to hit the hay.

The Bs out there, on the other hand, identify as night owls. Your ideal lifestyle revolves around late nights and late starts. Since your energy levels peak in the evening, you often burn the midnight oil.

Whilst environmental factors and personality play a role, where your bedtime preferences fall on the lark-to-owl spectrum is largely determined by your genes. Whether you’re more of a morning or an evening person can range from mild to extreme.

Recent studies show that mutated gene is responsible for extreme night owl tendencies, known as “delayed sleep disorder.”  People who test positive to the mutated gene have a circadian rhythm which is delayed by up to 2 hours, meaning they find it difficult to fall asleep before 2am or 3am, and generally sleep in until past 10am. For extreme night owls, working regular office hours can be a real struggle.

So can you actually reset your circadian rhythm?

If you’re genetically wired to be a morning person you can’t become an evening person, and vice versa. But if an irregular schedule or poor sleeping habits have left your body clock feeling out of whack, there are a few things you can do to reset your circadian rhythm:

1. Get outdoors

Since sunlight is a key factor in regulating your circadian rhythm, it’s important to expose yourself to the sun as soon as you wake up and to limit artificial light in the evening. This is why camping is one of the most effective ways you can do to get your circadian rhythm back on track. (Find inspiration for your next camping holiday here!)

2. Maintain a strict sleep schedule

It may take some time to shift your sleeping pattern, but consistency is key. Set a bedtime which allows you to get enough sleep each night and be strict about sticking to it – even on weekends!

3. Practise good sleep hygiene

Make sure your sleep environment is cool, dark and noise-free. Establish a bedtime ritual that allows you to completely wind down before going to sleep. This might include taking a bath, reading a book or doing some yoga.

4. Exercise

Regular physical activity significantly improves your quality of sleep, which is why daily exercise is so important for establishing healthy a sleeping pattern.

The post Can You Reset Your Circadian Rhythm? appeared first on BRUNO Blog.

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We’ve all experienced it at some point: feeling exhausted, yet lying wide awake at night, mind racing and unable to fall asleep.

And of course the more you worry about losing sleep, the harder it actually is to drift off!

Is insomnia troubling you? There’s a range natural sleep remedies you can try to help you fall asleep more easily and to stay asleep throughout the night.

1. Make your bedroom sleep friendly

The first step to alleviating sleep troubles is to address the environment you’re sleeping in. Clear away clutter as this can add to feelings of anxiety. Ensure your bedroom is cool, dark and quiet. Comfortable pillows, covers and a mattress are also key to an uninterrupted night’s sleep.

2. Do some yoga before bed

If you find it hard to wind down at the end of the day, introduce yoga to your bedtime routine. A few gentle stretches and deep breathing exercises can help to ease stress and muscular tension that may be keeping you awake at night.

3. Try using essential oils

Many essential oils are effective aids for relaxation. Lavender scent is known to be particularly effective at easing anxiety and inducing sleep. Try sprinkling a few drops of lavender oil on your pillow before bedtime.

4. Drink Valerian tea

Valerian root has been used for centuries as a calming remedy. Brew a cup of tea with this natural herb before bedtime. If you find the odour quite strong, you could also take natural Valerian in capsule form.

5. Take melatonin supplements

Melatonin is the hormone which our brain releases when there is an absence of light, signalling our body it’s time to sleep. Melatonin can be taken as a natural supplement to encourage the onset of sleep.

6. Add some plants to your bedroom

Many household plants are natural sleep remedies. Why? Plants are highly effective at clearing toxins from the air, which helps to promote relaxation and a better night’s sleep. Top indoor plants which are proven to aid sleep include aloe vera, jasmine, and peace lily.

Which natural sleep remedies work best for you?

The post Natural Sleep Remedies For Insomnia appeared first on BRUNO Blog.

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Yawning, irritable, forgetful, hungry… sound familiar?

According to The Great British Bedtime Report, the majority of Brits (70%) are scraping by on 7 hours or less a night. But experts say this isn’t enough. Evidence shows that long-term sleep deprivation can lead to a range of serious health issues. Getting enough sleep, on the other hand, is linked to feeling happier, better health, and even looking younger.

It’s clear that sufficient sleep is important, but how much do we need? It’s an individual question. Some people find they can function perfectly well on 6 hours’ sleep. Others need 8-9 hours of quality sleep each night to get through the day. Interestingly, over-sleeping can have a similarly adverse effect on your mood as getting a poor night’s sleep, and how much sleep you need does, in fact, alter with age.

Early life

In those first few years of rapid growth and development, babies and toddlers need a huge amount of sleep. Of course, as weary parents will attest, babies’ sleeping patterns are irregular and their sleep cycles are much shorter.

  • Newborns (0-3 months): 14-17 hours
  • Infants (4-11 months): 12-15 hours
  • Toddlers (1-2 years): 11-14 hours
Young children

Kids are busy and they need a lot of sleep. At this age, sleep is a vital part of a child’s physical growth and their ability to learn new skills. It’s important to set a regular bedtime routine for school-aged children to ensure they are getting enough quality sleep each night.

  • Preschoolers (3-5): 10-13 hours
  • School-Age Children (6-13): 9-11 hours
Adolescence to early adulthood

Teenagers often get a bad rap for being lazy, but those extra hours of snooze are really needed to help mediate the inevitable ups and down of puberty. Exam season is a particularly important time for adolescents to be getting enough quality sleep each night.

Though typically the recommended amount of sleep for adults is 7-9 hours, new research recognises that we may still need up to 10 hours of sleep each night in our early twenties.

  • Teenagers (14-17): 8-10 hours
  • Young Adults (18-25): 7-9 hours
Adults & older adults

As we get older, it becomes much harder to get a solid night of uninterrupted sleep – especially if you’re a parent dealing with one of those tireless toddlers. However, how much sleep you actually need remains consistent.

  • Adults (26-64): 7-9 hours
  • Older Adults (65+): 7-8 hours

So to sum up, no matter which decade you belong to, anything under 5 hours’ sleep a night can be harmful to your health!

The post How Much Sleep You Actually Need (According to Your Age) appeared first on BRUNO Blog.

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Losing sleep over the summer heat? You’re not alone. Our British homes may keep us snug and warm in the winter, but all that insulation is far from ideal in a heatwave. In fact, science tells us that our bodies need a cool environment (ideally between 15 to 20 degrees) in order to fall asleep quickly and to stay asleep throughout the night. So it’s no wonder this sizzling summer has many of us tossing and turning in our beds!

Of course, if we could contend with the rising mercury by flicking on the AC, maybe we’d be getting a little more shut-eye. But for most of us, this isn’t an option.

Rest easy, this doesn’t mean you need to struggle through a sleep-deprived summer. Follow these tips to cool down before bedtime, so you can slumber peacefully throughout the night.

1. Drink plenty of water

This seems obvious, but it’s a vital tip for summer. It’s also especially important to remember after those long, boozy afternoons in the sun. Staying hydrated means that your body can properly regulate your core temperature, which is essential for drifting off easily.

2. Take a cool shower…

…but not icy cold! As tempting as this sounds after a roasting hot day, if the water is too cold your body temperature will actually rise to counteract the chill, which is the reverse effect you want before climbing into bed! Keep to tepid temps for bedtime bathing.

3. Cover yourself in Aloe Vera

Keep a bottle of Aloe Vera in the fridge on standby, particularly for those days when you’ve been out in the sun for hours. Slather the gel on your skin for an instant cool-down effect. As a bonus, Aloe Vera is an excellent aid for sunburn, too.

4. Choose the right bedding

Any extra padding on the bed will add to trapped heat and discomfort. During the summer months, pack away thick duvets and remove mattress protectors. Also, steer clear of bedding made from synthetic fabrics, which offer poor ventilation and often retain heat. Instead, choose bedding made from natural fibres, such as 100% cotton or bamboo, as these materials offer the best breathability and will wick away moisture.

For a long term solution, look at investing in a mattress with temperature regulating materials, such as natural latex.

5. Put your bedding in the freezer

It sounds a little strange, but the effort pays off (plus, it’s an excuse to get the frozen pizza out for dinner!)

Place your pillow cases and sheets in a plastic bag and then stick in the freezer for half an hour before your bedtime. The effect doesn’t last all night, but your bedding should stay cool enough for you to comfortably fall asleep on those really hot and humid nights.

6. Know when to open your windows

When it’s stifling hot, it’s tempting to fling open the windows in hope of finding a breeze. But all you’ll do is let all that hot air in. Instead, shut out the heat during the day by keeping your bedroom windows closed and the curtains or blinds drawn. Then about an hour before bedtime, after the temperature has dropped, open your windows and bedroom door to allow the cooler air to circulate.

7. Make a cool fan

Although they can be a little noisy, a fan is a summer must-have. For a super cool trick, place a shallow pan or bowl full of ice in front of your fan. As the ice melts, the fan’s breeze will pick up the cold water, creating a refreshing light mist.

8. Go au naturel?

The jury is out on this one. Some claim stripping off is the best way to beat the heat for a good night’s sleep. But evidence suggest that light, breathable pyjamas are a better option, as the material will soak up perspiration to help you stay cool and dry. Whatever your preference, less layers will definitely make it easier to sleep cool through the night.

Still can’t sleep? Check out these tips on how to get to sleep, fast!

The post Beat The Heat: Top Tips To Sleep Cool appeared first on BRUNO Blog.

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Who really has time in the morning to get up and prepare a big, healthy breakfast? As soon as the alarm goes off, the first thing anyone wants to do is hit snooze and get back under the covers.

If you’re prone to sacrificing your morning meal for a few more seconds of shut-eye, we really can’t blame you (especially if you own a Bruno – so comfy it’s impossible to get out of bed…) but we’ve got to shake you awake…

Evidence shows that starting your day with a nutritious breakfast has a whole stack of benefits, such as boosting your mood, improving your concentration and setting you up to make healthy food choices throughout the day.

What’s more, eating a healthy breakfast doesn’t need to mean waking up a the crack of dawn. Simply throw a few of these nutrient-dense foods on to your breakfast menu, and enjoy an instant health kick that will leave you with all-day energy.

1. Eggs

Whether you like them scrambled, fried or poached to perfection, eggs are a brilliant choice for a healthy breakfast.

Why? Apart from their culinary versatility, eggs are a great source of protein and promote a feeling of fullness. This means you’ll be less likely to reach for the biscuit tin mid-morning if you’ve tucked into a scrumptious omelette for breakkie!

2. Peanut Butter

A post shared by Janelle (@hungryhappywhole) on Jun 13, 2017 at 8:09am PDT

As well as healthy fats and protein, peanuts contain potassium, which lowers the risk of high blood pressure, stroke and heart disease.

For the perfect combination of healthy + delicious, top your breakfast toast with peanut butter and slices of banana.

3. Chia Seeds

They may be small, but don’t underestimate these mighty seeds! Chia seeds are high in fibre and protein to keep you feeling full and energised after your meal. They are also packed with antioxidants, which work to reduce inflammation and decrease disease risk.

For a breakfast which really packs a nutritional punch, we suggest giving some of these delicious chia pudding recipes a try.

4. Coffee

A post shared by Pasha Cafe (@pashacafe.ro) on Jun 14, 2017 at 1:40am PDT

Do you struggle to start the day before your morning espresso?

Turns out that the caffeine in your cup of coffee does more than just wake you up. It also improves your mood, heightens your concentration and kick starts your metabolism. Just make sure you limit your caffeine intake in the afternoon, or you may find it difficult to fall asleep at night!

5. Greek Yoghurt

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Greek yoghurt is a great source of calcium and protein. Some types also include probiotics, which help your gut to stay healthy.

A bowl of greek yoghurt with muesli and fresh seasonal fruit makes for a super simple breakfast option loaded with nutritional value.

6. Berries

Berries are delicious and packed with antioxidants and fibre.

Add a generous handful of mixed fresh berries to your morning smoothie, your bowl of cereal, or scattered over pancakes for a special healthy breakfast treat!

7. Oats

This classic breakfast option is easy to prepare and the best choice for cereal lovers. Oats are rich in dietary fibre which keeps you feeling full and helps to lower cholesterol.

For added health benefits (and Instagram-worthy presentation), top your bowl of oats with fruit, nuts, seeds, and a sprinkle of cinnamon.

Looking for more ways to wake up healthy? Check out these top tips from T Plus Drinks!

The post The Best Breakfasts For All-Day Energy appeared first on BRUNO Blog.

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