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Is harvesting wild plants part of your survival plan? There are plenty of edible plants growing, but there are also plenty of deadly ones.

You must take time now to learn what plants around you are nutritious and safe. Otherwise you will be at a disadvantage when disaster strikes, and you can’t buy produce at the local store.

While I share ten common edible plants in this article, they might not all be available in your part of the world. Spend time in nature, learning what wild edibles are local to you. Learn to identify them, so you always know what you’re eating.

What Not To Eat

If you don’t know that a certain plant is safe, don’t assume it is. There are tests you can do to determine the edibility of the plant. This Survivopedia article goes into detail on that process. Here are five warning signs to watch for. These often indicate that a plant is poisonous, though there are exceptions.

  • Umbrella shaped plants
  • Lacy foliage that resembles dill or carrot tops
  • Sap that is discolored or milky
  • Stems covered in spines, thorns, or fine hairs
  • Plants with yellow or white berries

Just as you learn to identify safe plants in your area, do the same with deadly ones. The more you know about the wild plants in your area, the more likely you are to survive when you are depending on them.

Now, let’s look at ten common wild plants that are safe, and offer some nutrition. Before you start harvesting them though, it’s important to know the growing condition of these plants.

Some are considered weeds, and many people treat them as such. You don’t want to eat wild plants that have been doused with weed killer. The chemicals can leach into the ground and cause problems for quite a while after application. Instead look for plants in wild areas, or in areas where no chemicals have been used.

Find out our Firefather’s Time-Tested Natural Cures and Household Remedies Dandelions

One of the most easily identified plants, every part of a dandelion is edible. The leaves are best when young, as they develop a bitter taste as they mature.

You can harvest the leaves and stems and put them in a salad. The yellow flowers are delicious when battered and deep fried. They’re also good as a garnish to your salad. The roots can be boiled to make a nutritious tea.

Plantain

Plantain is a common source of food found in many lawns. The leaves are shaped like a wide-oval and are ribbed. You want to eat the leaves, not the stems or flower spikes.

Pick these leaves when they’re young to avoid bitterness. They taste great when sautéed in a bit of butter. Cook this leafy green however you’d cook kale.

Read also: Plantain: One Of The Best Healing Herbs On The Planet

Cattails

If you’re in a swampy area, or near a creek or lake, cattails are a good source of nutrition. You can eat the root raw or boil it. This part is underground, like a potato, so make sure to clean it well before cooking or eating.

The stem portion of this plant can also be boiled or eaten raw. Cook the leaves like you would spinach.

Even the flower spike on a cattail is edible, if eaten in the spring and early summer before it develops fluff. Boil this spike and eat it like corn-on-the-cob.

Chicory

Chicory is a bushy plant with small flowers. The flowers can be blue, lavender, or white. When coffee wasn’t available in the past, many people roasted the chicory root and ground it. Then they used this as a coffee substitute.

The flowers and leaves can be eaten raw. You can also boil the leaves for a different taste.

Lamb’s Quarter

If you’re looking for a plant that offers some protein, you want lamb’s quarter. It has easily identifiable leaves. They have jagged edges and a diamond shape.

You can eat the leaves raw, in a salad, or cook them like spinach. This plant does have oxalic acid, so you don’t want to each too much of it raw, especially if you have kidney problems. Cooking it first neutralizes this acid.

Purslane

Often found growing through cracks in the sidewalk, purslane has small yellow flowers and smooth leaves. The stems and leaves make a nutritious addition to your wild plant survival salad.

Purslane can be used as a thickener for soup if you boil the leaves and stem. This versatile plant can also be added to stir-fry or sautéed.

Pig Weed (Amaranth)

This plant can grow tall (sometimes over 6 feet tall). It’s found in gardens, fields, and other areas where the ground has been cultivated.

The flower part of this plant makes it easily identifiable. They are small and green, appearing in bristly spikes near the top of the plant.

All of this plant is edible, though the stems, leaves, and seeds are most commonly eaten. You can collect the seeds by shaking the top of mature plants. You can cook the seeds like a hot cereal, ground it into flour, or eat them raw. The stems and leaves can be boiled or eaten raw in a salad.

Curly Dock

Related to rhubarb, curly dock plants have large, wavy leaves. They grow from a taproot, and are drought-resistant.

Though poisonous to cattle and sheep, this plant offers many nutrients for people. Treat this leafy green like you would kale. You can boil it, sauté it, or even bake it with a little oil into dock chips.

Milk Thistle

Though very spiny, the milk thistle plant is edible. It’s distinguished by its light purple flowers and prickly leaves. Make sure you are using gloves when harvesting to avoid getting poked.

If you take the spines off the leaves, they are tasty eaten raw or when cooked. After you peel the tough stem, you can cook it like asparagus.

Chickweed

Found in partially shaded areas of the lawn and other cultivated ground, chickweed plants are stringy. They produce a tiny white flower.

You can eat chickweed like you would sprouts. Put it onto a sandwich for a nutrient boost, or use it as the base of your salad.

Start Eating Wild Plants Now

When you know what you’re doing, wild plans make a good food source when times are tough. But, don’t wait until the SHTF to start adding wild plants to your diet.

Get yourself a good reference book for plants in your region. Make it a point to study plants that you can eat and ones you need to avoid. You don’t want to feed your family a deadly meal because you made a mistake in your plant identification.

Instead, take the time now to learn about these plants. Learn to identify, prepare, and store them for longer term use. Eat them occasionally to introduce your taste buds to the unfamiliar tastes. This preparation will go a long

way in helping you survive a disaster situation.

Source: survivopedia.com

In the first chapter of The Lost Book Of Remedies, you’ll find all the other medicinal weeds and backyard plants that are hidden around your property. You’ve got a homegrown pharmacy that you don’t even know about! Most of these plants are edible and can provide you with precious nutrients if you ever run low on food. This goes for all the plants you’ll find in The Lost Book of Remedies—not only will you learn what parts of the plants are edible, but I’ll also show you how to prepare them. In the second part, you’ll discover how to identify the wild edibles and remedies that grow in forests. 

Get your paperback copy HERE

The post 10 Wild Plants You Can Eat (+5 You Shouldn’t!) appeared first on Bio Prepper.

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This article first appeared on naturallivingideas.com

The plantains used as medicinal herbs are low-growing plants that you can find growing almost anywhere. In some circles plantain is regarded as a weed, but it’s actually one of the best healing herbs on the planet. 

Plantains have a long history of being used as food plants and healing herbs in many diverse cultures around the world. The Native Americans used it to heal wounds, cure fever, and to draw out toxins from stings and bites, including snakebites.

You might have come across mainly two types of plantains; the ones with broad leaves called Plantago major and the narrow-leaved type P. lanceolata. You can use either one for healing purposes, depending on the availability in your locality, but most herbalists seem to prefer the broadleaf plantain with larger, but softer, edible leaves.

Health Benefits Of Plantain

Plantains have wide-ranging antimicrobial properties besides being anti-inflammatory and analgesic. It can not only soothe insect bites and superficial wounds but prevent infections and accelerate healing. An active biochemical aucubin is mainly responsible for the antimicrobial action of the herb. Another substance allantoin in the herb helps with skin tissue regeneration.

Plantains also have an astringent property that has a cleansing effect on the body. It helps dry up excess secretions in the respiratory tract and the digestive system, thus being useful in treating colds and diarrhea. The astringency is moderated by the demulcent effect of the mucilage in the herb, so this herbal remedy is much gentler than other commonly used astringents.

The edible leaves of broadleaf plantain are rich in calcium and other minerals and vitamins, including Vitamin K. This vitamin helps stem bleeding from cuts and wounds. Tender leaves can be eaten fresh in salads, but older leaves have to be cooked.

How To Collect Plantain Herb

Despite their medicinal and nutritional value, plantains have a weed status, and are, in fact, invasive in many areas. If you find them growing in abundance in wastelands in your area, it’s better to gather them from there, rather than introduce them into your garden. But make sure that the area is clean, and not chemically treated.

Most importantly, you should be able to positively identify the correct plant. The plants don’t have any stems above the ground. All you see is a tuft of leaves coming from a point. The characteristic flower stalks help identify plantain among other rosette-forming plants, but they may not be present all the time. If you are in doubt, get the help of a knowledgeable person.

Plantain leaves are mainly used for herbal preparations, so it is best to pick just the leaves, rather than dig out the entire plant. Pinch off unblemished leaves, selecting slightly mature ones over the very tender leaves, unless you’re planning to use them in salads. Mature leaves have a higher concentration of potent phytochemicals.

How To Use Plantain For Healing

Plantain is used to treat a variety of everyday problems, from mosquito bites and skin rashes to kidney problems and gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases. Let’s see how you can use this herb for healing.

Burns – Apply a poultice immediately and apply a bandage with leaves. Follow it up with a plantain salve.

Cuts and open sores – Stop bleeding from fresh cuts by applying crushed plantain leaves. Wash with plantain tea or diluted tincture (1 tbsp to a glass of water) to prevent infections and promote healing.

Boils and acne – Touch with a drop of tincture or apply salve.

For mouth ulcers – Swish 2-3 Tbsp plantain tea in the mouth 3-4 times a day. You can use 1 tbsp of tincture diluted with a cup of water too.

For throat pain/infection – Gargle with plantain tea or diluted tincture. Take 5-10 drops of tincture under the tongue and ingest it slowly.

Dandruff and other scalp problems – Apply plantain tea or oil infusion to the scalp and wash off after an hour.

For poison ivy/sumac/oak – Apply a poultice immediately, and then wash the area with plantain tea. Apply plantain sludge (more details at the end of this article) until the stinging pain is gone.

For sunburn – Apply fresh poultice or plantain sludge liberally. Wash the area with the tea and then apply the salve.

To improve liver and kidney function – Drink 1-2 glasses of plantain tea every day.

For relief from gastrointestinal inflammation – Take the tincture under the tongue or drink plantain tea.

For cold, flu, and respiratory infections – Take the tincture under the tongue or drink freshly brewed warm tea with honey.

How To Make Plantain Poultice

This is the quickest, and reportedly the most effective, way to use this healing herb. Keep a mental note of where you can find it in the garden or yard in an emergency. In case of an insect bite, bee sting, or poison ivy exposure, grab a few leaves, crush them between the palms, or pound them with a stone, and apply directly on the skin. If you are using it on yourself, just chew the leaves and use it as a poultice.

The mucilage from the bruised leaves will immediately soothe the pain while the anti-inflammatory effect of the herb reduces swelling and redness. The poultice will also draw the toxins from the sting, so it works best when applied immediately.

Read More: How To Make A Plantain Poultice

How To Make Plantain Tea

You will need:

  • Fresh plantain leaves – 1 cup
  • Water – 2 cups
  • Heat-proof bowl with fitting lid
  1.   Wash the plantain leaves thoroughly and keep it in a bowl with lid.
  2.   Boil the water and pour over the leaves in the bowl, cover with the lid and let them steep until the bowl is cold to touch.
  3.   Strain out the tea and store in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

Drink 1-2 cups of this plantain tea a day to control diarrhea or to get relief from the symptoms of cold and fever. You can drink it plain or add honey for taste. It can bring relief to people who have stomach ulcers, IBS or other inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Plantain tea can be used as a general tonic too.

Use plantain tea topically to wash wounds, boils, and skin damaged by sunburn, rashes, eczema etc.

How To Make Plantain Salve

Keeping a tub of plantain salve handy can be so useful in situations when you cannot run out to get the herb. It is an excellent first aid for cuts and bruises, insect bites, poison ivy attacks, and skin rashes and eruptions that suddenly appear for no apparent reason. You can even use it in small amounts as a diaper cream for babies.

To find out how to make a plantain salve, visit our full step-by-step tutorial here

Tips:

Use this healing salve on skin rashes, chapped skin, insect, and spider bites. It is excellent for regular use on eczema and psoriasis-affected skin.

To make sure that the salve lasts for some time without any preservatives, gather the leaves on a dry day, and dry them thoroughly after washing.

Since coconut oil naturally solidifies at room temperature (below 75F), you can make this preparation without beeswax, but the salve will have a creamy consistency. You can make the oil infusion with olive oil or castor oil for use on the scalp.

How To Make Plantain Tincture

You will need:

  • Plantain leaves washed and dried of excess moisture – 1 cup
  • 100 proof vodka or brandy – 1 pint
  • Glass jar with tight-fitting lid

Method:

  1.   Put the leaves into a jar and pour the alcohol over it so that it completely covers the leaves and fills the jar. Use a glass rod to stir the mixture well.
  2.   Put the lid on and place the jar in a dark place, giving it a good shake every few days.
  3.   After 6-8 weeks, decant into clean bottles and store in a dark place.

Tips:

The tincture made with plantain leaves and 100% alcohol can last for two to three years without losing its potency.

It is a very potent remedy for cold, respiratory infections and ailments of the stomach. Use 10 drops under the tongue and hold for 30 seconds before swallowing. You can add 10 drops of the tincture into a glass of water and drink slowly. For external use, put a drop on boils and sores.

Plantain Leaf Sludge

The sludge obtained from draining the tea can be applied as a cooling and healing poultice on your face, shoulders and back red and raw from sunburn. Similarly, the residue left over from the oil infusion can be used to ease burns, eczema, and psoriasis. Grind it to get a more uniform paste.

Read also:

All the Edible and Medicinal Plants in North America (video)

 6 POTENT NATURAL PAIN RELIEVERS FOR PREPPERS OFF GRID ANTIBIOTICS – FOR WHEN THERE IS NO MEDICINE  A MEDICINAL PLANT MAP THAT SHOULD BE IN YOUR SURVIVAL KIT

The post Do Not Kill This Weed! It’s One Of The Best Healing Herbs On The Planet appeared first on Bio Prepper.

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The most important thing you should know about antibiotics!

Never expect a doctor to phone-in a prescription for an antibiotic without seeing you first. Why? To ensure your illness is in fact a bacterial infection, as viruses do not respond to antibiotics.

For example Influenza is a virus infection – this is why your doctor will never prescribe you antibiotics for this.

Knowing the difference between a viral and bacterial illness may save you time and money. Here are four tips to help you determine when an illness could be viral or bacterial. Take this advice only when you can’t see a doctor (when SHTF):

  1. Location: A viral illness typically causes wide-spread symptoms. A bacteria usually causes site-specific symptoms, such as those involving the sinuses, throat, or chest.
  2. Phlegm color: A virus may produce clear or cloudy mucous, if any. A bacterial illness typically causes colored phlegm (green, yellow, bloody or brown-tinged).
  3. Duration of illness: Most viral illnesses last 2 to 10 days. A bacterial illness commonly will last longer than 10 days.
  4. Fever. A viral infection may or may not cause a fever. A bacterial illness notoriously causes a fever (normal body temperature is 98.6, a fever is considered greater than 100 degrees Fahrenheit).

If you are diagnosed with a bacterial illness, typical antibiotic treatment is 10 to 14 days.

For more info click HERE

A person is no longer considered contagious once on an antibiotic for 24 hours and any fever has been resolved. (Source – Dr. Linda Petter)

If your symptoms do not resolve, or if at any time you develop a severe headache or neck pain, persistent nausea / vomiting or a fever, be sure to see a doctor promptly.

What Antibiotics to Stockpile

No antibiotic is effective against every type of microbe. Certain ones will kill aerobic bacteria, others are used for anaerobic bacteria, still others are effective against resistant strains, and certain people are allergic to or intolerant of various antibiotics.

Instead of buying 10 types of antibiotics (many having similar substances) you should consider 4-5 with totally different actions, so if the bacteria is resistant to one of them, you have 4 totally different “solutions” to try.

This, of course, only if you don’t have access to a clinic where they can test the bacterial resistance to these antibiotics first.

For example if you took Amoxicillin with no effect, there is no need to try other penicillin based antibiotics (Carbenicillin, Cloxacillin, Flucloxacillin, Oxacillin, Methicillin an so on) so you can exclude a wide range.

But the antibiotics listed bellow should work for most bacterial diseases, including Most Common Biological Weapons (like Anthrax – 90% mortality without treatment in the first 3-6 days).

The 4 Antibiotics You’ll Need

1. Amoxicillin

Amoxicillin is a penicillin antibiotic used to treat many different types of infection caused by bacteria, such as tonsillitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, gonorrhea, and infections of the ear, nose or throat.

Amoxicillin is also sometimes used together with another antibiotic called clarithromycin – the second one – to treat stomach ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori infection.

Update – at the suggestion of Dr. M (comment area): Augmenting is also a very good option. It’s basically an upgraded amoxicillin (contains amoxicillin + clavulanate potassium) but with increased (mild) side-effects: stomach discomfort with mild cramping and diarrhea. I know it’s OK for most of people. I personally tried it 2 times and I had the bad luck of happening to me.

Related: Meds Stockpile For a Crisis

2. Clarithromycin

Clarithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic. It fights bacteria in your body.

Clarithromycin is used to treat many different types of bacterial infections affecting the skin and respiratory systemIf the bacteria seems to be resistant to Amoxicillin, this is the next best thing one should try when SHTF.

Contains Erythromycin and can be substituted with. Don’t take both antibiotics at the same time.

Update – at the suggestion of Dr. M (comment area):  Zithromax (also a macrolide antibiotic) is a very good (better in many ways) substitute for Clarithromycin. But it is less active against Helicobacter pylori.

3. Ciprofloxacin

Ciprofloxacin is an antibiotic in a group of drugs called fluoroquinolones.

Ciprofloxacin is useful for anthrax, urinary tract and prostate infectionsdiverticulitis and many forms of pneumonia and bronchitis.

Related: The Only Meds That You Need To Stockpile for SHTF

4. Metronidazole

Metronidazole belongs to a class of antibiotics known as nitroimidazoles.

Metronidazole is used to treat parasitic and bacterial infections including Giardia infections of the small intestine, colon infections, liver abscess, vaginal infections (not yeast), fungating wounds, intra-abdominal infections, lung abscess and gingivitis.

How to store antibiotics?

Every antibiotic has its own particular decay rate, as proteins (oligopeptides) are subject to hydrolyzation, the main form of attack (heat and moisture are the enemy).

So, if you plan on long term storage, the individual foil packs are the best choice. Then pack them in sealed containers with dessicants to be sure.

For how long is it still safe to take antibiotics after the expiration date?

The American Medical Association (AMA) conducted a study and concluded that the actual shelf life of some products is longer than the labeled expiration date.

Manufacturers put expiration dates on for marketing, rather than scientific, reasons,” said Mr. Flaherty, a formal pharmacist at the FDA. “It’s not profitable for them to have products on a shelf for 10 years. They want turnover.”

With time, most antibiotics simply become less effective.

So maybe the question should be “for how long these antibiotics are expected to still have effects?”

Amoxicillin (tablets) – 5 years after the expiration date;

Clarithromycin and Doxycycline (tablets) – 5 years after the expiration date;

Ciprofloxacin (tablets) – 10 years after the expiration date;

Metronidazole (tablets) – 3 years after expiration date;

I hope you found this information useful. This is a guest post from Dr. S. Flint.

Alternative medicine with The Lost Book Of Remedies

Read also:

All the Edible and Medicinal Plants in North America (video)

 6 POTENT NATURAL PAIN RELIEVERS FOR PREPPERS OFF GRID ANTIBIOTICS – FOR WHEN THERE IS NO MEDICINE  A MEDICINAL PLANT MAP THAT SHOULD BE IN YOUR SURVIVAL KIT

The post The Only 4 Antibiotics You’ll Need when SHTF appeared first on Bio Prepper.

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Modern medical marvels are uncovering new ways to treat illness everyday, but at the same time, the practical, common and inexpensive ways our ancestors used to stay healthy are being lost.  The ancients may have only needed to look as far as the spice cabinet for some remedies, and that knowledge has been mostly lost to history.

Related: 10 Health Benefits of Cinnamon That Surprised Even Us

All of these remedies were once used by our ancestors to treat common illnesses, and they would have been well known to the population.

  1. Decoction is the technical term for a a type of medicine made by boiling plant material to extract and concentrate their medicinal constituents. Today we make gentle teas in convenient bags, but historically medicinal plants, roots and barks were often boiled whole in a pot and cooked down into a concentrated decoction.
  2. Cayenne Pepper was used topically to treat pain and arthritis. A simple capsaicin salve can block pain receptors and dramatically reduce pain on the spot. Peppers were also taken internally to help digestion, warm the body and speed the metabolism.
  3. Willow Bark has gone by the wayside as a natural pain reliever with the advent of synthetics, but some modern pain relievers are still made with the same active ingredients naturally present in willow bark. Our ancestors chewed the bark or boiled it into a tea to ease pains of all sorts.
  4. Oxymels are a remedy that date back to the ancient roman times. A mixture of herbs, raw vinegar and honey that was used to treat a variety of ailments depending on the herbs used. Elderberry oxymels, for example are potent immune boosters.  When herbs like cherry bark are used, an oxymel can be a potent home made cough syrup.
  5. Raw Vinegar is naturally probiotic and helps to correct digestive troubles by balancing the bodies pH level. In it’s raw form, it’s a potent probiotic that contains millions of active microbes to promote health and healing throughout the body. Most preparations these days are pasteurized, but if you’re looking for medicine make sure you seek out the raw stuff.
  6. Turmeric is a powerful anti-inflammatory, and research has shown that it can be just as effective at treating inflammatory pain as ibuprofen. Fresh turmeric is a rhizome, similar to ginger, that is grated into foods. More commonly known, ground turmeric is generally available in just about every grocery store spice section.
  7. Black Pepper is great for topical pain relief in much the same way that cayenne pepper is used. Make a salve by infusing an oil with black pepper and apply directly or convert it to a healing salve by adding beeswax. Black pepper is also antibacterial, which is one reason it was so commonly used in recipes for salt preserved meats historically.
  8. Chamomile tea tastes great, but it’s also powerful medicine. It was used by Native Americans as a sedative when drunk as tea, but it’s also used in healing salves for skin irritation. Chamomile hair rinses are also great for conditioning hair and treating scalp issues.
  9. Honey was taken by the spoonful for immune support, but it was also used topically to heal wounds. A bit of honey spread on a healing wound helped prevent infection. The high sugar content in the absence of water prevents microbes from growing in much the same way that salting meats prevents spoilage.  Honey is also naturally antimicrobial due to enzymes made by the bees, so it works in two ways. Here are 23 survival uses for honey that you didn’tknow about.
  10. Garlic is antibacterial and antifungal. It’s used in oil extractions to treat all sorts of issues, including ear infections. Eating garlic raw helps with lung issues and promotes good circulation.  Eating fresh garlic also helps prevent bug bites because the sulfur compounds that give garlic it’s taste are processed by your body and emitted through your skin.
  11. Ginger helps support the immune system and promotes good circulation. It was used historically for stomach issues, and while crystallized ginger is eaten as candy today, it was once taken as medicine for nausea, sea sickness and morning sickness.
  12. Poultice is a word you’ll see in ancient herbal texts, but not one you’ll find prescribed by a doctor today. To make one, mash or chew up fresh herb material and apply it topically. They’re used for all sorts of issues from minor skin irritations to chest colds when applied directly to the chest.  A poultice is an ancient way to prepare herbs, and it’s impact depends on the herbs used.
  13. Bay Leaves are added for flavor to soups and stews these days, but historically they were used to detoxify the body and manage bacterial infections. Smoke from burning bay was used to clear and focus the mind.
  14. Yarrow is also known by the Latin name “achillea” for the ancient Greek hero Achilles. He was said to have carried it to treat wounds from his soldiers. It’s a powerful medicinal that stops bleeding quickly when applied as a poultice directly to the wound.
  15. Infused Oils are used to extract and preserve the medical properties of herbs for both topical and internal use. Some infused oils, like calendula or plantain are used for external applications to treat skin issues, while others like the rosemary oil you’ll find in the supermarket, were once used to treat nausea and stomach issues when consumed. While they’re used as flavorings now, they were once well known medicine. Here’s how to make a powerful calendula extract to keepin your medicine cabinet (with pictures).
  16. Pine Pitch is easily extracted from pine trees and it was used historically for extracting splinters and poisons. A “drawing salve” would have been made and applied, using pine pitch, to draw out a splinter or snake bite venom. Learn howto make pine syrup at home (step by step guide with pictures).
  17. Aloe Vera was applied directly to wounds on battlefields historically, but it was also consumed. The gel within the plant leaves is consumed to help improve digestion, reduce inflammation and treat constipation.
  18. Cloves are perfect for topical pain relief, and before dentists were commonly available to the people, cloves would have been used to treat tooth pain. A cavity would have been packed with ground cloves to numb the pain, or whole cloves would be chewed.
  19. Burdock is a garden weed these days, but it’s also a powerful blood detoxifyer and diuretic. Patients would be prescribed a burdock root tincture, tea or told to simply eat burdock root as a boiled vegetable in much the same way carrots are consumed.
  20. Red Raspberry Leaf is rich in minerals that help keep just about everyone healthy and well nourished, but it’s particularly potent for pregnant women. Red raspberry leaf tea was drunk by pregnant women to promote easy labors and help tone the uterus.
  21. Plantain was so well known for it’s ability to treat skin ailments, that it’s used as a joke in Romeo and Juliet. The entire audience would know that when they’re discussing plantain, it was to be used to treat skin wounds in much the same way that a modern audience would know what was meant if you said “band aid.” Plantain was the band aid of the day in Shakespearean’s times.
  22. Medicinal Beer isn’t something you’ll find at your local liquor store these days, but historically, herbs were brewed into beer where the alcohol helped extract and preserve the medicinal properties.
  23. Cranberry is mostly served for holiday meals these days, but historically it was used to treat all sorts of urinary tract health issues. It’s naturally antibacterial, and consuming cranberries help to purge infection from the body.
  24. Maple Sap it tasty when cooked into maple syrup, but our ancestors drank the sap straight to help strengthen their bones and for cleansing. A group would get together in a heated room and each person would try to drink as much as 5 gallons of the sap, while sweating profusely from the heat. The idea was to bring the medicinal benefits of the sap in, while sweating the toxins out.
  25. Rhubarb is mostly made into pie these days, but the Romans used rhubarb for gas, convulsions, stomach issues, asthma and dysentery. Web MD even verifies this, saying rhubarb is useful for digestive complaints. It wasn’t even used as food until the 1830’s, but when’s the last time you ate rhubarb for medicine?
  26. Herbal Smoking isn’t something hear about these days. When someone smokes, it’s assumed it’s tobacco. Historically, all manner of herbs were smoked for their medicinal benefits.  The smoke is inhaled and the medicine can be absorbed directly by the capillaries in the lungs.

You can get your paperback copy HERE

Source: askaprepper.com

Read also:

All the Edible and Medicinal Plants in North America (video) 

 6 POTENT NATURAL PAIN RELIEVERS FOR PREPPERS OFF GRID ANTIBIOTICS – FOR WHEN THERE IS NO MEDICINE  A MEDICINAL PLANT MAP THAT SHOULD BE IN YOUR SURVIVAL KIT

The post 26 Ancient Remedies That We Lost to History appeared first on Bio Prepper.

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Not long ago I picked up a copy of The Lost Book of Remedies by Claude Davis, and it’s a decision I’ll never regret. Most of the first few days were spent reading it from cover to cover, and since then I’ve been dipping into it a few times a day, always finding something interesting – either a piece of knowledge I’d appreciate, or one of Doctor Davis’s charming anecdotes.

What really impressed me about this book wasn’t just the huge amount of knowledge it contains; it was how painstakingly Claude has pulled together everything he could remember or research about Doctor Davis – his grandfather – and the remedies he used with his patients. For Claude, the book was obviously a labor of love, and his respect for the man who taught him so much shines through on every page.

Anyway, I’m a huge fan of Lost Remedies, so when I realized last week that work would be taking me pretty close to where Claude lives, I thought I’d give him a call. We chatted for a while about what we’ve both been doing since I saw him last, and he finished by inviting me to drop round again.

Find out our Forefather’s Time-Tested Natural Cures and Household Remedies

Visiting Claude is always an experience. There’s something hugely reassuring about his home. When I arrived lunch was cooking in a cauldron out front, and Claude’s wife was just taking some loaves out of the oven built into the side of the open fireplace. This is living the way it used to be done.

Once I’d said hello to Claude and his family, the two of us sat down and started chatting about his latest book. We talked about a lot of things, in fact, but here’s what we discussed about The Lost Book of Remedies.

Me: I’ve read all three of your books now, and loved them. They’re a bit different, though the first two cover a really wide range of skills, dealing with just about everything. The new one is all about remedies and medicine. What made you do things different this time?

Claude: Well, there are two reasons. One’s personal, and the other is something I think all preppers need to keep at the front of their minds.

Me: The personal one… this book was obviously inspired by your grandfather and his work, right?

Claude: Yes, it was. My grandfather was a huge influence on me as I grew up. I was basically raised by my grandparents, and they were remarkable people. Even by the standard of grandparents, they always stood out as old-fashioned; not stuck in the past, but I would say rooted in it.

Me: How do you mean, exactly?

Claude: They always saw the value in traditional ways of doing things. They were never rich, and they’d known real poverty in their lives, so the modern, throwaway society wasn’t for them. I guess you could almost say they were offended by the amount of waste that went on even then. What they would say about society today, well, I don’t even want to guess at that.

Me: I can relate to that. I’m amazed how much money I’ve saved just by looking if I can fix things up, instead of throwing them away and buying a new one.

Claude: Well, that was a way of life for my grandparents, in everything they did. And they taught me those same values. So I guess I wrote this book – edited it, really; my grandfather did the real writing, in his notes – to help preserve some more of the old ways they taught me. And to honor my grandfather’s memory, of course. That’s important to me.

Me: So that’s the personal reason. What’s the other?

Claude: Because healing is something we all need sometimes, but our modern healthcare system is very vulnerable even at the best of times. Getting sick in the USA can be an expensive business, even if you have insurance. My grandfather healed people because that was his calling. He didn’t ask for payment, but most people paid him what they could. Sometimes it was cash, sometimes a sack of potatoes or a couple of chickens. I remember once he set a farmer’s broken arm and came home with half a pig. Well, the modern healthcare business isn’t like that. If you can’t pay, a lot of the times you’re not going to get the treatment. If you know how to use the traditional remedies old Doctor Davis used, you can treat yourself a lot of the time – and do it just as well.

Me: I sure like that idea. I needed treatment for a minor skin condition a few years ago. I’m insured, but the copayment still put a dent in my budget.

Claude: You could have used a stinging nettle tincture.

Me: And next time I will, for sure.

Claude: Now imagine you weren’t insured and had to pay the full cost. Maybe you have kids to care for too, and money’s tight. Are you going to pay, or just suffer? A lot of people just suffer, but there’s no need to. Four or five generations ago everyone had a load of home remedies for things like that. Real preparedness isn’t just about EMP or natural disasters; are you prepared for an illness you can’t afford to get treatment for? I am, and I want other people to be prepared as well.

Me: That’s true, and I think it’s something a lot of us overlook. We’re so focused on a major crisis that we forget a minor crisis can hit us at any time.

Claude: Exactly! And then, what if that major crisis does come? What’s going to happen to our clinics and hospitals then?

Me: Nothing good.

Claude: You’re right. The whole system will collapse in a hurry. Hospitals run their inventories on a just in time system, like any business. When the supplies stop arriving they’ll run out of things fast. Even basic drugs and things like bandages won’t last long. So everywhere will be overloaded. They’ll be turning people away, and those who do get in might be the unlucky ones.

Me: Why do you think so?

Claude: Overcrowded hospitals with drugs running low? Infection is going to be a real issue. Personally, I’d be a lot happier here at home, with my own remedies that I’ve made and tested myself.

Me: Yes, I see your point. I didn’t think of that.

Claude: You’re not the only one, but I believe we all need to think of that. Whether a crisis lasts weeks or years, people will get hurt. People will get sick. And the hospitals we all rely on could become very dangerous places, both from infection and angry crowds trying to get in. We need to be prepared to treat things ourselves, and we need the old remedies for that. Your first aid kit will run out of supplies eventually. The drugs you’ve stockpiled will expire or get used up. All we’ll have left are the natural remedies my grandfather spent his life learning about and using. We need to know them, be familiar with them, and maybe, most important of all, learn to trust them. Remember, these are all remedies you can make from natural ingredients. There’s a lifetime supply of them out there, if you just know how to find and use them.

Me: Yes, I see exactly what you mean. Well, I’ve learned a lot from your book already, and from now on it’s going to be one of my go-to references. Thanks for sharing all this knowledge with us.

Claude: I know Doctor Davis would have wanted me to do this. He spent his life helping people; if more people can use what he knew to help themselves I know that, wherever he is now, he’ll be very happy.

Click below to find out how you can turn common weeds around your house into powerful remedies.

You can get your paperback copy HERE

Source: survivopedia.com

WHAT TO READ NEXT:
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BACK TO BASICS: HOW TO MAKE AND PRESERVE LARD
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OLD FASHIONED PRESERVING-GRANDPA’S RECIPE FOR CURED SMOKED HAM
HOW TO MAKE GUNPOWDER THE OLD FASHIONED WAY
SURVIVAL HERBAL RECIPES FROM OUR ANCESTORS
HOW TO PRESERVE MEAT FOR SURVIVAL LIKE OUR GRANDFATHERS

OTHER USEFUL RESOURCES:

The 3 Pioneer Survival Lessons We Should Learn

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Old School Hacks for Off-Grid Living

The Medical Emergency Crash Course

The Smart, Easy Way to Food Independence

How to Survive the Coming 100 Years Long Drought

The post The Lost Book Of Remedies: An Interview With Claude Davis appeared first on Bio Prepper.

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Canned food is so prevalent today that it’s hard to imagine life without it. When you have extra produce that you want to preserve, most people will tell you to can it.

But, what happens when you don’t have the equipment you need for proper canning? What if you run out of flat lids and can’t go to the store for more? Or if you can’t start a fire and keep it going long enough to properly heat and process your jars?

Depending on what happens, canning extra food may not always be possible. You need some alternatives.

Canning was thought to be invented by Nicolas Appert back in 1809, when he was looking for a way to preserve food for the French military. The invention of the mason jar in 1858 helped spread canning’s popularity, as did other inventions throughout history.

But prior to these events, people preserved food without canning. They knew they had to grow or harvest enough food each growing season to last the winter. Their very survival depended on putting up food that they could safely eat months later.

Make YOUR Food Last 2 Years Without Refrigeration

By looking back in history, you can learn alternative methods of food preservation, like the three below.

Fermenting

Perfect for preserving fresh produce, dairy, and more, fermentation is a traditional preservation method used all around the world. Fermentation allows natural microorganisms, like bacteria, to increase the lactic acid in food.

The lactic acid preserves the food. Further details of the fermentation process are detailed in this Survivopedia post.

Sauerkraut, yogurt, sourdough, and kimchi are popular examples of fermented food. In addition to lasting longer, fermented foods give you plenty of probiotics to help you stay healthy.

Basic Process of Fermenting Vegetables

Slice your vegetables finely. Then, use about a tablespoon of salt to draw out some of the moisture from the slices. Squeeze them with your hand until you’ve gotten out as much liquid as possible. Make sure you are catching the liquid in a glass or ceramic container, as this is the start of the brine they’ll ferment in.

Push your vegetable slices into the brine, and make sure they are fully submerged. If they aren’t you can add more brine by mixing a teaspoon of salt with a cup of water. You can also use a plate to help push the vegetables into the brine.

Allow your vegetables to ferment at room temperature. Check it daily, and add additional brine as needed to keep the vegetables covered. Also check for any signs of mold.

Once your vegetables have fermented far enough (taste them to find out), you can slow the process by moving your container to a cool location. The fermentation process will continue at a slower rate, so your food will get tangier as it stores.

Preserving Dairy Through Fermentation

If you have a milk cow on your homestead, you can create a variety of fermented foods to help preserve the milk. Buttermilk is an easy starting point.

You’ll need a cup of raw milk to get started. Put it in a glass container and allow it to stay there until it clabbers. Depending on the temperature of your room, this can take several days.

When your milk is thick, remove all but a quarter cup. To the quarter cup of clabber, add another cup of milk. Leave this out to clabber.

Continue this process of adding a cup of new milk to a quarter cup of clabber. Your goal is to reach a point where the new milk clabbers within 24 hours consistently. Taste it at the point to make sure you have a thick, tart product.

At this point, you can create a quart of buttermilk at a time. Use ¾ cup of the clabber and add fresh milk to make a quart.

Dry Curing

Salt prohibits bacterial growth by removing the water from each cell. Historically, meats were preserved in salt.

Click on the book for more info

When dry cured, meat doesn’t need to be refrigerated. You don’t have to worry about having a working pressure canner, or access to electricity.

All you need is your meat, salt, brown sugar, sodium nitrite, and some wooden shelves or boxes for storing. You’ll also need a way to hang your meat when it’s time.

You can also add additional herbs and spices to give your meat a unique flavor. Feel free to experiment and see what flavor profiles you prefer.

Sodium Nitrite

This ingredient helps keep your meat safer while curing. It helps prevent your meat from harboring botulism.

Many people died from botulism before the practice of adding saltpeter, or sodium nitrite became common. Let their deaths serve as a lesson to you, so you don’t have to learn it the hard way. Add some sodium nitrite powder to your food stores.

But, be careful with it. It can be fatal if eaten alone, in small quantities. You don’t want to leave the container out where your kids or animals can get into it.

Alternatively, you can buy and store premade curing salts. These are mixtures of salt with either sodium nitrite or sodium nitrate. Because of the dilution, you’d have to consume a lot more to reach a fatal dose.

When to Cure Meat for Best Results

Whatever kind of meat you have, you can use salt to preserve it. But without refrigeration, it’s important to start the preservation process at the right time of year.

You need a cool spot, ideally 36 degrees Fahrenheit for the first part of the process. The second part requires a slightly warmer location.

The temperature is essential. Too cold and the preservation process will take longer. Too hot and you risk spoilage.

If the evenings are cool in the fall where you live, do your preserving then. That way your food is ready to go before the freezing temperatures of winter arrive.

The Curing Process

Rinse your meat and pat it dry. Then, cut off any chunks of visible fat. You need lean meat because the salt won’t penetrate the fat well.

Mix your salt, nitrite, and sugar. For 100 pounds of meat you’ll need:

  • 8 pounds salt
  • 2 pounds sugar
  • 2 ounces sodium nitrite

Once you’ve mixed your cure, divide it into half. You’ll need the first half on day one of your curing, and the second on day seven.

Rub the mixture thoroughly on each chunk of meat you’ll be drying. Pay careful attention to the area by bones, to ensure you cover it well. You need to cover the entire surface of your meat.

When it’s ready, place your meat in a cool environment in wooden boxes or shelves. After seven days, take it out and check it carefully. Apply the remaining cure mix, then return the meat to it’s resting place.

Leave it here for a month. If the temperature drops below freezing, you’ll need to extend the resting period.

Once it’s time, move your meat to a warmer environment to hang. You want the temperature to be around 50 degrees Fahrenheit. Hang the meat carefully, where pests and pets can’t get to it.

Then leave your meat to complete the curing process. It’ll shrink as it continues to dehydrate.

When you’re ready to eat, rinse the meat carefully to remove excess salt. Then check for any signs of mold or funny smells and cook as normal.

Related: 

OLD FASHIONED PRESERVING-GRANDPA’S RECIPE FOR CURED SMOKED HAM

HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN BACON (STEP BY STEP GUIDE)

POTTED MEAT: A LOST SKILL OF LONG TERM MEAT STORAGE

BACK TO BASICS: HOW TO MAKE AND PRESERVE LARD

Dehydrating

By taking the moisture out of food, you greatly increase it’s storability. While modern food dehydrators are quickest, you may not always have the luxury of electricity when you need to preserve food. When necessary, the sun makes a powerful dehydrator.

You can find directions to make two different types of solar dehydrators here. While you can just set food in the sun to dry on blankets, you risk pests or dust getting into your food. A dehydrator set-up will help keep your food clean and safe.

Once you have your dehydrator ready, slice your food into thin slices. You don’t want any of them more than ½ an inch thick. This will help ensure even dehydration.

Many people recommend blanching your food at this point, to help minimize potential pathogens. A short amount of time in hot steam will help keep your food safe. Just remember to drop them in cold water when they’re ready to stop the cooking process.

Then, add the slices to the tray of your solar dehydrator. Leave a little space between each slice to help encourage airflow. Rotate your trays every day until they are dry.

What’s your favorite way to preserve food without canning?

I only focused on three alternatives to canning in this article. There are others that can safely be used, and it’s important to have some in your knowledge.

That way if you are ever unable to can, you can pull out this forgotten wisdom and continue to feed your family, even during the winter. Please share your favorite canning alternatives in the comments below.

Source: survivopedia.com

WHAT TO READ NEXT:

HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN BACON (STEP BY STEP GUIDE)
A RETURN TO THE OLD PATHS: HOW TO MAKE PEMMICAN LIKE THE NATIVE AMERICANS
20 LOST RECIPES FROM THE PIONEERS: WHAT THEY COOKED ON THEIR JOURNEY WESTWARD
SEVEN CLASSIC GREAT DEPRESSION ERA RECIPES GRANDMA USED TO MAKE
POTTED MEAT: A LOST SKILL OF LONG TERM MEAT STORAGE
BACK TO BASICS: HOW TO MAKE AND PRESERVE LARD
THE BEST WAY TO STOCKPILE VEGETABLES OFF-GRID
OLD FASHIONED PRESERVING-GRANDPA’S RECIPE FOR CURED SMOKED HAM
HOW TO MAKE GUNPOWDER THE OLD FASHIONED WAY
SURVIVAL HERBAL RECIPES FROM OUR ANCESTORS
HOW TO PRESERVE MEAT FOR SURVIVAL LIKE OUR GRANDFATHERS

OTHER USEFUL RESOURCES:

The 3 Pioneer Survival Lessons We Should Learn

The Most Effective Home Defense Strategies

Old School Hacks for Off-Grid Living

The Medical Emergency Crash Course

The Smart, Easy Way to Food Independence

How to Survive the Coming 100 Years Long Drought

The post The Forgotten Wisdom Of Preserving Food Without Canning appeared first on Bio Prepper.

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Many financial analysts believe the United States economy is in a dire situation.  Peter Schiff, who accurately predicted the 2008 recession has come out and declared we will all live through another Great Depression, only this time, it’ll be much worse than before.  But there are ways to prepare for such an event, and we’ve gathered some helpful tips and tricks to help make the process a little more smooth.

“The bad news is, we are going to live through another Great Depression and it’s going to be very different. This will be in many ways, much much worse, than what people had to endure during the Great Depression…This is going to be a dollar crisis.”

When you are talking about the magnitude of the debt we have, that extra money [raising interest rates] is big. That’s going to be a big drain on the economy to the extent that we have to pay higher interest to international creditors…a lot of this phony GDP is coming from consumption, while the average American who is consuming is deeply in debt and they are going to impacted dramatically in the increase in the cost of servicing that debt…given how much debt we have, and how much debt is going to be marketed the massive increase in supply will argue for interest rates that are higher.” -Peter Schiff

According to Financial Times, it is becoming clear that the global monetary policy is now caught in a debt trap of its own making. Continuing on the current monetary path is ineffective and increasingly dangerous. But any reversal also involves great risks. It stands to reason that the odds of another crisis blowing up continue to rise.

So how can you forecast this economic disaster and best prepare?  For starters, you should pay off as much debt as possible. There are many reasons for this, the obvious being if it truly belongs to you and you have the title in hand, no one can take that property from you.  Pay off your unsecured debts first and as quickly as possible, however.  Credit card debt will become more expensive as interest rates rise, making those already only able to make a minimum payment stuck choosing between a credit card payment or another bill. Make sure you stop putting things on a credit card in order to pay it down with the goal of eliminating that debt. Cut things out of your budget if you must to pay things off. A good tip from Surviopedia is to tackle your debts one at a time starting with the smaller ones. Once the smaller one is paid off, apply the money for those payments to the next biggest debt, paying it off early. Once things are paid off, you’ll also have the added benefit of having extra money to buy things of value that can be used as currency during a crisis, such as gold, food, or ammunition.  Remember, when paper money is of no value, food or ammunition could very well be a powerful form of currency as bartering for goods and services inevitably returns.

Everyone knows they should store a little extra food “just in case,” even if it’s only to wait out a harsh storm. But accumulating ammunition is a great way to prepare for a post-apocalyptic world, especially one in which no one has money (or money is worthless) and grocery store shelves are empty. This is a great primer article to learn more about SHTF Firearms. Rifle and pistol cartridges will always have value if you store them right because ammunition could mean the difference between life and death.  An unloaded gun is merely a club, while a loaded gun can kill an animal for meat or protect one’s life from a violent attack.  Hoarding ammunition and having a safe and dry place to store it could be almost seen as a “savings account.” Even if you don’t own a gun capable of shooting a cartridge you are storing, someone else likely will. One strategy to use, though is to arm yourself with firearms and ammunition using very common cartridges. This will increase the chances that someone else, will have a gun that can shoot what you are offering. The most common pistol cartridges are 9mm, 38 Special and .45 ACP. The most common rifle cartridges are .22 Long Rifle, 7.62x39mm, and 5.56x45mm.  Ammunition is often overlooked as a possible form of currency during a financial crisis but it will be necessary and difficult to come by making it a highly valued currency.  Make sure you have a safe place to store your ammunition and keep its availability quiet to prevent theft or violent attacks against yourself. Rifle cartridges will represent months worth of food, even if you don’t own a rifle. The trick is to find someone who does and trade them for something of equal value.

The final tip to best prepare yourself for a financial crisis is to learn how to make things, such as biodiesel or vegetable oil. Vegetable oil can be extracted by the proper processing of corn and other seeds of your choice and during Venezuela’s collapse, this was one of the first staples that disappeared from the market. Most of the oil producing companies were seized and nationalized. Now their production is a small fraction of what it was when they were private, and the military controls the supply and sales in the black market. Once the vegetable oil has been used for cooking, it could be used as fuel, to improve the heat output of wood stoves, or even as a makeshift a water heater that runs with WVO (waste vegetable oil).  But you should also consider learning to make biodiesel, especially if you own a vehicle or a generator that will run on diesel fuel. It is possible to make biodiesel using vegetable oil too.  If you’d like to try it, Thoughtco has put together a helpful guide that will walk you through the process. 

Remember the three things that will be the most impactful during an economic collapse: having no debt, having items that will serve as a currency, and being able to produce things of value.  If you can accomplish all of those, your chances of survival will go up.

Source: readynutrition.com

WHAT TO READ NEXT:

HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN BACON (STEP BY STEP GUIDE)
A RETURN TO THE OLD PATHS: HOW TO MAKE PEMMICAN LIKE THE NATIVE AMERICANS
20 LOST RECIPES FROM THE PIONEERS: WHAT THEY COOKED ON THEIR JOURNEY WESTWARD
SEVEN CLASSIC GREAT DEPRESSION ERA RECIPES GRANDMA USED TO MAKE
POTTED MEAT: A LOST SKILL OF LONG TERM MEAT STORAGE
BACK TO BASICS: HOW TO MAKE AND PRESERVE LARD
THE BEST WAY TO STOCKPILE VEGETABLES OFF-GRID
OLD FASHIONED PRESERVING-GRANDPA’S RECIPE FOR CURED SMOKED HAM
HOW TO MAKE GUNPOWDER THE OLD FASHIONED WAY
SURVIVAL HERBAL RECIPES FROM OUR ANCESTORS
HOW TO PRESERVE MEAT FOR SURVIVAL LIKE OUR GRANDFATHERS

OTHER USEFUL RESOURCES:

The 3 Pioneer Survival Lessons We Should Learn

The Most Effective Home Defense Strategies

Old School Hacks for Off-Grid Living

The Medical Emergency Crash Course

The Smart, Easy Way to Food Independence

How to Survive the Coming 100 Years Long Drought

The post How To Best Prepare Yourself For The Coming Financial Crisis appeared first on Bio Prepper.

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There are actually a lot of different types of energy sources to tap into after a disaster strikes. One of the major differences is that unless you have formed some kind of intentional community or have a group of like-minded individuals in your area, you will be the engineer, the mechanic, and the maintenance man all rolled into one.

To digress just a bit, this is why shows such as “The Colony” (the reality show, not the aliens), and “Doomsday Preppers” are productive for the introduction of ideas. Those ideas need to be researched and employed, in that order.

Let’s cover some methods to generate energy and provide power, and discuss the positive and negative aspects of each one.

  1. Wood:  absolutely a mainstay after disaster strikes. I’ve written several pieces on the benefits of wood stoves: for cooking, boiling water for washing, laundry, and drinking, and of course, for heat. For those with a fireplace and no woodstove, a set of Dutch ovens (cast-iron cookware) and a kettle that can be hung within it are good for starters. There are also racks out there for hanging laundry and taking advantage of the heat from the fireplace or the woodstove. The main problems with the woodstove are fuel and security. First, you need to lay in a good supply of wood long before either the winter and/or the disaster strikes. Secondly, the wood fire produces smoke, something that cannot be concealed, and this will alert others to your location.
  2. Solar:  It’s always worthwhile to throw some panels up on the roof, as these can give at least a trickle charge, if not power everything you have. Undertaking this is fairly uncomplicated. During your spring, summer, and fall months, you’ll get a lot out of it. Winter is a different matter: not just for the snow, but also for the gray days where you won’t receive that much light. There are even solar generators. This solar generator is a complete kit and all you need to do is point, plug, and power up! For the bug-out-bag, you can find portable solar panels that roll up for easy tight-fitting spaces.
  3. Wind: There are plenty of kits out there that will enable you to throw up one or more windmills, and these can take up the slack for the solar panels on days that there is not much in the way of the sun. Windmills also need to be maintained a little more, as they can be damaged or have a breakdown from the moving parts.
  4. Bicycle Generator: Please take note: this is a generator that runs from pedal power, as in a stationary exercise bicycle that doesn’t move…just turns that front wheel. The wheel provides the power to turn a generator flywheel. There are many different plans and kits available here, as well. Basically, all you need is a generator of some type, a belt to rig up on the front wheel of the bicycle, a voltage regulator (so you don’t overload/blow out your battery), and the battery itself.
  5. Wood Gassifier: this contraption is made from a container holding a heat source (fire) that in turn heats another container filled with wood pieces. The resulting wood gas is then channeled to the carburetor of an engine and directly used by that engine for fuel to run on. The fuel tank is bypassed, as the wood produces a gas. The engine then turns a flywheel that is hooked up to an alternator, and your power is then produced…that can charge a battery array. There are plans all over the Internet for these gassifiers.
This smart device will help you slash an excess of 70% off your power bill overnight…

The time to begin undertaking these projects is now, prior to needing them. One other problem has to do with the human element, an element more inhumane than anything else. Local building codes, community and residential codes, inspectors, permits, and the usual “conga line” of loser-bureaucrats coming out to steal your money and prevent you from doing anything…these are sure to materialize. You may have to build everything and not employ it until after a disaster hits. Not to mention “friendly,” nosy, intrusive, vicious, snooping neighbors will swoop in to denounce you or cause you other forms of trouble. I’ve written about these “gems” before in the past: more deadly to deal with after the S hits the fan than the disaster itself.

Those are some basics, and you need to do some research and figure out which one (or ones) can be viable for you. There are plenty of resources out there all over the Internet, as well as in your local library or county extension office. Take some time working with each to come up with the best possible courses of action. Then when the time comes, if you’ve prepared, you’ll be able to sing the song, “I’ve got the power,” although it will be getting kind of hectic. You’ll be able to handle it.  JJ out!

Source: readynutrition.com

WHAT TO READ NEXT:

HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN BACON (STEP BY STEP GUIDE)
A RETURN TO THE OLD PATHS: HOW TO MAKE PEMMICAN LIKE THE NATIVE AMERICANS
20 LOST RECIPES FROM THE PIONEERS: WHAT THEY COOKED ON THEIR JOURNEY WESTWARD
SEVEN CLASSIC GREAT DEPRESSION ERA RECIPES GRANDMA USED TO MAKE
POTTED MEAT: A LOST SKILL OF LONG TERM MEAT STORAGE
BACK TO BASICS: HOW TO MAKE AND PRESERVE LARD
THE BEST WAY TO STOCKPILE VEGETABLES OFF-GRID
OLD FASHIONED PRESERVING-GRANDPA’S RECIPE FOR CURED SMOKED HAM
HOW TO MAKE GUNPOWDER THE OLD FASHIONED WAY
SURVIVAL HERBAL RECIPES FROM OUR ANCESTORS
HOW TO PRESERVE MEAT FOR SURVIVAL LIKE OUR GRANDFATHERS

OTHER USEFUL RESOURCES:

The 3 Pioneer Survival Lessons We Should Learn

The Most Effective Home Defense Strategies

Old School Hacks for Off-Grid Living

The Medical Emergency Crash Course

The Smart, Easy Way to Food Independence

How to Survive the Coming 100 Years Long Drought

The post Sustainable Prepping : 5 Alternative Energy Types for When the SHTF appeared first on Bio Prepper.

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When cowboys hit the trail for a cattle drive, they had a long journey ahead of them. Many drives took months, taking the crew into remote areas along the way.

Outposts to buy supplies were few and far between, so the cowboys had to prepare carefully. They filled the chuck wagon with everything they needed to survive the months long journey. From sleeping rolls to cooking supplies and medical equipment, the chuck wagon was the lifeline of the drive.

Space was limited. They only had room for the bare necessities, so they selected everything with care.

Their food was simple, but filling. Cowboy biscuits were a staple.

What Are Cowboy Biscuits?

Back at the home ranch, eggs and milk helped produce fluffy biscuits. But, those farm products don’t travel well and are perishable.

Cowboys had to learn to bake biscuits with just a few, travel-friendly ingredients. So, they used sourdough.

When fed regularly, sourdough lasts a long time. It stayed in a crock or jar, not taking much space. And, it gave each batch of biscuits flavor, helped them rise, and made them hearty.

Sourdough starter was the star of cowboy biscuits. It turned plain old flour and salt into filling victuals.

Sourdough biscuits aren’t as fluffy as biscuits you might be used to eating. They are denser, with an almost cake-like texture.

Cowboy biscuits also differ from traditional biscuits in the baking stage. Since there were no ovens available on the open range, cowboys baked their biscuits in cast iron skillets or Dutch ovens, over hot coals.

The Ingredients in Cowboy Biscuits

There are only three ingredients in traditional cowboy biscuits: sourdough starter, flour, and salt.  The salt and flour were typical pantry staples. The flour was most often whole wheat, though the cowboys used whatever was available.

The sourdough starter was the most important ingredient.

Wild Yeast Sourdough Starter

Instead of using baking powder to leaven their biscuits, cowboys relied on yeast. But, individual yeast packets weren’t available yet. Instead, they collected their own wild yeast.

Wild yeast lives almost everywhere. It’s in the air, in flour, and all around. Once you capture it, you can keep it alive in sourdough starter.

Some sourdough starter recipes call for potatoes, a bit of commercial yeast, or some other host for the yeast. While some cowboys may have used a complicated sourdough recipe, most didn’t.

The simplest way to make your own yeast is to combine flour and water in a clean, non-reactive container.  Each day, feed it with fresh flour and water. Within a couple of days, you will start to notice bubbles in your starter. The bubbles tell you you’ve successfully found wild yeast and it’s starting to multiply.

When the cowboys set out on the trail, their starter was full-strength and ready to use.

Make Your Own Sourdough Starter for Cowboy Biscuits

If you want to make your own batch of sourdough starter like the cowboys did, here are directions.

You’ll need:

  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup lukewarm water (not chlorinated)
  • A non-reactive container
  • A wooden spoon
  • A towel for covering your container
  • Additional food and water for feeding (1 cup of flour and ½ cup of water for each feeding)

Combine the flour and water in your container. Stir thoroughly, ensuring there aren’t any pockets of dry flour at the bottom.

Cover the container with the towel and leave at room temperature for 24 hours.

Examine your starter. Check for any signs of bubbles.

Whether or not you see bubbles, remove half of your starter. To the remaining half, add another cup of flour and a ½ cup of lukewarm water.

Stir well and cover it again.

In 12 hours, your starter will be ready for another feeding. Keep half of the starter in your container and remove the rest. Feed the starter you kept with one cup of flour and ½ cup of lukewarm water.

Stir well and cover it again.

Every twelve hours, repeat the feeding. You will always keep half the starter and feed it a cup of flour and ½ cup of water. Remember to stir and cover.

Over the next few days, your starter will begin to change. You’ll notice more bubbles throughout. It will develop a distinct smell. And it’ll double in bulk more quickly.

The temperature of the air in the room where your starter is in affects its growth. If it’s too hot you can kill the yeast. If it gets cool, the yeast slows. When the temperature drops too low, the yeast will stop growing completely.

Out on the trail, cowboys also kept an eye on the temperature. When the weather turned cool in the fall, they took their sourdough container to bed with them. Their body heat kept it alive even when it was cold outside.

Your starter will take several days to come to full strength. Since there are so many variables, it’s best to use signs instead of a specific timeline. Your starter is ready when it:

  • Is bubbly throughout and appears frothy.
  • Doubles in bulk within 4-6 hours of a feeding.
  • Has a distinct sourdough smell (a fresh, yeasty odor)

By this point, it has the potency it needs to make your biscuits rise. Before then, it won’t be strong enough.

The Discarded Starter

There’s a lot of discarded starter when making your own sourdough starter. Removing starter before each feeding helps to keep your total amount of starter manageable. If you kept it all, you’d have tons of starter.

It also helps keep the PH where it needs to be. By reducing the competition for food among your yeast cells, you decrease your chance of growing the wrong bacteria.

When you take the starter out, you don’t have to throw it away. Here are four suggestions for using it:

  • Give it to a friend who wants their own starter
  • Thin it down with a little milk and add several eggs to make sourdough crepe batter
  • Add it to your compost pile
  • Use it to make waffles or pancakes
How to Maintain Your Starter

Cowboys used their starter daily. Each time they made biscuits, they fed their starter. In addition to adding more flour and water, they’d mix any leftover dough back into the starter to avoid waste.

If you aren’t using your starter daily, you will need to maintain it.

You can place the starter in the fridge or a cool location. Then, just remove half of it and feed it once a week. Make sure to stir it well each time. When you’re ready to use it, take it out of the fridge several hours before baking. This gives the yeast cells time to wake back up.

You can also leave your starter on the counter. This means it will be ready to use whenever you want to bake. But, it also means need to remove and feed every day.

Decide which method works best for you. Just don’t forget about your starter. If you neglect it for too long, it will mold.

If you maintain it properly, it will last indefinitely. There are sourdough starters that have been passed down throughout families for generations.

How to Make Cowboy Biscuits

Once your starter is at full-strength, you can make your first batch of cowboy biscuits.

You’ll need:

  • 2 cups sourdough starter
  • 2 cups flour
  • ½ tsp salt
  • Butter, oil, or lard to grease the skillet

In a large bowl, combine the starter, the salt, and the flour flour. Stir it well.

If your dough is too thick, slowly mix in a little water until it’s the right consistency for biscuits. This happens occasionally, especially if your sourdough starter is really thick.

Grease your cast iron skillet. Pinch off golf-ball sized clumps of dough and roll them into balls. Place each ball in the skillet. Begin at the outside and continue moving in towards the center in circles of biscuits.

Set the skillet on a large rock or rack over hot coals. Bake until browned.

Or you can bake in an oven at 350 degrees for 30 minutes, or until brown.

Fluffier Version of Cowboy Biscuits

As mentioned previously, these biscuits will not be the fluffy biscuits people eat today. They are a stick-to-your-ribs, dense biscuit that travel well. Cowboys could throw a couple in their pockets after breakfast and chew on them throughout their shift.

By using a limited amount of ingredients, biscuits could be made anywhere along the trail. But, with just a couple of extra ingredients, you can improve the taste and texture of these biscuits.

You’ll need:

  • 2 cups sourdough starter
  • 2 cups flour
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 TBS honey
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 2 TBS lard or butter cut into small pieces
  • Additional lard or butter to grease skillet

In a large bowl combine the starter, flour, salt, honey, baking powder, and lard. Mix together, forming a soft dough.

Form and bake as directed above.

Looking Back in Time for Survival Skills

Though you likely aren’t setting out on a cattle drive, cowboy biscuits are a great survival recipe. They take minimal ingredients, and travel well. The sourdough can also be used for many other breads, and you won’t need to worry about storing yeast.

Because of their hardiness, ingenuity, and knowledge, cowboys were able to survive for months at a time with few materials. By looking back in time, and learning the skills from the past, you can be prepared for any situation you find yourself in.

Recipes: Civil War Recipe ~ Union Skillygalee HARDTACK:WORLD’S FIRST ORIGINAL SURVIVAL FOOD RED CROSS WAR CAKE (TRENCH CAKE): WWI SURVIVAL FOOD HOW TO MAKE PEMMICAN – THE ULTIMATE SURVIVAL FOOD

Source: survivopedia.com

Here’s just a glimpse of what you’ll find in The Lost Ways:

From Ruff Simons, an old west history expert and former deputy, you’ll learn the techniques and methods used by the wise sheriffs from the frontiers to defend an entire village despite being outnumbered and outgunned by gangs of robbers and bandits, and how you can use their wisdom to defend your home against looters when you’ll be surrounded.

Native American ERIK BAINBRIDGE – who took part in the reconstruction of the native village of Kule Loklo in California, will show you how Native Americans build the subterranean roundhouse, an underground house that today will serve you as a storm shelter, a perfectly camouflaged hideout, or a bunker. It can easily shelter three to four families, so how will you feel if, when all hell breaks loose, you’ll be able to call all your loved ones and offer them guidance and shelter? Besides that, the subterranean roundhouse makes an awesome root cellar where you can keep all your food and water reserves year-round.

From Shannon Azares you’ll learn how sailors from the XVII century preserved water in their ships for months on end, even years and how you can use this method to preserve clean water for your family cost-free.

Mike Searson – who is a Firearm and Old West history expert – will show you what to do when there is no more ammo to be had, how people who wandered the West managed to hunt eight deer with six bullets, and why their supply of ammo never ran out. Remember the panic buying in the first half of 2013? That was nothing compared to what’s going to precede the collapse.

From Susan Morrow, an ex-science teacher and chemist, you’ll master “The Art of Poultice.” She says, “If you really explore the ingredients from which our forefathers made poultices, you’ll be totally surprised by the similarities with modern medicines.” Well…how would you feel in a crisis to be the only one from the group knowledgeable about this lost skill? When there are no more antibiotics, people will turn to you to save their ill children’s lives.

And believe it or not, this is not all…

Table Of Contents:

How North American Indians and Early Pioneers Made Pemmican
Making Your Own Beverages: Beer to Stronger Stuff
Ginger Beer: Making Soda the Old Fashioned Way
Spycraft: Military Correspondence During The 1700’s to 1900’s
Wild West Guns for SHTF and a Guide to Rolling Your Own Ammo
How Our Forefathers Built Their Sawmills, Grain Mills,and Stamping Mills         How Our Ancestors Made Herbal Poultice to Heal Their Wounds
What Our Ancestors Were Foraging For? or How to Wildcraft Your Table
How Our Ancestors Navigated Without Using a GPS System
How Our Forefathers Made Knives
How Our Forefathers Made Snow shoes for Survival
How North California Native Americans Built Their Semi-subterranean Roundhouses
Our Ancestors’Guide to Root Cellars
Good Old Fashioned Cooking on an Open Flame
Learning from Our Ancestors How to Preserve Water
Learning from Our Ancestors How to Take Care of Our Hygiene When There Isn’t Anything to Buy
How and Why I Prefer to Make Soap with Modern Ingredients
Temporarily Installing a Wood-Burning Stove during Emergencies
Making Traditional and Survival Bark Bread…….
Trapping in Winter for Beaver and Muskrat Just like Our Forefathers Did
How to Make a Smokehouse and Smoke Fish
Survival Lessons From The Donner Party

Get your paperback copy HERE Part II of the book available now. Get yours HERE

WHAT TO READ NEXT:

HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN BACON (STEP BY STEP GUIDE)
A RETURN TO THE OLD PATHS: HOW TO MAKE PEMMICAN LIKE THE NATIVE AMERICANS
20 LOST RECIPES FROM THE PIONEERS: WHAT THEY COOKED ON THEIR JOURNEY WESTWARD
SEVEN CLASSIC GREAT DEPRESSION ERA RECIPES GRANDMA USED TO MAKE
POTTED MEAT: A LOST SKILL OF LONG TERM MEAT STORAGE
BACK TO BASICS: HOW TO MAKE AND PRESERVE LARD
THE BEST WAY TO STOCKPILE VEGETABLES OFF-GRID
OLD FASHIONED PRESERVING-GRANDPA’S RECIPE FOR CURED SMOKED HAM
HOW TO MAKE GUNPOWDER THE OLD FASHIONED WAY
SURVIVAL HERBAL RECIPES FROM OUR ANCESTORS
HOW TO PRESERVE MEAT FOR SURVIVAL LIKE OUR GRANDFATHERS

OTHER USEFUL RESOURCES:

The 3 Pioneer Survival Lessons We Should Learn

The Most Effective Home Defense Strategies

Old School Hacks for Off-Grid Living

The Medical Emergency Crash Course

The Smart, Easy Way to Food Independence

How to Survive the Coming 100 Years Long Drought

The post The Best Pioneer Survival Food: Cowboy Biscuits appeared first on Bio Prepper.

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Well on my adventure to find the “perfect” picture of what the Union soldiers called Skillygalee I came up empty.  As this has never happened to me before, I am quite dismayed by this.  HOWEVER, we are in luck that I am persistant.  Through many hours of this link, leading to that link, and so on, I was able to find some pictures that I think will give you a pretty good idea of what the Union was cooking up.

Here are some pictures of what I was able to find.  I think you will agree, it doesn’t look to bad, and almost appealing to the appetite.  I think I would soon begin to cringe at the sight of it, as it was nearly a daily staple for the Union soldiers in the field.

Picture courtesy of TimeTravelKitchen

For a much-needed change of pace from the “worm castles” that were often received by the Union soldiers, they made Skilligalees.  Now I’m not sure if this was from self-preservation or because they wanted a change in diet.  I’m guessing that these options were essential in the prevention of starvation.  As rations weren’t always delivered in a timely manner, by the time soldiers received their hardtack it was often infested with weevils and other undesirable critters.  Facing either feast or famine, the hardtack was often seen as undesirable to eat.  Yet the ingenuity of the Union soldiers most likely saved them from the latter of the choices they faced.

Union rations Hardtack Box pictures courtesy of Soonerfans.com

The soldiers would break up the hardtack and soak it in hot water, one to make it softer to eat.  And the other, to kill the critters that didnt’ really want to share.  Now I don’t want to discourage you here, and I definitely don’t want to kill your appetite either.  But here is what they often did to salvage the hardtack.  They would break up the hardtack and soak it in hot water.  Soon, the critters would drowned and float to the top.  They would scoop (or by some other means) off the weevils or whatever else floated to the top, then drain the water.  Have you ever seen a soggy cracker?  Quite possible in the attempt to save the hardtack for consumption they came up with Skillygalee to dry it back out.

After “washing” the hardtack, the soldier would add other things (salt pork, brown sugar, or molasses) to it, making it more appealing to the palette.

Here is the recipe for the Skillygalee.

Union Skillygalee:
  • Hardtack, broken into small chunks
  • Water
  • Salt Pork
  • Bacon grease

Break up hardtack into small chunks in the bottom of a tin cup.
Soak hardtack for 10-15 minutes or until soft.  (Don’t forget to drain off the floaties!! :p)
While hardtack is soaking, fry up some salt pork.  After frying chop into small pieces.
Dump soaked hardtack pieces into grease remaining in skillet, canteen half, tin-can,or tin-cup.  Return the chopped salt pork to the skillet also.
Fry this until heated through.
Remove from heat and eat.

Recipes: HARDTACK:WORLD’S FIRST ORIGINAL SURVIVAL FOOD RED CROSS WAR CAKE (TRENCH CAKE): WWI SURVIVAL FOOD HOW TO MAKE PEMMICAN – THE ULTIMATE SURVIVAL FOOD

Recipe courtesy of 26nc.org.  It is of no doubt that the Civil War was one of hard times, and hard choices.  I know I’ll never look at a cracker the same way again! 

Source: loweryleather.wordpress.com

Here’s just a glimpse of what you’ll find in The Lost Ways:

From Ruff Simons, an old west history expert and former deputy, you’ll learn the techniques and methods used by the wise sheriffs from the frontiers to defend an entire village despite being outnumbered and outgunned by gangs of robbers and bandits, and how you can use their wisdom to defend your home against looters when you’ll be surrounded.

Native American ERIK BAINBRIDGE – who took part in the reconstruction of the native village of Kule Loklo in California, will show you how Native Americans build the subterranean roundhouse, an underground house that today will serve you as a storm shelter, a perfectly camouflaged hideout, or a bunker. It can easily shelter three to four families, so how will you feel if, when all hell breaks loose, you’ll be able to call all your loved ones and offer them guidance and shelter? Besides that, the subterranean roundhouse makes an awesome root cellar where you can keep all your food and water reserves year-round.

From Shannon Azares you’ll learn how sailors from the XVII century preserved water in their ships for months on end, even years and how you can use this method to preserve clean water for your family cost-free.

Mike Searson – who is a Firearm and Old West history expert – will show you what to do when there is no more ammo to be had, how people who wandered the West managed to hunt eight deer with six bullets, and why their supply of ammo never ran out. Remember the panic buying in the first half of 2013? That was nothing compared to what’s going to precede the collapse.

From Susan Morrow, an ex-science teacher and chemist, you’ll master “The Art of Poultice.” She says, “If you really explore the ingredients from which our forefathers made poultices, you’ll be totally surprised by the similarities with modern medicines.” Well…how would you feel in a crisis to be the only one from the group knowledgeable about this lost skill? When there are no more antibiotics, people will turn to you to save their ill children’s lives.

And believe it or not, this is not all…

Table Of Contents:

How North American Indians and Early Pioneers Made Pemmican
Making Your Own Beverages: Beer to Stronger Stuff
Ginger Beer: Making Soda the Old Fashioned Way
Spycraft: Military Correspondence During The 1700’s to 1900’s
Wild West Guns for SHTF and a Guide to Rolling Your Own Ammo
How Our Forefathers Built Their Sawmills, Grain Mills,and Stamping Mills         How Our Ancestors Made Herbal Poultice to Heal Their Wounds
What Our Ancestors Were Foraging For? or How to Wildcraft Your Table
How Our Ancestors Navigated Without Using a GPS System
How Our Forefathers Made Knives
How Our Forefathers Made Snow shoes for Survival
How North California Native Americans Built Their Semi-subterranean Roundhouses
Our Ancestors’Guide to Root Cellars
Good Old Fashioned Cooking on an Open Flame
Learning from Our Ancestors How to Preserve Water
Learning from Our Ancestors How to Take Care of Our Hygiene When There Isn’t Anything to Buy
How and Why I Prefer to Make Soap with Modern Ingredients
Temporarily Installing a Wood-Burning Stove during Emergencies
Making Traditional and Survival Bark Bread…….
Trapping in Winter for Beaver and Muskrat Just like Our Forefathers Did
How to Make a Smokehouse and Smoke Fish
Survival Lessons From The Donner Party

Get your paperback copy HERE Second edition of the book available now. Get yours HERE

WHAT TO READ NEXT:

HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN BACON (STEP BY STEP GUIDE)
A RETURN TO THE OLD PATHS: HOW TO MAKE PEMMICAN LIKE THE NATIVE AMERICANS
20 LOST RECIPES FROM THE PIONEERS: WHAT THEY COOKED ON THEIR JOURNEY WESTWARD
SEVEN CLASSIC GREAT DEPRESSION ERA RECIPES GRANDMA USED TO MAKE
POTTED MEAT: A LOST SKILL OF LONG TERM MEAT STORAGE
BACK TO BASICS: HOW TO MAKE AND PRESERVE LARD
THE BEST WAY TO STOCKPILE VEGETABLES OFF-GRID
OLD FASHIONED PRESERVING-GRANDPA’S RECIPE FOR CURED SMOKED HAM
HOW TO MAKE GUNPOWDER THE OLD FASHIONED WAY
SURVIVAL HERBAL RECIPES FROM OUR ANCESTORS
HOW TO PRESERVE MEAT FOR SURVIVAL LIKE OUR GRANDFATHERS

OTHER USEFUL RESOURCES:

The 3 Pioneer Survival Lessons We Should Learn

The Most Effective Home Defense Strategies

Old School Hacks for Off-Grid Living

The Medical Emergency Crash Course

The Smart, Easy Way to Food Independence

How to Survive the Coming 100 Years Long Drought

The post Civil War Recipe ~ Union Skillygalee appeared first on Bio Prepper.

Read Full Article

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