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From the builders of Manny Pacquiao’s Lambretta!

Elmer R. Reyes is a Filipino Canadian who dropped out of his third year of law school to pursue his true passion:  designing, building, and restoring motorcycles. He founded his shop, Laguna Choppers, with his godson, Russell — to help keep Russell off the streets and teach him valuable mechanic skills. As their shop motto goes:

Some people watch things happen.

Some people wonder what’s happening.

Others…make things happen.

After a few years in business, they restored a Lambretta for none other than World Boxing Champ Manny Pacquiao, unveiling it on his 32nd birthday! Says Elmer:

“After Manny Pacquiao, the shop flourished. An idea then came to me of opening up a school for kids from the poorest of the poor.”

Four years ago, Elmer opened the Laguna Choppers Institute of Technology — a school that takes students from poor neighborhoods and teaches and trains them in the shop. They now have 27 scholars enrolled in the school, and the bike you see here was built by out-of-school youths that Elmer trained in his shop. They’ve also built two custom bikes for the History channel, displayed at History-Con Manila in 2016 and 2017, as well as the “Marawi Heroes” build:

“A tribute for the fallen soldiers of the war in the south of the Philippines — we will donate the proceeds for the education of the children of all the fallen soldiers of that war.”

“Regardless of religion, we are one.”

This 1984 BMW R65 — “Sulyap” — was built for the owner of a hotel and restaurant in the shop’s hometown of San Pablo City, Philippines. We especially love the hardwood accents and highly-modified R100 tank, which houses fuel on one side and the bike’s electronics on the other. Below, we get the full story on the build!

BMW R65 Tracker: In the Builder’s Words About the Shop…

Here’s a little info about my me and the shop. I’m a Filipino Canadian, 50 years old. I started my shop in 1995 as a hobby, after I dropped out of law school in my 3rd year — I didn’t see myself as a lawyer. Right after that, I embraced what I really love doing — it’s designing and restoring motorcycles. I named our shop Laguna Choppers, which came up after a few bottles of brew with my friends here in our little town called San Pablo, in Laguna, Philippines. I enrolled myself in a motorcycle mechanics school in metro Manila, though it wasn’t enough since they were just teaching me about small engines. It was all self study after that, reading books and watching Youtube really helped me, but in those days the internet was not yet available, so I relied on the old school ways. Reading books :).

I started my shop with my godson, his name is Russell, he was 12 years old then. His dad, who is a dear friend, could not afford to get him to have a good education and asked me if I could help him enroll his son in high school to get a formal education — very talented and smart boy, but his high school was short-lived, didn’t last. I went back to Vancouver for several months and when I came back the principal told me that he always skip classes, Then that started the shop in my garage with very few tools. I told him if you’re not going to study, you have to have skills for you to be able to make a living.

So I thought him slowly, from small bikes to scooters, to choppers, cafe racers, bobbers etc. — anything that we can lay our hands on just to make a living and keep him off the streets and getting into trouble. God is so good that after a few years, we restored a Lambretta scooter for World Boxing Champ Manny Pacquiao and unveiled it on his 32nd birthday — photos are on our website.

Unveiling Manny’s custom Lambretta scooter!

After Manny Pacquiao, the shop flourished. An idea then came to me of opening up a school for kids from the poorest of the poor. It was not easy opening a school, besides the funding — so much documentation has to be submitted but God is always on our side providing us with what we need — never late never early.

We opened the Laguna Choppers Institute of Technology Inc four years ago and we now have 27 scholars, some companies and private individuals help for their tuition and I teach them together with my wife. My passion for motorcycles went to a different level — it became an advocacy. We got the attention of History Channel for two consecutive years and we did two custom bikes for the HISTORY-CON MANILA last 2016 and 2017. We also built a bike called the MARAWI HEROES, which was featured at HISTORY-CON II. The bike is a tribute for the fallen soldiers of the war in the south of the Philippines — we will donate the proceeds for the education of the children of all the fallen soldiers of that war. Photos are also in our website.

Our shop does not have high tech tools like CNC and other stuff — everything is hand crafted or pure artistry and craftsmanship. Twenty-four years now and still getting stronger also teaching PWD kids.

About the Bike…

We started this BMW R65 Tracker project a year ago for a hotel and restaurant owner here in San Pablo City, Philippines. The owner wanted to have a bike designed to blend in with the theme of his hotel and restaurant, which is filled with antique wooden houses.

So I decided to put wooden accents on the bike. Levers, suspension covers, fender trims, and the speedo case are all handcrafted hardwood trims, with leather tooling for the seat and copper accents that I made for the brackets and other parts.

I love the R100 tanks so I used it for the project instead of the original R65 tank, which is slimmer. I cut the tank and made it smaller but it still retains the R100 tank contours, so I can hide all the electricals and the battery to make the bike nice and clean with very minimal wire that you can see without sacrificing the beauty of the original R100 tank.

The engine head covers are from an R50 model BMW to give that more classic look that minimizes the straight lines. The engine back cover is fitted with a plastic aftermarket cover that I got from a supplier in UK to make it look slimmer and lighter and highlight the beauty of the boxer engine.

The tank left side is were the fuel goes; the right side of the tank is hollow and that is were we placed all the electricals. We made our own mufflers to give that shorty but chunky look on the drag pipes.

The genuine leather is made by a friend John Perez and an Artist Leather tooler Dragoro Draginzo. The hardwood accents are made by our master wood craftsman Orlando Cosico. My shop chief mechanic Russell Caberos, master mechanic Teotemo Caberos, master metal fabricator Roger Marasigan, lead electrician Noel Purganan, Mechanic II Rusty Dela Cruz, and head painter Ritchie Dela Cruz are the guys who put their talents into building this project. We made an entry in our yearly bike show called the MOTOBUILDS Pilipinas and luckily we got the championship trophy!

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“I put a tricked out H1 engine with the left and right cylinders reversed into a Framecrafters road race frame and put lights on it.”

This was the cryptic message we recently from Mike McSween of Fort Pierce, Florida. Of course, we were instantly intrigued. The Kawasaki H1 Mach III — aka the Kawasaki Triple — was a 500cc, two-stroke, three-cylinder street machine with 60 horsepower and a quarter mile time of 12.4 seconds. The bike quickly earned a fearsome reputation as a “widowmaker,” a bike capable of biting inexperienced and veteran riders alike. In “Song of the Sausage Creature,” gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson wrote:

“I still feel a shudder in my spine every time I walk into a public restroom and hear crippled men whispering about the terrifying Kawasaki Triple… I have visions of compound femur-fractures and large black men in white hospital suits holding me down on a gurney while a nurse called ‘Bess’ sews the flaps of my scalp together with a stitching drill.”

The bike’s brakes and handling have been criticized by various reviewers. Says MC News:

“The brakes [were] questionable and the handling decidedly marginal in every situation — except when the bike was stopped with the engine switched off. Not for nothing was the H1 known as, ‘The triple with the ripple’.”

That said, the H1’s braking performance was second only to the Honda CB750 in Cycle magazine’s 1970 comparison of the seven top bikes of the time — so modern writers may have a tendency to overlook the poor brakes of all bikes of the period.

In any case, few bikes have attained the near-mythical status of the H1. Motorcycle historian Clement Salvadori — who wrote about the bike in the Guggenheim Museum’s 1999 The Art of the Motorcycle exhibition — says the H1 sold well in the heyday American muscle cars, when quarter mile times were paramount, because:

“It could blow just about anything else off the road — for less than $1,000.”

Of course, this high power-to-dollar ratio helped contribute to the fearsome reputation of the H1, as did the loud, smoky, violent nature of the beast. The bike was not a favorite with the nation’s law enforcement authorities — or polite society at all — which earned Kawasaki more of a rebellious, outlaw image than the squeaky clean, “nicest-people”  character of Honda. Due to everything from pollution enforcement to noise regulation, the H1 was never fated for a long production run — nor were many of her owners. Said Salvadori in the Guggenheim exhibit:

“Motorcycle lore has it that very few original owners of the Mach III survived.”

Enter Framecrafters, the well-known performance motorcycle fabrication shop located in Northwest Illinois. Since 1994, they’ve built replica frames for many marques — Bultaco, Champion, Trackmaster, just to name a few — along with the repair and modification of stock and aftermarket frames for motocrossers, road racers, and flat trackers. Over the years, they’ve expanded their focus from frames to the entire motorcycle.

Mike McSween of Florida took one of their road race frames and fitted a tricked-out H1 engine and just enough lights to make the bike road-legal. Below, we get more details on how Florida’s Mike McSween transformed his ’71 Kawasaki H1 into the machine you see here.

1971 Kawasaki/Framecrafter H1: In the Builder’s Words

I used a full tilt Framecrafter S2RR Road race frame. The engine is a 500cc H1 three cylinder two-stroke engine. It has 34mm Mikuni carbs and advanced porting by Half Fast Racing in Fort Pierce, Fl. The chambers were custom made by Framecrafters.

It has a stock ignition with a battery eliminator. Scitsu tachometer. The gas tank is all handmade aluminum and the seat is from Airtech. The rear sets are hand made for this bike by Jimmy Purnell of Half Fast Racing in Fort Pierce, Fl. He also tuned this bike.

Hear it roar…

 

Framecrafters / Kawasaki H1 Cafe Racer - YouTube

1972 Road Race Monster

This is my bike when I just completed the restoration. I bought the bike in Japan coming back from Vietnam in 1972. I brought it back on the USS Constellation. It is now a 130hp full road race monster. It was built by Jimmy Purnell of Half Fast Racing in Fort Pierce, FL.

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The Kawasaki KZ750/Z750, introduced in 1976, was a 55-hp vertical twin designed for riders who preferred the dependability, character, and easy maintenance of a big twin — a machine that recalled the 750 twins of British marques like Norton, BSA, and Triumph. The big Kawasaki 750 twin packed some modern tech for the era, including a pair of chain-driven counterbalances to curb vibration and double overhead cams. Says Motorcycle Classics:

“Thanks to its simple but robust construction, the KZ750 earned a reputation for rock solid dependability, owners piling on the miles with little more than routine maintenance.”

Enter Denmark’s Andreas Hyldgaard Olesen, who shares a shed with five other guys in Aarhus — a workshop they call Östrig Motorcycles. For Andreas, it’s a space he loves, especially since he lives in a two-room apartment in the middle of the city. After cutting his teeth with a trip of Honda CB builds, including a CB550 that serves as his daily driver, Andreas picked up this lesser-known 1988 Kawasaki Z750 twin and decided to build a scrambler influenced by the look of vintage dirt bikes, especially the Penton.

Since Denmark is strict with frame modifications, Andreas decided to eschew a new rear loop in favor of the original tail, fitting a short seat and chrome rear fender to the long square unit — which worked out beautifully. Overall, this 750 twin makes a rugged urban scrambler and gravel machine. Below, we get more details on the build.

Kawasaki KZ750 Twin Scrambler: Builder Interview

• Please tell us a bit about yourself, your history with motorcycles, and your workshop.

I am 32 years old and live in Aarhus, Denmark. My history with motorized vehicles started when my dad bought me my first Honda Express moped when I was around 12 years old. I bought my first motorcycle six years ago, which was a Honda CB350 Four. It was my first café racer project. Later on, I purchased a CB550 Four and modified that too. The CB550 I still own today and is my daily driver. I really love that bike.

I share a workshop — or a shed, you might call it — in the middle of Aarhus with five other guys. We call it Östrig Motorcycles. I’m not really sure why, but we had to call it something. I really love that place and spend a lot of time there. Especially when you live in the city in a two room apartment.

• What’s the make, model, and year of the bike?

Kawasaki Z750B, 1977.

• Why was this bike built?

Just for pure pleasure and fun and because I love wrenching on old bikes. The bike will come up for sale in a couple of weeks since I need the room for a new project.

• What was the design concept and what influenced the build?

I really wanted the look of a vintage dirt bike. Of course, the big Z750 is not the ideal candidate, but I think I managed okay. The design is influenced by old Penton dirt bikes (google them). In Denmark, we have quite strict rules if you want to modify your frame. So, like the Penton, I decided to keep the original rear frame exposed without installing a new rear loop. I bought a new rear fender and fitted it to the original rear fender brackets and made a new seat setup to catch that vintage dirt bike feeling and still having a street legal bike for the Danish roads.

• What custom work was done to the bike?

The bike was stripped down, frame was de-tabbed and powder-coated.

Wheels were powder-coated and fitted with Continental TKC80 tires.

New rear fender fitted to the original brackets with a simple LED rear light.

Original Kawasaki front fender raised to the bottom of the triple tree together with a new 4.75-inch yellow headlight in a stainless steel bracket.

New homemade leather seat, new scrambler style handlebar, simple speedometer, double action throttle body, new front brake master, DNA pod filters and re-jetted the carbs to match the air flow. Compact Moto GP style muffler and heat wrapped the headers.

Raised the rear end 2.5 inches with new shocks for a bit of gravel riding.

New simplified wiring harness. • How would you classify this bike?

Scrambler.

• Was there anything done during this build that you are particularly proud of?

I would say the rear end of the bike. I was really worried that the long square frame on the Z750 would be a show stopper for what I had in mind, but I really like the result with the chrome rear fender, short seat, and big knobby rear tire.

Who is the photographer?

Photographer Gisli Dua’s Instagram: @gislidua

Follow the Builder @andreas.hyld
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The Honda CJ series was a stripped-down, less expensive offshoot of the better-known CB/CL series. For instance, the CJ360T featured a five-speed transmission instead of the six-speed box on the CB360, along with a front drum brake, no electric starter, and a few other differences that helped keep the original retail price below $1000.  Actually, many riders of the time preferred the styling of the CJ360, which sported a 2-into-1 exhaust and different tail piece, and the bike offered better performance due to its lighter weight.

Enter Thomas Lambert of Germany, who left his well-paid job at a large automotive supplier to open his own custom workshop, Elemental Custom Cycles, whose motto we love:

“Life is too short to ride boring motorcycles.”

Amen, brother! The Honda CJ250 you see here arrived at the shop in very poor condition, as the previous owner had tried unsuccessfully to transform the bike into a cafe racer. On the good side, the bike had a rebuilt CJ360 engine, offering 34 horsepower and a broad torque curve — perfect for a small cafe build.

Below, we get the full story on the build, along with some lovely shots from photographer Christian Motzek.

Honda CJ360T Cafe Racer: In the Builder’s Words

My name is Thomas, I’m a mechanical engineer. In 2017 I quit my well-paid job at a big German automotive supplier to run my own small custom shop. Today I want to show my latest build to you, a Honda CJ250 with a rebuilt CJ360 engine.

The bike came in really poor condition, as the owner tried to build a cafe racer himself. After many tries and a lot of money wasted, he ended up asking my shop for help. It was obvious that he couldn’t bring the build to an end by himself. And if he ever made it work again, he wouldn’t really reach the result he was looking for.

The electronics and the line he choose were really poor. The rear shocks were totally worn and the forks were leaking. After a short look at the bike, several other things came up. But on the other hand, it had a rebuilt CJ360 engine.

As I really like the old cb/cj series, I could already imagine what kind of nice little machine I could build. With the picture of the right line in my mind, I stripped the bike, took a few photos and made some drafts in Photoshop.

I lowered the fork by an inch, put some clip-ons on and added a 6-inch headlamp.

The rear light is integrated into the rear cover, which is made from stainless steel sheet metal.

I really don’t like wrapped exhaust manifolds, so I built a new 2-into-1 stainless system. To meet the German TÜV regulations regarding noise, I shortened the stock silencer and decided to keep the stock intake system to avoid the money and time intensive noise measurements.

For older bikes, a pair of the Motogadget M Blaze disc front turn signals is sufficient.

The bike already came with an overhauled CJ360 engine, which didn’t run really well. So I overhauled the electronics and the carbs to bring back its original 34hp.

I added new rear shocks and the fork got a service for the perfect handling. I brushed the fork tubes, triple clamps and switches to give it a classic look. The frame was painted black.

Last step was to find the right color for the bike. To highlight the new lines, it got a one color paintjob with a metallic blue, which Audi used on a special series of their RS6 in 2017.

The bike is completed by a new black seat.

I hope you like the bike as much as I do.

More Photos

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Introduced in 1970, the R75/5 was the largest BMW motorcycle of the time, offering a 750cc, 50-horsepower boxer engine capable of pushing the machine to 110 mph. The entire “Slash 5” or “/5” series, which also included the R50/5 (500cc) and R60/5 (600cc), represented a revolution in the company’s motorcycle design. The bikes featured a new, lighter frame with a large-diameter backbone, along with a new telescopic fork, 1-piece crank, chain-driven cam, and 12-volt electrical system with both an electric and kick starter. Says Motorcycle Classics:

“The overall effect was a machine that, at a little over 400 pounds dry, was much less bulky than the /2, had more power, handled extremely well and had better clearance thanks to the cylinders being farther away from the ground.”

Enter Duc Tran of Texas, a garage builder and family man whose BMW R65 urban tracker we featured last year. As Duc says, this 1973 BMW R75/5 “descended” on him by chance, when a good friend and bike collector had run out of storage space and asked him to take one of his bikes home to store:

“Given that I’m a big BMW airheads fan, I was drawn to the red toaster tank /5 like a bug heading toward a light zapper.”

Last winter, Duc rode the bike only sparingly, but then the builder bug hit. He purchased the bike from his friend and began the build:

“My builds are done organically with no computer aided drawings. I am my only customer and biggest critic. My goal for this build was to keep it simple and clean, with a touch of vintage elegance.”

While the bike was not 100% original and complete, Duc still felt compelled not to cut up the frame or detab it, allowing him to return the machine to original form if desired. With lots of borrowed tools and “beer payments” to neighbors, he created the gorgeous machine you see here. Appropriately enough, he named the bike “HaLong,” which means “descending dragon” in Vietnamese. After all, the bike “descended” on him by chance, and what’s more, riding the bike through the Texas hill country gives him the same peace and tranquility he experienced at Vietnam’s HaLong Bay.

Duc at HaLong Bay, Vietnam.

Below, we get the full details on the build from the man himself!

BMW R75/5: In the Builder’s Words

I named the bike “HaLong”, which means “descending dragon” in Vietnamese. HaLong Bay is a majestic and picturesque area in Northern Vietnam. There, you will find peace and tranquility. This 1973 BMW R75/5 “descended” on me by chance. I already have two bikes and a Vespa in the garage and really do not have room for another. A good friend, who’s an avid bike collector, asked me one day to take one of his bikes home since he ran out of storage space. It was my choice on the bike. Given that I’m a big BMW airheads fan, I was drawn to the red toaster tank /5 like a bug heading toward a light zapper. I squeezed the bike into the garage to the chagrin of my better half. I told her that I was only holding it for a friend. I rode it sparingly, but over the winter break, I got bit by the builder bug. I asked my friend if I can modify the bike. He came back offering to sell me the bike at a price that I couldn’t turn down. As they say, the rest is history.

Since the BMW /5 toaster is a classic, I felt compelled not to cut up any part of the frame or detab it. Don’t get me wrong, the bike was not 100% complete and pristine. I wanted to have the option to put it back in the original form if desired. I’m a garage tinkerer with no mechanical or fabrication training. My builds are done organically with no computer aided drawings. I am my only customer and biggest critic. My goal for this build was to keep it simple and clean, with a touch of vintage elegance. I also wanted to retain as much of the bike’s DNA as possible. I challenged myself to make as many parts as I’m capable of. This leads me to borrowing a lot of tools from my neighbors. Believe me, I spent a lot of money on beer as repayment. My work area is ¼ of a two cars garage that was allotted to me. Every time I work on the bike, I’d have to move the other bikes into the driveway. It’s annoying at time, but I had to make it work.

The build:

The most expensive parts I purchased was a rear subframe and fender from Vonzeti in the UK. I forgo their seat kit because I wanted to design the seat myself. That was very time consuming because it’s not easy to get the seat right. I made seven different seats out of cardboard. Even my anti-bike family members helped me picked out the final design. I made the seat pan out of aluminum and opted for a rich brown leather that will last for years to come.

The most laborious part of the build was refreshing the 46 yrs old engine. I replaced the gaskets and leaking push rod seals. Adjusted the valves and rocker arms. I painstakingly scrub/polish the engine, all the covers, front fork, upper clamps, wheel hubs, and exhaust pipes by hand.

None of my other bikes have rear fender, so I wanted to incorporate one for this build. It’s attached to the rear swing arm with a bracket and fender struts. I hand sanded the fenders to give it a brushed aluminum finish and protect it with clear coat. To keep the rear half as clean as possible, I made a battery box and relocated it to the very bottom right behind the 4-speed transmission.

A Radiantz LED light strip was incorporated into the seat for brake light. Two small brackets were made that attach the rear Supernova blinkers to the upper shock mounts and ran the wires inside the rear subframe. To keep the build budget low, I went with universal Emgo mufflers compatible with the exhaust brackets on the frame. In the front, I made a small fender that fit in nicely with the existing fork brace. Motogadget M-Blaze were used for front blinkers. The only modern electronic upgrade were the LED blinkers and brake light.

To give it the classic look, I opted for Bumm mirrors that are attached to the headlight bucket. The Euro handlebar was swapped for one from an early Ducati Monster. I used leftover leather and made grip covers and a battery strap to add a little handcrafted touch to the bike.

It took me 6 months, juggling a full-time job and family activities with three growing kids. I’m thoroughly satisfied and elated with how it turned out. HaLong brings me peace and tranquility when I ride it through the central Texas hill country.

Follow the Builder: @planetducky
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The Honda CB350 is one of the most beloved small twins of all time, a 36-hp scrapper that recalled the old adage: “It isn’t the size of the dog in the fight, it’s the size of the fight in the dog.” While Honda’s small fours may get more of the attention, this bulletproof 325cc OHC parallel-twin sold some half a million units in North America, and the bikes continue to be popular in vintage racing. According to one racer:

“The 350 Hondas also represent one of the most reliable bikes, even referred to as ‘bulletproof’ by those who have owned and race them in vintage motorcycle racing.”

Enter 26-year-old Kevin Bergeron of Bergnco — a firefighter, heavy-duty mechanic, and high-end bicycle builder out of Calgary, Canada, who began building custom motorcycles after riding a buddy’s enduro in the mountains. Says Kevin:

“When I took interest in motorcycles again, I started building on a KLR250 and things have evolved naturally from there. I do nearly everything in-house, which allows me to create real relationships with the folks who have chosen me to build a bike for them and I am very proud for that.”

We recently featured Kevin’s Suzuki DR200 “Johnny Lightning” street scrambler, built as a dirt-happy commuter, and his recent KLR250 build was featured at the 2019 One Moto Show. Today, we’re thrilled to feature this Honda CB350 cafe racer, built for correctional officer who needed a getaway from work — “a classic bike that wouldn’t break the bank.”

While Kevin is quick to point out that CB350 cafe racers have been done many times in the past, we can’t help but think this is one of the most well-balanced, elegant, downright perfect small commuters we’re seen. Says Kevin:

“I really believe we hit the mark on this one, keeping it classic all while making it feel like home for a first time bike owner. We weren’t out to re-invent the wheel, but simply to provide a good set to a better guy.”

Amen, Kevin. Below, we get the full story on the build, along with photos from @benjaminallan23.

Honda CB350 Brat / Cafe Racer: Builder Interview

– A bit about me:

I am a 26 year old firefighter here in Canada with a background in heavy-duty mechanics. I got my first “real” motorcycle when I was 18. It was a Buell XB9 Firebolt. When I sold the bike, I swore I would never get another one and would simply stick with the human-powered wheels, so I began building high-end bicycles and have been for the better part of eight years out of my small shop here in Calgary. When I took interest in motorcycles again, I started building on a KLR250 and things have evolved naturally from there. I do nearly everything in-house, which allows me to create real relationships with the folks who have chosen me to build a bike for them and I am very proud for that.

– Make and model of the bike:

This is a 1973 Honda CB350.

– Why was it built:

This bike was built for a friend, more specifically a correctional officer at a jail up here in Canada. Like the rest of us (if not more), he needed a getaway from work once in a while. This year he decided his getaway would also be his first motorcycle. We discussed options for some time and settled on a classic bike that wouldn’t break the bank. So we designed what I think is the perfect small displacement commuter for him.

– Custom work

As per usual, the engine is a top down re-build with no real tricks. Standard stoke. Standard bore. It breathes through a set of ram-air filters and coughs through a 2-into-1 exhaust made up by Merlin Cycleworks (big shout out to Mark down there). The rear section of the frame was removed, rebuilt and was fitted with a new battery box, fender as well as a custom seat. We sleeved the forks and added a few personal touches.

-Influences and overall design

It’s no lie that the CB platform has been done and redone numerous times in the past. That being said, I do believe it is for a good reason. The CB provides a reliable platform with access to inexpensive parts and a seemingly endless resource of information (good and bad). Although not an uncommon bike, I really believe we hit the mark on this one, keeping it classic all while making it feel like home for a first time bike owner. We weren’t out to re-invent the wheel, but simply to provide a good set to a better guy.

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Going Equilateral: Long-Armed CL350 from San Francisco…

The Honda CL350 was the scrambler version of the beloved CB350 twin, featuring a high-mount exhaust and 19-inch front wheel. While the 346 curb weight and 33 horsepower OHC parallel-twin engine did not make for staggering performance, the CL350 scored high on the fun scale. Says Honda guru Charlie O’Hanlon:

“They have a very ‘Japanese’ style, with plenty of class. But they were built to be ridden, they were built to be reliable, and they were built for people to have fun on them.”

Enter Jason Lisica of Offset Motorcycles, a San Francisco Bay Area restoration and modification shop whose bikes we’ve featured previously on the blog. With some 30 custom builds under his belt, Jason has decided to start supplying builders with a few limited-production parts. In order to showcase his CB350 extended swingarm kit, he’s build this 1972 Honda CL350 “brat scrambler”:

“I wanted to show off what a 3” extended swingarm can do to the stance of a CB350. There have been a handful of builders that have created an equilateral triangle using an extended swingarm and shock combination. I have always admired those bikes.”

As Jason says, the extended swingarm gives the bike just enough “papi chulo” — a stretched bobber with pullback bars. Below, we get the full story on the build.

Stretched CL350: Builder Interview

• Please tell us a bit about yourself, your history with motorcycles, and your workshop.

Offset Motorcycles is dedicated to making vintage custom bikes that people can ride today. Rounding the corner on 30 bikes now, it felt like it was time to start creating some purchasable parts. I find that the more customer builds I take on, the more it’s just one or two pieces of fabrication that make or break a whole bike. My hope is to supply builders with that one special bolt-on piece that helps them get over the creative hump, and onto an inspiring new build they made with their own two hands.

• What’s the make, model, and year of the bike?

1972 Honda CL350. Classic swap meet special. I picked up the bare frame for cheap and started sourcing parts.

• Why was this bike built?

The bike was built primarily to showcase a product I have brought to a limited production run, the CB350 extended swingarm kit. I have two different models listed on my website and for sale on eBay. The swingarms come with new bushings and a bunch of other stuff to help you get the stance adjusted and extended the linkages if you like. The kit is $289 plus shipping, and you get it on eBay (https://www.ebay.com/itm/273761599606) or cheaper if you contact me through my website and mention BikeBound.

• What was the design concept and what influenced the build?

I wanted to show off what a 3” extended swingarm can do to the stance of a CB350. There have been a handful of builders that have created an equilateral triangle using an extended swingarm and shock combination. I have always admired those bikes. One in particular was from 5 years ago on BikeEXIF, and it never left my consciousness. A Finnish industrial design student named Timo Karinen had the same idea (before it was cool) but he didn’t lower his front end to make the bike sit level. I did that here. I also had an idea to build a bike that could satisfy my cravings for a 1940’s bike, and I think I nailed it. It’s hard to explain the riding position, but it’s exactly what I was looking for, a stretched bobber with pullback bars.

• What custom work was done to the bike?

The first step was to match the odd CL tank slope to the brat seat I bought from Tran at OC Cafe Racer in Orange County. This is my third featured bike on BikeBound with one of Tran’s seats.

So, I lowered the front tank mounts both down and back a half inch and that helped me to squeeze the slopes together. After that I put my extended swingarm kit on there and made my perfect triangle. Buying shocks the right length wasn’t hard, but then I had to lower the front end to make the whole bike sit level. With this early triple tree assembly, you can’t just mount the fork legs higher in the clamps, so I heated up the outer fork springs and compressed them using a spring compressor to get them to mash down to the right height. Then I cut a section out of the fork legs and rewelded them.

The tank and headlight ears were stripped to bare metal and torched with propane to give it a burnt pipe look. All the electronics are mounted under the seat in a flat tray like I do all my bikes. This one was done with no electrics on the handlebars at all. The bike starts with a turn-key ignition, like in a boat, and the headlight switch is under the headlight itself.

Finally on the exhaust I had some help from my friend Alan, who owns this KZ400 café racer featured on BikeBound. We got two left side CL350 exhausts and cut one of them apart to make the right side rams-horn effect. The two sides aren’t identical because the engine cases are different, but it turned out great.

• How would you classify this bike?

Brat-scrambler.

• Was there anything done during this build that you are particularly proud of?

Just the way the bike sits. I really love this stance. It’s got just the right amount of “papi chulo”. This bike is special to me because building it made me realize that the cheap 70’s donor bikes are almost gone, and they aren’t coming back. The more we keep hacking them apart, the more valuable they will become.

Follow the Builder

Web: www.offsetmotorcycles.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/offsetmoto
Instagram: @offsetmoto

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“The Scrambled Duke”: An alternative to the “new” Ducati Scrambler…

Long before they revived the name for the modern L-twin Scrambler in 2015, Ducati produced their original “Scrambler” series of air-cooled singles in 125, 250, 350, and 450 cc displacements. Introduced in 1962, these bikes were built at the behest of the American importer, who wanted a lightweight all-purpose bike to appeal to young people. Says one rider who’s owned his 450 Scrambler since 1971:

“I could go on dirt roads and trails, twisties and longer adventures. With typical Ducati handling, light weight, plenty of midrange torque and a smoothshifting, five-speed gearbox, it was really fun to ride.”

Enter Wreckless Motorcycles of the United Kingdom, a Pro/Am “tag team” consisting of two friends who’ve known each other for 15 years. Rick Geall is “the Amateur” — he designs, welds, fabricates, and source parts out of his small brick barn, located near Silverstone Race Circuit:

“I went to college to learn to weld and everything else is self-taught and just sheer enthusiasm and man hours.”

Iain Rhodes is “the Pro” — a professional mechanic with his own shop, who does the engine work and final assembly on the builds, and makes sure they run.

The project you see here was triggered by the 2015 revival of the Ducati Scambler name, attached to a bike that many have lamented as being too street-oriented to warrant the name. Says Rick of the build:

“The design brief was to try and retain and enhance the early Scrambler style and feel, but give it a modern 2018 twist. I wanted more ‘scrambler’ rather than the ‘street’ direction Ducati took.”

Together, Rick and Iain have managed to tranform a “wide case” 1970 Ducati 350 Scrambler into a modernized stunner — a resto-modded Scrambler that hasn’t lost touch with its roots. We especially love the attitude behind the work:

“There’s no showroom, no celebrity sponsor, no TV show, no glamour. We do it because we love it and because we can (but also, like an addiction, it’s hard to give it up!). Money and prestige in very short supply but the Scrambled Duke sits in my living room at home at the moment and it seems like reward enough.”

Indeed, indeed. Below, we get the full story on the build, along with some stunning shots from photographer Daniel du Cros at the studios of Junction Eleven.

“The Scrambled Duke”: In the Builder’s Words

Donor: 1970 Ducati 350 Scrambler Widecase Single

The idea for the Scrambler build was triggered by two things – Ducati’s re-launch of the “new” Scrambler in 2015, and also the timing of acquiring an original 1970’s bike in late 2016.

The bike started life as a black and yellow 350 imported into the UK many years ago from South Africa. It was a running bike but a little tired and unloved, but a period correct Ducati, virtually original from the factory.

Like many bike (and car) producers, some of their most evocative machines came out of the late 60’s and early 70’s, a great period in design generally but especially automotive design.

The design brief was to try and retain and enhance the early Scrambler style and feel (with more than a nod to the Ducati 400/450 RT, which I believe was mainly a US export version), but give it a modern 2018 twist. I wanted more “scrambler” rather than the “street” direction Ducati took. I still hope Ducati will do an MX style bike at some point, but I guess it is a big and already crowded market of very fine bikes.

To recreate that 70’s Scrambler look, stance would be challenge no. 1 — get it sitting a lot higher and recreating an MX style, making it a little more extreme, ultimately a caricature of the original which is really our style.

Given the original motor had a slightly wheezy but fun 24 horsepower, clearly some weight saving wouldn’t go amiss, achieved broadly by losing the original forks, wheels and exhaust that were very heavy items. Styling, overall, was to remain vintage, so a retained but modified frame, hand-made aluminium panels all round, the original tank and a completely refreshed, re-bored, rebuilt, original motor were all to be a focal point for the build.

Modern components, designed for the KTM SX small bike range (65 and 85) became the backbone of the significant modifications. We added a set of unique billet triple clamps from Fastec Racing in the UK (that caused Danny a few headaches and head scratching when he realised what I was asking for). We went to Fastec as they already produced a very nice aftermarket clamp set for the KTM SX range so figured we were halfway there!? The brief was to machine them to retain the existing 1970 Scrambler head geometry but be able to take the KTM SX WP’s up front — this set the taller stance we wanted.

This was balanced at the back via some lengthy Ohlins twin shocks at the rear (370mm eye to eye), modified, assembled and supplied by Ben at BG Motorsport Silverstone. We lengthened the swingarm as well, just to give it a more stretched out look, less compact.

Brand-new SM Pro Platinum wheels designed for KTM application completed the look while up front along with Beringer’s very pretty full MX front braking kit for the KTM SX series, putting the stopping power on the nose (literally). Thanks to Christophe and the team at Bike Design in Belgium as ever for sourcing the Beringer components we needed.

We debated long and hard about whether to run a rear brake, but I wanted to keep the styling nice and clean at the rear, and show off the oversized rear hand machined one-off sprocket from a 49T Renthal blank.

The usual array of goodies from Renthal, Rizoma and Daytona all add the finishing touches. A brand new seat pan was fabricated in house and covered in a mix of soft black leather with a perforated and stitched seating area from Matt at Herbert Ellison Upholstery in Stockbridge.

Paint was chosen to give a vintage feel, with a nod towards the yellow and orange hues used by Ducati in the 70’s.

That carb’d single sounds nasty via the brand new hand-built exhaust mated to a modern Akrapovic end can designed for the current Yamaha R3.

I’m not sure how you’d categorise the bike, so lets just say it’s a Scrambler, a nod to the original icon and its very cool MX cousin, the 400 RT, whilst celebrating what’s best in modern on road/off road components.

The overall build meandered over an 18-month period, mainly because the eventual build no.1 (Kawasaki W650 – sixfiveoh) took over the build slot and focus during a lull in proceedings on the Scrambler. The real timetable was more like 30 weeks to do this particular bike.

Getting the triple clamps machined took time, as did sourcing the genuine 70’s parts for the motor, piston, carb etc. (a big thanks to Barry at Classic Ducati for his patience and support in finding me the things I needed – I’m not 100% sure he’ll like what I did with it all but that’s custom, you won’t please everyone). The benefit of using the modern parts designed for KTM was helpful from a sourcing point of view, but getting it all to marry with the frame presented lots of fitment challenges that Iain skillfully (as usual) mastered.

The lack of rear brake might make this an MOT challenge ultimately if a buyer comes along for it, so perhaps we will revisit this in good time, but for now, the combination of the vintage range Heidenau K67 Trials tyres and those Beringer stoppers make it a hoot to ride.

Summary of main changes
  • Reduced and reshaped original rear fender – brand new KTM SX85 aftermarket UFO front fender
  • New seat pan fabricated and covered in premium smooth black leather with perforated leather insert
  • New “vintage” 7.7inch headlight and grill (painted Traffic Black) hung with two tone machined aluminium fork hangers
  • Original gear shifter extended, with new rubber
  • New WP front forks for the KTM SX65/85 range
  • New Ohlins Black Edition rear twin shocks adapted from a Honda application
  • New Beringer MX Race Kit and Aerotec cable clutch with 4 fingers levers both sides of the bars
  • New Scrambler style 7.7” headlight with mesh grill insert
  • New Venhill tailored brake and clutch cables and Venhill throttle
  • Engine sprayed and cases polished
  • New Beringer MX Aerotec front disc
  • New Renthal 754 22mm bars, and Renthal firm grips, with Rizoma Scugardo bar end indicators
  • Modified aftermarket KTM bar risers
  • New Daytona Velona 80mm 9K analogue & digital single combination clock
  • Brand new SM Pro Platinum wheels for the KTM SX85 (12-17) in Gloss Black rim and hub, Stainless spokes, nickel nipples combination. 19×1.6 F and 18×2.15 R
  • New Heidenau K67 Trials 3.25 x 19 54T TT on the front and 4.00 x 18 64T TT tyres on the rear
  • New chrome vintage style horn
  • New generator, CDI, custom fuse box
  • New Lithium battery and Lithium charger
  • Bevel gear gazer from DiscoVolante
  • New nuts, bolts, gaskets, seals, washers, engine plate mounts, valve guides, tank bracket, battery case etc. 100% overhaul of every small item
  • Engine – new gearbox bearings, full strip down, crankshaft grind, valve lap, barrel honed and ceramic coated, piston honed, new rings clips and pin
  • One off billet triple clamps, stem and stem nut from Fastec Racing
  • New custom wiring loom
  • Original DEllorto VHB carb, sonic cleaned, overhauled, and refurbished as new
  • New vintage look bellmouth
  • All panels custom made in marine grade aluminium
  • Refurbished original tank, complemented by original cap
  • New DID VX GB chain and sprockets (530 x 13F and a “blank 49 tooth Renthal rear)
  • New aftermarket steel adventure pegs grafted onto existing footrest mounts
  • Custom Wreckless design decals onto new paint scheme plus the use of a small original Ducati Meccanica decal on the rear, WP fork decals etc.
  • Original Swingarm lengthened 40mm
  • Original frame shortened at the rear, de-lugged and new electrics tray
  • New Rizoma Iride S Rear bi-directional running light, brake light, indicators all in one
  • Frame and swing arm powder coated Traffic black
  • New one off handmade side stand mounting point grafted to original frame and peg mounting plate, plus aftermarket tall side stand designed for KTM EXC range from Trail Tech
  • Kick starter and gear shifter all original with new rubbers
  • Custom hand assembled wiring loom

The tank, fenders and panels were painted a combination of Traffic Black in gloss and Traffic Yellow in gloss. Inset Wreckless logos on the tank and Wreckless logo and bespoke design decals for the side panels. Frame and swingarm were powder coated Traffic Black.

Photography Credits

The photo-shoot took place locally in Banbury at the studios of junctioneleven, the stills taken by the highly talented Daniel Du Cros.

Web: www.junctioneleven.com
Twitter:

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A Frankenstein airhead built for modern-day mayhem…

The BMW R100GS, introduced in 1987, was the world’s largest displacement enduro / adventure bike at the time — the next evolution in the legendary R80GS. The GS series broke with the convention that an off-road bike had to be a lightweight single, thereby creating an entire new class of motorbike:  the adventure / touring bike.  The 980cc airhead in the R80GS offered 60 horsepower, capable of pushing the 455-lb machine to 112 mph. While the R100GS was the king of big trailies in its day, its performance has faded by modern-day standards.

Enter Judd Blunk of Woodacre, California, whose motorcycling obsession began in the late 1960s when he was a corner worker at a motocross track his brother managed in Kansas. Since then, he’s ridden all over the continent, from the aspen forests of Colorado to the farthest northern coast of Alaska to the deserts of Nevada, where he wrecked his modern R1200GS amid a clutch of airheads. Upon returning home, he went air-cooled and never looked back.

“I eat, sleep and obsess about mid eighties BMW GS’s.”

Judd’s recently retirement from a German car company has allowed him to dedicate more time to his airhead GS hobby, outfitting his garage with more fabrication equipment and naming it “Blunk’s Garage” after the garage his grandfather and his brothers owned in Oxford, KS, in 1929. Judd doesn’t build show bikes, nor does he build them as a business. His projects are meant to be ridden, and ridden hard:

“I say my bikes are cool enough to turn heads, ugly enough to ride the crap out of and reliable enough to take anywhere.”

For this 1988 BMW R100GS restomod — nicknamed “Franky,” short for Frankenstein — Judd has updated the suspension, reinforced the frame, beefed up the charging system, and increased the engine performance. Meanwhile, he’s  “added lightness,” bringing the weight down to just 365 pounds!

Below, we get the full story on the build, along with photos from Matt McCourtney.

Airhead GS Restomod: In the Builder’s Words

My motorcycle obsession started in the late 60s when my brother managed a motocross track in Pittsburg, KS. I was cheap labor and he had me flag on the corner that had the most crashes. (That’s why I wear hearing aids today :). I have ridden the woods of Colorado on a WR Husky, and a KDX Kawasaki — I rode to Prudhoe Bay Alaska and cross country (the long way) on a R1200 GS.

Two years or so ago, I retired after working 30 years for a German car company…that’s when I was able to dedicate a lot of time to my GS airhead hobby. I took over the garage, and with my last bonus (thanks to my wife) equipped it with some basic fabrication tools, welders and the like. For fun, I have called it Blunk’s Garage as my grandfather and his brothers had a Blunk’s Garage in 1929 in Oxford, KS.

About the build…

It all started with a group of guys who ride every spring in the Nevada desert. I got invited, and showed up with my 1200 GS… All these guys had airhead GS’s. I wrecked the second day on the ride, but was able to ride back to NorCal — with the insurance money, I bought my first airhead GS and was obsessed.

I call this bike “Franky,” (Frankenstein) as it has the parts from a ’95 1100 GS (rear suspension) and the WP forks off a 2005(ish) KTM.

Dry it weighs 365 lbs and handles really light. Plus it is easy to pick up when I drop it.

The frame is reinforced ala the SWT Sports guys in Germany and the suspension was all set up by Super Plush here in San Francisco. It has a big output alternator from EME, the pipe is custom from House of Fubar (Eric McCallum).

The triple clamps were custom made by Hendersen Precision in Groveland, CA, and the heads were redone by Engine Dynamics in Petaluma, CA.

It has my desert tank (water, whisky or even fuel if you want), and it has a stainless tool box and a custom aluminum subframe.

I also mounted the BMW Navigator IV to show me the way.

Pictures BTW are by Matt McCourtney Photography.

Follow the Builder @BlunksGarage
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The Yamaha XT500 is one of the most beloved enduros of all time. Introduced in 1976, it was the first big four-stroke “thumper” from Japan — a 27-horsepower big single brute that was stone-ax reliable, sexy to look at, and a hoot to ride. The XT proved itself in the major African rallies, winning the Paris-Dakar among others, while a tuned version of the 499cc engine was used in the HL500, which competed against the two-strokes in the 500cc Motocross World Championship!

Enter brothers Seth and Casey Neefus of Red Clouds Collective, whose Portland-based company makes lovely, high-quality waxed canvas clothing and leather goods:

“We are a collective of makers and adventurers, and each piece we make is an extension of our lives.”

The Neefus brothers are also moto enthusiasts, a passion which started some 15 years ago when brother Casey managed to build three separate bikes from a pile of CB350 parts he’d bought. Soon, brother Seth wanted in on the action. At the 2019 One Moto Show earlier this year, we were absolutely staggered by their newest creations, the matched pair of Yamaha XT500 builds you see here. Says Seth of the concept:

“We wanted to build two motorcycles that were the same, but different at the same time. Kind of like brothers, we are from the same parents, but we look different and live different lives.”

While building two similar bikes at the same time was more work than expected, they’ve succeeded in creating two of our favorite bikes we’ve ever featured. They brothers were inspired by the slim, aggressive style of vintage motocross bikes, which certainly shows in the final design. We love that they set up their own vapor honing cabinet for the engines and collaborated with another of our favorite shops, One Down Four Up, for the stainless steel bars. Says Seth of the process:

“The best part was building motorcycles side by side as brothers. It is a very satisfying feeling to see these motorcycles finished, they actually look and feel like brothers.”

Below, we get the full story on this incredible pair of XT500 customs.

The Red Clouds Twin XT500’s: Builder Interview

• Please tell us a bit about yourself, your history with motorcycles, and your workshop.

We are Red Clouds Collective, we make clothing, bags, and accessories inspired by our daily lives in the Pacific Northwest. We use durable materials to create timeless pieces. We are a small family business, with Seth Neefus and Casey Neefus as the designers and makers behind everything put out. We also build motorcycles for fun when we aren’t busy making waxed canvas clothing and leather goods.

We have always loved riding motorcycles in the dirt and on the street and when it comes to the vibe of a bike, we love the look of vintage dirt bikes, desert sleds, and anything that you can catch some air on or take to the woods. About 15 years ago, when Casey was 17 he bought a pile of Honda CB350’s and built three bikes from all of the parts with a friend.

As the years went on his love for vintage motorcycles grew and Seth soon took note to the fun times Casey was having wrenching and riding bikes. There was always a love for the dirt mixed with the need to ride on the road for Seth and Casey. They took a liking to vintage enduro bikes, old Triumphs and even modern dirt bikes and have spent the last decade buying old bikes, fixing them, riding them and making them look they way they wanted them to be.

About six years ago Casey was working on a 1973 Triumph build and we put that in the One Moto Show. The experience opened up a whole new world of purpose behind our motorcycle projects and it gave us a reason to finish them to a higher level of perfection, pushing our craftsmanship to build something that was presentable to the public. No matter what we are building we plan on getting it dirty, but it is nice to have a small window of time when we can show off all of our hard work and let the bikes shine.

• What’s the make, model, and year of the bike?

1978 Yamaha XT500 and 1981 Yamaha XT500.

• Why was this bike built?

Originally we wanted to build an XT500 with a minimal look and just keep it fun and functional, but when we started stripping the bike down and got a feel for the direction we decided that we both needed to build an XT500 so we can ride them together and we thought building two bikes at the same time wouldn’t be too much more work. Well it definitely was a lot more work for most of the process, but it did save time with certain things like making custom brackets, ordering parts, etc.

• What was the design concept and what influenced the build?

We love vintage motocross bikes, but we also love riding around Portland and the surrounding forests full of logging roads and single track. We just wanted to build two great looking thumpers that looked as cool as possible and were a blast to ride.

We wanted to build two motorcycles that were the same, but different at the same time. Kind of like brothers, we are from the same parents, but we look different and live different lives. We both enjoy the same sort of riding and want to be take similar adventures so we didn’t want the bike to perform differently so we decided that when it came to the color schemes we would choose different colors that compliment each others bikes and use a unifying color to tie them together.

• What custom work was done to the bike?

With a slim, light dirt bike as the motorcycle we want to ride and an awesome 70’s Yamaha bike as the look we wanted to work off of, we started by removing everything that was not necessary and seeing if we could make some other tank options work. With a little effort we modified some tanks to securely mount onto the frame.

We cut about five inches off of the rear end of the bike and found some old Wassel fenders that had the right look. The rear fenders worked pretty seamlessly, but we wanted to add a front fender rack to the front fenders so we could strap a tool roll to it while on the trails. We designed and fabricated the rack and mounted it nice and high right under the headlight.

We wanted to make these bikes trailworthy and keep the look of an aggressive vintage Yamaha dirt bike. The PIAA headlights added so much light to the situation and cut down on a lot of front end weight and bulk. We converted the 6v electrical system to 12v and eliminated the battery. We also used the Mikuni VM36mm Carburetor and a K&N Air filter.

We shaped fiberglass seat pans and made some custom antique white leather seats and found matching Biltwell grips for our Red Clouds Collective x One Down Four Up Stainless Steel Bars. There is a huge XT500 community out there, but it is hard to find aftermarket parts for the style that we were going for and everything out there is really expensive so we ended up making our own custom foot pegs that are about 2” wide and pretty much every other mount and bracket on the bike to make all of our desired parts and components work.

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