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Australian Brews News by Megan Sahli - 8h ago

Burleigh Brewing Chocolate Schwarzbier

Burleigh Brewing has released a new German black lager. Available in keg at the taproom only, this latest brew tastes of pronounced chocolate and comes in at 4.4% ABV.

Burleigh Brewing Velvet Glove IPA

Burleigh Brewing has also released a new IPA to add to its selection. Now available at select venues in Brisbane and on the Gold Coast, Burleigh’s Velvet Glove IPA has been described by the brewery as a beer of firm bitterness with balanced characteristics of caramel malt and mandarin with mango and stone fruit aromas.

Velvet Glove comes in at 6.5% with 60 IBU.

Colonial Brewing Co Sheedy Kolsch Ale

Port Melbourne’s Colonial Brewing Co has released its latest AFL tribute beer. This time the brewery is celebrating “the legend” Kevin Sheedy with its Sheedy Kolsch Ale.

Sheedy Ale is now available at select bottleshops and venues in Victoria.

Two Birds Double Sunset

Back for a third time is Two Birds Brewing Double Sunset Red Ale.

At 7.3% abv, Double Sunset is a bolder, higher alcohol version of the brewery’s “beloved” red ale Sunset. Having turned up the malt to 10 and doubled the Citra, Galaxy and Cascade hops in the kettle and dry-hop, Double Sunset has been described by the brewery as a luscious brew with rich, toffee malt and grapefruit hop notes.

Launching today at Two Birds’ Spotswood brewery, Double Sunset will be available elsewhere from Monday in keg and 500ml bottles.

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Despite an attention-grabbing UK marketing campaign in which it acknowledged it’s ‘probably not the best beer in the world’, Danish brewer Carlsberg will not be making any changes to its Australian recipe.

Carlsberg, which has been brewed in Australia by Coopers since 2012, recently announced that it was reformulating its beer in the United Kingdom.

Carlsberg UK’s VP marketing, Liam Newton, said in a media statement the brand had lost its way in the UK

“Drinker’s interest in mainstream lager has waned because, though the world has moved on, the mainstream category hasn’t,” he said.

“At Carlsberg UK, we lost our way. We focused on brewing quantity, not quality; we became one of the cheapest, not the best.”

With Carlsberg having run a campaign since 1973 centered around being ‘probably’ the best beer in the world, the admission in the the £20million campaign is a huge gamble. However, it will not be making its way to Australia.

In a media statement, Carlsberg advised the beer subject to revision has always been a beer brewed exclusively for the tastes of UK drinkers.

“A new recipe has been introduced together with new packaging and a range of sustainability innovations,” the statement read.

“This is a UK specific situation and is not the case in other markets. We are very satisfied with the quality and performance of Carlsberg Pilsner in other markets, including Australia, and hence we will not change the recipe.”

Asked how UK tastes differed from those in Australia, Carlsberg’s VP Group Development Myriam Shingleton, said the difference related more to the lower alcohol content in the UK version.

“[In the UK] it was always only 3.8% abv and brewed exclusively for the UK and our goal was to keep it at 3.8% abv because it’s a tradition in the UK that we appreciate,” Myriam explained.

“Honestly, the UK’s Carlsberg 3.8% brew needed a radical change. A new recipe.

“Our development team here at Carlsberg Group developed a recipe that retains the unique characteristics of its predecessor, but with a smoother, fuller mouthfeel, complemented by greater depth of flavour.

“It has more malty notes, a more balanced crisp bitterness and a distinctive hop aroma that you will recognise from the Carlsberg pilsner served in other markets and in general, the new UK Carlsberg Danish Pilsner is crafted to be more like the Carlsberg pilsner we serve outside the UK.

“In Australia, and in all other markets, outside the UK, we are extremely happy with our brew quality and recent growth and given its exceptional taste profile, we have no plans to make any changes to the Carlsberg beer recipe in other markets at this stage, although we always try to improve its quality and reduce its environmental impact.”

Carlsberg advised that the company “globally is on a journey and very soon, including in Australia, Carlsberg will look a little different”.

“This is not a relaunch. It represents a moment within a constant reappraisal and refinement of all aspects of the Carlsberg brand, its products, packaging and behaviour,” a spokesperson said.

Notable on the campaign materials released, and in the media statements, is the increased focus on referring to Carlsberg as a pilsner, changed glassware and emphasizing its Danish heritage as traditional beer brands seek to buttress declining sales in the wake of growing interest in contemporary brands and craft beer.

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Brewery lawyers, Ramsden Lawyers, offer advice on the pros and cons of different capital solutions when starting your brewery…

Opening a brewery can be a costly experience. It is important to ensure that you have adequate financial capacity to fund your planned operations.

Most new breweries are self-funded by owners or funded through external sources such as investors, loans or crowdfunded (either ‘rewards-based’ or ‘equity-based’). Each option has its advantages and disadvantages – we discuss each briefly below.

Option 1: Self-funded by owners

The least complex and most straightforward arrangement.

Pros: You are the owner – meaning no loan repayments, no interest payments and no shareholders or investors to manage. This is a simple and straightforward means of funding your brewery.

Cons: Breweries are expensive! You may find it financially onerous to fund everything on your own, it may not be the best use of your money i.e. you could have your money invested elsewhere.

Tip: Ensure that you properly structure your business to minimise tax obligations and to mitigate legal risk. This may require incorporating a company (or multiple!) and/or establishing a trust.

If you are going into business with others (even if they are family!), it is important that you have the arrangement properly documented with a Partnership Agreement or a Director and Shareholder Agreement tailored to your circumstances.

Important things to consider include – Who is responsible for what? Who pays for what? Who is liable for what? What if someone wants to leave / sell/ becomes sick or dies?

Option 2: ‘Traditional’ financing

The most common method. Banks and other financial instructions often fund new and expanding businesses.

Pros: This type of financing allows you access to capital upfront and over time, allowing you to open and expand operations. There are a few different types of finance whether it be a line of credit, standing overdraft or specific finance arrangements (i.e. a number of companies offer specific brewery equipment finance). Applying for and obtaining bank finance is typically a straight-forward process that can occur in a relatively short timeframe.

Cons: You will be liable for interest repayments! You may also be required to provide collateral or personal guarantees. It is also not unusual for some financial instructions to only fund operating businesses who have demonstrated cashflows.

Tip: Seek advice about structuring your personal affairs ahead of applying for finance. There are legal ways to ensure that your assets (i.e. your house) are protected should you default under your finance facility.

Option 3: Funded by investors

More complex than being self-funded. Generally, investment is by way of ‘angel investment’ or ‘venture capital’, which are both forms of private investment that involve investors giving money to the business in exchange for some form of ownership (generally shares in the company i.e. ‘equity’ and/or a right to have a say in business decisions).

However, investment can also be through ‘private capital raising’ options utilised by the company.

Pros: Fast/easy access to money. Can be on terms more favourable than that offered by banks/financiers. The funding arrangement can be tailored to the business (i.e. if money is required upfront, overtime or at certain events).

Tip: If you plan to raise capital privately, it is vital that you comply with legislation in particular as to how you plan to raise money, who from, how much and how you will advertise the raise. Penalties can apply if you fail to comply with the legislation.

Cons: You have to manage your investors! This may include providing accounts or seeking their consent for certain activities if they are a shareholder. Most investors will want to have a say in business decisions. Some investors will only invest on inflated terms. Depending on your arrangement with your investor, you may have to repay amounts at certain times, give up a share in your company, pay dividends, provide security for the investment or provide personal guarantees.

Tip: Ensure that your investor arrangement is properly documented with a Loan Agreement (or similar if the investor is not becoming a director or shareholder) or a Director and Shareholder Agreement (if the investor is becoming a director or shareholder).

Option 4: Funding by a lot of investors i.e. ‘Crowdfunding’

Increasingly, breweries are opting to raise capital through crowdfunding campaigns, both ‘reward-based’ and ‘equity-based’.

Crowdfunding has been available in Australia for a number of years in one form or another. Traditionally, crowdfunding has been limited to charitable or ‘rewards based’ campaigns (i.e. if you invest $x, the company will give you a reward usually a limited release t-shirt or beer etc.).

In late 2018, legislation changed allowing private (i.e. Pty Ltd) companies to offer ‘equity’ crowdfunding. Equity crowdfunding allows the general public to buy shares in the company.

Pros: Businesses can ‘crowdfund’ up to $5,000,000 in any 12-month period (subject to eligibility and a range of other criteria). Crowdfunding means your business receives funding while being widely advertised through campaign marketing. Investors who take part in crowdfunding campaigns often become loyal customers and advocates for the business!

Success Stories: UK based BrewDog famously crowdfunded their breweries (called ‘Equity for Punks’). In Australia, others have followed suit including Black Hops Brewing, Endeavour Brewing Co, Your Mates Brewing and Dainton Brewery.

Cons: A crowdfunding campaign requires a lot of work! You will be required to prepare documents (including company financials and accounts), undertake extensive marketing, manage the campaign, respond to investor queries etc. The company must do what it said to investors that it would do with the money raised (within reason). You will need to manage a lot of investors. This may require a lot of interaction with investors and may make seeking consent for certain activities onerous.

Tip: Ensure that your business is structured appropriately for a crowdfunding campaign and that your Offer Document (i.e. the document made public) are compliant with legislation. Penalties can apply if you fail to comply with the legislation.

The above is a short list of matters relevant to funding a brewery and should not be relied on as specific advice for you or your circumstances.

You should seek professional advice in relation to any of the above. Ramsden Lawyers are experts in beverage law and regularly advise clients on compliance matters.

If you produce beer, wine or spirits and have queries or concerns about your operations, please contact one of our expert beverage lawyers.

Brews News occasionally works with trusted partners to publish content they provide in the form of a sponsored post.

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This week Matt and Pete raise a glass to our service men and women and discuss the news of the week including:

Want to be part of our private Facebook group? Join here and listen to this podcast for the secret code word.

Radio Brews News is proudly presented by Cryer Malt. With over 25 years in the field, Cryer Malt has been bringing you the world’s best local and imported malts. Your premium brewing partner and proud supporters of Brews News.

We thank Rallings Labels and Stickers for sponsoring this podcast. Call Rallings on 1300 852 235 to discover a more efficient way to get your small batch canning labels done.

If you like what we do at Radio Brews News you can help us out by:

All letter writers will receive a brews news bottle opener and go into the draw to win a mixed six-pack thanks to our good friends at Beer Cartel who sponsor our letter for the week.

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Gage Roads will be unveiling its latest brand extension this weekend as GABS rolls into Brisbane tomorrow.

The Atomic Beer Project, which will be housed at Gage’s recently-announced east coast expansion in Sydney, sees the business’ Atomic Pale Ale break off from the Gage brand to stand alone.

Head of Marketing, Miles Hull, told Brews News that Atomic Pale Ale is the foundation beer for a brand that’s going to concentrate on hop-driven ales.

“The Atomic Beer Project is a bit of a side project for Gage Roads and a bit of a place that we can experiment a little bit more and allow the brewers to really wholly and solely focus on hops and hop-driven ales,” he said.

“Gage has been making Atomic for 10 years now, and is a classic US-style hop ale, with dry hops and a nice balance of malt but one where the hops can shine through.

“As with every other brewer, we get pretty excited by hops and IPAs and pale ales, so we thought let’s take this and use this as a foundation.”

Hull said that Atomic’s strong growth on the east coast made it a logical choice to head up the Sydney venture.

“It’s got a really great following in Sydney and in Victoria particularly, away from our home state of WA,” he explained.

“So Atomic Pale Ale will be the first beer re-badged under Atomic Beer Project, so the same product.

“We’re going to relaunch that and at the same time we’re bringing out an IPA under Atomic Beer Project as well in can, with another coming out by the end of the year.”

While the Pale Ale will be unchanged but for branding, the new IPA is described as ‘sessionable’ at 5.6% abv.

Hull said the decision to launch Atomic as its own brand was a tactical move for the business.

“We saw an opportunity. We obviously wanted to concentrate the Gage Road family as being nice, approachable beer styles, playing in that coastal outdoor lifestyle sort of drinking occasions,” he said.

“Atomic was something slightly different, and really worked for us in terms of being a more inner city, urban brewery, which the Redfern site’s going to deliver.”

“This will allow a bit of a creative outlet for our team to play and experiment with hop-driven ales where we want to keep the Gage range a little bit more approachable or not so specialised in that area. We can be a bit more flexible in this range than under the Gage Roads umbrella.”

He said Gage’s breadth of brands under the overarching Good Drinks business, including Gage, Matso’s, Alby and its cider Hello Sunshine and now Atomic, provided a portfolio to offer retailers.

“As brewers, you have consumers and you have customers, so consumers are obviously the ones picking up the product at the end of the day, but we have to look at our customers and our customers’ needs, and they’re the retailers and small bars,” he said.

“There’s always a limit to what they want to put on, and if you see a restaurant that only has wine from a couple of producers, it seems a bit two-dimensional to me.

“You want to have a bit of a mix of style and producers, so I think it’s about providing your customers, so the retailers and bars, with a different range of products to suit different consumers and different occasions too.

“What we’re trying to do under the Good Drinks range is provide a real mix that allows customers a range of products to list, whether it’s on shelf or on their beer list, that appeal to a good mix of people coming in that offer different styles and different varieties from, I guess, a bit of a mix of breweries.

“So I think there is a limit to how many beers you can really bring out under one brand.”

The Sydney Brewery, which is yet to receive council approval, will have a substantial hospitality offering.

“We’re putting in a kitchen and we want it to be a place that you go into regularly as a local or not just to see the beer, but as a place that you can go to for a bite to eat with friends and family,” Hull said.

Festival-goers at GABS Brisbane will be introduced to the repackaged Pale Ale, new IPA and a limited release Double IPA, weighing in at 8.5% abv, and a limited edition green hop ale, made in collaboration with Karridale Hop Farm, which is working to reintroduce hope to Western Australia.

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Move over girl power, it’s all about the Fempocalypse!

Join Two Birds Brewing for a celebration of amazing women-led beer, entertainment, local makers and music during Good Beer Week 2019!

It’s the ideal Mother’s Day extravaganza!

Starting from midday, enjoy delicious brews from Australia’s first female-owned brewery – Two Birds Brewing, accompanied by live music from female and non-binary acts brought to you by Love Shack Studios…

Featuring – Hotbox, Jo Huf, Widows of the Parish, Yukumbabe (solo), Emily Chen, Racerage, Thibault (solo), Powerful Owl, FCK and DJ Intalink.

PLUS chats with our international guest, Pints and Panels’ Brewtoonist Em Sauter!

Tickets only $15 at Good Beer Week.

Date and time: May 12, 12-9pm

Location: The Two Birds’ Nest, 136 Hall St, Spotswood, VIC

RSVP here.

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A Celebration about creating great Beer!

About De Havilland Road Contract Brewing

De Havilland Road Contract Brewing is a contract brewing facility. We brew out of Albatross Brewing, located at 39 De Havilland Road, Mordialloc.

Here small batch beers are brewed with the finest quality ingredients and set before the thirsty, discerning drinkers of Mordialloc (and the rest of the world!).

A range of keg and bottled craft beers, along with a cider, have been crafted and packaged here to satisfy a variety of tastes.

The equipment we brew on:

  • 12.5 HL Brewhouse which consists of 3 vessels. Mash Tun, Kettle and Whirlpool.
  • 1 x 50 HL Hot Liquor Tank
  • 1 x 50 HL Cold Liquor Tank
  • 6 x 30 HL Fermenters (Soon to be 12)
  • 1 x Keg washer, semi-automatic
  • State of the art Computer system which runs the Brewhouse, Fermenters and monitors the ferment process auto adjusting to allow easy monitoring of your beer!

To find out more about contract brewing services, please the team or call 0447 443 690.

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This week Matt catches up with Pete while he’s at the beach in Adelaide. The big stories of the week are:

Want to be part of our private Facebook group? Join here and listen to this podcast for the secret code word.

Radio Brews News is proudly presented by Cryer Malt. With over 25 years in the field, Cryer Malt has been bringing you the world’s best local and imported malts. Your premium brewing partner and proud supporters of Brews News.

We thank Rallings Labels and Stickers for sponsoring this podcast. Call Rallings on 1300 852 235 to discover a more efficient way to get your small batch canning labels done.

If you like what we do at Radio Brews News you can help us out by:

All letter writers will receive a brews news bottle opener and go into the draw to win a mixed six-pack thanks to our good friends at Beer Cartel who sponsor our letter for the week.

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Australian Brews News by Megan Sahli - 1w ago

Two Birds Brewing Galaxy Hop Harvest

For Hop Harvest 2019, Two Birds Brewing has brewed a “straight-forward” pale ale to show off the Galaxy hop in all its glory. The Spotswood brewery has described this release as a beer with confident bitterness, balanced with a healthy hit of citrus and passionfruit.

Hop Harvest 2019 is now available in keg-only and comes in at 5.3% ABV.

Felons Brewing Co Natural Ale

Brisbane’s Felons Brewing Co has released a new core-range beer called Natural Ale. Available on tap and in cans from today, Natural Ale is an “easy, breezy summer-of-Brisbane-in-a-can type beer” with passionfruit and mango characters.

Natural Ale is brewed with malt and wheat, it’s unfiltered, unpasteurised and has no added preservatives. Natural Ale comes in at 4.4% ABV, 16 IBU and 5 EBC with a slight haze.

Bright Brewery Hop Harvest Ale

Bright Brewery‘s Hop Harvest Ale is brewed with freshly-picked experimental hop 016. At 6.3% ABV, Hop Harvest Ale 2019 “packs a whole lotta punch” with citrus and tropical fruit notes and a malty backbone.

Hop Harvest Ale 2019 is now available on tap and at selected retailers with bottles to come shortly.

Bright Brewery Barleywine

Appropriately released in time for Easter this weekend, Bright Brewery has ducked down into its cellar to retrieve its 2018 English Barleywine, which has been ageing for the past 12 months.

With an ABV of 14.4%, Barleywine has been aged to allow for those rich, malty flavours to mellow into a sweet, warming brew with flavours of dried fruit and toffee.

Barleywine is only available on tap and at select retailers.

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Pink Boots’ Western Australia Chapter has just released its yearly brew, a boysenberry, chocolate and ice cream brown ale.

Starting in 2007 from an online list of 60 women in the brewing industry, Pink Boots has grown into an international network of women who make a living from beer.

A not-for-profit organisation, Pink Boots is dedicated to supporting and empowering women working in any aspect of the beer industry.

The brew, named Girlsenberry Choc Bomb, was brewed at the Nowhereman Brewery in Leederville, Perth and saw a collaboration between the Little Creatures, Nowhereman, Feral, Eagle Bay, Rocky Ridge, Nail, Gage Roads, Colonial and Brew-U.

Playing on the current trend for dessert beer, the brewers decided to keep their brown ale light and refreshing enough to want to drink on a hot and dry Western Australian day.

It used 20 kilograms of cacao husks in the mash and some oats for extra creaminess, lactose sugar to give it a cream body and 100 kilograms of boysenberry for flavour. The ingredients were donated by Gladfield Malts, Bintani, Kegstar and Bahen & Co.

WA Pink Boots Coordinator Pia Poynton said Pink Boots gives women visibility by showing the feminine side of this industry.

“Where the beer industry is mostly male-dominated, Pink Boots looks to bring women together,” she said.

Little Creatures brewers Jess Curtin and Mel Dennis gave a resounding “yes” when asked if they were happy with the direction that Pink Boots’ was going in. Mel Dennis continued that “It’s all about proving that beer can be feminine”.

From hop growers to ladies in the lab, Pink Boots offers genuine support to all women in a traditionally male industry.

Since 2016, Pink Boots Australia has awarded scholarships to women in beer by way of covering the associated costs in attending the IBA Brewers conference. There are no scholarships available at the moment.

The beer is available in select beer venues in Perth as well as in the South West at Darleen’s in Busselton and Bush Shack, Cheeky Monkey’s, Colonial and Eagle Bay breweries.

A limited number of kegs will heading to Melbourne and will be available at Colonial, Two Birds and during Good Beer week it will be available at the Royston Hotel.

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