Loading...

Follow Bellingham Whatcom County Tourism on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

The Lynden Craft and Antique Show returns to the Northwest Washington Fairgrounds, Thursday, October 18th through Saturday October 20th, 2018.

Shoppers will enjoy perusing the familiar and fun new finds of over 100 artisans, crafters, antique, and vintage dealers. The vibrant colors of Fall and the warm scent of Sugar & Spice Donuts will greet our visitors.  An extravaganza of home and holiday decor, gourmet foods, vintage and re-purposed treasures will fill the Haggen Exposition Building.  Some of the new vendors are Dan Hamilton-Dakota Creek Forge, Wild Oak Boutique Clothing, Fresh Picked Baby Boutique, Brenda Calvert Art, and many more.   It will be a perfect opportunity to get a start on your holiday Shopping!

Enjoy the delectable savory and sweet offerings from Bellingham based AB Crepes. A Perfect Blend will have your favorite Fall espresso, Pumpkin Spice and Carmel Macchiato drinks to enjoy while exploring the shows old fashion market.

The show’s Facebook page will be in full operation during the show with interviews and glimpses of the fabulous booths filled with treasures and treats!

Fall Craft & Antique Show Family Night is Friday October 19th, 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.  Family Admission on Friday is $10.00 for Dad & Mom and children.  Free pumpkins for kids.  Cider and donuts and lots of giveaways!

Hours are Thursday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

General admission is $6. Seniors ages 60 and over are $5. Children 12 and under are free. Entrance fee includes return privileges to the show. Free parking.

For more information visit: www.lyndencraftantiqueshow.com or http://www.facebook.com/LyndenCraftandAntiqueShow

The post Lynden Craft and Antique Show Returns for 29th Year, Oct. 18 – 20, 2018 appeared first on Bellingham Whatcom County Tourism.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Rachel taps her e-bracelet on the digital reader, pours herself a 6oz sample of Atwood Ales En Blanche, and takes a seat in the taproom. Sure, she’s a Cicerone Certified Beer Server with years of experience in the industry. But at Downtime Taps, you don’t have to be. Anyone age 21+ can pour their own beer, cider, and wine from the tap at Ferndale’s self-serve taphouse.

Downtime Taps in Ferndale. Brandon Fralic photo.

Walking in, we’re greeted by Downtime Taps co-owners Chay Tan and Tomas Amminie. They show us the ropes and we’re pouring in no time. Like many first-time customers, we want to know: how’d such a unique business end up in Ferndale? Here’s the story behind Downtime Taps.

Filling a Need

The closure of Ferndale’s former watering hole, Maggie’s Pub, left local beer enthusiasts without a neighborhood gathering place in 2017. When Chay and Tomas recognized the need for a new taproom in town, they wanted to make the experience a unique one. Tomas had seen the self-serve concept in action on the east coast; he knew it would be a great addition to Whatcom County’s thriving beer scene. He joined forces with business partner (and Coconut Kenny’s owner) Chay, and together they opened Downtime Taps in July 2018.

Downtime Taps in Ferndale. Brandon Fralic photo.

Chay and Tomas worked collaboratively with the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Control Board to open the first self-serve establishment in Washington State. Their resulting high-tech taproom marries the benefits of a classic pub (good beer and good company) with an interactive, educational experience. And as an added bonus, customers rarely have to wait in line for their pour.

Downtime Taps aims to be an inclusive space for beginners and enthusiasts alike. Never had a craft brew before? This is the perfect place to try several styles and see what you like. Beer connoisseurs will have no trouble finding a few favorites as well, with the option of sampling cider and wine as an attractive alternative. It’s a fun, fresh approach to the taproom model that could very well catch on throughout the state. “We think this is the way craft beer was meant to be delivered,” Chay says.

How it Works

Ready to experience the pour for yourself? The first step is to check in with taproom staff, showing your ID and a credit card in exchange for an iPourIt e-bracelet. Staff are on hand to show you the ropes, but it’s pretty straightforward. After browsing the 32 available taps, select the shape and size of glass you prefer, give it a quick rinse, and go for the pour. Tap your e-bracelet on the reader to activate your beverage of choice, then pour as much or little as you wish. The digital screen tells you how many ounces you’ve poured, and the e-bracelet keeps track of your total amount dispensed. When you’ve had your fill, return the e-bracelet to pay and check out. That’s it!

Pour your own beer at Downtime Taps in Ferndale. Brandon Fralic photo.

Each e-bracelet is activated for up to 24oz. Once you hit that limit, the bracelet will stop working until you check in with a staff member to re-activate. This simple threshold is a safety measure that prevents overservice. Otherwise, you’re free to taste at will. New to craft beer? Try a few ounces of IPA, pilsner, or porter. Find one you like and fill up a glass, or sample to your heart’s content.

Downtime Taps in Ferndale. Brandon Fralic photo.

Each beer, cider, and wine on tap features a digital screen, offering information and per-ounce pricing. Ecliptic Mexican Lager, for example, is 4.8% alcohol by volume (ABV) with a rating of 20 on the international bittering units (IBU) scale. And there’s always something new to try. Downtime Taps never replaces empty kegs with the same beverage. Rather, they prefer to always have something new and fresh on tap. Customers can view the current offerings online, and even play a part in the selection process by voting for their favorite beer.

Nuts and Bolts

While there’s no kitchen at Downtime Taps, food is available from neighboring businesses like Coconut Kenny’s. Food trucks are often on hand, and you can bring in your own food if you wish. As Downtime Taps is strictly a bar, minors are not allowed. Dogs are welcome in the outdoor seating area.

Outdoor seating at Downtime Taps in Ferndale. Brandon Fralic photo.

In addition to consuming beer on premise, customers can get a crowler to-go. As for entertainment, Downtime Taps hosts regular events — from live music to yoga sessions and trivia. Keep an eye on their events calendar for upcoming entertainment. Cheers!

Downtime Taps

1730 Labounty Dr #11, Ferndale, WA

Hours:
  • Monday – Thursday, 4pm – 10pm
  • Friday – Saturday, 12pm – 11pm
  • Sunday 12pm – 10pm
Also, see our Beer page for more posts about Bellingham Craft Beer.

The post Downtime Taps: Experience the Pour in Ferndale appeared first on Bellingham Whatcom County Tourism.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It’s September and harvest season is upon us. Along with crunchy leaves underfoot and jugs of fresh-pressed apple cider, the corn is as high as an elephant’s eye and just perfect for getting lost in a corn maze.

In Whatcom County we have two corn mazes to explore, hosted by the Lynden FFA and Bellewood Acres.

FFA Corn Maze

The FFA corn maze is located directly south of Front Street in Lynden on Hannegan Road. You won’t miss this maze thanks to the big, green sign next to the road.

After you’ve parked, head to the trailer to pay the admission. Then get ready to get lost!

And get ready to get muddy!

This is a corn field. If it rains, it gets muddy. The ground is uneven (and probably isn’t the best for strollers). We definitely tracked some mud home on our shoes.

How long will it take to get through the maze? Who knows?

We went through twice – the first time we were done within half an hour and the second time took longer. (Maybe that’s because the kids lost us adults!)

In between runs through the maze, the kids took at break for sustenance – the FFA sells popcorn and soda. Once they were fueled up, they we’re off again!

Each year the maze is different. From the air you can see the pattern cut into the corn. This year is a lion. Past years have included an owl, a windmill, a tractor and a wooden shoe.

The FFA maze is a fundraiser for Lynden-area high school students who are members of the Future Farmers of America club. I talked with Maxine, one of the FFA moms, about the club and learned that the money raised from the corn maze helps send kids to state and national competitions.

I also learned that the FFA kids aren’t just raising pigs and cows for the fair, they learn about parliamentary procedure, marketing, land use, water rights and other issues that people connected to the ag industry need to know. How cool is that?

The FFA corn maze runs weekends through the end of September. Bring your flashlight Friday and Saturday nights to do the maze in the dark!


FFA Corn Maze
Weekends through Sept. 30
Fridays, 6-10 p.m.
Saturdays, 2-10 p.m.
Sundays, 2-6 p.m.
Adults – $6
Kids – $4
Preschoolers – Free
Just south of Lynden on Hannegan Road

Bellewood Acres Corn Maze

The folks at Bellewood Acres celebrate the harvest throughout September and October, with u-pick apples and pumpkins, the “corn cannon” and a corn maze.

 Photo courtesy Bellewood Acres

This “maze” throws in an educational scavenger-hunt twist, where instead of finding your way through the field, you’re searching the maze to find facts about water quality, sustainability and local farming. There are 8 dead ends in the maze. Each one gives you the answer to the following questions:

  • How many acres of farm land does Whatcom County have?
  • How many gallons of mile do we produce each month?
  • How many acres of strawberries does Whatcom County grow?
  • Do you like blueberries?
  • How does Whatcom County beef production rank in the state of Washington?
  • Who is the largest u-pick apple orchard in Whatcom County?

Can your family find answers to all the facts on the scavenger hunt? It’s challenging! The prize is a BelleWood Sugar cookie in the cafe once you’re done.

Photo courtesy Bellewood Acres

The corn maze is part of Bellewood’s Harvest Happens celebration, which also include u-pick apples, farm tours, fresh cider and caramel apples. On the weekends there are apple bin train rides, face painting and the corn cannon. Friday nights in September features Farm Tunes music from 6 to 9 p.m.

Bellewood Acres Corn Maze

Open in September & October

Daily, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

$4 per person

6140 Guide Meridian, Lynden

The post A-maizing Fun: Whatcom County Corn Mazes appeared first on Bellingham Whatcom County Tourism.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

One of 80 works in Endangered Species: Artists on the Front Line of Biodiversity at the Whatcom Museum in Bellingham, WA. Jason deCaires Taylor. British, b. 1974. Photograph of Vicissitudes, Grenada, West Indies, 2011. Courtesy of the artist.

More than five years in the making, the new art exhibition, Endangered Species: Artists on the Front Line of Biodiversity, at the Whatcom Museum in Bellingham, WA is a masterful collection of more than 80 works of art, from rare books, sculpture and exquisite paintings to photography and cutting edge video, that span the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries.

The captivating exhibition runs September 8, 2018 to January 6, 2019 at Whatcom Museum’s Lightcatcher Building. The museum also has 20 related programs planned for this exhibit including tours with collection’s Curator Dr. Barbara Matilsky. This exhibit integrates art history, the natural sciences, and environmental conservation, displaying work by contemporary artists alongside their counterparts from the nineteenth century. It’s focus is more timely than ever in the context of climate change, continuing habitat loss, pollution, national and global politics and economic globalization.

Nick Brandt, British, b. 1964. Line of Rangers Holding the Tusks of Elephants Killed at the Hands of Man, Amboseli, from Across the Ravaged Land, 2011. Archival pigment print, 44 x 78 in. Courtesy of the artist.

I had the pleasure and privilege of attending the Whatcom Museum Members preview the day before the exhibition opening where I was able to meet and talk with Dr. Matilsky as well as three of the featured artists.

Meaning, Emotion and Inspiration

A sequel exhibition to and inspired by Whatcom Museum’s Vanishing Ice: Alpine and Polar Landscapes in Art (2013–14), Endangered Species is a moving collection of pieces from around the world. As you might expect, the collection is…well…diverse. Matilsky has brought together works representing every continent, an array of species and habitats, and a variety of media. Rare books and paintings are displayed near modern art sculpture of a coral reef on the sea floor, National Geographic photography, modern Native American art and Andy Warhol. You would have to spend years traveling the world to see each of the pieces in this collection making this a once-in-a-lifetime collection that exposes its audience to works they would otherwise never see.

David Chancellor, British, b. 1961. Untitled Hunter #1, Trophy Room,
Dallas, Texas, 2011, from Hunters, 2013. Chromogenic print, 54 x 34 in. Courtesy of the artist.

The exhibition catalog describes it well, “The splendor and vulnerability of our planet is magnificently portrayed in the telling of touching and fascinating stories around several basic themes: the beauty and immensity of Earth’s biodiversity, natural extinctions, human-influenced extinctions, endangered species, trophy hunting, and of course, global warming.”

During Dr. Matilsky’s introduction she acknowledged that the works both celebrate the wonder and beauty of our planet’s biodiversity, while acknowledging that many are in peril or have been lost.

Martin Johnson Heade (1819-1904). Cattleya Orchid, Two Hummingbirds and a Beetle, ca. 1875-1890. Oil on canvas. 24 x 31 1/2 x 4 in. framed. Courtesy of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas, 2010.67. Photography by Amon Carter Museum of American Art.

The recombinant multichannel audio-video installation of Sockeye salmon, Salmon People, 2010-2015 by Julie Andreyev and Simon Lysander Overstall share the fishes point of view. Killer Whale (2009), a glass sculpture by American Tlingit Preston Singletary reminded me of orca mother, J35 or Tahlequah who made headlines around the world this summer after carrying the body of her dead calf for 17 days near Vancouver, Canada. Her endangerd pod has dwindled to just 75 individuals.

Other species and habitats have already been lost. The mixed media sculpture of the now extinct flightless dodo by Harri Kallio, Les Gris Gris #3, Mauritius (2001) seemed as cheerful and unassuming as it must have been when hunted to extinction and its habitat destroyed in 1662. Many of the works are poignant and dark when drawing attention to their current vulnerability. The segment devoted to pollution includes striking, factual photography that speaks for itself. Alberta Tar Sands #3 (2010) is an aerial photography by Canadian Garth Lenz of the oil extraction’s impact on the land. Contents of Laysan Albatross Stomach and Laysan Albatross Necropsy (moli Phoebastria immutabilis) (2004) highlights the pounds of plastic and garbage found inside the body of a single bird. The six-legged frog in DFB 39 Priapus (2013), from the series Malamp: The Occurrence of Deformities in Amphibians by Brandon Ballengée is other worldly.

Isabella Kirkland, American, b. 1954. Gone, from the Taxa series, 2004. Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel, 48 x 36 in. Private Collection.

Perhaps my favorite piece was Tlinget-Aleut Nicholas Galanin‘s Inert Wolf (2009). Part trophy rug and part struggling to survive, Dr. Matilsky notes that the wolf in this piece is a metaphor for the Native American struggle to survive.

Despite highlighting the sad realities over the last 300 years, Dr. Matilsky maintains that the exhibit is not about doom and gloom, but inspiration. “Our hope is that by creating awareness about the magnitude of these growing phenomena through an accessible gallery setting, visitors can experience thought-provoking artwork by artists and scientists and learn firsthand about our earth’s plight.”

Meeting the Artists

With more than 80 pieces in the collection, I can only scratch the surface of this exhibit. You’ll have to go see them all for yourself. But I had the deep pleasure of meeting three of the artists.

Illustrator David W. Miller had the distinct honor of being the preparator of the exhibit, the person who helps set up each piece, on a custom made display or wall hanging. His own work, Quetzalcoatlus (2002), an oil and acrylic was also on display. Miller told me that he worked for many years creating illustrations of this and other extinct dinosaurs in prehistoric landscapes for natural history museums. His work highlights humanities efforts to document and reconstruct the past from fossil records as well as the ever-evolving interpretation of it as we learn more over time. Miller’s works appear in the Smithsonian Institution, the American Museum of Natural History, and Yale University’s Peabody Museum.

David W. Miller, American, b. 1957. Quetzalcoatlus, 2002. Oil and acrylic on illustration board, 16 x 12 in.
Courtesy of the New York State Museum, Albany.

I very much enjoyed meeting American Madeline von Foerster, who hand delivered one of two pieces to the collection from her home in Cologne, Germany. Reliquary for Rabbs’ Frog (2018) commemorates the extinction of the Rabbs’ fringe limbed treefrog. Her painting is symbolic and was based on the last specimen that died at the Atlanta Botanical Garden on September 26, 2016. The frog sits in an elaborate container of metal and glass, its style incorporates elements of German architecture. The container is held carefully by a pair of gloved hands, she said to symbolize our laboratory-like separation from the animal. I couldn’t help but tear up seeing this piece. We often think of extinctions as something that happened somewhere else a long time ago. Not here. Not now. But here we are in 2018, still losing an estimated 200 to 2000 species to extinction each year.

Artist Madeline von Foerster with museum patrons. Madeline von Foerster, American, b. 1973. Reliquary for Rabbs’ Frog, 2018. Oil and egg tempera on panel. Courtesy of the artist.

Her second piece in the collection, Carnival Insectivora (Cabinet for Cornell and Haeckel) (2013) includes a variety of carnivorous plants, including the Venus flytrap that now survives in the wild only within a seventy-five-mile area in North Carolina. The plant is threatened due to habitat destruction and rampant poaching of wild species. It is currently listed as a species of concern, a status that offers no legal protection. Von Foerster pays homage to the artist-biologist Ernst Haeckel and his influential drawings of flora and fauna in his book Art Forms of Nature (1904) and references Joseph Cornell’s dream-like sculptural boxes. She noted that the hands in the piece have a layered meaning, both as protectors, but also as collectors.

Madeline von Foerster, American, b. 1973. Carnival Insectivora (Cabinet for Cornell and Haeckel), 2013.
Oil and egg tempera on panel, 20 x 16 in. Collection of John Brusger.

Both paintings, along with many of her other works, use a five century-old mixed technique of oil and egg tempera, developed by the Flemish Renaissance Masters. The subject of her works are entirely modern, exploring the human relationship to nature with such themes as deforestation, wildlife trafficking, and human-caused extinction.

I also had the pleasure of meeting Port Townsend, WA artist Michael J. Felber. At first I mistook his colored pencil of a polar bear, Arctic Father (2017) for a photograph because it was so detailed and realistic. Felber meticulously based his drawing on bears that he photographed while on a cruise in Svalbard and Greenland, this one representing bear Number 14 observed in June 2016. Unlike the way these bears have been portrayed in the past, as viscous wild animals, Felber’s bear is serene. Felber communicated with the Norwegian Polar Institute’s monitoring project to share and obtain more information about this bear and to support their efforts to monitor impacts of climate change on the populations. Felber and I discussed his detailed use of the black and gray color pallet as well as how you create depth in a ‘white’ landscape. Felber connected the bear directly to the ice upon which it is delicately perched.

About Curator Dr. Barbara Matilsky

Endangered Species isn’t Dr. Matilsky’s first foray into the subject area. She also curated Whatcom Museum’s Vanishing Ice: Alpine and Polar Landscapes in Art (2013–14). Prior to her nine years with Whatcom Museum, Dr. Matilsky was Curator of Exhibitions at Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and curator at the Queens Museum of Art, New York City, where she organized the traveling exhibition, Fragile Ecologies: Contemporary Artists’ Interpretations and Solutions (1992).

Dr. Barbara Matilsky with the painting on loan from the Smithsonian. George Catlin, American, 1796–1872 Buffalo Bull, Grazing on the Prairie, 1832–1833. Oil on canvas 24 x 29 in. Smithsonian American Art Museum. Gift of Mrs. Joseph Harrison Jr.

To produce this collection, Dr. Matilsky worked on and off for over five years, and most intensely over the past two to three. Curating an exhibit of this scale is complex. She spent a year on research, a year writing the catalog, a year to organize, as well as time spent throughout to raise the funds. A huge investment before you even know if the exhibit will actually happen.

Dr. Matilsky allowed me to photograph her in front of a very special piece in the exhibit. Buffalo Bull, Grazing on the Prairie (1832–1833), one of the oldest in this collection, is on loan from the Smithsonian. Dr. Matilsky explained that the loan was made possible by an affiliate relationship between Whatcom Museum and the Smithsonian and that these works very rarely travel. Similarly, she was able to obtain the Warhol paintings through a long-time connection with the Ronald Feldman Gallery who commissioned the works in 1983.

She not only has curated exceptional and diverse works of art in this exhibit, but she also infused her own creativity in the selection and juxtaposition of the pieces. Dr. Matilsky noted that each artist handles a similar subject in vastly differing ways based on technology, the time and culture in which they lived, and their own personal influences.

John James Audubon, American, 1785–1851. Passenger Pigeon, from Birds of America, vol. 5, plate 285; 1842. Hand-colored lithograph 10⅜ x 7 x 2⅛ in. Courtesy of Linda Hall Library of Science, Engineering, and Technology, Kansas City, Missouri.

The collection is bold and honest in its presentation. It does not shy away from the emotional darkness of habitat loss from deforestation, tar sands extraction or species extinction from overfishing, illegal ivory harvest and extirpation of bison and wolves. Although lighter subjects could have broader popularity, Dr. Matilsky stays positive and strives toward progress despite our dark past. She purposely made a point of noting the strides made in conservation since the 1970s, the increased education and awareness overall, and a hopefulness that the situation will improve. She also noted that despite the emotional subject matter, the quality of the pieces themselves alone would be a draw to audiences. The vibrant colors, intricate details, story and craftsmanship on their own are notable.

Charles R. Knight, American, 1874–1953. Woolly Mammoth and Hunter,
1909. Oil on canvas, 27½ x 39½ in. Courtesy of the American Museum of Natural History, New York.

I enjoyed this so much that I’ll be heading back with my teenagers. I noticed other children of all ages got something different out of the exhibit. As I wandered through the collection, I could hear the deep conversations among visitors, about the status of species and their habitats, global politics and economics and the artists themselves. I’ll look forward to those conversations with my teens.

Plan your visit now to catch this bold and thought-provoking collection of exquisite work before January 6, 2019.

Endangered Species also provides hope for the future. According to the catalog, “Artists themselves are not only creating works that draw attention to environmental problems, but they are also designing projects that help restore habitats. It is our fervent hope that visitors will be inspired and take notice of these positive changes so that they feel empowered, even if in small ways, to help make a difference.”

Whatcom Museum Lightcatcher
Wednesday – Sunday, noon – 5 p.m.
250 Flora Street, Bellingham, WA 98225
360.778.8930
www.whatcommuseum.org

For more about the arts in Bellingham, see our Museums and Galleries page.

The post International Artists Emphasize Endangered Species At Whatcom Museum in Bellingham appeared first on Bellingham Whatcom County Tourism.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

As its name implies, the Third Annual Bellingham SeaFeast will showcase Bellingham’s waterfront, maritime heritage, and its internationally-renowned fishing and seafood industry’s unsurpassed culinary bounty. But while you’re downing a local oyster or grilled wild salmon, don’t overlook the equally impressive visual and performing arts and musical entertainment they have planned for September 21 and 22, 2018.

Bellingham’s identity lives in the water, the people, and the rich history that ebbs and flows around Bellingham Bay. The waterfront was and has remained life-giving for both the Coast Salish Peoples and the generations of commercial fishermen, boat builders, and fish processors that descended from the European settlers. Bellingham SeaFeast’s free two-day festival each September celebrates this cultural heritage. Its an excellent way to appreciate the best of what the Pacific Northwest has to offer. Parents dropping students off at Western Washington University should plan to stop by. Taking place across several venues on the waterfront and in the Downtown Bellingham Arts District, the seafood, poetry, visual arts, music, competitions and games, and interactive tours will delight and satisfy visitors and locals of any age or interest.

How it Began

The Bellingham/Whatcom County region has three legacy industries at its roots: agriculture, forestry/wood, and commercial fishing/maritime trades. SeaFeast showcases the maritime sector and its booming economic impact locally, regionally, and internationally. Bellingham SeaFeast was founded as a nonprofit festival after an organizing group won a three-year $75,000 seed grant from the City of Bellingham Tourism Commission.  The funds came from the lodging tax from hotel and motel visitors. The City of Bellingham and the Port of Bellingham continue to collaborate on waterfront redevelopment to intentionally connect the City and its visitors with the bounty of the sea.

The Servants of the Salish Sea - YouTube

An Overview of the Fun

This action-packed weekend opens Friday, September 21, 2018 with Lummi Nation canoes arriving at Waypoint Park and a celebration in Maritime Heritage Park. The Friday Night SeaFeed, a Dungeness Crabfeed (plus salmon, oysters and scallops) on the waterfront (tickets required) can fill your belly. Then you can enjoy an evening at a variety of venues in the Downtown Bellingham Arts District, where you’ll learn about and celebrate our maritime culture through the arts. You can sing along with sea shanties, see videos, and hear original poems, choral performances, and storytelling of life at sea. Don’t miss the FisherPoets-on-Bellingham-Bay all Friday evening (details below) and then close out the night with some unforgettable music.

The seafood feeding fun continues all day Saturday, perfectly paired with local brews and Pacific Northwest music on the Squalicum Harbor waterfront and in Zuanich Point Park. There are also kid-friendly activities planned throughout the day. Below are just a few of the details of all that you can explore at your own pace.

Baby Cakes Music Video By Dyrland Productions - YouTube

Music

I’m looking forward to seeing my friends Baby Cakes and the ukulele and slide guitar of Orville Johnson. Friday night’s festivities will be closed by a performance by psychedelic fish rock band, Ray Troll and the Ratfish Wranglers, at the Sylvia Center for the Arts. Yes, that Ray Troll. The award-winning Alaskan artist known for his beautiful, sometimes humorous, nature drawings including ‘Spawn Til You Die.’ If you’re in town September 20, you can catch Troll’s book signing at Village Books in Historic Fairhaven. They’ll also play again as part of the full line up of music and other entertainment that will appear from 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the Zuanich Point Park Main Stage.

Ray Troll and the Ratfish Wranglers - Cannery Girl - YouTube

Bring chairs, a blanket or your dancing shoes and see a range of music styles and performances. Zuanich Point Park has a beautiful view of the marina, clean restrooms, a playground area for the kids and is ADA accessible.

FisherPoets-On-Bellingham-Bay

A celebration of the commercial fishing industry in poetry, prose and song, the FisherPoets Gathering first began in Astoria, Oregon in 1998. Bellingham SeaFeast borrows from their tradition and adds film all evening Friday! A $5 FisherPoets button gets you in to all Friday FisherPoets events. Some FisherPoets we’re expecting are young locals like Maria Dosal and Maggie Bursch, along with long-time FisherPoets performers Geno Leech, Lloyd Montgomery, and Pat Dixon, among many others! Performances include original pieces and you can find them in Downtown Bellingham at Boundary Bay Mountain Room, Honey Moon Mead and Cider and Sylvia Center for the Arts.

Even if poetry isn’t your thing, you can attend an artists reception with marine watercolorist Steve Mayo marine watercolor at Fourth Corner Frames. Pickford Film Center will present ocean-inspired films from 9 to 11 p.m. Friday.  The photography of commercial fisherman and National Geographic Photographer Corey Arnold will be projected on downtown buildings.

2016 FPG - 2016-02-26 - Pat Dixon - YouTube

Art

Allied Arts of Whatcom County is coordinating the art booth and family activities component of this event with an emphasis on depicting our thriving marine heritage and lively Salish Sea. They have invited artists, performers, presenters, and class instructors with a passion for Bellingham’s marine heritage. You can find the work of more than 30 artists in the art booth area near Squalicum Harbor. Artists will share their fine art paintings, metal and glass work, handmade soaps, ceramics, jewelry and more. I like to grab a few Pacific Northwest themed items to include in my holiday gift giving.

Family-Friendly Fun on Saturday

On Saturday from 10 a.m.  to 6 p.m. families can enjoy the Field of Fun, an array of hands-on, creative, maritime-themed activities for kids and a few for adults too. Friendly competitions will include the XTRATUF Stomp at 2:30 p.m. where two teams of four in fishermen’s boots race. Don’t miss the Herring Toss at 3:50 p.m., where you can test your skills for throwing and catching while slippery.

During the same time frame, families can enjoy Meet Your Fisherman activities at the Sawtooth Dock and Gate 5. From demonstrations and exhibits including knot-tying and net-mending demos, and Guess the Fish Species, everyone will stay entertained.

At 3:30 p.m. you can watch (or swim) in the 3rd Annual Survival Suit Race and to win the Golden Boot Award.

From 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. you can take boat tours of a variety of fishing vessels where everyone learns something new. If you thought a pie eating contest was fun, then don’t miss the 3rd Annual Oyster Shuck & Slurp at 2 p.m. How many oysters can you down in 2 minutes?

Plan nothing else during Bellingham SeaFeast weekend so you can immerse yourself in Bellingham’s maritime culture. Fresh seafood, cold brew, hot music, local art and hands-on history will fascinate the whole family.

Bellingham SeaFeast
September 21 & 22, 2018
Tickets
Getting Here
www.bellinghamseafeast.com

For more fun ideas see our events calendar, things to do pages, or the full list of Lorraine’s articles.

The post Bellingham SeaFeast Celebrates Food, Fishing, Art and Music appeared first on Bellingham Whatcom County Tourism.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

As its name implies, the Third Annual Bellingham SeaFeast will showcase Bellingham’s waterfront, maritime heritage, and its internationally-renowned fishing and seafood industry’s unsurpassed culinary bounty. But while you’re downing a local oyster or grilled wild salmon, don’t overlook the equally impressive visual and performing arts and musical entertainment they have planned for September 21 and 22, 2018.

Bellingham’s identity lives in the water, the people, and the rich history that ebbs and flows around Bellingham Bay. The waterfront was and has remained life-giving for both the Coast Salish Peoples and the generations of commercial fishermen, boat builders, and fish processors that descended from the European settlers. Bellingham SeaFeast’s free two-day festival each September celebrates this cultural heritage. Its an excellent way to appreciate the best of what the Pacific Northwest has to offer. Parents dropping students off at Western Washington University should plan to stop by. Taking place across several venues on the waterfront and in the Downtown Bellingham Arts District, the seafood, poetry, visual arts, music, competitions and games, and interactive tours will delight and satisfy visitors and locals of any age or interest.

How it Began

The Bellingham/Whatcom County region has three legacy industries at its roots: agriculture, forestry/wood, and commercial fishing/maritime trades. SeaFeast showcases the maritime sector and its booming economic impact locally, regionally, and internationally. Bellingham SeaFeast was founded as a nonprofit festival after an organizing group won a three-year $75,000 seed grant from the City of Bellingham Tourism Commission.  The funds came from the lodging tax from hotel and motel visitors. The City of Bellingham and the Port of Bellingham continue to collaborate on waterfront redevelopment to intentionally connect the City and its visitors with the bounty of the sea.

The Servants of the Salish Sea - YouTube

An Overview of the Fun

This action-packed weekend opens Friday, September 21, 2018 with Lummi Nation canoes arriving at Waypoint Park and a celebration in Maritime Heritage Park. The Friday Night SeaFeed, a Dungeness Crabfeed (plus salmon, oysters and scallops) on the waterfront (tickets required) can fill your belly. Then you can enjoy an evening at a variety of venues in the Downtown Bellingham Arts District, where you’ll learn about and celebrate our maritime culture through the arts. You can sing along with sea shanties, see videos, and hear original poems, choral performances, and storytelling of life at sea. Don’t miss the FisherPoets-on-Bellingham-Bay all Friday evening (details below) and then close out the night with some unforgettable music.

The seafood feeding fun continues all day Saturday, perfectly paired with local brews and Pacific Northwest music on the Squalicum Harbor waterfront and in Zuanich Point Park. There are also kid-friendly activities planned throughout the day. Below are just a few of the details of all that you can explore at your own pace.

Baby Cakes Music Video By Dyrland Productions - YouTube

Music

I’m looking forward to seeing my friends Baby Cakes and the ukulele and slide guitar of Orville Johnson. Friday night’s festivities will be closed by a performance by psychedelic fish rock band, Ray Troll and the Ratfish Wranglers, at the Sylvia Center for the Arts. Yes, that Ray Troll. The award-winning Alaskan artist known for his beautiful, sometimes humorous, nature drawings including ‘Spawn Til You Die.’ If you’re in town September 20, you can catch Troll’s book signing at Village Books in Historic Fairhaven. They’ll also play again as part of the full line up of music and other entertainment that will appear from 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the Zuanich Point Park Main Stage.

Ray Troll and the Ratfish Wranglers - Cannery Girl - YouTube

Bring chairs, a blanket or your dancing shoes and see a range of music styles and performances. Zuanich Point Park has a beautiful view of the marina, clean restrooms, a playground area for the kids and is ADA accessible.

FisherPoets-On-Bellingham-Bay

A celebration of the commercial fishing industry in poetry, prose and song, the FisherPoets Gathering first began in Astoria, Oregon in 1998. Bellingham SeaFeast borrows from their tradition and adds film all evening Friday! A $5 FisherPoets button gets you in to all Friday FisherPoets events. Some FisherPoets we’re expecting are young locals like Maria Dosal and Maggie Bursch, along with long-time FisherPoets performers Geno Leech, Lloyd Montgomery, and Pat Dixon, among many others! Performances include original pieces and you can find them in Downtown Bellingham at Boundary Bay Mountain Room, Honey Moon Mead and Cider and Sylvia Center for the Arts.

Even if poetry isn’t your thing, you can attend an artists reception with marine watercolorist Steve Mayo marine watercolor at Fourth Corner Frames. Pickford Film Center will present ocean-inspired films from 9 to 11 p.m. Friday.  The photography of commercial fisherman and National Geographic Photographer Corey Arnold will be projected on downtown buildings.

2016 FPG - 2016-02-26 - Pat Dixon - YouTube

Art

Allied Arts of Whatcom County is coordinating the art booth and family activities component of this event with an emphasis on depicting our thriving marine heritage and lively Salish Sea. They have invited artists, performers, presenters, and class instructors with a passion for Bellingham’s marine heritage. You can find the work of more than 30 artists in the art booth area near Squalicum Harbor. Artists will share their fine art paintings, metal and glass work, handmade soaps, ceramics, jewelry and more. I like to grab a few Pacific Northwest themed items to include in my holiday gift giving.

Family-Friendly Fun on Saturday

On Saturday from 10 a.m.  to 6 p.m. families can enjoy the Field of Fun, an array of hands-on, creative, maritime-themed activities for kids and a few for adults too. Friendly competitions will include the XTRATUF Stomp at 2:30 p.m. where two teams of four in fishermen’s boots race. Don’t miss the Herring Toss at 3:50 p.m., where you can test your skills for throwing and catching while slippery.

During the same time frame, families can enjoy Meet Your Fisherman activities at the Sawtooth Dock and Gate 5. From demonstrations and exhibits including knot-tying and net-mending demos, and Guess the Fish Species, everyone will stay entertained.

At 3:30 p.m. you can watch (or swim) in the 3rd Annual Survival Suit Race and to win the Golden Boot Award.

From 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. you can take boat tours of a variety of fishing vessels where everyone learns something new. If you thought a pie eating contest was fun, then don’t miss the 3rd Annual Oyster Shuck & Slurp at 2 p.m. How many oysters can you down in 2 minutes?

Plan nothing else during Bellingham SeaFeast weekend so you can immerse yourself in Bellingham’s maritime culture. Fresh seafood, cold brew, hot music, local art and hands-on history will fascinate the whole family.

Bellingham SeaFeast
September 21 & 22, 2018
Tickets
Getting Here
www.bellinghamseafeast.com

For more fun ideas see our events calendar, things to do pages, or the full list of Lorraine’s articles.

The post Art and Music at Bellingham SeaFeast appeared first on Bellingham Whatcom County Tourism.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

If you’re looking for BIG Action on mountain bikes – head up to two of the new challenging trails on Galbraith Mountain – just on the outskirts of Bellingham. Mohawk and Spacewolf offer experienced riders two difficult and very different experiences: Flow and Steep respectively.

Both are listed as Black Diamond runs on Trailforks– a platform that provides riders with an overview of trails, photos, videos, reports, comments, a 3D Tour, Leaderboard, Ridelogs and Stats. This awesome crowd-sourced database is a resource hosted by our friends at Pinkbike.com.

I had to get out and see what all the hullaballoo buzzing around town about these trails was all about. So, I got a couple friends together- Chris Mellick, old school mountain biker, trailbuilder and all around great guy and Matthew Kowitz, my summer intern at Recreation Northwest and local shredder- to see for ourselves. Matthew also was kind enough to share his written perspective with us all. His trail descriptions are quoted in italics below.

We serendipitously also had local adventure photographer Brandon Sawaya, Brandon Sawaya.com, join us to help tell the story for your wondering eyes.

MOHAWK

Mohawk could be nicknamed MO Huck- the trail is a wide flowy, jumping bonanza. “Mohawk is a fresh WMBC build in July of 2018 featuring numerous gap jumps, hip jumps and other goodness. Props to Spencer Baldwin & Andy Grant for this trail design and build & Bill Hawk for the the vision” – Trailforks. Here’s the trail profile:

Chris and I were happy to watch Matt rip down the trail and huck himself into the air. Here he is, showing us how it’s done, with Brandon crouched in the shadows, camera poised, getting the shot.

Brando is the pro with the camera. Here’s the outcome of two people that know what they’re doing.

If you’re not in the know with the lingo:

What’s a Flow Trail? “Flow Trails take mountain bikers on a terrain-induced roller coaster experience, with little pedaling and braking necessary. This style of trail typically contains features like banked turns, rolling terrain, various types of jumps, and consistent and predictable surfaces. Conspicuously absent are abrupt corners or unforeseen obstacles.” According to IMBA – International Mountain Biking Association.

Matthew on MOHAWK
“Mohawk, the big bad wolf of Galbraith jump trails, opened earlier this summer. Starting from the lookout near Evolution that furnishes Bellingham Bay and Mt. Baker views, Mohawk starts small. A few rollers and low speed jumps prepare the rider for the chaos that is to ensue. Due in part to master craftsmanship, Mohawk isn’t particularly technical, though bike-handling skills are an absolute must to safely survey the trail. Fast corners and deep berms lead into lofty takeoffs, and steep landings.

After the entrance, most of the hits on Mohawk are in no way small, and push the rider to advance their limits and jumping techniques. The straight sections of trail contain lengthy tabletops, and several of the corners challenge the rider with hip-jumps, forcing a somewhat sideways landing. The trail’s steepest right-hand corner leads into a step-up with a generously sized optional takeoff on the right. Mohawk’s final features are perhaps its most challenging, where the trail widens and splits into several choices ranging from relatively easy, to fully commanding.”

“It’s not all about the jumps, though. The routing of the trail from top to bottom is truly genius, utilizing Galbraith’s natural contours to its advantage, while creating a refreshing gateway from the top of Tower Road to Road 4000’s western section which is home to Mullet and Happy Hour.

I fell in love with Mohawk immediately for several reasons. It provides another rewarding South Side jumpline, as a more committed alternative to Unemployment Line or Evolution, Mohawk pushes even the best riders to practice their form. The builders of Mohawk incorporated all of mountain biking’s newest favorite features: a trusty sharkfin gap, offset mounds for ultimate sideways brap (read: skid) sessions (see Brandon Semeuk’s Raw 100 v3 for optimal technique), and a set of in-n-out berms you have to ride to understand. Apart from the day we shot the pictures to go along with this piece, I don’t think I’ve gone for a Mohawk lap without taking a second trip down, I love this trail.” Matthew Kowitz

SPACEWOLF

Spacewolf  is named after the trailbuilder’s dog. John “JC” Canfield is also a local outdoor recreation manufacturer with his brand High Above. Check out the Freehub Magazine review of his High Above Cascadia Hip Pack.

Below is the trail profile “a steep and sometimes loose trail filled with a nearly blind rock drop and a large rock roll that has consequences to the right side in the form of a 8-10′ vertical drop.” Trailforks

Follow the map to get to the top. You’ll be rewarded with sweeping eastern views looking at Mount Baker and the Twin Sisters. You’ll see a “Safety Break” bench to prepare for your descent. You’ll also notice the custom sign, confirming you’re headed in the right direction…DOWN!

This is one of my favorite kind of trails to ride! Steep and technical. Point and shoot!  There’s no other choice. One main feature of Spacewolf is the big rock ride that drops off to the right with a 20′ drop. So, don’t go that way!

Matthew helped sussing out the best line for Chris and I before we dropped in.

While we were getting ready to risk it all, Brandon was waiting below to capture the moment. Yes, we were out having fun, BTW!

With our wits about us and Brando in place, we went for it.

Matthew followed, showing us how to round out at the end and carry his speed into the corner.

Next up, or should I say DOWN, was Chris leading the charge through the steep trees.

As we moved down the hill Brandon’s perspective gives a better sense of the pitch of the trail.

I even got to get in on the action. Hang on and point it!

Matthew knows what’s up and came with the appropriate eye ware.

As we made our way DOWN the trail, we found a sunny spot that made for some great shots. This was my perspective of a work in progress:

It’s all a matter of perspective. This is Brandon’s take on it:

Spacewolf takes dedication. You have to be on it! This is not for beginners. If you qualify, go up and check it out for yourself.

Matthew on SPACEWOLF
“Opened during Summer of 2017, Spacewolf is one of Galbraith’s most unique trails, and also one of the least traveled on the mountain. Starting from a picturesque viewpoint on Galbraith Mountain’s southeast side, the trail immediately dives down one of the finger-like ridges that riddle Galbraith’s eastern zone. When introducing friends to the trail, my most common beta is simple: “Don’t fall to the right.” Advice like this may seem trivial, however, a majority of the upper trail follows the ridgeline so closely that the rider is often peeking past their handlebars at a drop upwards of 25 feet.

The trail itself is narrow, very narrow, and steep to boot. As the rider negotiates the upper trail’s precarious turns and rutted, choppy root sections, they are soon met with a host of technical features.

Spacewolf’s flagship feature, in my opinion, is one of the most satisfying on the mountain. The rider approaches a large rock face, with a cramped spine-like entrance move, which grants passage to a long rock-ride, followed by a hard right-hand turn off the boulder.

After the rock, the trail acts as a dividing line between old, gorgeous trees the south, and a more recently planted harvest to the north. In this section, the rider goes essentially in a straight line, cruising down a choppy steep section in which the soil tends to be pretty loose, skidding their way past roots and stumps. Better hope your brakes are on their A-game here.

The end section of the trail is recognizable by a split-cedar bridge, tight technical turns, and finally, a short-but-punchy climb back to the road. A relatively short pedal up Road 4000, and the rider finds themselves near the top of Keystone, and the bottom of Wonderland.” Matthew Kowitz  @m.kowitz

For more insights on Bellingham outdoor adventures see the full list of Todd’s articles, or our biking page.

Special thanks to Matthew for sharing his new school perspective on the trails. And to Brandon, for the incredible  photography. You can follow Brandon Sawaya @brandonsawaya  and see more of his work at PacificVim

The post Galbraith Mountain New Expert Mountain Bike Trails Open – Mohawk and Spacewolf appeared first on Bellingham Whatcom County Tourism.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Bellingham Beer / Credit: Heather Hulbert

So much beer, so little time. With 15 brewery locations now operating in Bellingham and Whatcom County, it can be tricky to keep track of them all. And there are many variables to consider when choosing your watering hole. Which ones offer food? Can you bring the kids? Fido? Do they offer happy hour? Who’s new, and who has been around awhile? What is each brewery known for?

To address these burning questions, we’ve compiled this list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ). Below the FAQ, you’ll find a directory of breweries in Whatcom County, with quick facts for reference. Cheers!

Bellingham Beer Garden at Twin Sisters Brewing. Brandon Fralic photo.

FAQ How many breweries are there in Bellingham and Whatcom County?

This question comes up a lot. The answer, of course, is a moving target — it seems we have a new brewery pop up every few months or so. As of August 2018, there are 13 breweries in Bellingham city limits and 15 breweries in Whatcom County

How many breweries per capita are there in Bellingham and Whatcom County?

According to US Census Bureau population estimates for 2017, Bellingham has a population of approximately 89,000. With 13 breweries inside city limits, that gives us one brewery for every 6,846 people in Bellingham.

Whatcom County has an estimated 2017 population of approximately 221,400. With 15 breweries countywide, that’s one brewery for every 14,760 residents in Whatcom County.

Beer in Bellingham at Aslan Brewery / Photo by Katheryn Moran / Credit: Bellingham Whatcom County Tourism

Which Bellingham breweries allow kids?

Most of our breweries are all ages, with a few exceptions. K2 (Kentucky Street), Structures Brewing, and Gruff Brewing are 21+ establishments. For more info, see our post on family-friendly Breweries in Bellingham.

Are dogs allowed?

Bellingham breweries are generally dog-friendly. Many — like Boundary Bay, Gruff, and Kulshan — offer outdoor seating with ample room for well-behaved pets. Check with the individual breweries for their pet policies, and see our post on 9 dog-friendly Breweries and Bars in Bellingham.

Dogs love Gruff / Credit: Gruff Brewing

Which breweries offer happy hour?

Aslan, Boundary Bay, Chuckanut, Melvin, and Stones Throw offer happy hour. See the Brewery List below for details.

Where are the breweries located? Can you walk between them?

Most of Bellingham’s breweries are located within a couple miles of each other in the downtown core. Some are very close together (Boundary Bay and Gruff are right across the street from each other). Others — like Kulshan, K2, Menace, and Stone’s Throw — are a bit far to walk from downtown, but easily accessible by bike, bus, or car.

The best way to plot your route between breweries is to pick up a Tap Trail map and passport. This handy guide — available at each brewery around town — features suggested routes between Bellingham’s breweries and taprooms. You can even earn prizes by collecting stamps at each Tap Trail location.

Bellingham Tap Trail Map and Passport / Credit: Tap Trail

When is Bellingham Beer Week?

Bellingham Beer Week takes place each year in April. It will be held April 19-27, 2019.

Bellingham Brewery List Aslan Brewing
  • Established: 2014
  • What’s Unique: All beer brewed at Aslan Brewing Company is USDA Certified Organic. Aslan opened their adults-only second location, Aslan Depot, in 2018.
  • Food: Full menu
  • Family Friendly
  • Happy Hour: Daily from 2-5pm & 9 pm – 10pm  
  • Outdoor Seating: Open and enclosed patio spaces
Atwood Ales (Blaine)
  • Established: 2016
  • What’s Unique: Belgian-inspired farmhouse ales utilizing local and seasonal ingredients from the family farm.
  • Note: Atwood Ales does not operate a tasting room. Find Atwood beer in bottles and on tap around Whatcom County using their Beer Finder.
Boundary Bay Brewery
  • Established: 1995
  • What’s Unique: Bellingham’s oldest brewery, Boundary Bay is a long-established community gathering place offering a wide variety of brews.
  • Food: Full Menu
  • Family Friendly
  • Happy Hour: Sunday-Thursday from 3-6pm & 9 pm – Close (in the taproom)
  • Outdoor Seating: Large beer garden and deck
Chuckanut Brewery
  • Established: 2008
  • What’s Unique: Chuckanut was awarded National Small Brewpub of the Year in 2009 and continues to brew award-winning European-style lagers and ales.  
  • Food: Full Menu
  • Family Friendly
  • Happy Hour: Sunday-Thursday from 4-6pm
  • Outdoor Seating: Covered patio and beer garden
Gruff Brewing
  • Established: 2016
  • What’s Unique: A nano-brewery with 16 taps, Gruff regularly releases experimental, small-batch beers.
  • Food: Delivery available from Horseshoe Cafe and rotating food trucks.
  • 21+ Only
  • Outdoor Seating: Large beer garden
Illuminati Brewing
  • Established: 2017
  • What’s Unique: Illuminati is Whatcom County’s first joint brewery-winery.
  • Food: Light fare available
  • Family Friendly
Kulshan Brewing (James Street) Kulshan Brewing (K2)
  • Established: 2015
  • What’s Unique: One of the fastest-growing breweries in Bellingham, Kulshan opened their second location — a 30-barrel brewhouse known as K2 — in 2015.
  • Food: Rotating food trucks
  • 21+ Only
  • Outdoor Seating: Patio
Melvin Brewpub
  • Established: 2017
  • What’s Unique: The first Melvin Brewpub brings their award-winning brews to Bellingham by way of Wyoming.
  • Food: Full Menu
  • Family Friendly
  • Happy Hour: 4–6pm Monday-Friday and during all Seahawks games; 9–11pm every night (bar area only)
  • Outdoor Seating: Covered Patio
Menace Brewing North Fork Brewery (Deming)
  • Established: 1997
  • What’s Unique: What’s not unique about the North Fork? A “beer shrine”, wedding chapel, and pizzeria, this brewery is a mandatory stop for anyone driving Mount Baker Highway.
  • Food: Full Menu
  • Family Friendly
  • Outdoor Seating: Small patio/beer garden
Stones Throw Brewery
  • Established: 2016
  • What’s Unique: Stones Throw’s outdoor fire pit seating area is hands down the most attractive in Bellingham, and the brewery is made out of shipping containers.
  • Food: Snacks available; Food trucks on weekends
  • Family Friendly
  • Happy Hour: Mondays from 12-6pm
  • Outdoor Seating: Three unique outdoor seating areas
Structures Brewing
  • Established: 2015
  • What’s Unique: Offering mixed fermentations, Structures focuses on fresh, small-batch brews including saisons, NE IPAs and barrel-aged varieties.
  • Food: Bring your own; Rotating food trucks
  • 21+ Only
  • Outdoor Seating: Small patio
Twin Sisters Brewing and Bellingham Beer Garden
  • Established: 2018
  • What’s Unique: Twin Sisters features a full-service restaurant and bar with an expansive beer garden.
  • Food: Full Menu
  • Family Friendly
  • Outdoor Seating: Bellingham’s largest brewery beer garden
Wander Brewing
  • Established: 2014
  • What’s Unique: Community-minded Wander Brewing serves traditional styles while experimenting with mixed fermentations through the Wander Barrel Project. 
  • Food: Rotating food trucks
  • Family Friendly
  • Outdoor Seating: Patio

Any additional Bellingham brewery questions we should address? Let us know in the comments!

Also, see our Beer page for more posts about Bellingham Craft Beer.

The post Rounding Up Bellingham’s Craft Brewery Scene appeared first on Bellingham Whatcom County Tourism.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Choirs have always impressed me. Many different voices working together in a moving performance can bring me to tears. Whether they’re ancient, gospel or secular, I admire and appreciate the talent and cooperation it takes to sing well and honor the musical legacy. Belllingham and Whatcom County offer performances by many different groups throughout the year. Many local chorale groups have been around for decades, bringing to life the varied music from every century to celebrate the human voice.

Choral, choralechoir, and chorus are in some respects used interchangeably when a body of singers perform together. Much of the music performed today has its roots in an array of European church music. You don’t have to practice or follow a religion to appreciate its musical heritage. I also love that I learn about the history of a piece when I see it performed.

Below are many groups that perform in Bellingham and Whatcom County throughout the year. Although too numerous to include them all, here are a few I’ve appreciated over the years and am excited to see again. I recommend you check their individual websites for the most updated performance schedules, programs and locations when making your plans.

Whatcom Chorale

Whatcom Chorale Hallelujah Dec 2012 - YouTube

Since 1972, Whatcom Chorale has grown to a 100-member community-based choir based that draws singers from Whatcom, Skagit and King counties.  They present both accompanied and a cappella choral music which includes sacred, classical and contemporary styles in a variety of languages. A few of my friends have been singing in this chorus for more than a decade. Each season has a theme or motivation behind the music presented. They usually present two or three performances per season. Their 2017/18 season was inspired by the art of alto Susan Bennerstrom. They take great pride in carrying forward this tradition of creative musical human experience that has existed for centuries.

Kulshan Chorus

Truth Martin Luther King Celebration at Mt. Baker Theater 2018 - YouTube

Celebrating their 30th year together as an ensemble, Kulshan Chorus sings to make a difference in the community and its visitors. Comprised of singers from beginners to professionals the chorus was initially led by founding director, Roger Griffith and accompanied by Karen Fitzgerald. Roger retired in 2013 and its now guided by Artistic Director Dustin Willetts.

Kulshan Chorus toured in Croatia in 2017.

To celebrate this special year they’ve scheduled two performances. The themes will revolve around togetherness and the beauty and power that ensues when togetherness is achieved. Following their January 12, 2019 and May 2019 performances, the group will head off on a singing tour through Norway in June 2019. Last year they toured through Croatia.

Bellingham Chamber Chorale
Founded in 2003 by Western Washington University Professor Timothy Fitzpatrick, the Bellingham Chamber Chorale continues to strive to fulfill its mission: touching lives through memorable, life-changing experiences by presenting diverse, challenging and eclectic choral concerts to entertain and inspire our audiences and members and bring world-class musical experiences to our Pacific Northwest community.

They present diverse, challenging and eclectic choral concerts to entertain and inspire audiences and members and provide performance and mentorship opportunities for young musicians and strive to be part of a firm foundation for local performing and developing artists.

They welcomed a new Artistic Director for their 2018/19 Season, Frederick Bayani Mabalot. A composer and choral conductor from Southern California, Mabalot is a classically trained pianist and vocalist. He studied at The Sydney Conservatorium of Music in Australia and The Royal Danish Academy of Music in Copenhagen. He is currently pursuing a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Choral Conducting at University of Washington School of Music in Seattle.

Their 2018/19 Season will open in November with Radiance. It includes luminous music by William Byrd in his simple yet sublime Mass for Four Voices, which was the first of his three great unaccompanied polyphonic settings from the 1590s. Also Morten Lauridsen’s Lux Aeterna (1997) will be accompanied by a chamber orchestra. It integrates musical elements of ancient modes, Renaissance polyphony, Romanticism, and modern dissonance. Rutter’s Candlelight Carol, Sheppard’s In pace in idipsum: In pace, Taverner’s Song for Athene, Victoria’s O Magnum Mysterium, Rheinberger’s Abendlied, and a setting of the spiritual In Bright Mansions will round out the program.

Their March 2019 Soul Migrations will include Miserere by Gregorio Allegri, Agnus Dei by Krysztof Pendrecki, and a work by Mabalot. In May 2019, they’ll share Euphoria! which will include a performance of Mozart’s Coronation Mass in C with orchestra and soloists
Lynden Choral Society

The Lynden Choral Society is made up of community members who sing for the love of singing. It has been in existence, under various names, since at least 1918. They usually host two performances each year and often perform The Messiah at Christmas time. In winter 2018, Katie Van Kooten, the international opera soprano, will be singing with them again this year, as well as Charles Robert Stephens, a baritone based in Seattle. They’ll be accompanied by the Starry Night Chamber Orchestra.

For thirty years, from 1972 to 2002, the group was either directed or accompanied by the late Claire vg Thomas, the namesake for Lynden’s community theater.

Bellingham Community Chorus
Now in its 28th season, this group claims to be the longest running non-auditioned choral group (aside from church choirs) in Whatcom County. Their new director, Rob Viens, inherited a 40-voice chorus. Their accompanist Lisa Nakahara is in her third year with the chorus.

They host two concerts each year. One is near the December holidays and another in late April. Their spring concert can include just about any type of music. They have sung Americana, folk, gospel, Steven Foster, Aaron Copland, as well as selections from musical theater.

Vox Pacifica
An Advanced Soprano and Alto Choir

A brand new advanced chorus, Vox Pacifica, is forming. This choir will present advanced music that is more challenging for its collection of 20 to 30 advanced singers.

The group will be led by Artisitc Director Wendy Bloom who relocated to Bellingham from Ann Arbor, MI. The choir will perform contemporary music written in the last 10 to 20 years specifically for sopranos and altos, many of which will speak to women’s issues and what its like living as a woman in this country. The themes will include beautiful messages about the world we live in. Concerts will be at the Firehouse Performing Arts Center and other locations including a winter holiday program honoring Mary/Marian in December with additional concerts in February and May. This choir is open to all genders, although those that sing soprano and alto are often women.

Vox Pacifica Artistic Director Wendy Bloom.

Wendy has performed in choirs, operas, as a soloist with symphonies, and in musical theater and cabaret. In recent years she has performed as alto soloist and her quartet, SATB, performed and toured extensively together for 15 years. During that time, she was also the artistic director for a popular cabaret in Ann Arbor, Michigan called Wine, Women and Song, which she will be recreating here as part of the inaugural Vox Pacifica season. She has been a regular singer with Conspirare in Austin, Texas as well as with the Santa Fe Desert Chorale, Audivi Vocem in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and Sounding Light in Birmingham, Michigan. She appeared in a PBS special with Conspirare in the spring of 2009.

Wendy Bloom Home of the Brave - YouTube

No matter what genre of chorale music you love, Bellingham and Whatcom County offer a range of options throughout the year. Be sure to include a performance in your next visit or outing and celebrate this deep community of voices that are eager to educate, inspire and share a musical legacy.

The post Chorale Music in Whatcom County appeared first on Bellingham Whatcom County Tourism.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

When I imagine the quintessential summer camping trip what I’m imagining is Silver Lake Park.

Silver Lake Park is owned by Whatcom County and sits near the base of Mount Baker. Just 40 minutes from Bellingham, the park’s namesake lake is nestled in between the foothills and is picture-perfect pretty.

Being so close to town, Silver Lake Park makes a great day-trip destination, but there’s enough to see and do that you may want to consider camping for a night or two.

Camping

The park has three individual campgrounds, one for tent camping (Cedar), one for RVs and tents (Maple Creek) and a third (Red Mountain) with RV pads plus two horse stables. The Red Mountain area of the park connects to horse trails, making it a popular getaway when families want to include their equestrian friends. A group campsite is also available.

The park also offers six lakefront cabins for rent. The cabins sleep four to six, and have a variety of amenities, including and stove and refrigerator – and a deck overlooking the lake. These charming 1940’s-era cabins are a popular draw, so it’s best to reserve your stay well in advance.

We camped in the Cedar campground, tucked in among the Douglas firs. Each campsite has a metal fire ring for campfires and a flat pad for pitching your tent, which is a welcome amenity if you’re used to carving out a spot for your tent between roots and rocks. It certainly made tent set up easier!

Lake time

Once we had the tents up, it was time to hit the lake. It’s an easy walk or a quick drive (if you’re schlepping your picnic gear) to the swimming area near the park’s Day Lodge. With plenty of picnic tables and barbecue grills, plus close proximity to the playground for the littles, you can definitely hang out here for the whole afternoon.

Along with swimming you can fish – the lake is stocked with trout – or boat on the lake. (There is a 10-horsepower limit, so no power boating.) The Day Lodge offers rentals of paddle boats, row boats, canoes and paddle boards.

The lodge also offers snacks, ice and firewood – and coffee. If you need something outside the lodge’s 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. hours, Maple Falls is only a 10-minute drive away.

And if the day turns cold and cloudy, the lodge is a great place to hang out and play board games by the fireplace.

Wild things

Wildlife is abundant in the park, in ways I didn’t expect. On an early morning walk, I was surprised by a wood duck popping up out of the water from nowhere. (These ducks are known to submerge themselves for long periods.) On the same walk I thought I heard a frog, but didn’t trust my ears, then later my daughter spotted a small frog by the water’s edge.

And then, there was this guy.

A banana slug!

I’ve lived in Washington nearly my entire life, and used to see these slugs as a kid on a fairly regular basis. That hasn’t been the case in recent years, so it was a treat to see this fine specimen.

Our trip to Silver Lake was far too short to see and do everything. We’re already talking about a return trip.

Ready to plan your own trip to Silver Lake Park? Get the details from Whactom County Parks and Recreation.

A note on swimmer’s itch: The lake has been known to harbor the parasite that causes swimmer’s itch, but Whatcom County has been taking measures to keep the lake healthy, and it’s working. Still, it’s not a bad idea to shower off after a day at the lake. The park offers coin-op showers, so don’t forget your quarters!

The post Family Camping at Silver Lake Park appeared first on Bellingham Whatcom County Tourism.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview