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Most people today have a generalized idea about addiction. They understand that there are far too many addicts in the world.  But, the majority of Americans don’t spend much time thinking about the subject, unless a family member becomes addicted. At that point, they want answers about what to do for their loved one.  The following are some of the most frequently asked questions about addiction that may prove helpful to someone who needs addiction treatment.

FAQ #1: Why Can’t Addicts Just Stop Using?

The American Society of Addiction Medicine defines addiction as:

“A primary, chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memory, and related circuitry.  Dysfunction in these circuits leads to characteristic biological, psychological, social, and spiritual manifestations.  This is reflected in an individual pathologically pursuing reward and/or relief by substance use and other behaviors.”

“The power of external cues to trigger craving and drug use, as well as to increase the frequency of engagement in other potentially addictive behaviors, is also a charateristic of addiction.”

When a person first begins using an addictive substance, they believe they can quit any time, and that they can control the behavior.  However, after repeated use, the drug induces changes in brain function. The person then loses their ability to exert control over their drug use, even if adverse consequences have occurred.  It’s important to remember that no one intends to become an addict.  

FAQ #2:  Can a Person Become Addicted to Prescribed Medications?

This is one of the most frequently asked questions about addiction.  Many people mistakenly think prescription painkillers are safe. But, in truth, opioid addiction is the leading cause of preventable death in the nation today.  Last year, 70,237 people died from drug overdoses. Of those, more than 17,000 involved prescription opioids, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Prescription drug abuse and addiction are not always deliberate.  Some individuals develop a physical dependency that leads to addiction, even when taking the medications as directed.   Or, they often combine medications with other substances such as alcohol. marijuana, or other prescription drugs to enhance the effects.  Furthermore, prescription painkillers are popular with people who want to get high because they are so readily available.  These two scenarios have created an opioid addiction crisis that has reached epidemic proportions today. 

FAQ #3:  Is It Possible to Detox Without Professional Help?

A person will seek more of their drug of choice when withdrawal symptoms begin. Withdrawals can be dangerous in cases of prolonged addiction. Depending on the drug involved, a person can experience symptoms such as high blood pressure, irregular heart rate, respiratory depression, hallucinations, seizures, or coma.  Anyone ready to give up drugs should seek professional detox to ensure a safe and effective process.

FAQ #4:  Aren’t All Rehab Programs the Same?

Absolutely not.  Addiction treatment programs today provide a wide range of treatment approaches and options.  These programs are as diverse as the people who come for treatment. Some facilities treat specific addictions.  Others are equipped to handle poly-drug addictions or co-occurring disorders.  Also, some facilities offer inpatient treatment, while others provide outpatient programs.

Treatment programs are available that offer considerations for age, gender, sexual orientation, health issues, economic status, religious preferences, and more.  No one is forced to undergo treatment in a program that doesn’t fit their needs.

FAQ #5:  Does Relapse Mean the Program Didn’t Work?

Recent statistics show that more than 85% of individuals relapse following addiction treatment.  In many of these cases, the individuals left rehab before completing the program. In other cases, the person failed to follow-up with an aftercare program. Nevertheless, these numbers don’t mean rehab failed. Nor do they indicate that the individual failed. When relapse happens, it means the person needs to do a little more work.  Many rehabs will allow patients to return to the program if they’ve relapsed.

Everyone responds to treatment differently.  We need to also look at the positive results.  Many rehab patients return to society as a sober, contributing member of their families and communities without relapsing at all.  

The National Institutes of Health researched relapse rates and found that only about one-third of alcoholics in the first year of recovery remain abstinent.  However, the success rate increases to more than 50 percent after the one-year mark. The Institute of Behavioral Research at Texas Christian University found that 23.5 percent of cocaine users were using again within one year of treatment.  

Find More Frequently Asked Questions About Addiction

Are you or a loved one seeking treatment for addiction?  If so, you can get answers to more of the most frequently asked questions about addiction by contacting us today.  One of our knowledgeable representatives will be happy to assist you in any way.

Resources:

https://www.asam.org/resources/definition-of-addiction – Definition of Addiction

https://www.drugabuse.gov/related-topics/trends-statistics/overdose-death-rates – Overdose Death Rates

The post What Are the Most Frequently Asked Questions About Addiction? appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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Last year in the United States, 70,237 people died from drug overdoses. Currently, over 21 million Americans have substance use disorders, yet only one in ten receive treatment.  In many cases, those who don’t get help are afraid of detox,  don’t think they can afford rehab or are worried they’ll lose their jobs.  To help you find your reasons for seeking addiction treatment, we offer these inspirational stories as an incentive.

Finding Inspiration in Stories from People in Recovery

Each person who struggles with addiction has their different reasons for seeking addiction treatment.  They live a substance-free life now because they got the help they needed.  Here’s what they have to say:

Stories from recovering alcoholics:
  • Robert J. –  “My five-year-old son had been ignoring and avoiding me. Finally, he told me that he didn’t like me when I drank because I was different.  I got sober by Monday and told him I was going to get help for my drinking problem.  His words were a wake-up call for me.  I got treatment and now, I go out a play ball with my son instead of sitting around drunk all weekend.”
  • Christy M. – “Thanks to my boss and fellow employees, I’m sober. My boss had told me the other employees reported alcohol on my breath at work.  He sent me to the EAP, and they recommended a treatment program. I was embarrassed that I had been caught drinking at work, but it was the incentive I needed to do something about my drinking.”
  • Steve D. – “I found myself in jail one morning after being arrested for public drunkenness.  I realized then that it was time to get real about my drinking problem. My biggest regret is that it took something this drastic to make me seek help.  I should have done something sooner.”
  • Randy T. “My drinking was out of control.  I used to hide bottles of vodka in the bushes beside my driveway.  I’d grab a bottle before getting in the car to go to work because I needed to make the shakes go away.  One day, I couldn’t find the bottles, and I panicked. My wife must have discovered my dirty little secret. But, that’s what got me to wake up and see where my life was headed.”
Drug abusers tell their stories:
  • Janice B. – “My husband was getting suspicious about where the grocery money was going. He hadn’t found out about all our savings that I’d used to buy cocaine. Then, he came home early one day and found me getting ready to use.  He told me he would leave me if I didn’t get help. I had to choose between him or my drug. I chose him. Cocaine almost ruined everything I loved in life.  But, rehab was amazing. They helped me learn how to get through the day without my drugs.”
  • Sarah W. – “I hate to admit this, but as a nurse, I found a way to steal pills from my patients.  I couldn’t seem to stop. I started lying to my family about my mood swings. Finally, I got worried that the hospital would catch me, and I’d lose my license.  That’s when I decided to get into rehab right away. The pills weren’t worth losing the career I had worked so hard for.”
  • Tamara J. “I was diagnosed with depression when I was 14, and began taking antidepressants.  Sometimes, when the medicine didn’t seem to work, I’d take Xanax, pain pills, or smoke pot to help me feel better.  I kept needing more and more just to feel normal.  But, when one of my friends OD’d, I knew it was time for me to get help.”

Each of these individuals is thankful that they found the courage to enter treatment for their addictions, and said they wish they had done it sooner.

Hopefully, their experiences will inspire someone else to do the same.  

What Will Be Your Reasons for Seeking Addiction Treatment?

If you are struggling with substance abuse, think about who you once were before drugs entered your life.  Reclaiming that life should be one of your reasons for seeking addiction treatment. If you are ready to begin, please contact us a Best Drug Rehabilitation today.  We can recommend a treatment program that is designed especially for your needs.

Resources:

drugabuse.gov – Overdose Death Rates

drugabuse.gov – Treatment Approaches for Drug Addiction

The post Recovering Addicts Share Their Reasons for Seeking Addiction Treatment appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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Many individuals think that substance abuse is only a problem in larger cities in the United States. If you are one of these individuals, you are wrong about that. Substance abuse in rural areas of the US is reaching epidemic proportions. In rural areas, tobacco use, alcohol abuse, and stimulant abuse run very high. Prescription drug abuse and heroin abuse are growing concerns in cities and rural areas.

Factors Contributing to Substance Abuse in Rural Areas

Individuals living in rural areas of the country struggle with more physical and social health consequences than people living in other areas. Residents of rural areas are at higher risks of death from accidental overdoses or suicide. Rural residents also tend to weigh more and smoke more. All of this points toward more risky behavior among individuals living in these areas of the country.

Some of the factors contributing to substance abuse in rural areas include:

  • Poverty
  • Lower education levels
  • Unemployment
  • Isolation
  • High-risk behaviors
  • Boredom

The majority of individuals living in these rural areas do not have medical insurance coverage, which means they have less availability for proper healthcare. No wonder they have shorter lifespans.

Substance Abuse in Rural Areas Brings More Challenges

Substance abuse in rural areas brings many challenges to its residents. First responders may all be volunteer emergency workers with only the necessary training in drug overdoses or alcohol poisoning. Services such as detoxification for alcohol or drugs and addiction treatment facilities may be miles away from these areas.

Other Problems for rural areas may include:

  • DUI (Driving under the Influence) accidents
  • Increased crime and violence
  • Homelessness
  • Infectious diseases being spread
  • Unemployment

People living in smaller towns may be more reluctant to ask for help for an addiction to drugs or alcohol. Smaller towns tend to have the problem of everyone knowing everyone else’s business affairs. Because of privacy matters, someone may not ask for the help that they need. By not getting the necessary support, it will only lead to more problems with substance abuse.

Overdose Deaths in Rural Areas of the US

Overdose deaths in rural areas of the US today are higher than they are in urban areas of the country. Most of these fatal overdoses are linked to opioids. If only rural areas had access to drugs like methadone and buprenorphine to aid in the treatment of opioid addictions, these numbers would not be so high.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), most overdoses in rural areas of the United States occur in the homes of the individuals who experience the overdose. If the individual is not alone in their home, the chances are that any family members that may be around don’t know the signs and symptoms of an opioid overdose.

Signs of an opioid overdose may include but are not limited to:

  • You can’t awaken the person, or they are not able to speak
  • Limp body
  • The face is ashen and may feel very clammy
  • Purple-coloring in nails and around the mouth
  • Breathing and heart rate very slow or stopped
  • The person is vomiting or making gurgling noises

Recognizing these signs is essential to saving a person’s life. Call 911 immediately! Administer CPR if necessary until medical help arrives.

Seek Help for Opioid Addiction

If you are struggling with an addiction to opioids or any other substance, don’t hesitate to contact an inpatient addiction rehabilitation facility. No matter if you are in a rural or urban area, there are inpatient centers that can give you the help you need and so deserve. Don’t let location determine if you recover from addiction.

Contact one of our representatives at Best Drug Rehabilitation to learn about a treatment program that will work for your needs and preferences. They can answer any questions you may have about a program that will fit your individual needs. Contact us today.

Resources:

ruralhealthinfo.org – Substance Abuse in Rural Areas

cdc.gov – CDC Reports Rising Rates of Drug Overdose Deaths in Rural Areas

samhsa.gov – Opioid Overdose

The post Rural Areas of the United States Struggle with Substance Abuse appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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Many individuals think that substance abuse is only a problem in larger cities in the United States. If you are one of these individuals, you are wrong about that. Substance abuse in rural areas of the US is reaching epidemic proportions. In rural areas, tobacco use, alcohol abuse, and stimulant abuse run very high. Prescription drug abuse and heroin abuse are growing concerns in cities and rural areas.

Factors Contributing to Substance Abuse in Rural Areas

Individuals living in rural areas of the country struggle with more physical and social health consequences than people living in other areas. Residents of rural areas are at higher risks of death from accidental overdoses or from suicide. Rural residents also tend to weigh more and smoke more. All of this points toward more risky behavior among individuals living in these areas of the country.

Some of the factors contributing to substance abuse in rural areas include:

  • Poverty
  • Lower education levels
  • Unemployment
  • Isolation
  • High-risk behaviors
  • Boredom

The majority of individuals living in these rural areas do not have medical insurance coverage which means they have less availability to good healthcare. No wonder they have shorter lifespans.

Substance Abuse in Rural Areas Brings More Challenges

Substance abuse in rural areas brings many challenges to its residents. First responders may all be volunteer emergency workers with only the basic training in drug overdoses or alcohol poisoning. Services such as detoxification for alcohol or drugs and addiction treatment facilities may be miles away from these areas.

Other Problems for rural areas may include:

  • DUI (Driving under the Influence) accidents
  • Increased crime and violence
  • Homelessness
  • Infectious diseases being spread
  • Unemployment

People living in smaller towns may be more reluctant to ask for help for an addiction to drugs or alcohol. Smaller towns tend to have the problem of everyone knowing everyone else’s business affairs. Because of privacy matters, someone may not ask for the help that they need. By not getting the help needed, it will only lead to more problems with substance abuse.

Overdose Deaths in Rural Areas of the US

Overdose deaths in rural areas of the US today are higher than they are in urban areas of the country. Most of these fatal overdoses are linked to opioids. If only rural areas had access to drugs like methadone and buprenorphine to aid in the treatment of opioid addictions, these numbers would not be so high.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), most overdoses in rural areas of the United States occur in the homes of the individuals who experience the overdose. If the individual is not alone in their home, chances are that any family members that may be around don’t know the signs and symptoms of an opioid overdose.

Signs of an opioid overdose may include but are not limited to:

  • You can’t awaken the person or they are not able to speak
  • Limp body
  • The face is very pale and may feel very clammy
  • Purple-coloring in nails and around the mouth
  • Breathing and heart rate very slow or stopped
  • The person is vomiting or making gurgling noises

Recognizing these signs is essential to saving a person’s life. Call 911 immediately! Administer CPR if necessary until medical help arrives.

Seek Help for Opioid Addiction

If you are struggling with an addiction to opioids or any other substance, don’t hesitate to contact an inpatient addiction rehabilitation facility. No matter if you are in a rural or urban area, there are inpatient centers that can give you the help you need and so deserve. Don’t let location determine if you recover from addiction.

Contact one of our representatives at Best Drug Rehabilitation to learn about a treatment program that will work for your needs and preferences. They can answer any questions you may have about a program that will fit your individual needs. Contact us today.

Resources:

ruralhealthinfo.org – Substance Abuse in Rural Areas

cdc.gov – CDC Reports Rising Rates of Drug Overdose Deaths in Rural Areas

samhsa.gov – Opioid Overdose

The post Rural Areas of the United States Struggle with Substance Abuse appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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No business owner or manager wants to believe that their employees have a drug problem. Small businesses, in particular, tend to think that they are not susceptible to these types of issues. Unfortunately, the truth is that small companies tend to have more significant drug problems than big businesses because they do not do random drug testing.  Do small businesses need random drug testing?

Do Small Businesses Need Random Drug Testing?

There are many compelling reasons that small businesses should initiate a drug testing program for the health of their business and their employees.  Here are a few examples of how drug use in the workplace can affect your operation.

Drug Use Is Dangerous For Everyone

Drugs such as amphetamines can cause wild mood swings, paranoia, and symptoms mimicking the effects of schizophrenia. Amphetamines include dangerous drugs such as meth and bath salts. Even when an employee is not actively using the drug, they can still be under the drug’s effects. This situation can cause them to act irrationally or even be violent towards fellow employees, company property, or themselves.

It Can Encourage Theft

Addictive drugs like cocaine and heroin are usually costly, and employees that are on these substances may quickly exhaust their resources. Once a person on drugs gets desperate enough, they will start to seek other methods of getting money. These methods could include everything from stealing a few dollars from the till to embezzling vast amounts of funds directly from a client. Many small businesses may also see inventory shrinkage due to employees that are desperate for funds.

Adversely Affects Productivity

Drugs like marijuana, heroin, and ecstasy can cloud the mind and keep an employee from being able to think clearly or remember essential things. This means that an employee that is on drugs is not a productive employee, and this lack of productivity can cost the company hundreds of dollars in lost wages.

Leads to Sick Days

Even simple party drugs such as ecstasy can eventually lead to employees having to call out sick. Ecstasy causes deep depression when abused, and this depression can manifest itself as an illness. Those who are addicted to more severe drugs may need to call out any time they take too much of it, or they are suffering withdrawals because they can’t get it.

How Random Drug Testing Can Help

Most drug use among employees is in the form of recreational party drugs. These drugs have a significant effect on how well the employee works but the employee may not be able to see this. Because this drug use is mostly recreational rather than addictive, employees are very likely to stop using these drugs entirely if they feel that their job is on the line. This makes drug testing a very effective way to discourage drug use.

Drug testing is necessary for a completely safe business environment. It is a straightforward process, and it protects a business’s employees, clients, and revenue. Most employees will have no objection to random drug testing, and it will also secure their safety.

Small businesses need random drug testing to ensure a safe and prosperous workplace.

The post 5 Reasons Small Businesses Need Random Drug Testing appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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Completing an addiction treatment program is a great achievement. You know that you are on a path of sobriety and recovery. Not only do you feel very proud of yourself, as you should, you also feel a bit anxious and nervous about your new life now that you are leaving inpatient treatment. You wonder if you truly can stay drug-free after rehab.

Life After Rehab

While in rehab, your life is very orderly and disciplined. Now, you will have to rely on what you have learned to help you stay drug-free after rehab. You have the tools to help you in times of cravings and when triggers come along that may make you want to use again.

A life of addiction is full of chaos and confusion. Comparatively, life in a rehab is full of structure and balance. Now, you are embarking on a life which is that of sobriety, new friends, and a new lifestyle. You know it won’t always be easy to stay drug-free after rehab, but you can do this!

Decisions You Must Make after Completing Rehab

Finishing your addiction treatment program is not the end of treatment for recovering addicts. An aftercare program is essential for staying drug-free after rehab. You learn the skills that are necessary for long-term recovery from addiction in rehab. However, you must continue your counseling and meetings after leaving your program.

You learn in rehab about the triggers that may cause you to want to use drugs or alcohol after leaving. You have to decide if you can go back to the same environment in which you were living while struggling with your addiction. If others are using drugs or alcohol in the home in which you live, you may need to relocate as you transition to your sober lifestyle.

You may live in the same neighborhood where your previous drug dealer lives, or the neighborhood may have triggers in places where you used your drugs or hung out while drinking alcohol. All of these are factors that you must decide if you can deal with when returning home.

Ways to Stay Drug-Free After Rehab

There are many resources to help you stay drug-free after rehab. Above all, continue with support group meetings. Attending meetings is a MUST for sobriety after rehab.

Below is a list of other ways to maintain your sobriety and recovery:

  • Make new sober friends to share activities with
  • Rely on family members for support and encouragement
  • Keep busy with volunteer work or new hobbies
  • Exercise and eat a nutritional diet to stay in good health
  • Have someone you can call when cravings become strong

These are only a few tips to help you stay drug-free after rehab. Yes, it is a constant issue for you daily, but you can learn to get through every day sober. It won’t be as hard after your initial transition period which will certainly entail some bumps in the road. However, with the helping hand from others, (and don’t be afraid to ask) you can overcome these bumps and go on with your life in recovery.

What if I Relapse after Rehab?

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse,

It’s common for a person to relapse, but relapse doesn’t mean that treatment doesn’t work.”

If you relapse after rehab, it does not mean that you are chained to addiction for the rest of your life. Many people do not come out of rehab for the first time and never look back. Things happen in people’s lives that sometimes lead to relapse. If this happens to you, contact us at Best Drug Rehabilitation and we can help you find a treatment program that will get you back on your path of sobriety.

Remember, falling down is part of life. It happens! However, a determined person with a strong will to succeed will do just that. You, too, can go on to live a life of sobriety in recovery from addiction. Get the help you deserve and return to a healthy and happy life with loved ones.

Resource:

drugabuse.gov  – Understanding Drug Use and Addiction

The post How do I Stay Drug-Free After Rehab? appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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There are many steps you must take on the road to recovery from addiction. Do you know what the first step would be? Detoxification is the first step you must make to recover from addiction to drugs or alcohol. Once the detoxification is complete, you will be able to focus and concentrate on your treatment program.

What is Detoxification?

Detoxification, or detox, is the process of eliminating the drugs or alcohol from your system. This is when you experience withdrawal symptoms from not using any substances. You should not attempt to detox from any substance alone without professional help and assistance. First, it is not safe to try detoxification alone. Furthermore, with the help of medical staff, you will be made more comfortable during this process.

Detox is not the same for every individual. A lot depends on your substance of abuse as well as how long you have been using the drugs or alcohol. Your physical condition can determine how hard the detoxification process will be on you. For instance, it probably would not be as hard for an otherwise healthy individual to endure the symptoms of withdrawal as it would be for an unhealthy person.

Where Should I Go for Detoxification?

There are inpatient and outpatient detoxification clinics. Most addiction treatment centers have facilities that handle detox for clients in the treatment center. You go through the detox process with medical staff on hand 24 hours a day, seven days a week to monitor you as you withdraw from the substance of abuse. Should any emergencies arise with your medical health, someone is there to handle it immediately. They can also keep you more comfortable as you detox.

Detoxing at the treatment facility you choose is much easier because you don’t have to leave one facility and go to another one to complete your treatment for addiction. While detoxification is the first step to recovery, you still have a lot more work to do before you achieve sobriety.

If Detoxification is the First Step, What Comes Next?

Next, you will choose an addiction treatment program that fits your needs and preferences. Make sure your treatment center is an accredited and licensed facility with a compassionate and caring staff. Inpatient treatment is always best because it removes you from all of the temptations while you are receiving counseling and therapy sessions for your addiction.  A reputable addiction treatment facility does not have a one-size-fits-all program. They can design a program which is tailor-made to fit your individual needs.

The specialists at Best Drug Rehabilitation can help you with any questions you may have about different facilities that fit your preferences. There are various treatment programs from which to choose today. You should choose a facility that offers different modalities of treatment. You also want to make sure that your treatment program provides aftercare.

What is Aftercare?

It can be a long road to recovery from addiction. Once your treatment program is complete, you still are not entirely recovered from addiction. Addiction recovery is an ongoing process that will need your continued commitment to sobriety. It is not an easy road to travel, but it is worth the hard work.

An aftercare program will help you transition from inpatient treatment to your daily life at home as a sober individual. You will face triggers and cravings when you are back to your day-to-day routines of everyday life. Once you leave rehab, you will need to attend group meetings and counseling, possibly to keep you on your road to recovery. Support groups can be beneficial to your long-term recovery.

You will want to take charge of your life in such a way as to live sober and healthy. This will probably mean making new friends and forming new relationships that do not include your previous friends who still use drugs or alcohol. An aftercare program will be there to help when you are having cravings or are about to slip up and use again.

Contact Best Drug Rehabilitation

Yes, detoxification is the first step to recovery. But once you have taken this step and completed your detox program, you will be ready to ahead with all of the following steps that will get you back to a life worth living, a life in recovery from addiction.

Contact one of our representatives today at Best Drug Rehabilitation. They can answer any questions you may have about a treatment program that will fit your individual needs and preferences.

The post The First Step to Recovery is Detoxification appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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Recovering from alcohol involves much more than just eliminating alcohol from your daily or weekly routine. The reason many people fail to succeed at alcohol detox is that they weren’t mentally or physically prepared for the challenges.  Living an alcohol-free life takes determination and a strong support structure.  Recovery is also dependent on having a realistic viewpoint on the emotional and behavioral aspects of life that contributed to the addiction.

What are the Biggest Challenges in Alcohol Detox?

The most difficult challenge, of course, is getting through withdrawals without taking a drink. To remedy this problem, a professional detox program is your best option. First of all, highly skilled detox specialists and medical staff monitor the process 24/7 to ensure that you are progressing safely and comfortably. Secondly, you are secure in an environment that allows no access to addictive substances. Therefore, your chance of success in enjoying an alcohol-free life is significantly increased.

Other challenges include learning to enjoy daily life without alcohol present and accepting the fact that you need support and guidance from friends or loved ones that you may have hurt in some way during your addiction.

Things You Can Do to Make the Transition Easier

Below are five suggestions for things you can do to get through alcohol detox successfully and then maintain an alcohol-free life for the long-term:

  • Be Emotionally Prepared

Before you begin your quest for an alcohol-free life, you must be emotionally prepared. For instance, there will be good days, and there will be bad days. Prepare yourself to face the bad days without giving in to temptation.  No one said this would be easy. But, the hard part doesn’t last forever. Recovery is a process, a journey. There is no specific deadline to reach. Allow yourself to have a bad day, but also do your best to keep on track. When the next bad day comes along, you’ll know you can get through it.  An alcohol-free life is not a destination; it is a journey you take each day.

  • Be Physically Prepared

Alcohol takes a toll on a person’s physical well-being in many ways. As a result, the body responds by making you think it needs more alcohol to feel better. You can counteract this response by eating nutritious meals. In addition to a healthy diet, an exercise routine is a great way to increase stamina and relieve stress. These are powerful tools to use in the battle against alcoholism.

  • Don’t Go It Alone

It takes a strong person to admit that they need help. Most of us think the opposite is true. The truth is, without help, your chance of living an alcohol-free life is questionable. A friend or loved one can be there when you have a terrible day and prevent you from taking just “one little drink.” Ultimately, without a supportive person nearby, that one little drink could result in total relapse.

  • Stay Busy and Have Fun

Another critical point to remember about staying sober is that you need to keep busy and find new interests and hobbies. By all means, stay away from events or places that promote alcoholic beverages. Why tempt yourself before you are sure of your ability to abstain?  Take time to try new forms of entertainment.

  • Join an Aftercare Program

In many cases, your support team consists of people who don’t drink. For this reason, they can’t completely relate to your situation and give the exact amount of support you need. An aftercare program offers recovering alcoholics a safe place to meet and discuss their experiences together. Their tips and advice can be valuable to you during this sensitive period. Because of their experiences with alcohol, these individuals understand what you’re going through. Therefore, they can more easily relate to your situation.

An Alcohol-Free Life Can be Yours to Enjoy

There are many more things you can do to prepare physically and emotionally for the challenges of alcohol detox.  It is essential that you keep in mind that recovery is possible. Millions of people succeed in giving up alcohol, and they now enjoy an alcohol-free life. It’s your turn. Let us help you make it happen.  Contact us soon at the toll-free number we’ve provided, and let’s get you started on your new life.

Resources:

helpguide.org – Overcoming Alcohol Addiction

https://medlineplus.gov – Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

The post 5 Steps to an Alcohol-Free Life appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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Although marijuana has been legalized for recreational and medical use in nine states and is legal for medicinal use in 25 states, it makes up 43 percent of all drug arrests. To put it another way, someone got arrested for marijuana possession every 49 seconds in 2017.  Is the war on drugs unfairly targeting marijuana users?

There are two ways to look at this. For example, a total of 643,000 people were handcuffed and arrested because of marijuana last year, according to the FBI. We can either look at it as getting drug offenders off the streets, or as unnecessarily harsh punishment for having a small amount of the drug for personal use.

A Growing Majority Supports Legalization

The reform group, Marijuana Majority, reports that a growing number of people support full legalization of marijuana.

What would full legalization mean for the occasional user? It means they wouldn’t have their entire life ruined by getting caught with a joint in their possession.

For instance, misdemeanor or criminal marijuana convictions can lead to:

  • Inability to adopt a child in 38 states.
  • Suspension of driver’s license for 6 months in 21 states.
  • Revoked professional licenses in 20 states.
  • No access to public housing for three years in 46 states.
  • No federal financial aid for a year in 28 states.

What would legalization mean to a dealer? More customers, more profits. But, it could also mean more competition to a dealer as more people decide to get in on the profitable action.

Who Pays the Highest Price in the War on Marijuana?

According to a report by the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA), the war on marijuana costs taxpayers $3.6 billion every year. On another note, the government rakes in billions in cash and assets that they seize from those who are arrested for marijuana sales or possession. This practice is known as “policing for profit.”

So, who suffers most? Society as a whole suffers because the costs are usually passed along to taxpayers in one way or another. Not to mention the costs for each person who is incarcerated for possession or dealing.

It’s somewhat ironic. On the one hand, a lot of people are making a lot of money from this little green plant. On the other hand, many people are struggling in life because they chose to experiment with marijuana.

A Mixed Blessing and a Curse

Marijuana is a mixed blessing in many ways. However, it is also a curse. In medical use, the benefits are surprising. However, recreational use there are some side effects that cause health problems after heavy or prolonged use.

As with prescription drugs, proper use of marijuana can bring a wealth of healing and pain relief for millions of people. On the other hand, the results can be life altering or deadly with abuse.  These are also reasons for targeting marijuana users.

Some of the side effects of prolonged or heavy abuse of marijuana include:

  • Decreased learning capabilities
  • A shortened attention span
  • Weakened verbal communication skills
  • Depression, suicidal thoughts
  • Anxiety, mood swings
  • Same respiratory problems as tobacco smokers
  • Dependency or addiction

As the controversy over marijuana continues, the need for treatment for those who are dependent or addicted is a daily concern across the country.  For this reason, targeting marijuana users may be one way to bring down the number of adverse consequences of marijuana abuse.

Benefits of Targeting Marijuana Users

Many marijuana users need professional treatment to overcome their substance abuse.  If you or someone you know needs help for marijuana abuse, please contact us today. Remember, even though marijuana is legal in many states, it can still have serious side effects. “Legal” doesn’t necessarily mean “safe.”

Resources:

engage.drugpolicy.org – Drug Laws are Destroying Lives for No Reason

ucr.fbi.gov – Crime in the United States

The post Marijuana: Main Target in the War on Drugs? appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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Partial hospitalization programs allow addicts to live at home while receiving treatment for their addiction problems and mental health conditions. The goal of partial hospitalization programs is to treat people with substance abuse disorders that are related to another mental health condition.   Most addictions involve other disorders such as depression, anxiety, or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The NIDA defines partial hospitalization programs (PHPs) as “programs that let patients undergo treatment at rehab facilities for four to six hours per day on a minimum of five days a week.” PHPs are sometimes referred to as “day treatments.”

A Step Between Outpatient and Residential Treatment

Partial hospitalization programs constitute a middle ground between residential treatment programs and regular outpatient programs in which a person receives treatment only a couple of times per week. For some people, PHPs can serve as a step down from residential treatment programs after they have detoxed and stabilized. For other people, a partial hospitalization program in and of itself might be their best choice to get the rehabilitation they need to live a life of sobriety, especially if they have mitigating circumstances such as caring for children or older adults in their households that make it difficult for them to leave home.

Strategies and Scope of Partial Hospitalization Programs

Patients in partial hospitalization programs receive much of the same types of treatment as patients in residential treatment programs.  PHPs can include individual and group counseling sessions, medical care, psychiatric medications, and Twelve Step meetings. Treatment plans in PHPs are individual plans. When it comes to recovery, one size doesn’t fit all.  But, all people with substance abuse disorders require treatment that provides stability and compassionate care.

Effectiveness of Treatment

Every effort is made by providers to ensure that patients fully avail themselves of the benefits of treatment programs. Partial hospitalization programs constitute effective rehabilitation for people with substance abuse disorders paired with a mental health condition. As a treatment option, a PHP offers an excellent balance between highly structured care and a higher degree of independence.  This ensures that patients can maintain their sobriety once the treatment program has ended.

PHPs can be an excellent choice, depending on your circumstances. You realize you need help with a substance abuse disorder.  But, you have commitments that mean you need to be at home as much as possible.  If so, you should talk with healthcare professionals to find out if a Partial Hospitalization Plan would be the best option for you.

Resources:

drugabuse.gov – Treatment Settings

The post Do Partial Hospitalization Programs Work for Addiction Recovery? appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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