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Beer & Brewer by Beer & Brewer Editor - 4d ago
Goodbye astringency, hello foam!

We know that you are as serious about the art of brewing as we are about the science and technology that goes into the brewing process. At Brewmax, we are uniquely positioned to develop and deliver equipment containing technological advances that craft brewers can now afford.

As a craft brewer you understand that quality beer demands quality technology. Our technological enhancements offer craft brewers flavour control technologies that major brewers use all over the world, but at an affordable price.

It starts with wet milling the malt to speed up lautering and reduce tannins in the beer, for smoother flavour. Then low-temperature decoction gelatinizes malt cells other than starch without adding more tannins, yet releasing unique malt and raw wheat flavours in malt-forward beers.

We all know that partial thermal degradation of alpha acids and LPT1 proteins is essential for bitterness and foam. However the complete degradation of around 25% of iso-humulones into harshly bitter degradation products is the usual result of high thermal stress systems.  Also old technology kettles completely degrade around 70% LPT1 foam-positive protein into useless trub in the whirlpool.

Brewmax has developed a ‘Low Thermal Stress’ brewhouse similar to German methods, that can achieve complete degradation of iso-humulones as low as 7%, and only 40% complete degradation of LPT1 protein, thus it is goodbye astringency, hello foam!

The efficient stripping of ‘Unwanted Volatiles’in the kettle improves flavour and shelf life. That is best accomplished by double fan spreaders and a pumped steam calandria. Crash-cooling at knockout further reduces post-boil evolution of UVs by up to 75%.

Yeast coated with Cold Trub has a carry-over of astringent hop products, and it re-releases foam-negative free fatty acids into beer over a few hours. It also promotes acetaldehyde and SO2 production.

Over 90% of German brewers remove about 60% of Cold Trub in cool ships or flotation tanks, but USA and Australasian brewers remove only about 25% in CCV cones. Brewmax’s sanitary Cool Ships will remove about 60% of CT in 12 hours.

Brewmax’s new patent-protected hydro-dynamic fermenters expose about 50% more yeast bed area to a strong, predictable circular convection. This technology reduces diacetyl and acetaldehyde quickly and speeds complete fermentation.

The complete exclusion of O2 from fermented beer is essential to flavour shelf life. This can be accomplished with Brewmax’s Nitrogen Generator, Hop Bomb advanced dry hopping, and Inert Gas Cloud isobaric bottling and canning lines. We package within a 99.9% Nitrogen cloud to preserve the most delicate aromas and flavours.

Brewmax specialises in state-of-the-art technologies such as:

Wet milling • De-aeration of strike & sparge water • Low temperature decoction • Faster, clearer lautering systems • Low Thermal Stress boiling systems • Advanced stripping of Unwanted Volatiles • Crash cooling at knockout • Denk whirlpool rings • Low shear zero-O2 pumping • Nitrogen generation • Cool ship trub separation • Hydro-dynamic fermentation tanks • Advanced dry hopping • Centrifuges • Zero O2 canning & bottling lines

Come and chat to us at BrewCon (Booth 107) 26 – 28 June 2018 at Australian Technology Park in Sydney.

Go to www.brewmax.net and subscribe to our ‘technical newsletter’ and regularly receive informative and interesting industry related studies.

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Brouhaha Brewery has undergone a brand refresh that coincides with the launch of its rebranded cans.

The brewery, which is located in Maleny, Queensland, will celebrate its second anniversary in June. In February it doubled the size of its annual brewing capacity by adding one 50hL and two 15hL fermentation tanks. In addition, Brouhaha has invested in its own canning and packaging line.

There are eight beers in the core range – Middle of the Road, Maleny Lager, New Zealand Pale Ale, IPA, DIPA, Raspberry Saison, Strawberry Rhubarb Sour and Milk Stout. A range of seasonal and limited release beers will also be canned as they are brewed.

“Our own canning line opened Monday last week,” explains Toby Stodart, who runs the marketing and events for the brewery. “We’re super excited about it. Going forward we’ll be canning every Monday and Tuesday to make sure we’ve got that core range. Not all seasonals will be canned, but if we make one that people get really excited about… We did an Apricot Sour recently and that was so popular that we’re going to brew that again and it will go in cans.”

The redesign aimed to remove any misconceptions about the quality of canned beer, creating a product that would be ‘just as welcome at a BBQ as it is at a wedding’.

“At the moment, we do a rectangle shape with the colours representing the colours of the beer,” adds Stodart. “There’s a slight redesign with our logo, but it’s very small. We’re working on the website as well. We’ve got lots of stuff in the works.”

The post Brouhaha Brewery undergoes rebrand appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

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Big Shed Brewing Concern won GABS’s Best Festival Beer while Devil’s Brewery took the Best Festival Cider Award following a record number of votes at GABS Melbourne and Sydney.

More than 11,000 people turned out for GABS Sydney at the Sydney Showground – the first ever GABS event to completely sell out all sessions. The Yenda Ferris Wheel of Beer at GABS Melbourne and Sydney, along with Brewmanity’s Brewer Ice Dunking, saw a record $18,500 raised to support the fight against Motor Neurone Disease, bringing the total raised over the last three years to $43,500.

Big Shed Brewing Concern, which is based in South Australia, entered the competition for the fourth time, with Boozy Froot, a beery NEIPA take on the Frosty Fruit ice blocks. The runners-up were Feral Brewing Co’s Shooter McGavin’s Breakfast IPA; Tom Collins Sour by Wolf of the Willows; Akasha’s The Eagle IIIPA; and Australia Beer Co’s 3yr Aged Bourbon Imperial Stout.

Boozy Froot from Big Shed

“The genesis of the beer came from working in the brewery,” explains Craig Basford, co-owner of Big Shed Brewing. “The boys were getting hot and they’d go down to the shops and get a Frosty Fruit. We tried it and we thought it could work. All those tropical fruity flavours are very popular now. What if we put them into our beer. I reckoned the flavours could work together. That’s what GABS is great for – having a crack at it.”

Despite making Boozy Froot just the once, the response to the beer has prompted the brewery to make another batch, which will be put into bottles and kegs.

“It’s really humbling,” adds Basford. “We went to GABS a complete non entity in Melbourne. To with our first beer in 2015 and to watch it explode on social media was amazing. That finished third in the People’s Choice. To have people choosing is amazing. There are judged awards out there, but to have the punter select the beer is great – they’re the people we make beer for. They don’t try to dissect or analyse it. To get enough of them to say ‘we really like that beer’ – we really rate that.”

Grandma’s Jam Cider from Devil’s Brewery

Of the 14 Festival Ciders at GABS 2018, Grandma’s Jam Cider from Devil’s Brewery in Tasmania took the prize. After finding a number of Tasmanian jams in the back of a cupboard, the Devils Brewery team set out to find more and make a cider with it. The runners-up were Tanninator by Wille Smith’s Cider; Rochdale Mojito Cider from McCashin’s in New Zealand; Grand Ridge’s Twisted Sister Apple Cinnamon Cider; and Honey I’n Cider from Napoleone.

“The inspiration was seeing the back of my fridge at home, with half eaten jars of jam,” explains David Tottle, head brewer at Devil’s Brewery. “Seeing them crystallizing over the month, all that concentrated fruit and sugar – that screamed fermentation to me. So I got the call out on social media and got aroudn 100kg of jam sent over to us from followers. And we went from there. It has a typical cider base with local Tasmanian apples and then we put that fermentation off and added and the jams and some fruit as well. It took two days to filter! It was a nightmare. It was done for fun, and to reconstitute all that product that had had so much love and effort put into it.

“We had to get it lab tested because of the unknown quality of these sugars. It was amazing to see the particular years when they had had good seasons for particular fruits. My favourite was a medlar jelly from 1995 that poured like treacle. Our oldest contributor was a 90 year-old who’s been making jam since she was old enough to stir a spoon. She had at least 60kg of jam.

“I went to GABS Melbourne last year as a punter and I was blown away. They do an incredible job. It’s not a competitive environment – you just put it there and have fun. To win People’s Choice was quite a surprise. It’s certainly lovely to be recognised.”

The post Big Shed and Devils Brewery win GABS People’s Choice appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

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The Independent Brewers Association (IBA) recently launched a Seal of Independence to help consumers easily identify what beers are locally owned by independent Australian brewers.

Encouraging consumers to #askforindiebeer, the Seal can be put on the beer packaging, vessels and tap points of the brewers signed up to the movement.

Similar marks of independence have already been launched overseas, with the US Brewers Association recently launching its own Independent Craft Brewer Seal.

Several breweries across Australia have already started using the Seal on their products. We spoke to some and asked them why.

Ross Terlick, Crafty Monkey, Western Australia

“There are a lot of consumers out there who would be very surprised to find out who actually owns their favourite beer, and while it may not change their mind about buying it, at least now they will be able to make a more informed decision. There are varying scales of production, from small brewpubs to large production breweries out West, but everywhere you go, you find a great love of beer and a very friendly and open industry. As the IBA’s Seal of Independence gets bigger and starts being seen by consumers over the next few months, we hope that more Western Australian brewers will sign up and support the movement.”

Ben Summons, Stone & Wood, NSW

Why did you decide to adopt the Seal?

It is the mark that unifies the indie brewers and helps drinkers identify who is behind the beer they are considering to buy. We believe that when a drinker buys an independently brewed beer they are choosing to support homegrown, local people (mums and dads, artisans, innovators), in their community who have put everything on the line to follow their passion and bring new life into their local community. Local jobs are created, innovation and choice thrives, grass roots communities are supported, and company tax dollars stay in Australia. It’s a vote for the little guys having a go, and the people and communities they are linked to.

Would you encourage other brewers to do so?

Absolutely. We know more and more drinkers are interested local and independent beers. Market data also highlights this is the case with consumption too. By getting behind the Seal it helps create more awareness for the indy brewers and makes it easier for the drinker consider and choose independent.

What has the reaction been?

A little too early, as were waiting for it to flow into trade, but we had a really positive response on social media when we announced that we are supporting it.

James Davidson, Bright Brewery, Victoria

Why did you decide to adopt the Seal?

The IBA Seal provides a strong linkage to one of our core Bright Brewery values: authenticity. The Seal of Independence is a quick identifier that the beer you are purchasing is an authentic indie beer, brewed here at Bright Brewery by people who care about the beer they make and the impact is has on our economy, community and culture. The Seal indicates that there are real brewers and beer lovers behind the label who you can actually meet and talk to about it, and that your money is going into an Australian business and helping the local economy. We care more about the flavour and quality of the product and what brewing means to us, rather than keeping stakeholders or foreign markets happy. We don’t need to make up stories or use spin to support our beers, the product speaks for itself, and the IBA Seal is a consistent way to confirm that.

Would you encourage other brewers to do so?

Yes, we are a very small industry and must partner, collaborate and work together to grow a sustainable future for authentic local beer. The more passionate brewers that show their support for indie beer, the bigger our collective industry voice will be to help influence growth and positive change for the businesses that care about beer as a force for good and not just a commodity. With so many non-independent and foreign owned companies and corporations releasing beers that look like they are made by a small local brewer, the IBA Seal needs genuine support to help us stand apart from the pretenders.

What has the reaction been?

The reaction has been very positive and supportive from our fellow indie brewers, trade partners and the media. It has generated some useful discussion and awareness around the issue of who really makes the beer behind the label. We look forward to the campaign for independence evolving as more brewers join in.

Peta Fielding, Burleigh Brewing, Queensland

Why did you decide to adopt the Seal?

Consumers often want to know not only what they’re buying, but who they’re buying from and, indirectly, what they are supporting in that process. Burleigh Brewing is a private, locally-owned business that’s driven entirely by what’s best for our beer, our team and our community. We’re all about living, and sharing, our passion. Using the seal enables consumers to know that message is genuine and truly who we are – not a manufactured marketing approach to appear like something we’re not.

The post Brewers across Australia adopt the Seal of Independence appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

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By Rachel Clark

Lion is expanding further into Asia with the opening of its second venue within Singapore, Little Creatures Mohamed Ali Lane.

The new Singapore venue, which includes a microbrewery and restaurant, opened its doors on 30 May. The newest addition to Lion’s portfolio is part of a continued expansion of the brand after opening its first venue within Hong Kong, Little Creatures Kennedy Town in 2016.

“Now is an excellent time to step into the South East Asian market by creating a home for one of Australia’s best loved craft beer brands in Singapore,” said Matt Tapper, Managing Director of Lion Global Markets.

The new venue will be serving the full range of beer created by Little Creatures as well as the White Rabbit award-winning White Ale and James Squire Orchard Crush Cider, with the bonus of having the capability for brewing on site.

The new Singapore location shall hold up to 280 people based in Mohamed Ali Lane with a Mediterranean-inspired menu with a Fremantle twist, allowing a comfortable and casual dining experience and for “Little Creatures to offer Singapore something different”.

Apart from adding another venue to the company’s portfolio but Lion hopes that Little Creatures will be embraced by the Singapore community, providing a positive experience.

Matt Tapper also emphasised how the surge in demand for craft beer in the Asian craft market has allowed the product to flourish.

“We pride ourselves on the positive reputation that all of our venues across Australia and Asia have within their local communities,” Tapper explains. “We’re dedicated to continuing this focus, to ensure that Lion becomes an integral part of the local Singapore community as we provide great beers, a great menu and a great hospitality experience.”

Beyond the expansion into Asia, Lion has also announced to add to the two-previous standing locations, that the next step will be to open a third location within London by the end of the year.

The post Lion opens Little Creatures outpost in Singapore appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

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The Independent Brewers Association (IBA) recently launched a Seal of Independence to help consumers easily identify what beers are locally owned by independent Australian brewers.

Encouraging consumers to #askforindiebeer, the Seal can be put on the beer packaging, vessels and tap points of the brewers signed up to the movement.

Similar marks of independence have already been launched overseas, with the US Brewers Association recently launching its own Independent Craft Brewer Seal.

Several breweries across Australia have already started using the Seal on their products. We spoke to some and asked them why.

Ross Terlick, Crafty Monkey, Western Australia

“There are a lot of consumers out there who would be very surprised to find out who actually owns their favourite beer, and while it may not change their mind about buying it, at least now they will be able to make a more informed decision. There are varying scales of production, from small brewpubs to large production breweries out West, but everywhere you go, you find a great love of beer and a very friendly and open industry. As the IBA’s Seal of Independence gets bigger and starts being seen by consumers over the next few months, we hope that more Western Australian brewers will sign up and support the movement.”

Ben Summons, Stone & Wood, NSW

Why did you decide to adopt the Seal?

It is the mark that unifies the indie brewers and helps drinkers identify who is behind the beer they are considering to buy. We believe that when a drinker buys an independently brewed beer they are choosing to support homegrown, local people (mums and dads, artisans, innovators), in their community who have put everything on the line to follow their passion and bring new life into their local community. Local jobs are created, innovation and choice thrives, grass roots communities are supported, and company tax dollars stay in Australia. It’s a vote for the little guys having a go, and the people and communities they are linked to.

Would you encourage other brewers to do so?

Absolutely. We know more and more drinkers are interested local and independent beers. Market data also highlights this is the case with consumption too. By getting behind the Seal it helps create more awareness for the indy brewers and makes it easier for the drinker consider and choose independent.

What has the reaction been?

A little too early, as were waiting for it to flow into trade, but we had a really positive response on social media when we announced that we are supporting it.

James Davidson, Bright Brewery, Victoria

Why did you decide to adopt the Seal?

The IBA Seal provides a strong linkage to one of our core Bright Brewery values: authenticity. The Seal of Independence is a quick identifier that the beer you are purchasing is an authentic indie beer, brewed here at Bright Brewery by people who care about the beer they make and the impact is has on our economy, community and culture. The Seal indicates that there are real brewers and beer lovers behind the label who you can actually meet and talk to about it, and that your money is going into an Australian business and helping the local economy. We care more about the flavour and quality of the product and what brewing means to us, rather than keeping stakeholders or foreign markets happy. We don’t need to make up stories or use spin to support our beers, the product speaks for itself, and the IBA Seal is a consistent way to confirm that.

Would you encourage other brewers to do so?

Yes, we are a very small industry and must partner, collaborate and work together to grow a sustainable future for authentic local beer. The more passionate brewers that show their support for indie beer, the bigger our collective industry voice will be to help influence growth and positive change for the businesses that care about beer as a force for good and not just a commodity. With so many non-independent and foreign owned companies and corporations releasing beers that look like they are made by a small local brewer, the IBA Seal needs genuine support to help us stand apart from the pretenders.

What has the reaction been?

The reaction has been very positive and supportive from our fellow indie brewers, trade partners and the media. It has generated some useful discussion and awareness around the issue of who really makes the beer behind the label. We look forward to the campaign for independence evolving as more brewers join in.

Peta Fielding, Burleigh Brewing, Queensland

Why did you decide to adopt the Seal?

Consumers often want to know not only what they’re buying, but who they’re buying from and, indirectly, what they are supporting in that process. Burleigh Brewing is a private, locally-owned business that’s driven entirely by what’s best for our beer, our team and our community. We’re all about living, and sharing, our passion. Using the seal enables consumers to know that message is genuine and truly who we are – not a manufactured marketing approach to appear like something we’re not.

The post Brewers across Australia adopt the Seal of Independence appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

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By Andy Young, The Shout

Gage Roads Brewing Co has announced that it has executed a binding agreement to acquire 100% of the shares in Matso’s Broome Brewing for $13.25m.

The deal also includes a further $2.8m in cash or scrip, which is subject to the achievement of a performance criteria, which is mapped out over the next three years.

Gage Roads managing director John Hoedemaker said Matso’s is an iconic WA Brand that was a natural fit for Gage Roads.

“We have a long-standing relationship with the Peirson-Jones family having provided brewing and packaging services for Matso’s since 2007,” he explains. “We’re therefore delighted to reach an agreement that will see Matso’s join the Gage Roads family.

“We’re looking forward to adding Matso’s to our portfolio and broadening our offering of high quality brands to our customers. The Peirson-Jones family has achieved terrific results with Matso’s, including having created Australia’s market leading Ginger Beer. We now have an exciting opportunity to position the brand for further growth through our national sales team.”

Matso’s is owned by the Peirson-Jones family in Broome and is best known for its Ginger and Mango beer varieties.

In a statement to the ASX, Gage Roads outlined what the deal means to the brewery, saying: “The acquisition represents a major expansion of the Gage Roads brand portfolio. The additional Matso’s brands at current volumes and strong profit margins provide Gage Roads the opportunity to leverage its existing national sales, marketing and distribution capability and deliver sustained earnings growth.

“Our history and knowledge of the Matso’s brands and existing production capability minimises integration and sales risks allowing the incremental margins to truly flow through to and complement existing earnings in full.

“With Gage Roads’ strength of people, sales, marketing and distribution expertise we anticipate outperforming current volumes and growing the Matso’s brands to their full national potential.”

Gage Roads said that it will undertake a $10m placement to institutional shareholders and a $2m share purchase plan as part funding of the transaction.

The post Gage Roads acquires Matso’s Broome Brewing appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

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Adelaide Beer & BBQ Festival launches biggest brewing lineup EVER at an Australian festival

Adelaide Beer & BBQ Festival is back in 2018 with its biggest lineup yet, in fact the biggest collection of brewers at any festival, anywhere in Australia, EVER, right here in ‘lil ol’ Adelaide! Bringing together a massive, eclectic lineup of brewers from across the country, the world and an Australian first international collab series of beers launching exclusively at the festival.

TICKETS

Tickets on sale now from www.beerbbqfest.com.au

ADELAIDE BEER & BBQ FESTIVAL

Friday 6 July – Sunday 8 July

Historic Brick Dairy Pavilion and surrounds

Adelaide Showground

Wayville, SA

The post BEERS & BBQ’S FIRE IT UP FOR A SMASHING 2018 FESTIVAL! appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

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Beer & Brewer by Dapter - 1w ago

We crafted this brilliant brew with the hop goodness of an IPA and infused it with mouthwatering mangoes. There’s plenty of tropical and citrus notes from our special blend of Galaxy, Amarillo & Mosaic hops & this shines through its unassuming malt character. Trust us, this beer you can enjoy all year round.

The post Matso’s Mango IPA appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

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By Deborah Jackson, National Liquor News

The owners of Two Heads Brewery in Bathurst have submitted a development application (DA) to open a boutique liquor store in nearby Orange that will focus on supporting independent drinks producers.

Two Heads opened its doors in April 2016 after brothers Campbell and Greg Hedley returned home from stints overseas and decided they wanted to “build something for ourselves combined with a love of good beer”.

Since then, and with the help of Head Brewer Ian Carman, the guys have been producing a range of “approachable” and “tasty” beers that are currently being poured at the brewery as well as at a selection of local pubs. And they are also available through BWS stores in the Central West and independent retailers Bucket Boys and Beer Cartel in Sydney.

Campbell Hedley told National Liquor News that the bottle shop idea was the result of a “lightbulb” moment he had while walking through the Orange Arcade.

“The brewery is in Bathurst, but for family reasons, Greg and I both live in nearby Orange. We both noticed an empty shop right near the exit from Harris Farm in an arcade that had a real boutique feel to it, and the cogs started turning.

“We’ve met so many fantastic producers in the industry since we started, and we decided a shop that was focussed on supporting independent beer, cider, wine and spirit makers really fitted well with what we, and Two Heads, were all about.”

The DA is still with Orange City Council for approval, but so far the community reaction has been positive and if all goes well the brothers hope to have the doors open to what will be called The Lane Cellars in September.

“Orange and the Central West generally has a fantastic food and wine culture, and people are genuinely proud of the product that comes out of the region. When I was delivering the letters notifying nearby businesses of the intention to apply for a license, the mum’s waiting at the dance studio upstairs were particularly excited about the idea of grabbing a bottle of wine to take home after the kids finished dance class,” said Hedley.

“The arcade has become a real fresh food and produce destination and the bottle shop, with a focus on interesting, local, alternative offerings, is a natural fit.

“We’ve deliberately chosen a small space in a high traffic area, so the key for success for the shop is going to be making sure we carefully select what we stock and make the most of the space available. We’ll also have what we think will be the widest range of good beer west of the Blue Mountains, and we’ve managed to convince David Cumming from Define Wine to come on board as our wine guy, so expect an interesting and eclectic mix of wines to go along with the beers.

“Finally, we hope to involve lots of the local producers in hosting tastings and other experiences for customers.”

The Lane Cellars is a separate venture to the brewery and will be used as a way to introduce a wider range of fantastic independent products to customers – but you can still expect to see plenty of Two Heads beers on the shelves.

The post Two Heads owners look to open bottle shop appeared first on Beer & Brewer.

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