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Do you think that all homeless people are either alcoholics or drug addicts? If so, you are not alone. Most homeless individuals are labeled as such. Homelessness and substance abuse are connected, and the truth of the matter is that substance abuse is both a cause and a result of homelessness. This doesn’t mean that all homeless people have problems with substance abuse but many of them do struggle with addiction as well as underlying mental issues.

You see, sometimes substance abuse happens because a person has lost their home due to other factors in their life. They may have lost their home due to an extended illness or they could have lost their job as a result of a bad economy and therefore, could not pay for their home. These individuals may turn to alcohol or drugs as a result of their becoming homeless and not knowing how to cope with their situation. Their substance abuse is because of their homelessness. Then there are others who may have started abusing substances and sank deeper into addiction until they lost their families, jobs, homes, and had nowhere to go but the streets. Their homeless is because of their substance abuse.

The Problems of Homelessness and Substance Abuse

It doesn’t matter how someone arrives in the throes of homelessness and substance abuse until they can get treatment for the substance abuse there will be no way for them to pick themselves up and get out of their life of homelessness and substance abuse. However, to receive treatment for addiction, it helps tremendously to have good insurance benefits that will pay some, if not most, of the charges incurred in an inpatient addiction treatment facility. Needless to say, someone who is homeless and living on the streets does not have good insurance benefits.

Neither does a person who has the problems of homelessness and substance abuse have a good family support system to help them as they transition from treatment into a life of recovery and living drug-free and without alcohol. Many homeless individuals who are dependent on alcohol started drinking at a very young age and were children of alcoholics. Therefore, they have never known a support system even as children. Many of them left home at an early age and ended up on the streets struggling with homelessness and substance abuse.

Homelessness and Mental Issues

With the healthcare system as it is in the United States today and health insurance being what it is, it is almost impossible for patients to have extended stays in hospitals. It seems the policies now in practically all healthcare facilities is to treat the major issue as quickly as possible and release the patient. When this happens to a person with mental health issues, they end up with no housing, living on the streets, and using drugs or alcohol to self-medicate. These individuals feel hopeless with no way out of their situation. They either continue on the streets or end up in jail or prison.

Homelessness and Substance Abuse Can be Temporary

If a family member ends up homeless because of substance abuse, it does not have to be a permanent situation. There is help available for them. There are resources available for you to help get your loved one into an inpatient addiction treatment facility. They can be rehabilitated and get back on the right track of sobriety. Many rehab centers help their clients find gainful employment once they have completed their treatment program. So, don’t give up on them. Their situation is not hopeless and they are not doomed to a life of homelessness and substance abuse.

Get professional help for your loved one to start their path to recovery from drugs or alcohol. Do it today!

The post Which Came First Homelessness or Substance Abuse? appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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The scope of heroin abuse in the United States is staggering. According to NSDUH, about 948,000 people reported using heroin in the past year. This trend is being driven by young adults aged 18 to 25. With this high number of heroin abusers comes a significant number of adverse effects. One of those effects is death from overdose. Of the 64,000 drug overdose deaths in the U.S. in 2016, more than 15,400 were attributed to heroin. Because of the high number of deaths, finding better methods for treating heroin overdose has become a priority in our nation today.

Treating Heroin Overdose: What are the Options?

Heroin addiction is one of the hardest addictions to overcome. But, with the right treatment program, a person can find freedom from the powerful grip of this drug. The important thing is to get a person into treatment before they suffer an overdose that takes their life. Prevention is the best method, but, if an overdose does occur, there is a new drug that has shown promising results in reversing the effects of heroin overdose. The drug is known as Naloxone.

Naloxone (Narcan) – This medication is an opioid receptor antagonist. It is used to eliminate the signs of opioid (heroin) intoxication as a means of reversing an overdose. Naloxone can be administered by non-medical personnel and has saved many lives. The FDA has approved a hand-held auto-injector that delivers a single dose of naloxone. This method is not a full treatment for overdose. It is used to minimize symptoms until medical responders can arrive.

Naloxone has benefits, but it is not a solution to treating heroin overdose. In some cases, it doesn’t have the desired effects. Also, some people have suffered severe after-effects for months or years after using this drug.

The use of Naloxone is becoming more widespread in the United States.  Police officers and first responders in cities with high heroin overdose rates are now allowed to carry Naloxone at all times.

What are the Symptoms of Heroin Overdose?

If you know someone who uses heroin, would you know if they were experiencing an overdose? Everyone reacts differently to heroin, and some users can take more of the drug than others. That’s why you can’t determine an overdose by merely knowing the dosage taken. The most common sign of heroin overdose is shallow breathing. Some of the other signs to look for include:

  • Vomiting
  • Choking or gurgling sounds
  • Discolored tongue
  • Constricted pupils
  • Bluish or purplish skin, nails or lips
  • Weak pulse
  • Delirium
  • Unresponsive even when awake

Many overdose victims lose consciousness or go into a comatose state. This sign of overdose should never be ignored. The individual is most likely not just “sleeping it off” and should be treated by professionals immediately.

Getting Treatment for Heroin Addiction

Heroin addiction is an all-consuming condition that can destroy a person’s mind and body. They will not be able to withdraw and recover without professional help. During withdrawals, the addict experiences a variety of uncomfortable symptoms. Depending on the severity of their addiction, the withdrawals can be life-threatening. Treating heroin addiction involves 24/7 monitoring during detox in a controlled environment to ensure the comfort and safety of the patient. After detox, the person should enter an inpatient rehabilitation program to learn how to cope with life as a sober individual.

You can get more information about treating heroin overdose by contacting us at our toll-free number.  If you know someone who needs treatment for heroin addiction, we can recommend a treatment program that is best for their needs.

The post What Can be Done for a Heroin Overdose? appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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The scope of heroin abuse in the United States is staggering. According to NSDUH, about 948,000 people reported using heroin in the past year. This trend is being driven by young adults aged 18 to 25. With this high number of heroin abusers comes a significant number of adverse effects. One of those effects is death from overdose. Of the 64,000 drug overdose deaths in the U.S. in 2016, more than 15,400 were attributed to heroin. Because of the high number of deaths, finding better methods for treating heroin overdose has become a priority in our nation today.

Treating Heroin Overdose: What are the Options?

Heroin addiction is one of the hardest addictions to overcome. But, with the right treatment program, a person can find freedom from the powerful grip of this drug. The important thing is to get a person into treatment before they suffer an overdose that takes their life. Prevention is the best method, but, if an overdose does occur, there is a new drug that has shown promising results in reversing the effects of heroin overdose. The drug is known as Naloxone.

Naloxone (Narcan) – This medication is an opioid receptor antagonist. It is used to eliminate the signs of opioid (heroin) intoxication as a means of reversing an overdose. Naloxone can be administered by non-medical personnel and has saved many lives. The FDA has approved a hand-held auto-injector that delivers a single dose of naloxone. This method is not a full treatment for overdose. It is used to minimize symptoms until medical responders can arrive.

Naloxone has benefits, but it is not a solution to treating heroin overdose. In some cases, it doesn’t have the desired effects. Also, some people have suffered severe after-effects for months or years after using this drug.

The use of Naloxone is becoming more widespread in the United States.  Police officers and first responders in cities with high heroin overdose rates are now allowed to carry Naloxone at all times.

What are the Symptoms of Heroin Overdose?

If you know someone who uses heroin, would you know if they were experiencing an overdose? Everyone reacts differently to heroin, and some users can take more of the drug than others. That’s why you can’t determine an overdose by merely knowing the dosage taken. The most common sign of heroin overdose is shallow breathing. Some of the other signs to look for include:

  • Vomiting
  • Choking or gurgling sounds
  • Discolored tongue
  • Constricted pupils
  • Bluish or purplish skin, nails or lips
  • Weak pulse
  • Delirium
  • Unresponsive even when awake

Many overdose victims lose consciousness or go into a comatose state. This sign of overdose should never be ignored. The individual is most likely not just “sleeping it off” and should be treated by professionals immediately.

Getting Treatment for Heroin Addiction

Heroin addiction is an all-consuming condition that can destroy a person’s mind and body. They will not be able to withdraw and recover without professional help. During withdrawals, the addict experiences a variety of uncomfortable symptoms. Depending on the severity of their addiction, the withdrawals can be life-threatening. Treating heroin addiction involves 24/7 monitoring during detox in a controlled environment to ensure the comfort and safety of the patient. After detox, the person should enter an inpatient rehabilitation program to learn how to cope with life as a sober individual.

You can get more information about treating heroin overdose by contacting us at our toll-free number.  If you know someone who needs treatment for heroin addiction, we can recommend a treatment program that is best for their needs.

The post What Can be Done for a Heroin Overdose? appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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Opioids kill tens of thousands of people every year, and it is predicted to kill many thousands more before we find a solution. But, as Americans, we should have seen this coming. We only need to look back through history to see that we have suffered many drug epidemics in our nation through the decades. That part of our history has been forgotten, or we are in denial about the fact that we weren’t paying attention while the opioid crisis became so widespread.

More than 45,000 people have died from opioid overdoses proving that this is the deadliest drug problem we’ve ever faced. Another distressing problem is that only about 10 percent of people who suffer from opioid addiction get the specialized treatment they need. Even though we’ve seen drug epidemics before, we could not have predicted the massive scale of the opioid crisis today.

Let’s take a look at some of our past drug epidemics and get an idea of how we can learn from our mistakes.

Underestimating the Power of the Pill

Early in the 19th century, medical professionals were responsible for the drug epidemic. Most of them considered morphine as a wonder drug. It was widely used for pain, alcoholism, diarrhea, and nervous disorders. Not only were homemakers, war veterans, and many others addicted to the drug, many doctors became addicts themselves. Part of the reason for morphine’s popularity is due to few alternatives for pain. Aspirin wasn’t available until the late 1890s.

Also in the 19th century, opium abuse became a problem of epic proportions. As with morphine, doctors overprescribed the painkiller. During the American Revolution, Continental and British armies used opium for treating wounded or sick soldiers. The Civil War was the beginning of America’s opiate epidemic, however. More than 10 million opium pills were issued to treat soldiers. These soldiers returned home addicted and suffering withdrawals. They needed something for pain, and morphine became the solution.

When the hypodermic syringe was introduced in 1856, it was widely used to inject morphine. Again, the medical community underestimated the dangers of morphine. They also didn’t have many alternatives for treating pain, so the warnings about adverse effects were pushed aside.

Beginning in the 1870s, Chinese immigrants were operating opium dens in major cities and towns. The dens were popular with Chinese immigrant workers as well as white Americans. When a law passed in 1909 limiting the supply of opium, prices rose from $4 to $50 for a “can of hop.” The price increased pushed addicts to seek more potent opiates like heroin or morphine.

America’s Opiate Epidemics: 120 Years to Learn a Lesson

Looking at the history of morphine and opium addictions in the 1800s, we see the similarities to today’s opiate epidemic. For instance, part of the opiate crisis today is due to high prices for prescription drugs, just as it happened back in last century.

In recent years, when the government cracked down on opiates, they forced pharmaceutical companies to create a pill that would be hard to crush. This action drove up the price of the drugs and people who were addicted to painkillers sought cheaper alternatives such as morphine or heroin. So, once again, to control one epidemic, we started another.  After 120 years, we should have learned more.

Today, as people turn to heroin as an alternative to pricey opiates, many of them suffer overdoses. This happens because, unlike prescription pills, the quality of heroin is not controlled. When someone buys heroin from a street dealer, they don’t know about the other drugs or chemicals that it contains. Today’s heroin can be laced (cut) with fentanyl, rat poison, painkillers, caffeine, laundry detergent, and more.  This dangerous drug is a big part of today’s opioid crisis.

Can We Learn from Our Past Mistakes?

In the U.S. today, lawmakers and the medical community are joining forces to come up with better methods for treating chronic pain. Tighter controls on opiate prescribing methods is another way to bring down the number of addictions. For instance, the Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs) are making headway. A PDMP is an electronic database that tracks controlled substance prescriptions. Most states require health care providers to check the PDMP before prescribing a controlled substance.

Another method for controlling opiates has to do with stricter controls in hospitals. The FDA, CDC, and DEA are scrutinizing the recordkeeping methods involving controlled substances administered to patients.

Across the nation, thousands of organizations and individuals are spreading awareness about the dangers of prescription drugs. For example, MADD, DARE, NCADD, SAMHSA, and many more advocates for education and prevention work tirelessly to make a difference and save lives.

If you would like to know more about the opioid crisis in American today, call our toll-free number to speak with one of our knowledgeable representatives.

The post History Foretold the Opioid Crisis but We Didn’t Pay Attention appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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We hear people talk about crack and then we hear them talk about cocaine, but are they the same things? These drugs do share similarities but they are not the same. Crack and cocaine are both stimulants and crack and cocaine are both very dangerous substances, but they are different. Hopefully, this information will help you understand the difference in the two.

What is Cocaine?

Cocaine is extracted from the leaves of the coca plant. Cocaine users experience feelings of well-being and euphoria. They also have a rush of energy. However, it is possible for cocaine users to become paranoid or aggressive. These are side-effects which are unexpected when individuals use cocaine. Cocaine is a fine white powder which is commonly snorted (sniffed through the nose), although it can be mixed with water and injected. Some users rub the cocaine onto the gums and let it absorb into the bloodstream that way.

A few of the street names for cocaine are blow, coke, and snow. Some short-term effects include insomnia, decreased appetite, and increased sensitivity to stimuli. It is possible for long-term users to experience side effects such as:

  • lung damage
  • cardiovascular problems
  • seizures
  • convulsions
  • loss of smell
  • bowel problems
  • sexual problems
  • loss of smell

Over time, your body builds a tolerance for the cocaine and it will take more of the drug for you to receive the high feeling which also increases the chance of an overdose.

What is Crack?

Crack is made from mixing cocaine with baking soda and water which is then dried and broken into small crystallized rocks. These rocks are then smoked which releases the drug into the bloodstream faster than snorting cocaine. The user feels an intense high but this high only lasts 5 to 15 minutes. This short-lived high causes many users to binge on this drug in order to continue the euphoric high feeling.

Crack gets its name from the crackling sound heard when the drug is heating up. Some of the street names for crack are gravel, grit, hail, sleet, and rocks. Crack causes an intense high but it is followed by depression, anxiousness, and extreme cravings for more of the drug. The user can also experience respiratory failure, heart attack, or stroke, any of which can lead to death.

More Differences in Crack and Cocaine

Cocaine is much more expensive to buy than crack (in the beginning). What this means is that the high from cocaine lasts longer than the high from crack which would make you think it should cost more. However, crack users seem to become addicted more quickly than cocaine users, making them use more of the crack, so even though it is cheaper to buy, more of it is used leading to more money being spent on this drug. Much more of it is needed to maintain that euphoric high.

Cocaine users tend to be people with higher means of income than users of crack. Crack is so cheaply made and sold that even teenagers can afford to buy it in the beginning when they are trying it out for the first time. What they don’t realize is that they can become addicted to this substance after only one or two uses.

Another difference in crack and cocaine is that cocaine has been in existence for a long time and is one of the oldest illicit drugs available. Crack is pretty new in the world of illicit drugs. When it comes to crack and cocaine, crack is considered much more dangerous and more addictive than cocaine. Today crack seems to be much more popular than cocaine.

Addiction to Crack or Cocaine

If you think you or someone you love may be addicted to crack or cocaine, get professional help immediately. Some individuals think that addiction to crack or cocaine is more psychological than a physical dependence. Whichever the case may be, anyone addicted to any type of substance needs assistance from a professional inpatient addiction treatment facility. Don’t try to go through withdrawals on your own without help. Even if you make it through the withdrawals alone, chances are you will be back using in no time without counseling and a treatment program.

To learn more about crack and cocaine or addiction to any substance, call one of our representatives today. They will be happy to answer any questions you may have. Make that call now.

The post Are Crack and Cocaine the Same Things or Different? appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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Each decade seems to usher in a whole new trend in drug abuse. What was popular forty years ago is being replaced by new synthetic drugs and potent prescription drugs. But, surprisingly, overall substance abuse rates were higher 40 years ago, then they dropped during the 1980s, and rose again in the 1990s. Surveys show that usage rates for many drugs are at the lowest levels since the surveys began in 1975, conducted by Monitoring the Future. This is due in part to the fact that we are being more honest with teens today about the effects of drugs and the dangers of following teen drug abuse trends just because it’s the newest thing to do for fun.

Decades of Getting High: Impact of Peer Pressure on Teens

Anyone who has had teenagers in their lives can attest that peer pressure has more of an impact on a teen than family relationships, cultural norms, or education programs. Teens usually worry more about what their friends think and whether they fit in with the crowd than about what their parents think. Many of these teens will be led to drug use and abuse by their friends, just as they have for decades.

Researchers believe that misinformation and false messages were spread about drugs during the 1960s and this led to higher rates of drug use in the 1970s. Marijuana and heroin were popular and some Harvard professors promoted LSD use. Teachers even told teens that marijuana use would cause acne, sterility, and blindness. They thought this fear tactic would keep the kids away from marijuana use, but teenagers figured out the manipulation and felt even more comfortable using the drug.

Parents, educators, and society as a whole have learned from past mistakes about teen drug abuse trends and are now being honest with teens about drug dangers. With proper education about the consequences of drug abuse, teens can make informed choices.

Teen Drug Abuse Trends Yesterday and Today

It’s hard to imagine, but back in the 70s, more teens reported drug and alcohol use than today’s teens. In 1975, these were the most commonly abused drugs by high school seniors:

  • 47.3% used marijuana
  • 22.3% used amphetamines
  • 18.2% used sedatives (barbiturates)
  • 17% used tranquilizers (Xanax, Valium, Ativan, Klonopin)
  • 11.3% used LSD
  • 9.0% used cocaine

Compare those numbers to the most commonly used drugs by high school seniors in 2016:

  • 44.5% used marijuana
  • 10.0% used amphetamines
  • 7.8% used narcotics other than heroin
  • 7.6% used tranquilizers
  • 6.7% used hallucinogens
  • 5.2% used sedatives

Marijuana continues to remain at the top and opiates and inhalants have made significant gains recently. It’s interesting to note that the amphetamines used in 1975 were “uppers”, but in 2016, the amphetamines that gained popularity were crystal meth which is far more dangerous.

How to Help Teens Who are Abusing Drugs

When young people abuse drugs, their brain is more susceptible to long-term damage. This happens because their brain is still developing. The effects of the chemical in drugs can interrupt the natural process and leave them with impaired cognitive abilities. If you suspect your teen is using drugs, get professional treatment right away to avoid permanent harm.

If you would like more information about teen drug use trends, contact us today at our toll-free number. Also, if you are seeking treatment for your loved one, give us a call right away. We are here to help.

The post Trends in Teen Drug Use: Then and Now appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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When it comes to treating an addiction problem, counseling in addiction recovery is one of the most common and widely used processes for addressing even the most brutal of substance abuse habits. Addiction counseling can appear in many different forms, and there are perhaps dozens if not hundreds of different types of counseling methods nationwide. Counseling can be performed on a one-on-one basis, or it can be provided on a group basis. Regardless of the type and style of the therapy, all counseling methods are thought to be useful, if they are delivered under the right circumstances, and the proper techniques are chosen for the patients.

It is rarely believed that any particular counseling method is “better” than any other. The importance rests in ensuring that those who take part in counseling can have selection and variety in the counseling methods that they take part in so that everyone can find something that works for them and that is significantly helpful. When it comes to pairing clients with counseling modalities, it becomes more of a task of finding and utilizing a method that will resonate well with the individual as opposed to picking a method that is “more effective” than others.

It is essential for addiction treatment centers to not only be prolific but also to be able to offer options in their treatment.  When people are contemplating going to a drug and alcohol addiction treatment center, they can really work hard to get the tools and skills to finally beat addiction for life. When people go into a treatment program, it takes some work to accomplish a full recovery, but people can take part in a variety of different recovery methods to do this efficiently. The key here is that clients of rehab centers have options and that they can choose for their needs and preferences.

The Need for Addiction Treatment Today

The need for effective and helpful drug and alcohol addiction treatment has never been as high as it is now. While it might take some effort to conquer an addiction struggle, people who attempt to do this are rewarded by finally being able to overcome even the worst substance abuse habits with the right recovery method. In this way, even people who feel as though they will be addicted to drugs and alcohol for the rest of their lives can get help and recover.

Never in the history of this country has the need for substance abuse treatment centers ever been as great as it is today. And, never has there been so many people addicted to drugs and alcohol with substance abuse problems as severe as the ones that people currently have today.

In the 21st century, drug and alcohol abuse has become a nationwide epidemic, creating a wave of addiction the likes of which were never really thought possible. Now, people who never would have expected to abuse substances are getting addicted, and the call to finding recovery and rehab solutions has never been more significant. Thankfully, the numbers of substance abuse treatment centers in this country have also been growing, effectively giving those who struggle with addiction a more capable and efficient approach to the problem.

Changing Lives With Counseling in Addiction Recovery

Counseling in addiction recovery becomes a necessary and needed approach for people who suffer from drug and alcohol addiction in this country. It is essential for helping recovering addicts make a breakthrough in their recovery.  A counselor at a rehab or an outpatient facility can help a recovering addict change their lives by assisting them in understanding the causes of their addiction and how to avoid going down that path again.

Addiction counseling is useful in that it serves to help people find out the fundamental approaches that they need to take if they want to beat addiction for life. With the importance of counseling, a treatment center must apply various kinds of addiction counseling. Many rehab centers made a point to offer multiple methods of counseling in their recovery program. Some of the counseling methods that are offered include:

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
  • Moral Reconation Therapy
  • Motivational Interviewing
  • Relapse Prevention
  • Twelve Step Group Therapy
  • SMART Recovery
  • Secular Counseling
  • Life Skills Counseling
  • Coping Strategies

These are just some of the counseling and therapy methods that can help an addict turn their lives around.  For more information about counseling in addiction recovery, call today. Let us help you on the road to long-term recovery.

The post The Importance of Counseling in Addiction Recovery appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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When people suffer from drug or alcohol addiction, they feel as though they are completely trapped into that substance and that there is absolutely nothing that they can do about how intensively and terribly they are addicted. When people suffer and struggle with an addiction to drugs or alcohol, they really do feel as though it is the end of the line for them, and that they have run out of effective solutions that can help them kick their habit. They feel as though because they spent so much time abusing drugs or alcohol that, even if they do get clean, they will ultimately end up relapsing, in the long run. This is the wrong attitude for an individual receiving addiction treatment. Don’t expect a relapse when you return to your everyday life. You must keep a positive attitude and apply what you have learned in rehab.

Causes of Addiction Relapse

Going through an addiction relapse is definitely a hot button issue in drug and alcohol addiction recovery, and this concern is such that people really do feel like they are doing something that is particularly difficult and potentially deadly. Don’t expect to relapse but if you do, what does it mean?

Recovering addicts overthink relapse constantly and get much too concerned that it is definitely going to happen. If you expect to relapse, it will ultimately set you up for failure in the long run. Relapse is one of those things that might happen, and it might not, but you cannot expect to relapse. Doing this is not going to help your chances of remaining in recovery.

There are five causes of relapse.  These are:

  1. Stress
  2. People
  3. Places
  4. Senses
  5. Emotions

If a recovering individual is able to control and dictate all of those things, then they are able to put themselves in a situation where they have much more control and direction over their sobriety.  They actually have the ability to direct and focus themselves on their path of abstinence and stability. Don’t expect a relapse; Remain thinking positive throughout your recovery.

Don’t Expect a Relapse: Think Positive and Use These Tips

Try to maintain a life that is not stressful so you can experience a degree of safety, stability, and peace of mind. Try to avoid stressful situations that you know will make you want to drink or do drugs in an attempt to feel better. Put yourself around the right people and not the wrong ones. You can no longer associate with friends who use drugs or drink alcohol. The temptation will be with you constantly to do the same. Cravings will happen and it will be too easy to relapse. If you can stay out of your old, “stomping grounds” so to speak, you won’t be tempted to use substances. You must avoid triggers whatever they may be that will be detrimental to your recovery. Try to keep your emotions under control. Remaining calm in all situations is hard to ask of anyone. Bad things happen in life along with disappointments. Learn to control your emotions without relapsing.

Contact Best Drug Rehabilitation

For more information on relapse and recovery, call Best Drug Rehabilitation today.  We can help you choose the right program for your needs.

The post Recovering Addicts: Don’t Expect a Relapse appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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Food has been known for centuries as one of the most powerful healing tools for man. There have been a lot of recent complications added to our foods.  It has been changed around for the worse, and we have used chemicals which should not be ingested on our foods.  The soil which holds the nutrients that our plants need has been destroyed.  Plus, our foods are being taken apart in a lab and reconstructed with harmful and unfitting substances.  With this in mind, how do we harness the power of food in addiction recovery?

It sounds like a Dystopia, but we do still have access to healthy, whole, as-nature-intended foods. Healthy, Organic plants which have minimal interference and healthy soil, unpolluted air and water, and animals which are humanely treated with open space, healthy foods that their bodies require and also provided with unpolluted water and air, and from which unnecessary drugs are kept away – these are the foods which heal.

The power of food can change your life around.  It can prevent disease, improve memory, and support overall good health. When a person feels healthy and vibrant they are less likely to use addictive substances.   So, you might say food acts a preventative measure.  When in recovery, one needs to know what food items that are presented as food aren’t healthy to consume, and which foods bring health, vitality, and the ability to heal.

What Does GMO Mean?

GMO stands for Genetically Modified Organism. These are foods which have been made in a lab and are chemically altered; they can add or remove anything from the food product, for example, the first FDA approved GMO produce item was a tomato, with intended abilities to stop it from naturally rotting, the tomato had pig genes structured into it.

There has not been sufficient research on GMO foods; we don’t know the effects they have when eaten over many years. GMO products can become way out of hand, to the point that we’re not aware of what we are producing and it’s capabilities. For example, many GMO products are created to be “pest”-resistant, but scientists don’t know all of the capabilities that the new product has, i.e., the GMO “Superweed” which is very hard to kill.

GMOs don’t allow the body to function correctly, they have been linked to the widespread killings of frogs, earthworms, and fisheries among others, they have also contributed to soil erosion. Needless to say, GMOs are potentially dangerous and should be avoided.

It is unfortunate that all kinds of our foods are Genetically Modified (GM). Over 80% of the US’s packaged foods contain GMOs.

Some common Genetically Modified “foods” are in most of our food items, some of these well-used ingredient items are:

  • Soy
  • Corn
  • Rice
  • Wheat
  • Canola
  • Cotton Seed Oil

Most “foods” offered to us are GMO food items. Besides being added to processed foods, they are added to seemingly healthy substances such as vitamins. GMOs are covertly added to most things we eat since there is no requirement for labeling and we don’t even know what it is we are consuming as anything can be added to it, and its DNA is changed around.  This can have a big impact on the power of food in addiction recovery.  If the food isn’t supplying much-needed nutrition, the person doesn’t get the results they hope for.

GMO is also overtly and covertly promoted, for example, Oprah helped put out a commercial showing a family eating together a big meal, stated to be healthy and it was a GMO meal.

At this point, we need to know what foods are GMO and what foods aren’t, we can do this by finding foods which are labeled “Non-GMO,” asking local farmers, and buying Organic.

What Is Non-GMO?

Non-GMO is any food which is not genetically modified. You know what is in it, as the ingredients are what they say they are. Many foods are labeled or certified as Non-GMO.  These are important to learn so you can find foods without genetic modification – whether DNA has been taken out, DNA structure has been changed, or DNA of other plants or animals have been added to its DNA, creating a new and unknown food item, disguised under the same name as the actual food.

Just because something is Non-GM doesn’t mean that it isn’t sprayed with herbicides, pesticides, and insecticides which are all risks to health. For example, high levels of herbicides can lead to congenital disabilities, immune weakness, behavioral delays and other potential dangers such as the development of cancer. Which is why the next best option up from Non-GMO is Organic.

Organic vs. GMO

Organic Certified foods are those natural foods which have not been Genetically Modified (are Non-GMO) and which aren’t sprayed with chemicals, like herbicides, pesticides, and insecticides.

This is the best you can find unless you can get Organic, Local, Sustainable and as with animals, Humane.

Local would be foods grown nearby, generally from individual farmers rather than big corporations.

Sustainable means you are not destroying the land and the food while you are growing so it can be used continually to produce more, and the soil is healthy. It is based on studying the balance and relationship of the ecosystem and factoring that into farming practices.

Humane standards vary as do certifications; however, if you can find a farmer who takes care of the animals he raises without the widely spread physical abuse that large companies practice on their livestock, and you study the different standards and certifications, then you can recognize humane meats.

Organic foods provide optimal health benefits. They help to fight disease in humans, protect crops, preserve soil, reduce pollution and is the way our fruits, herbs, and vegetables have been grown throughout history.

When looking at produce, you can spot which are Organic and sometimes you can detect which ones are Genetically Modified. There are stickers with a code, and if a five digit code begins with the digit nine, then this signifies it is Organic.

It is currently not mandatory to label GMO, however, sometimes there is a five digit code that is labeled with an 8, and that indicates GM. Although, GMOs are also classified under other codes.

Learn More About Food in Addiction Recovery

Knowing what foods are Organic VS. GMO is the first step to eating a healthy diet which can support you in healing and be energizing during recovery.  Learn more about the power of food in addiction recovery today by calling our toll-free number.

The post The Power of Food: How to Harness it During Recovery appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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There are many reasons for seeking treatment for addiction. Here, we will discuss some of the reasons you may have finally accepted the fact that you indeed do need professional help to recover from your drug or alcohol dependence. One of your reasons for seeking treatment for addiction could be:

  1. The fear of losing your life has become too great to ignore.
  2. You’ve become the kind of person you wouldn’t normally want to be around.
  3. Nothing else has worked; rehabilitation is probably your only choice.
  4. The exhausting cycle of quitting alone only to relapse again.
  5. You miss the things that give life meanings.
  6. You miss the healthy life you see other people living.
  7. The economics of addiction has cost you dearly.
  8. Treatment might be your only hope for rebuilding relationships broken by addiction.
  9. You desire a greater spiritual connection.
  10. You’re too exhausted to continue running from the fear of consequences.

Some people called it “The breaking point.” In the world of addiction, it’s referred to as “reaching the bottom.” At this point, you or your loved one feel as if you’ve sunk about as low as you possibly can in life. The emotional, and sometimes physical, pain associated with reaching the bottom is so unbearable that it pushes many addicts to do what they’ve avoided all along…admit there’s a problem and reach out for help.The circumstances that cause you or a loved one to feel as if the bottom has been reached are likely to be very different from what causes another addict to feel the same way. Just like no two people suffer the exact same consequences of addiction, there are often different reasons for reaching the point of feeling completely beaten down by it.

Hitting bottom is a heart-wrenching, scary situation that’s likely to be remembered as one of the all-time low points in your life or the life of your loved ones. But, when you take advantage of this situation and use it to its full potential, reaching the bottom can become the turning point that saves your life.Many people who reach this low point in their lives and eventually come to realize that the only way to get back on their feet is through treatment. This is a moment most families, friends, and loved ones of addicts wait for. If you or a loved one have reached a point of feeling broken by addiction, reaching out for help can be the best move you make on your own behalf or the behalf of someone you care about.

Circumstances for Seeking Treatment for Addiction

These top ten circumstances which are leading people to seek treatment for addiction are just a handful among many. But if you see yourself or a loved one in one or more of these situations, reach out for help so you can return to a life of hope and happiness through sobriety. Let the discovery of yourself or someone you love in these circumstances be the nudge you need for seeking treatment for addiction.

At one point or another, many drug and alcohol addicts experience a close call. The knowledge that you’ve teetered on the edge and ultimately cheated death may provide a temporary sense of invincibility, but as the experience repeats itself, it eventually creates a profound fear of losing your life. Treatment at a professional rehab center has saved many lives and can save yours or your loved one’s life, as well.

Addiction Side Effects Continue to Worsen

Addiction leads to severe consequences in the user’s life, and death is certainly one of them. Although the side effects of addiction often go unnoticed early on, as substance abuse continues these side effects become more pronounced. You or your loved one may experience health symptoms that range from mild and irritating, such as sleeplessness, irritability and dry mouth. As the addiction continues, more serious health symptoms will develop, such as accelerated heartbeat, hallucinations, and an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, or organ failure.

But health problems aren’t the only things that cause death for substance abusers. People who are high on drugs or alcohol often place themselves in high-risk situations where they can easily sustain harm from another person.

Risky behavior and carelessness can cause you or someone you love to accidentally overdose or sustain fatal injuries at the hands of someone else who frequents the area or group of people where your drugs are obtained.

Hopes and Dreams Fall by the Wayside

We all have aspirations, hopes, and dreams we wish to fulfill in our lifetimes. When substance abuse and addiction become the focus of life, most of these dreams and hopes fall by the wayside. As this occurs, it’s only natural for someone’s outlook on life to change. The side effects of substance abuse lead to definite changes in personality, and these alterations can be compounded by the changes that occur due to the hopelessness and desperation of addiction.

When there’s little to nothing that’s positive in your life or your loved one’s life, it’s understandable that hopelessness can eventually turn into bitterness and negativity. Then, one day, a glance in the mirror or some other type of awakening puts you face to face with the realization that you or someone you love has become the person that would normally be avoided at all costs.

Losing Self-Respect

Becoming the type of person you can’t stand can be the catalyst for many addicts to seek treatment. As much as you wish it to be true, love, begging, bargaining, and threatening are not enough to instantly bring back the person that addiction stole from you, but professional treatment and rehabilitation can help you or a loved one find your way back to being the kind of person you know you can be.

Staying sober for more than a day, or even several hours is a struggle for many addicts. In an effort to become sober alone, you or someone you love may have begged and pleaded or made bargains and threats you’d never have otherwise considered or resorted to. Engaging in these types of behaviors often compounds the difficulties and side effects of substance abuse because there’s simply no way to reason with addiction. A threat or bargain is made, but the addict can’t or won’t do their part to maintain it. In the end, this is a setup for failure that leaves you and your loved ones feeling frustrated and defeated.

The vicious cycle that results from these tactics can make sobriety seem unattainable. Many addicts who’ve tried to quit on their own and failed believe that if they can’t do it alone, no one else can help them. But this couldn’t be further from the truth. The reason quitting alone, begging, bargaining, and threatening doesn’t work is that these tactics are all void of the support and care that’s a necessary part of recovering from addiction.

Are You Stronger Than Your Addiction?

No matter how much you love the person who’s suffering from addiction, they still need the supervision and care of a professional trained to deal with the different facets of addiction treatment. The care and treatment they provide throughout detoxification and recovery provide the components that are missing in those other ineffective tactics. All hope for recovery and a life of sobriety aren’t lost; they’re just not obtained through pleading, bargaining, and threatening.

There’s nothing worse than the feeling of failure, and addiction is riddled with one failure after another. It’s likely that you or your loved one have attempted to quit drugs or alcohol at one time or another. You may have even been acting under the assumption that doing so would be easy. But then an attempt is made to quit alone and the withdrawal symptoms that quickly develop show you or your loved one that addiction is stronger than the desire to quit.

Those who try to stop abusing drugs or alcohol without the benefits of professional help face a much higher risk of relapse than those who obtain it. This has nothing to do with weakness, personality defects, or character flaws. Addiction is a disease that alters the brain, causing the body to rely on the substance of choice in order to feel as if it can function normally. When you or a loved one attempts to quit cold turkey, the brain sends signals to the body, alerting it that something has gone wrong and a fix is needed to feel better again. These feelings can lead to repeated relapse and the belief that it will never again be possible to live a sober life.

Finding Meaning in Your Life Again

When you or a loved one are stuck in addiction, anything that isn’t directly related to using drugs or drinking alcohol begins to sound and feel like a chore. The activities you used to engage in with enthusiasm become boring and disinteresting.

The people who brought meaning to your life are now obstacles standing in the way between you and your next fix. The little things that once meant a lot have long since been forgotten.

Somewhere along the way, you or someone you love might catch a glimpse of another person’s life and see the things you’re missing out on. Addiction will tell you that you no longer need these things and people, you only need your substance of choice. But, as you draw nearer to hitting rock bottom, the realization that important things and people are no longer part of your life can create a sadness and emptiness that’s overwhelming.

Reaching this point gives you or someone you love the chance to work your way back to the kind of life you used to find meaningful. As you break free from addiction through the effective and compassionate program of a professional treatment center, you will slowly become reacquainted with the things that gave your life meaning. In fact, through treatment and sobriety, you will gain insight into greater meaning in life, as well as joy and fulfillment.  Seeking treatment for addiction is your first step.

Restoring Your Health with Addiction Treatment

Health is something we take for granted until it’s compromised. No matter what your substance of choice is, with prolonged use, you will experience side effects that compromise your physical and emotional health. It’s possible you or your loved one may not even realize the toll addiction has taken until other people are observed living a healthy life and enjoying a lifestyle that promotes good health.

Although the side effects are different for various substances, there are similarities in the risks addicts face. Drug and alcohol abuse increases the risk of developing potentially fatal diseases, such as heart disease, lung disease, stroke, organ failure, or contracting a contagious disease like HIV/AIDS or hepatitis C. Developing symptoms of poor health makes it hard to handle day-to-day tasks, and can even impact the ability to get the next fix.

Health can be restored and physical and mental illnesses caused by substance abuse can be treated once you or someone you love gets appropriate help. Upon entering a professional addiction treatment center, you or your loved one will undergo
health assessments that provide the healthcare staff with important information that allows them to treat the health issues caused by or exacerbating addiction. Working towards restoring the best possible physical and emotional health is an instrumental part of recovering from addiction and beginning a life of sobriety.

Money is No Excuse

Most anything can be used as an excuse to continue abusing drugs or alcohol, including the cost of treatment. “That rehab center is too expensive!” is merely a convenient response that allows you or someone you love to continue abusing drugs or alcohol. In reality, addiction is more costly than any form of professional treatment

that might be pursued.

Some addicts spend hundreds or thousands of dollars weekly to feed their addiction. Even those who abuse less expensive drugs can rack up large expenditures over the course of a year. When weighed against the expense of professional addictions treatment, the cost of continuing to abuse drugs or alcohol doesn’t stand a chance.

In addition to money that’s thrown away purchasing drugs or alcohol, there are other ways you or someone you love can feel the pressures of financial problems due to addiction.

One of the common social side effects of continued addiction is the loss of employment. Many addicts don’t show up for work, or they arrive high on drugs and unable to safely perform their jobs. Poor performance, lack of attendance, and aggressive, erratic behavior can lead to being fired. Under these circumstances, if the addict continues to use financial resources to buy drugs or alcohol, they put themselves and their families at risk of losing their car and home. The financial cost of addiction can be tremendous, and it often leads to another high price you or someone you love might pay for continuing to feed your addiction.

Addiction is a “Family Disease”

Even the strongest of relationships will eventually crumble under the tremendous weight of addiction. Initially, you or your loved one may not care if friends and family members begin to distance themselves from you. You might find it irritating, but substance abuse will prevent it from becoming an issue by convincing you that you don’t need those people anyway. The fact is, we all need loving, caring, positive people in our lives.

Addiction is referred to as a family disease because it affects more than just the addict. Partners, spouses, parents, and children also suffer the effects of substance abuse, exhibiting the strains and pressures in different ways. Countless families have been torn apart by addiction, leaving members feeling as if the damage is irreparable. In some cases, you or your loved one might even become emotionally or physically abusive toward those around you.

Although it’s impossible to see it through the eyes of addiction, from the outside, it’s easy to understand why the loved ones of addicts become fed up, exhausted, and too stressed out to stick around. The longer the addiction progresses, the more victims it pulls into its downward spiral. Often the only way to have any hope of repairing these broken relationships is through professional addiction treatment. During treatment, the counseling you participate in individually and with family members can help rebuild the trust that’s needed as a foundation for any long-lasting relationship.

Reconnecting with Your Spirituality

Some addicts report having a spiritual awakening when they reach a low point in their life. This experience may or may not pertain to a specific religion or belief, and that’s not important. Hitting rock bottom can lead you or a loved one to the point in which you desire a greater spiritual connection. As this desire manifests and grows, it can become the one single circumstance that causes you to seek treatment, even when nothing else worked.

The peace of mind and connection many people feel with the world around them is taken away by the power of addiction. Stress and anxiety over getting the next fix take the place of peace, making it impossible to relax and calm down. The disconnect you or your loved one may feel from those around you results in hopelessness and a sense of being alone in the world.

The desire to form a greater spiritual connection helps restore peace of mind and the feeling that you have a place in the world around you. Effective addiction treatment helps your mind reach a state where you can begin to focus on spiritual beliefs and participate in activities that encourage a spiritual journey.

Is Fear Your Constant Companion?

Fear is a constant companion to those who’ve succumbed to drug or alcohol addiction. There is the fear that the next drug or alcohol fix won’t be obtained. Finding yourself at serious risk of harm can make you fear for your life. As your family falls apart and your health begins to suffer, you face the fears of multiple consequences too great for any one person to bear. Eventually, substance abuse becomes a way to run from these fears, resulting in a vicious cycle that repeats over and over again.

If you or your loved one are exhausted from running from the consequences of addiction, treatment can provide the relief and rest that’s needed. Becoming free from drugs or alcohol and healing emotionally and physically can help you or someone you love regain the strength and confidence needed to face down these fears. Initially, the thought of entering a rehabilitation center can be scary, too. But you or your loved one will be met with the compassion, care, and understanding of professionals who understand what you’ve been dealing with and what you need to overcome.

At the bottom of addiction, it is often hard to remember life before drugs or alcohol, or even get a glimpse of who you or your loved one used to be. But, one moment in time or a series of events that leads you to make a painful realization can be enough to jar you or a loved one awake long enough to know that seeking help is the only hope. When the fear of giving up the substance of choice is overshadowed by the fear of what will happen with continued use, it’s time to listen to that small voice inside.

Gain Health, Happiness, and Hope Once Again Through Recovery

Where there are defeat and hopelessness from addiction, seeking treatment for addiction for yourself or a loved one can provide new hope. Where there are pain and sickness caused by the consequences of addiction, professional treatment can lead you to heal and health. It is possible to get back the life you lost and have the chance to build new dreams for the future. Reach out to someone for help on behalf of a loved one or for yourself. The life you or your loved one deserve to live is within reach with the support, personalized care, and the compassionate guidance of a professional rehabilitation team.

Don’t allow the moment to pass; if you’ve read this far, you’re seeking the health, happiness, and hope that can be attained through sobriety. You or your loved one can take the first step on the path toward sober living if you reach out today. Someone is waiting to help you or the one you love to find your way back after hitting bottom.

The post Top 10 Reasons for Seeking Treatment for Addiction appeared first on Best Drug Rehabilitation.

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