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We could not do this work without the support of so many members and volunteers.

  • Thank you to Alan Kleinschmidt and the San Francisco Choral Society for complimentary tickets for our staff, board & volunteers to their wonderful performances!
  • Thank you to Carol Fong for her many years of ongoing help in the office.
  • Thank you to Abigail Arons, Karen Klein, Matt Lauer, Catherine Williams, Kate Holcombe, and Yamini Ranchod for helping to plan out 7th Annual Acting Out – For the Health of It variety show and fundraiser, which will be held on June 27.
  • Thanks to all of our Spring Houseparty and 3rd Party Event hosts for all their work to make so many great events happen over the past few months. We’re so grateful for how they support our work:
    Paris (AJ) Adkins-Jackson
    Kathleen & Henry Chalfant
    Marie Garlock
    Channte’ Keith
    Ngina Lythcott, Dr.Ph, and Byllye Avery
    Ken Russo, Michael MacIntyre & Gary Pasnick
    Dr. Cornell Wright
  • Thank you to the Butler High School Community for their football fundraiser.
  • Thank you and Happy Birthday to Amber Danielle and Sam DiSalvo for making a fundraiser on Facebook in honor of their birthdays, and to everyone who gave in their honor.
  • Thanks to everyone who used our Don’t Pink For Me platform to host unique, interesting, and powerful fundraisers:
    Paris (AJ) Adkins-Jackson

    Rebecca Saltzman
     
    Coco Villaluz

    Sharon Barrett
    Amy Brezinka
    Mary Ann Burg
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Every day, Breast Cancer Action receives gifts honoring those who are living with or are affected by breast cancer. We also receive contributions to honor the passionate advocates, volunteers, medical professionals, and leaders of the breast cancer movement.

Many donations also memorialize those who have died of this disease. Each gift made in honor and memory will be used wisely by Breast Cancer Action to end the breast cancer epidemic.

DONATIONS MADE IN HONOR

Breast Cancer Action gratefully acknowledges donations made in honor of the following individuals April 3, 2019 – June 6, 2019.

Brenda Bellinger
from Duane Bellinger

Carole Telfer
from Robin Barkins

Deanna
from Mary Anne McGuire-Hickey

Dorothy Kaplan
from Marion Thurnauer

Joan Goddard
from Charlene Lilie

Joyce Bichler
from Denise and Todd Helfstein

Linda Potter
from Rosalie Hewins

JoAnn Loulan
from Sarah Dorahy

Pamela James
from Fiona Gill

Peggy Huston
from Noelani Holden-Kane

Rebecca Saltzman
from Nick Josefowitz

Rose Brown and Steve Butler
from Linda Sue Johnson

Sandra Hagen Goldstucker
from Nancy Hagen Goldstucker

Smith College, Class of 1973
from Roberta Lipsman

DONATIONS IN MEMORY

Breast Cancer Action gratefully acknowledges donations made in memory of the following individuals April 3, 2019 – June 6, 2019.

Anne Elizabeth Somsel
from Mr. Stephen Kobasa

Annette Nasuta
from Annette Aronson

Atma Kaur Khalsa Okazaki
from Peggy Orenstein

Barbara Neckel
from Mary and Jon Drinnon

Beverly Hambrook
from Patricia Blair Pierce

Carol Sheinfeld
from Susan Sheinfeld

Cheryl McMillan
from Donna Zacchero

Doris Wechsler Freidin
from Ralph Freidin, MD

Ella Korman Mermelstein
from Sandy Mermelstein

Ellen Palmer
from Marianne Sargent

Gerald Larson
from Pratapaditya and Chitralekha Pal

Jacqueline Charak
from Virginia Wolfe

Janet Lee
from Stephanie Foster

Jennifer Wiliams, Angela Consolo Rossi, Francis Chapman and Traci Gibson Little
from Leah Bass-Baylis

Kim Pistey
from Marlene Fink and Stephen Lebbert

Linda Baralt
from Karen Snyder

Lucia Centrone
from Dora Weaver

Margaret Cheap
from Davia Lee Nelson

Miriam Shapiro
from Dianne and Nelson Shapiro

Patricia Hughes
from Katie Brennan and Albert Gasser

Rosalind Cohen
from Hallie Cohen

Sara McMickle
from Pamela Spencer

Sheri Simoncelli         
from Elaine & Howard Myers
from Patty & Paul Lucca
from Susie & Phil Zuehlke

Susan Claymon and Shelly Eisner
from Julie Gordon and Richard Eisner

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By Karuna Jaggar, Executive Director

“The power in people is stronger than people in power.” I don’t know who first uttered this phrase, but I do know that Breast Cancer Action has always been a people-powered organization.

Since our founding nearly 30 years ago, we’ve had an outsized impact because of the people who founded, led, joined, and supported Breast Cancer Action. Together we’ve boldly challenged the cancer industry and changed the conversation about breast cancer. We’ve exposed the hypocrisy behind countless pink ribbon fundraisers and achieved momentous wins against multi-billion dollar corporations.

Our members make our work possible. And together we’re able to make real and lasting change.

We’re able to do the work that matters most for our members because we’re not in the pocket of industry, which means we’re not taking the lead from people invested in maintaining the status quo when it comes to what’s possible or necessary. We do, however, always want to hear from you about the work that needs to be done and to get your take on the issues we’re working on.

This summer, we’re launching our next strategic planning process that we’ll kick off with a member survey. Five years ago, nearly 1,500 people participated in our survey. We hope to hear from even more of you this year. Keep an eye out next month for the survey and please take some time to let us know how we’re doing.

Breast Cancer Action has always pulled in passionate and committed people. And when I stepped into the role of executive director at Breast Cancer Action in early 2011, not only did the amazing governing Board impress me, I was struck by the engagement and commitment of former Board members, who continued to be involved in and support the work. Eight years later, a number of Board members I’ve worked closely with over the years have termed out. But lucky for me, even though they’ve stepped down, they haven’t stepped away.

For example, earlier this month I was in New York City and Provincetown for Breast Cancer Action events. And there I was, joined by former Board member Beverly Canin and staying with another former Board member and her partner, Ngina Lythcott and Byllye Avery. These wise and wonderful women have accomplished so much as leaders and activists over the decades, and we are stronger for all the ways they give to and support Breast Cancer Action.

In May it was time for Karen Klein, who served as our Board Chair the past three years, and Abigail Arons to term off the Board after six years of service. But even though their terms as leaders of the organization have ended, they remain deeply committed and have both chosen to stay active and involved in many areas of the organization. If you live in the Bay Area, I hope you’ll join us at Acting Out on June 17, where you’ll have the chance to meet and thank Abigail and Karen for their service. 

We’re also helping to grow the next generation of activists and recently welcomed a new group of summer interns. Interns like Kavya Narendra-Babu, our Communications Intern; Emma Strand, our Strategic Planning Intern; and Edwina Wong, our Think Before You Pink® Intern bring new skills and enthusiasm to Breast Cancer Action and we’re so grateful for the ways they support our work and help us do even more! Often, an internship is the first step in a long-lasting relationship with our organization. After interning with us in 2013, Kristen Keller chose to frequently volunteer her time over the years, and she’s generously shared her many talents, contagious laugh, and positivity with us. Recently, she joined our staff in a temporary role, and we’re so grateful for all she’s helped us accomplish. At the end of this month we’ll say goodbye to Kristen and wish her luck as she begins her new career as a high school science teacher in the Bay Area. We’ll also say goodbye to our Communications Manager, Kira Jones, who has contributed to our work in countless ways with her seemingly endless talents, full-throated enthusiasm, and big-hearted passion. Kira first interned with Breast Cancer Action in 2007 and she’s promised to find new ways to stay involved.

Our talented, hard-working staff, devoted Board, and committed members all make our work possible.

And there’s a lot going on here this summer. We’re working hard to improve informed consent for breast implants, to pass legislation that allows lymphedema supplies to be covered by Medicare, and to stop a bipartisan group of industry-friendly Senators and Representatives from rolling back a unanimous Supreme Court ruling that decided naturally occurring genes are not patentable. Check out our 2019 summer issue of The Source for more details and be sure to follow us on social media (@BCAction on Facebook and Twitter). And, as always, help us spread the word.

Our power comes when we take action together. But it also comes from hearing from you. Reach out to us by and social media or come to one of our upcoming events, like the one we’re having in North Carolina next week, to ask your questions and share feedback. Because people-powered means people-driven and led.

Thank you.

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By Karuna Jaggar, Executive Director

I’m heading to North Carolina next week! I’m attending an American Association for Cancer Research conference on environmental approaches to cancer prevention.

While I’m in town, I’ll be the keynote speaker at a Lunch & Learn hosted by Dr. Cornell Wright, Breast Cancer Action Board Member Channte’ Keith, and Community Leader Marie Garlock.

Here are the details:

Lunch & Learn with Breast Cancer Action
North Caroline Institute of Medicine
630 Davis Drive, Morrisville, NC
Tuesday June 25, 2019
12:00-1:30 pm

This is a great opportunity to meet other health advocates in the area, hear more about what we’re up to at Breast Cancer Action, ask questions, and share your perspective. 

I’d love to see you there. You can RSVP here and, of course, we encourage you to share this email with anyone who is passionate about challenging the cancer industry.

Email Katrina Semich at ksemich@bcaction.org if you have any questions, and I hope to see you next week!

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By Kira Jones, Communications Manager

We’re excited to introduce you to our summer interns: Kavya Narendra-Babu, our Communications Intern, Emma Strand, our Strategic Planning Interns, and Edwina Wong, our Think Before You Pink® Intern. We’re thrilled to have them with us this summer.

______________________________________________________________________

Kavya Narendra-Babu

Kavya is currently a senior at UC Berkeley working on a double major in Legal Studies and Neurobiology, and a minor in Human Rights. She works for the local campus newspaper, The Daily Californian, which has invigorated her interest in communications. Kavya helped coordinate social media outreach as a part of the Tell Her Story project with the Institute for South Asia Studies at Berkeley. She also worked closely with Professor Elul’s lab on research relating to the brain, which has allowed her to gain intensive skills in data analysis and research. Kavya’s excited to work as Breast Cancer Action’s Communications Intern this summer and is looking forward to all the ways she can support the organization’s strategic communications.

Tell us a little about yourself and what brought you to Breast Cancer Action.

I have experience with cancer and how devastating it can be for both the person who has been diagnosed and their friends and family. Breast Cancer Action’s brand and voice really resonated with me from an activism standpoint. They are unapologetic and focus on the root causes of the disease. Breast Cancer Action has made a remarkable impact in the community.

What most inspires/excites you about Breast Cancer Action’s work?

Breast Cancer Action is a resilient, independent watchdog of the breast cancer movement. They’re not your average breast cancer organization. They have a strong conflict of interest policy and they don’t give an inch. Breast Cancer Action is currently working to stop a draft bill that would allow companies to patent human genes again, overturning the unanimous Supreme Court decision that ruled naturally occurring genes are not patentable. This work is extremely important, and my ability to work on this project alongside staff really excites me. 

What are you looking forward to working on/what do you think are the most pressing issues in breast cancer?

Breast Cancer Action is at the forefront of issues affecting members. The organization works to make sure that new treatments that the Food and Drug Administration approves are less toxic, more effective, or more affordable than existing treatments—and that these effective and affordable treatments are available to all breast cancer patients, regardless of race or economic status. Breast Cancer Action tackles the unacceptable disparities within the breast cancer community and focuses on systemic solutions so that fewer women are diagnosed with breast cancer and fewer women die. Every member of the Breast Cancer Action staff is dedicated to ensuring health justice for all women living with or at risk of breast cancer. These women are truth-telling, compassionate inspirations, and I am thankful to be able to work with and learn from them. 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

Emma Strand

Emma is entering her final year as an undergraduate at UC Berkeley, majoring in Public Health with a minor in Human Rights. She comes to Breast Cancer Action after a semester studying and doing research at the University of Ghana in Accra. With experience in sexual assault prevention and restorative justice on her campus, Emma deeply respects Breast Cancer Action’s work to provide women with accurate and reliable information and to shift the burden of addressing and ending the breast cancer epidemic from the individual to society. During her internship, Emma will work closely with staff to support Breast Cancer Action’s 2019 Strategic Planning process, overseeing the membership survey and landscape analysis. She’s eager to contribute to the organization’s sustainable progress.   

Tell us a little about yourself and what brought you to Breast Cancer Action.

I recently finished a semester at the University of Ghana where I assisted research on women with disabilities’ access to maternal and reproductive healthcare in northern Ghana. At UC Berkeley (UCB), I work as a student leader in the UCB Restorative Justice Center, conducting conflict reduction and community building circles for various university and high school groups. I’ve been engaged in sexual assault prevention, activism, and survivor support on my campus and was first drawn to Breast Cancer Action because of the parallels in the way society overburdens the individual in both of these issues. With the end of undergrad on my horizon, I find myself gravitating towards values-driven work at the intersection of social justice and public health, so my work with Breast Cancer Action comes at the perfect time.

What most inspires/excites you about Breast Cancer Action’s work?

There are so many things! But I am particularly inspired by Breast Cancer Action’s consistent commitment to the people affected by this disease. In the maze of bureaucracy that is our country’s healthcare system, it is refreshing to find an organization that consistently shows up for the people it says it supports, and that calls out those who are not similarly following through. Breast Cancer Action is bold and unapologetic in the style necessary for taking reality-based action (Cancer Sucks!), but also transparent to its membership in a way that our healthcare system should strive to emulate. Societal change is slow with long-term gratification, but this organization stays grounded in the people it serves.

What are you looking forward to working on/what do you think are the most pressing issues in breast cancer?

As Breast Cancer Action’s Strategic Planning Intern, and as someone who likes to zoom out and look at the big picture, I am excited to contribute to the organization’s long term road map. This involves getting feedback from Breast Cancer Action’s vast member network through a member survey (launching in July) and a landscape analysis of where we stand in relation to other organizations working in the field of breast cancer. This organization plays a niche role as an independent watchdog and educator that always tells the truth about breast cancer and the systemic change we need to address and end the epidemic. I am continuously impressed by the way it addresses so many pressing issues – from anti-fracking activism to mammogram education.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………

Edwina Wong

Edwina is currently a graduate student at UC Berkeley, pursuing a master’s degree in public health, with a focus on epidemiology and data science. She has a background in microbiology and biotechnology, as well as experience in data analysis and visualization, local outreach to disadvantaged business enterprises, and water quality analysis. 

Tell us a little about yourself and what brought you to Breast Cancer Action.

I’m passionate about helping to close gaps in health disparities and achieving better health outcomes for socially and economically disadvantaged groups, such as women and minorities, through research and innovative interventions that take into account social, personal, and cultural values. I admire Breast Cancer Action’s mission, core values, and prioritization of systemic interventions for addressing the root causes of the disease. 

What most inspires/excites you about Breast Cancer Action’s work?

Breast cancer is a public health epidemic for which there is a lack of epidemiological data, particularly on prevention. Although the scientific community has identified risk factors that can be potentially prevented, there is still an increase in the incidence of breast cancer. Breast Cancer Action’s Think Before You Pink® campaign is important because it raises awareness of companies that run pink ribbon promotions and appear to support the breast cancer cause, but at the same time produce, manufacture and/or sell products that are linked to the disease. I hope to learn more about pinkwashing and gain experience in campaigning for accountability and ethics in breast cancer fundraising.

What are you looking forward to working on/what do you think are the most pressing issues in breast cancer?

I’m most looking forward to providing a synthesis of ideas and evidence-based data in support of the 2019 Think Before You Pink® campaign. I hope that a successful campaign will influence population-level changes that are needed to begin decreasing breast cancer risk factors.

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By Karuna Jaggar, Executive Director

Just three months after premature approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), new data released at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) challenges the earlier hype surrounding Roche’s immunotherapy atezolizumab (or Tecentriq) to treat metastatic triple-negative breast cancer.

The March 2019 approval of atezolizumab was widely celebrated as a big step forward in treating advanced triple-negative breast cancer—despite the lack of evidence that it helps people live longer or improves their quality of life, and comes with a list price of $13,400 a month!

At the time, I explained Breast Cancer Action’s opposition to the approval and why the FDA shouldn’t use surrogate endpoints like Progression Free Survival for approvals.

Unfortunately, final results from the IMpassion130 study presented at ASCO last week showed no significant overall survival benefit of atezolizumab versus placebo–a huge let down to everyone who so desperately needs new effective treatment for their aggressive breast cancer. Although it’s worth noting that for a subgroup of patients with higher PD-L1 expression, there was a numerical difference of seven months (25 vs. 18 in the placebo group), it was also not statistically significant (with a hazard ratio of 0.71).

Expensive drugs that don’t work do more harm than good. The FDA’s approval should be reserved for safe and effective treatments that have been shown to improve overall survival or quality of life. Anything less is a give-away to Pharma and biotech at the expense of patients.

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By Karuna Jaggar, Executive Director
 
Congress is moving quickly with a plan to let companies patent human genes—overturning our historic Supreme Court win against Myriad Genetics!
 
The notion that a company can own human genes is fundamentally absurd. And Congress’s proposed giveaway to corporations and biotech threatens our health and our lives. Take action now!
 
Ten years, ago Breast Cancer Action joined a lawsuit led by the ACLU that challenged Myriad Genetics’ patent on the human BRCA genes—commonly referred to as the “breast cancer genes”—because the misguided corporate patent was blocking access to life-saving information and blocking progress on breast cancer research.
 
In 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled in our favor that naturally occurring genes are not patentable. Yet, if a bipartisan group of industry-friendly Senators and Representatives have their way, all that would soon change!
 
 
A Senate subcommittee will be holding three hearings in the next week, starting TODAY, on a bill that would invalidate the Supreme Court decision on AMP v. Myriad, as well as two other related cases. 
 
The stakes are high. And no one knows this more than the families who have inherited an extremely high risk of breast and ovarian cancer from harmful BRCA mutations. 
 
For nearly twenty years, Myriad Genetics held a monopoly patent on the human BRCA 1 & BRCA 2 genes, which prevented any other company from offering BRCA testing. This monopoly allowed Myriad to increase the cost of their BRCA test, until it cost several thousand dollars, despite the fact that technological advances should have helped bring the cost down. Before the Supreme Court overturned Myriad’s patent on the BRCA genes, revenue from the test generated close to half a billion dollars a year! 
 
Not only was Myriad’s expensive test out of reach for some people, it also didn’t always provide useful information for those who learned they had a mutation. Some people, especially people of color, got ambiguous results explaining that a mutation had been found, but Myriad couldn’t say if the mutation was harmful or not. And because Myriad refused to allow other companies to provide the test, there was no way to get a second opinion while considering life-changing surgeries. 
 
When the Supreme Court ruled on June 13, 2013 that Myriad could not patent naturally occurring DNA, the real-world impact was immediate and powerful. The day of the ruling, several companies immediately announced they would offer BRCA testing for a fraction of the cost of Myriad’s test, including one test under $1,000. 
 
The bill’s authors already invited Myriad Genetics to participate in roundtable discussions hosted by Sen. Chris Coons and Sen. Thom Tillis as they were drafting their legislation. Now it’s time to make our voices heard!
 
We refuse to go back to the days when corporate greed limited access to potentially life-saving information. Help us stop this bill in its tracks.
 
Contact your Senators and Representative now!
 
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By Lopa Pal, Development Manager
 
Tickets are now available for the 7th Annual Acting Out – For the Health of It variety show and fundraiser. This year we’re holding the event at PianoFight, an intimate, community-driven venue in the heart of San Francisco, on Thursday, June 27. We hope you’ll join our feisty and fearless community as we “act out” to achieve health justice for everyone at risk of and living with breast cancer.
We’ve got a great program in store for you. You’ll laugh out loud at comedian Molly Sanchez’s outrageous comedy and improv, which has been featured at The Los Angeles Comedy Store, the Del Close Marathon, SF Sketchfest and “various hives of scum and villainy all over the world.” You’ll be moved by the personal stories members of the Bay Area Young Survivors will share through powerful readings. And you’ll find it hard to resist swaying to rhythms and melodies of the Caribbean coast of Colombia and Mexico by Calafia Armada
 
And guiding the evening as our host will be musician, composer, poet, and prankster Guinevere Q.
 
Plus, there’s much more in store!
 
Join us for the VIP reception and be treated to appetizers and additional entertainment by pianist Rich Leiter’s unique jazz and R&B spin on Gershwin, Jobim, Motown, and the Beatles.
 
Here are the details:
 
June 27, 2019
5:30-6:30 pm: VIP reception
6:30-8:00 pm: Variety show
Presented at PianoFight, 144 Taylor St, San Francisco, CA
 
sponsor this event
There will be a great selection of silent auction items so come ready to bid!
 
Acting Out is a fun and provocative night of activism and community. It’s a chance to meet fellow Breast Cancer Action members and health justice advocates, enjoy a thought provoking program, and learn more about our work. 
 
We look forward to seeing you on June 27!
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By Susie Lampert, long-time BCAction supporter

Barbara Brenner (L) and Susie Lampert

Barbara Brenner was Breast Cancer Action’s executive director from 1995 to 2010. Under her leadership, the organization grew into a national powerhouse to be reckoned with, taking on the cancer industry like no other. Barbara defined Breast Cancer Action’s persona and voice: fearless, smart, fierce, unapologetic, and, at the same time, compassionate.

Barbara was my partner for 38 years, and the love of my life. She died in 2013 and although she’s been gone for six years, her message and her work lives on through the establishment of the Barbara Brenner Breast Cancer Activist Scholarship.

This scholarship is intended to enable an activist to attend the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, the world’s largest conference devoted specifically to breast cancer. This year’s conference will be held December 10-14.

To find out more about Barbara and her message take some time to read her blog, Healthy Barbs or her book, So Much To Be Done. The Writings of Breast Cancer Activist Barbara Brenner.

Please consider applying, and I hope you’ll join me in spreading the word about the Barbara Brenner Breast Cancer Activist Scholarship and share this unique opportunity with any activists you think might be interested.

Read about the scholarship and how to apply below.

THE BARBARA BRENNER BREAST CANCER ACTIVIST SCHOLARSHIP

The Barbara Brenner Breast Cancer Activist Scholarship will be awarded to an activist who is committed to carrying on Barbara’s practice of telling truth to power and who wishes to attend the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS), the largest scientific meeting in the world devoted exclusively to breast cancer research, treatment and survivorship. The 2019 SABCS will be held December 10-14 at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio, Texas.

Every year, tens of thousands of attendees from more than 90 countries around the world gather at SABCS. They are physicians, researchers and other stakeholders, including activists who want to know – and comment on – what research is being done, what directions it is taking and how it actually affects treatment decisions and outcomes for people who have been diagnosed with breast cancer.

One of the leading activists was Barbara Brenner, Breast Cancer Action’s former executive director. Barbara attended the symposium every year, disseminating her analysis of the information through nightly emails to thousands of followers in Breast Cancer Action’s database. She often asked pointed questions from the microphones and challenged faculty, as when, in response to a presenter’s comment, she famously declared, “Patients don’t fail treatment. Treatment fails patients.”

AWARD

The scholarship is intended to cover the costs of transportation to and from SABCS, conference registration, housing, meals, minor incidental costs while attending the symposium, and a small stipend to cover the potential cost of lost income. The amount of the award in 2019 will be $4,000.

ELIGIBILITY

  1. Must have been diagnosed with breast cancer.
  2. Must be familiar with breast cancer science, and have the ability to write about it for the general public.
  3. Must demonstrate previous breast cancer or health advocacy/activism experience or show why any other experience is relevant.
  4. Must not be employed by or receive funding of any sort from any entity that profits from or contributes to the breast cancer epidemic.

REQUIREMENTS

  1. Must attend the entire conference, including educational sessions, poster sessions, and nightly mentor sessions.
  2. Must live tweet during the conference to relay breaking news and critiques.
  3. Must write 2 blog posts about the conference that will be published on Barbara’s blog,Healthy Barbs, or another site to be identified by the scholarship committee. These articles may also be published elsewhere, with a reference to Healthy Barbs, at the attendee’s discretion, subsequent to their appearance on Healthy Barbs and subject to approval by the scholarship committee.

TO APPLY
Send a personal statement describing your interest, qualifications, and how your attendance at the symposium will further your work in breast cancer activism, along with a CV, by June 30, 2019 to the following email address:

BrennerScholarship@gmail.com

The 2019 recipient will be selected by the Scholarship Committee no later than August 31.

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Breast Cancer Action by Kira Jones - 1M ago
By Karuna Jaggar, Executive Director
 
With your support we are building a national movement to end fracking and dangerous drilling practices that harm our health and increase our risk of cancer.
 
That’s why Breast Cancer Action, along with organizations and frontline leaders across California and around the world are launching #LastChanceAlliance to demand action from California’s new Governor, Gavin Newsom. 
 
Watch and share our launch video to spread the word about this new campaign. 
 
Thanks for joining us in action last year to demand California Governor Jerry Brown ban all new oil and gas infrastructure before he left office. With a new administration comes a new opportunity to expand and build on the progress we’ve already made.
 
That’s why we’re proudly helping lead the #LastChanceAlliance because we know that breast cancer is a public health crisis and a social justice issue. 
 
The rapid expansion of fracking and dangerous drilling over the last decade has positioned the U.S. as one of the top oil producing countries. And California is currently a top oil producing state, in addition to the most populated state in the nation and grows more of our food than anywhere else in the country. In our interconnected world, that means we’re all at risk of exposure to the toxic chemicals used by California’s oil and gas industries.
 
Hundreds of chemicals are used to drill and process fossil fuels, and many of them are linked to breast cancer, as well as other diseases and disorders. Workers and frontline communities, the people who live the closest to oil and gas sites, have increased risks of asthma attacks, higher hospitalization rates, more rashes and upper respiratory problems, and a higher risk of cancer down the road.
 
Without strong action now, we’ll pay the price with our health and our lives for years to come. That’s why we’re calling on Gov. Newsom to put an end to fracking and dangerous drilling that threatens to increase our risk of cancer.
 
Our future depends on what we do today. Thanks for helping us spread the word about the #LastChanceAlliance.
 

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