Loading...

Follow Beer & Brewer on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

TAFE SA’s in-demand brewing course – Certificate III Program in Food Processing (Brewing) – is now offering a traineeship program enabling people to combine paid employment in the industry with structured accredited training.

Lecturer and respected brewer Stephen Nelsen said while new breweries were still opening, others were consolidating and looking to employ more staff.

“There’s a real demand for technical skills and formal qualifications in the industry,” he said.

The Certificate III Program in Food Processing (Brewing) is an intensive course held twice a year at TAFE SA’s state-of-the-art brewery facilities at Regency Park.

As part of the course, students learn the process of commercial beer production from start to finish.

In total, students cover 17 units of competency including food safety and quality, wort production, fermentation, beer maturation and filtration, labelling, packaging and cleaning.

The beer is produced under the Campus Brewery label and is sold on campus at Results Deli and Café, as well as through specialist craft beer retailers around Adelaide.

The traineeship will offer three blocks of study – core skills, beer skills and pack skills – spaced out over several months, so employees can juggle their work and study commitments.

“There is a financial benefit for employers and it’s a way to reward and retain good staff and share skills,” Stephen said.

“It’s a young industry so we can learn from each other and that’s ultimately to the betterment of beer.”

TAFE SA’s impressive on-site brewery and industry-recognised educators attract students from across the country.

Jonny Bucknall, of Sydney, travelled to SA for the brewing course after initially doing a one-week Craft Beer Boot Camp.

“It was an expense to come to South Australia to do this course but the knowledge and experience I have gained is invaluable and will no doubt help me in pursuing a career in the industry,” he said.

Jonny, who now works for Modus Operandi, said the breweries he had approached in Sydney had high praise for the TAFE SA course with many of the brewers having completed it themselves.

For more information, visit https://www.tafesa.edu.au/courses/hospitality-tourism/beer-brewing

The post Learn from the best in brewing appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The newly-launched Oxford Tavern in the Sydney suburb of Petersham will reveal a co-op bottle shop with fellow Inner West craft beer experts Bucket Boys on Anzac Day (25 April).

The co-op will focus primarily on six-packs of tinnies from Aussie breweries, as well as a curated range of singles (sours, saisons, wild ales and stouts), and a few select natural wines and Aussie spirits – all built into a yet-to-be-revealed dedicated display behind the main bar.

James Thorpe, director of Thorpe Hospitality (which also owns The Taphouse/Odd Culture in Darlinghurst), told Beer & Brewer that the range will basically be a “hero selection” of the Bucket Boys vast range.

“The part of it that I’m most excited about, with our focus on hyperlocal breweries at the Tav, is that we’re going to be curating mixed six packs along various different lines,” he says.

“Maybe there’ll be an Inner West IPA six-pack, maybe a female brewers six-pack, a Berliner Weisse six-pack – just things like that, that allow the customer to try a whole bunch of beers without having to buy cases on cases, or if they’re buying singles too it’s generally quite expensive.

“With the backing of Bucket Boys’ massive stockholding in their bottle shop and online store, we’re going to be able to put something really exciting together.”

Thorpe Hospitality have had a close working relationship with Bucket Boys for a long time now, and so it was a natural partnership to enhance the customer experience at the Tav.

“Johnno and Clint, the guys behind Bucket Boys, have been our really good friends for a long time,” Thorpe explains.

“We’ve worked with them at The Taphouse and Odd Culture in a wholesale capacity, because they import a lot of stuff from overseas. They also have a really good distribution channel to Tassie, so we were getting Bruny Island, Van Dieman and breweries like that through their wholesale portfolio.

“More recently Johnno approached us with the idea of expanding our off-premise side of the business – we’ve got two grand old hotel licences at both the Taphouse and the Oxford Tav, and we aren’t really doing anything at either venue with that at the moment.

“Johnno proposed the idea that we partner with them and try to put something really cool together.”

While Petersham is now well serviced with a number of top venues including the Oxford Tavern (in addition to the White Cockatoo and The Public House), the addition of a craft and locally-focused bottle shop for takeaways is a big win for locals.

“In bottle shop terms, Petersham is a bit of a black hole – you’ve got this giant BWS up next to Public House, but the range isn’t great – and we wanted to put something together that more accurately reflected the output of the area, which is not what BWS sells as a huge supermarket chain,” says Thorpe.

“There’s so much good beer coming out of the Inner West, and that’s what should be on show – not endless macro brands from overseas. There’s so much awesome natural wine and cider being produced here too, and that stuff is just not getting a fair crack in the big outlets.”

There’s also a strong chance that the co-op will become a permanent feature of the venue, with Thorpe’s eyes also on a potential expansion of the concept.

“We’re trying it out for a couple of months to test the waters – it’s by no means a pop-up, the plan is for it to be a long-term thing and for us to potentially try something similar at the Taphouse as well, which is an even worse area for off-premise sales.”

The post Sydney craft beer experts join forces for co-op bottle shop appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Good Beer Week 2019 launches in less than a month (10-19 May), and organisers are drumming up excitement with the announcement that a host of international brewers will be making their way to Melbourne for the festival.

Brooklyn Brewery co-founder Steve Hindy from New York (pictured above), American-born brewer Mike Murphy – of Norway’s hottest craft brewery, Lervig – and microbiologist Kelly Tretter from Colorado’s New Belgium Brewery will all be hosting a variety of events around Melbourne.

Steve Hindy is the co-founder, chairman and president of Brooklyn Brewery, one of America’s top 20 breweries. A former journalist, Hindy’s path to brewing is more unusual than most.

Hindy first became interested in home-brewing while serving as a Beirut-based Middle East correspondent for The Associated Press. During his time in the Middle East, he was abducted while on a United Nations Peacekeeping patrol in South Lebanon and survived.

In 1988, he returned to the States as a foreign editor and began brewing his own beer, and eventually persuaded neighbour and banker Tom Potter that they should quit their jobs and start a brewery. Soon after, Brooklyn Brewery was born.

Good Beer Week attendees will have the chance to meet the globally-regarded brewer at a bevy of events around Melbourne, starting with ‘Grandad’s Supper: straight outta Brooklyn!’ at Beer DeLuxe Federation Square on 11 May. Hindy will also be on hand at the Brooklyn Tap Takeover at Loop Roof on 13 May.

Lervig’s head brewer Mike Murphy will also visit Good Beer Week for the first time. Murphy came on with Lervig in 2010 and has built the brewery from producing a single pilsner to being one of the best collaboration brewers in the world.

Murphy is a self-taught home brewer that grew up in Philadelphia before moving to Rome and then settling in Stavenger, Norway. He’ll be in Moorabbin for a ‘Whole Lotta Lervig’ at Grape & Grain Liquor Cellars (Sunday 12 May), showcasing 12 taps of Lervig, featuring some of their most-loved beers along with some serious rarities.

New Belgium’s microbiologist Kelly Tretter is also coming to Australia for the first time. While the spotlight in beer is usually shining on brewers, microbiologists are also playing more of a role in making beer.

Tretter is involved in several events while in Melbourne including Good Beer Week’s annual sell out event, ‘Mega Dega VII’ (Friday 17 May) at The Hotel Windsor and two panel discussions at the Cryer Malt Trade Hub presented by Pink Boots Australia.

At these events (Pink Boots presents: Sensory Panel (Monday 13 May) and Pink Boots presents: Know Your Worth (Thursday 16 May)), visitors will get the chance to discuss these issues with a panel of women in the craft beer industry, including Tretter.

Find out more about the rest of the Good Beer Week program for 2019 here.

The post USA brewing talent headed to Melbourne for Good Beer Week appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Hope Brewery has upped the stakes with its GABS Festival Beer for 2019, unveiling a truly massive 18% IIIIIPA on its social media channels last week.

Hope’s F/A-18% Rhino IIIIIPA sits firmly at the extreme end of brewing, and according to the brewery, is named after the F/A-18 fighter jets that “dominate the Hunter skyline”.

Head brewer Matt Hogan told Beer & Brewer that the beer was a “logical step forward” from the brewery’s F11.1% Jet Black IIIPA, which was released late last year.

In terms of the brewing process, Hogan says that “time and lots and lots of hops,” were the key to producing the Rhino.

“We started with a Brut DIPA which was fermented out with a brewer’s yeast, at the end of this fermentation the beer was dry hopped for the first time.

“After this it gets a little different… we added a super strong wine yeast to the brew and started feeding it with grape juice concentrate. Once we got to the desired ABV and the ferment was all finished, we dry hopped the brew for a second time.”

Using a combination of all-American hops (Citra, CTZ, and Centennial), Hogan describes the finished beer as “intense!”

“Dank and resinous with top notes of lemon sherbet, passionfruit, pawpaw with some sweet floral notes, the palate delivers much of the same with intense hoppiness,” is Hogan’s description of the Rhino.

“The booze and fruitiness are all pulled together by solid bitterness. The booze is noticeable but doesn’t detract from the overall experience.”

Not many IPAs can lay claim to such a whopping ABV; apart from Dogfish Head’s 120 Minute IPA – which lands between 15 and 20% ABV depending on the vintage – Hogan says “there aren’t too many others out there”.

With GABS just around the corner, festival organisers have also released details about the Festival Beers & Ciders pouring on Container A and B.

Australia’s craft breweries are up to their usual tricks for GABS 2019, with the unique festival beers stretching from a Grilled Pineapple and Smoked Bacon NEIPA by Eden Brewery to an ‘Unphogettable Blonde’ from Morrison Brewery, made with basil coriander, citrus, anise and fish sauce.

F/A-18% Rhino IIIIIPA will be pouring at all three Australian editions of GABS – kicking off in Brisbane on Saturday 27 April, followed by Melbourne (Friday 17 May-Sunday 19 May) and Sydney (Saturday 1 June).

Selected independent retailers and Hope’s Cellar Door in the Hunter Valley will also have Rhino available after GABS makes its way around the country.

The post Hope Brewery go massive with 18% IIIIIPA for GABS appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In our recent Autumn issue, and in the first of our new Regional Breweries series, we headed to the high country to talk to the brewers doing exciting things in what is a booming pocket of north east Victoria.

The state capitals are awash with craft breweries visited and beloved by the thousands, if not millions who live there. But there is so much happening beyond the urban sprawl. Away from the major hubs and population clusters, craft breweries across Australia have been providing jobs, investment and increasingly tourism to their area and their local communities, not to mention fresh beer!

For our inaugural Regional Breweries series feature, we are in Victoria’s High Country and its environs, three hours’ drive north east of Melbourne near the NSW border. Also serviced by Albury Airport, this was gold rush country a century ago and the hideout of bushranger Ned Kelly. Here you will find historic towns and awe-inspiring views amid Victoria’s highest mountains and largest lakes. Riddled with hiking, driving, cycling and running trails, the High Country also offers watersports in summer and skiing in winter. This is the place to find high quality food, wine and increasingly beer – which is what we’re here for!

The local population is well served by a fraternity of breweries who are seeking not only to bring the region to the rest of Australia, but also bring the rest of Australia to the High Country. So, why have the local brewers chosen this part of the country to open their breweries?

A RURAL AFFAIR

Ben Kraus

Many of the brewers in the High Country were born or bred here, while others came seeking an escape from urban life in Melbourne. But none have anything other than love for the calmer but no less breathtaking lifestyle available in the hills. Ben Kraus returned from Melbourne to his parents’ home in Beechworth with his wife Maria and all their life savings in 2004 to set up Bridge Road Brewers in their garage. He’s not looked back since.

“There are no traffic lights in Beechworth, everything we need in day-to-day life is within a five-minute drive or a 10-minute walk,” he says. “We have a beautiful town with a great hospitality offering, a large lake 500m from the brewery, the ski fields one and a half hours away, and I have more options to ride a bike than I have time to do so.”

This part of the world is considerably agricultural, which is great news for brewers looking for malted barley and hops straight from source. In an age when the provenance of ingredients is placed on a pedestal, being able to visit the fields where your brewing ingredients are growing is not just a marketing bonus, it’s an incredibly opportunity to forge relationships and get what you need right where it’s grown.

“We are lucky to establish good relationships with local suppliers and when it comes to wet hop or hop harvest time, it’s only a short 20min drive to pick them up,” says Grant Jones, who founded Malt Shed Brewery in the Rural City of Wangaratta with Andrew Bett and Mathew Saunders in 2017, having decided that their hometown needed its own brewery. “Nothing’s fresher than picking up your hops in the morning and [having them] in the brew by the afternoon – now that’s true fresh hop beer.”

“The only real challenge is the cost of freight, however the benefits far outweigh the challenges,” says Nathan Cowan, founder of Billson’s Brewery also in Beechworth. “Our regional base allows us better access to fresh, local produce and ingredients such as hops. Being in a tourist town means that visitation to our brewery is consistent and relatively easy to predict.”

However, while the ingredients for brewing might be close at hand, there are also considerable challenges living and brewing such a distance away from urban centres. Getting brewing equipment delivered to you, for example, is a considerable challenge. On top of that, getting the beers you’ve made beyond regional towns and into larger marketplaces many miles away can be prohibitively expensive. And that’s before you have to consider that where there are fewer customers, there are also fewer head brewers, marketers, engineers, salespeople and the rest of the staff you need to build your business and keep it running smoothly.

“There are some unique challenges to operating a regional brewery,” says Scott Brandon, founder of Bright Brewery. “Logistics is the obvious one – with freight and specialist equipment, etc., being harder to come by. Attracting staff, particularly in management roles, can also be a challenge, though our beautiful location and our commitment to staff wellbeing and work-life balance help counteract that. And obviously our local market is much smaller than it would be if we were located in a major city, so we need to adapt our marketing and wholesale approach to account for that.”

Read the full article in the Autumn issue of Beer & Brewer. To subscribe, click here.

The post Brewing above the snowline: A brewery tour of Victoria’s High Country appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Danish brewer Carlsberg is turning heads in the UK with a new ad campaign that admits its lager is “probably not the best beer in the world.”

The reportedly 20 million GBP campaign is part of a relaunch of the brewery’s flagship beer, which has been revamped with a new recipe and a new name.

According to the brewery, Carlsberg Danish Pilsner has been “completely rebrewed from head to hop”.

The full advertisement reads: “’Probably the best beer in the world.’ Once true, but today? Probably not. Somewhere along the line, we lost our way. We focused on brewing quantity, not quality. We became one of the cheapest, not the best.

“So, there was only one thing for it. We had to create a better beer. A new Carlsberg, that’s been completely rebrewed from head to hop. The result? A perfectly balanced Danish Pilsner with a crisper, fuller flavour than before.

“Finally, a beer that lives up to its promise? Probably.”

The ad campaign is a play on Carlsberg’s former advertising motto – “Probably the best beer in the world” – and given the bold nature of the campaign, is getting plenty of industry and marketing experts talking.

“It takes a bold brand to change the way their products have been made for decades, even if it costs them more time and money in the process,” client director at drinks marketing agency YesMore, Tom Harvey, told Drinks Business.

“This will likely earn respect and advocacy from a great portion of their target consumers.”

Harvey also hinted at the role that the overall premiumisation of the beer market has played in this decision.

“It’s well researched and documented that people are drinking fewer alcoholic drinks, but at a higher quality and price,” he added “So with consumers’ tastes opting for quality products, Carlsberg are smart to recognise that selling on quantity alone won’t last.”

Premium Beverages, which brews Carlsberg in Australia, has not yet responded on what the UK campaign means for the Australian market and the locally-brewed version of the beer.

The post ‘Probably not the best beer in the world’: Carlsberg appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Independent brewers have a new trick up their sleeves with BrewInk, a printing platform specifically designed for independent brewers and beverage makers, recently launched by industry marketing stalwart Kinetic.

After servicing the needs of major multi-national beverage companies’ print and marketing requirements for many years, Kinetic saw a need to help newcomers and smaller outfits get access to quality marketing collateral at an affordable price point.

“All brewers need the basics – tap decals, tap badges, point of sale, local area marketing materials and apparel; we’re aiming to give them a one stop shop, with the best pricing in the country”, says Mark Livings, CEO at Kinetic.

“There’s a real opportunity here to help brewers get the word out to their local communities.  Beyond that, we can help them scale with everything they need to support their first taps in venues outside their own brewery and beyond”

Additionally, Kinetic is proud to be supporting Australia’s Independent Brewers, and is an affiliate member of the IBA.

“We hope we can make it easy for our customers, so they can focus on what they do best – creating and crafting beer and beverages”

To browse BrewInk’s range and score a GABS19 discount, with 19% off print and merchandise, visit http://www.brewink.com.au/

Please get in touch with the BrewInk team at https://www.brewink.com.au/contact

The post Indie craft printers team up with GABS with a 19% discount for GABS19 printing needs. appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By Andy Young, The Shout

The Brewers Association of Australia has hit back at media reports today regarding alcohol advertising, sports sponsorship and youth drinking, which the association has labelled as “demonstrably wrong”.

The reports followed a media release and report from the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education into alcohol advertising in the NRL and AFL. The release claimed: “There is overwhelming evidence that exposure to alcohol marketing encourages children to start drinking from an earlier age and is linked to increased consumption, including among school children and those who play the sport.”

However the Brewers Association said this claim was wrong.

“Over the last 40 years alcohol advertising has increased in volume and expanded its reach, especially in the last 10-15 years through digital and online media. Yet, every Australian Government indicator over the same period shows underage drinking improving markedly.”

The association pointed to abstinence among 12-17 year olds in 2004 being 54.3 per cent, whereas in 2016 it was 82 per cent. In 2004 the average age of first drink was 14.7, in 2016 it was 16.1. In addition the proportion of 12-17 year olds drinking at lifetime risky patterns has declined from 6.4 per cent in 2004 to 1.3 per cent in 2016 and the proportion of 12-17 year olds at risk of drinking harm on a single occasion has fallen in that timeframe from 17.2 per cent to 5.4 per cent.

The Brewers Association said: “If the claim were true, the trends in underage drinking would be going up. Instead, they are falling.

“Independent Australian and international research shows alcohol advertising is not a catalyst for youth attitudes to alcohol, drinking behaviour or uptake. Parents, family and peers are by far the principal influences.

“In 2014, Australian researchers concluded that the predictors of frequent alcohol consumption among adolescents included having a sibling or a friend who consumed alcohol; believing parents, friends and/or siblings approved of drinking; drinking behaviours of parents, friends and/or siblings.”

It added: “Australia’s major brewers pride themselves on responsible marketing and strict adherence to the Alcohol Beverages Advertising Code (ABAC), which stipulates no alcohol ads can be aired during programming with less than 75 per cent adult viewership.

“Australia’s official source of television audience measurement – reveals that those aged 18+ account for the vast majority of sport viewers, including the 2018 AFL and NRL seasons where 92 per cent and 91 per cent, respectively, of viewers are adults.

“You cannot, with any credibility, claim that sports broadcasts or the ads run during them target kids when less than 10 per cent of viewers are under 18.”

The foundation reviewed clubs’ official websites, merchandise and social media channels to find 17 of 18 men’s AFL clubs and 15 of the 16 NRL clubs had some form of alcohol sponsorship. The Brewers Association said this is set against a backdrop of declining alcohol consumption more generally. Australian Bureau of Statistics data records a steady decline since the 1970s with the most recent data showing alcohol consumption per capita is at a 55-year low.

The post Brewers call foul on alcohol advertising claims appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By Andy Young, The Shout

GrainCorp Limited has detailed plans to its shareholders to help fight of a $2.9bn buyout by demerging its global malting business and listing it as a separate entity on the ASX.

The move would see both MaltCo and New GrainCorp listed, with GrainCorp saying that MaltCo becoming the world’s fourth largest independent maltster. MaltCo services the specialty malt, whisky and craft beer markets which are all experiencing substantial growth.

GrainCorp Chairman, Graham Bradley, said: “The board believes that the demerger would unlock significant value for shareholders by establishing two unique and high-quality ASX-listed agribusinesses with focused management teams able to pursue independent strategies and growth opportunities.”

MaltCo operates malting houses in Australia, the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom and also operates Country Malt Group, a leading craft malt distribution business in North America.

In its statement to the ASX about the proposed demerger, GrainCorp said: “MaltCo benefits from high quality, low operating cost processing assets strategically located in premium barley growing regions.

“These assets have benefited from significant historical investment and are expected to require stay in business capital expenditure of $15-20m per annum. In FY18 MaltCo generated EBITDA of $170m.”

GrainCorp CEO, Mark Palmquist will remain in his role until the demerger has been completed and will then become Managing Director and CEO of MaltCo. The company said that given this intended appointment alongside a place on the MaltCo board he has resigned his position at GrainCorp and stepped down from the GrainCorp board.

Klaus Pamminger, currently Group General Manager Grains, has been appointed as Chief Operating Officer of GrainCorp and will replace Palmquist as Managing Director and CEO of GrainCorp once the demerger is completed.

Palmquist said: “Our portfolio review made clear that these businesses have different characteristics and would benefit from operating separately. A demerger would provide both MaltCo and New GrainCorp with increased flexibility to implement independent operating strategies and capital structures and allow them to attract investors with different investment priorities.”

Following the proposed demerger, New GrainCorp will be an integrated global agribusiness with grain handling, storage, trading and processing operations in Australia, New Zealand, North America, Asia, Europe and Ukraine, focused on grains, oilseeds, pulses, edible oils and feeds.

The post GrainCorp to demerge global malting business appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Peroni is launching its most significant global brand makeover since 2005 and is currently rolling out across Australia.

The premium Italian beer brand has updated its bottle, glass and a revamped logo, with the aim to evoke classic Italian style, re-affirming its premium positioning.

Peroni’s new bottle is an elegant and sleek design which takes inspiration from the brand’s rich history, re-introducing its iconic elements such as sophisticated curves and an engraved signature of Giovanni Peroni, the founding father of Peroni. This new design creates differentiation in the category and will be applied to both Peroni Nastro Azzurro and Leggera.

The new glassware has been specifically styled to deliver the best drinking experience. With a tall and elegant profile, the glassware takes on a new modern hexagonal base and also shares the engraved signature of Giovanni Peroni. This keeps with the new bottle design and again reinforces Peroni’s premium Italian craftsmanship.

The Peroni logo has also evolved to evoke a classic iconic style with references to the brand’s Roman provenance in a new, hexagonal label on the bottle, inspired by the centre of the original Birra Peroni Crest.

Subtle changes such as the iconic blue ribbon will take a modern new shape and the appearance of a hand drawn maize icon highlights its high quality Italian ingredients. Each change softly reflects the brand’s authentic Italian heritage in keeping with its iconic blue, red and white colours.

“Peroni has always brought Italian style to the world of beer and our bottle and glass are one of the strongest drivers of our brand equity,” says Grayson Cook, Marketing Manager for Peroni.

“We tested the new designs through consumer research and received outstanding results for premium perception, purchase intent and link to Italian heritage and style. We are amplifying the launch of our new bottle and glassware through a national media campaign, which will kick off some fantastic plans for this year including Peroni being the official beer sponsor of Mercedes Benz Fashion Week in Sydney in May and some exciting new product launches.”

The new brand updates come at a time where Peroni has experienced significant sales growth in Australia over the past 12 months from both Nastro Azzurro and Leggera. Asahi Premium Beverages will support the brand makeover with a national media campaign featuring the new bottle and reinforcing the brand’s style credentials.

Peroni is also the official beer sponsor of Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Australia and will be activating at select venues in Sydney.

To further amplify its connection to style, Peroni will partner with Australian cult fashion label, Double Rainbouu to create uniforms for the key venues to celebrate Aperitivo Hour with a twist – pairing curated snack menus with Peroni beer and cocktails.

Peroni will also be expanding its portfolio with some exciting brand innovations due later in the year.

The post Peroni launches global brand makeover appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview