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Brooklyn Plans - Certified Financial Pla.. by Kristen Euretig, Cfp Women's We.. - 1M ago
“For better or for worse, money plays a huge role in our romantic relationships as they become more serious. Come learn some best practices of how to handle your finances with your partner. First dates to 50th anniversaries welcomed!" - Kristen Euretig, CEO
Whether you're saving together or saving seperatly but with the same goal in mind; you always have to start somewhere.
Brooklyn Plans has always had you in mind, and this ToolKit is no different. It's cleverly devised to help you identify a workable strategy while providing you with communication tips for financial cooperation.
All you need is a pen and an open mind because we've done all the leg work to help you grab hold of and define what's been weighing on your minds and your pockets.
It consists of a simple two page guide that will help you organize your thoughts and more importantly - your finances.
What do you have to lose?
It could mean your dream vacation is more attainable than you thought, or your student loans could become less of a burden and more of a target.
We know that money is a difficult subject for couples to handle, as it's not usually something that will naturally come up in conversation. We also know that money is one of the biggest sources of discourse in all kinds of relationships; with even the strongest bonds being fractured by a credit card. I'm not saying that this Toolkit is a magical formula to heal all problems, because every couple and every situation is different; what it will do however is help you get to the root of the problem and guide you towards the correct first steps to solving it.
Here's the link you'll need:
and now let us do the rest!
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Check out the latest from our founder in the Royal Neighbors reading room and give something that will last this year: Holiday gifts that build healthy money habits.
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I've seen, been tagged into and participated in several FB conversations about how and where Brooklyn women dissatisfied with megabanks financing the Dakota Access Pipeline can move their money. I was at the epicenter of the Move Your Money movement last time this topic was hot back in 2012 with the Occupy movement. I worked as a financial advisor at the time at a Community Development Credit Union and was privy to an outpouring of consumers dissatisfied with their megabanks who were interested in the cooperative banking credit unions offer. The FB event Bank Transfer Day went viral. Having been through one move your money movement, I wanted to share some tips and resources for Brooklyn women looking to make the jump as well as some pitfalls you can avoid by knowing what to expect from moving your money.
1. Find alternatives to big banks near you
Check out the Move Your Money Map I created for a pretty deep dive on Brooklyn banks and credit unions that provide a respite from big banks. I provided pin drops of banks and credit unions that don't finance the pipeline and were also not major players in the '08 economic crisis. Whether their products or services are up to par is something you can consult Yelp or Google reviews for. You can check out the list of 17 banks involved in the financing of the DAPL to see if your bank is implicated.
2. Be prepared to sacrifice on convenience and cost
Consider that so many still use big banks despite their moral failings because they deliver on convenience and cost. Making a switch to a regional bank or credit union may be an adjustment. Banking by your values may mean giving up some conveniences you are used to in the way of ATMs on every corner or a sleek, advanced websites, or even an App, to give a few examples. Big banks are able to deliver on technology and convenience precisely because they are well, big.
You may be surprised to find that big bank rates on everything from loan products to fees and services are sometimes lower than their regional counterparts and credit unions because they have a tiered system that profits off of the lowest credit score and income earners through higher interest rates and frequent fees to provide free or low cost products to those with higher incomes and credit scores. Giving up these perks is a sacrifice but one that supports a more ethical and equitable financial system. Also alternatives to banks may offer additional services that benefit consumers but are not profitable like credit counseling, tax prep or financial education.
3. Do your research
Before making the move, think about how you use your bank regularly. What services can you not live without? If it's mobile check deposit or online bill pay, make sure the new institution can provide that. Credit unions may participate in ATM networks like the Coop or Allpoint networks that are not as clearly marked as big bank ATMs are. It may involve going to a McDonald's or a bodega to access no fee withdrawals. Find out where the closest ATMs to your place of work and home are that you can access before making the switch. You will also want to consider what is most important to you ethically i.e. is it diversity within the leadership structure? How many women are in leadership roles that you can see on the institution's website? How many people of color? I find the meaningful inclusion of women and POC in leadership roles can lead to more fitting products and policies for those same populations.
4. Moving your bank accounts is just one way to defund big banks
Consider moving your loan balances! The best thing you can do for a financial institution is move over loans, not checking and savings accounts. Financial institutions make money on loans, but bank accounts cost them money to service and pay interest on (unless, like some big banks they are feeing you to death). If you had to pick one, it's actually more beneficial to a financial institution to move a mortgage (through refinancing), credit card (through balance transfer) or other loan, although you'd have to consider the impact on you as a consumer and if it makes sense to do so. However, starting a relationship with a regional bank or credit union can still have a long term impact, make you feel good about who you're interacting with and position you to take a loan from them in the future. It also sends a message to big banks by standing up to unethical investments and could change the way they do business going forward.
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I just got the news from a couple I worked with that they're expecting. When we started working together on their finances, they shared with me that the process had brought them clarity on their next steps and that they wanted to start a family sooner rather than later. I'm honored to participate in the life events of my clients and have seen time and time again how financial planning is a powerful force that drives new opportunities, experiences, and life changes to those who are willing to participate in the process. I once described this phenomenon to my acupuncturist who related this to the root chakra, which is responsible for your sense of safety and security. When this chakra is in balance, it creates a solid foundation for the others to open. It makes perfect sense that addressing financial fears, insecurities, and vagueness would be a stabilizing force for the other areas of your life to open up and expand in amazing ways. Are you ready for new possibilities, a bigger life and an open horizon? I'd love to work with you to experience the stabilizing power of financial planning.
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Credit card debt is the great equalizer - people of all races, backgrounds, genders and income levels struggle with it. You are not alone. I don't want to normalize it just because it's so common though. It's toxic.
We don't get into how to get out of it in this quick clip in the series we recorded with NowThis News but we help clients come up with a plan for repaying debt and saving regularly at BKP by implementing these three steps:
1) paying off higher interest cards first
2) saving regularly for emergencies
3) saving regularly for freedom (travel, classes & fun!)
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Our founder, Kristen Euretig, CFP, talks lessons learned in spending and saving with Now This Money.
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We had a great turnout last week for our first Financial Vision Boarding event at New Women Space in Greenpoint. These 18 women (& 1 man!) are going to have a great 2017. We did a guided visualization, set financial goals, crafted away and then shared ideas on concrete steps to take next. Great energy in the room, and we left excited and ready to take 2017 by the horns. Missed this event? Check out our upcoming events at Brooklyn Plans.
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