Loading...

Follow Bad Left Hook on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Three big heavyweight fights from London this Saturday.

This Saturday in London, Matchroom Boxing has a big trio of heavyweight matchups, airing live on DAZN and Sky Box Office.

Let’s take a look at the three fights.

Dillian Whyte vs Oscar Rivas

Whyte (25-1, 18 KO) and Rivas (26-0, 18 KO) will be fighting for the interim WBC title, and a guaranteed shot at the full belt by July 2020. So ends Dillian Whyte’s long battle with the WBC to recognize his status as their No. 1-ranked contender and the guy who’s held their “silver” title for nearly two years.

Whyte, 31, has become a top contender in the division following a Dec. 2015 loss to Anthony Joshua, which was a British title fight back before Joshua had won his first world title. It was expected, actually, that Whyte would rematch Joshua earlier this year at Wembley Stadium, but he wound up turning it down, feeling the deal wasn’t good enough. It was a gamble, but his focus was clearly on that WBC belt, not on Joshua, and at the very least, he has a chance to get a chance. You can debate whether it was worth it or not after seeing Andy Ruiz Jr beat Anthony Joshua in June.

Whyte’s run of wins since that loss to AJ has been solid, but not exactly spectacular: Ivica Bacurin, Dave Allen, Ian Lewison, Dereck Chisora, Malcom Tann, Robert Helenius, Lucas Browne, Joseph Parker, Chisora again. The best wins have been against Parker and Chisora, and all were very competitive.

Rivas, 32, is a former Olympian, a Colombian now based in Montreal. His pro career began a decade ago in Canada, and to be frank, never really went anywhere. Six years in he was still facing the likes of Jason Pettaway, Joey Abell, and Jeremy Bates. Eight years in, Carl Davis Drumond. He was unbeaten, but he wasn’t beating anybody.

After a decision win over MMA veteran Fabio Maldonado in Dec. 2018, which went a full 10 rounds, Rivas got back in the ring six weeks later to face Bryant Jennings in an ESPN+ main event from Verona, New York.

Rivas came in the underdog, as Jennings was the house fighter and the A-side, and for much of the fight, it appeared Jennings was in control. Then in the 12th, Rivas poured it on, feeling he needed a knockout, and he got it just 54 seconds into that final round. (As it turned out, Rivas did not need the KO — he led on split decision scores of 105-104, 106-103, and 103-106, so at worst if he’d just lost a normal round, he’d have left with a draw, but that’s neither here nor there.)

The win over Jennings was the best of Rivas’ pro career and vaulted him into the discussion at heavyweight, at long last. He has a real chance to prove he’s for real on Saturday, but it’s going to be difficult.

Whyte has some physical advantages, standing 6’4” with a 78-inch reach. Rivas is just over 6’0” with a 76½-inch reach. But he has some skills and some pop, and Whyte has been pushed hard before by guys who weren’t exactly elite. It’s a potentially interesting fight and the result will be meaningful as far as future title fights go.

Dereck Chisora vs Artur Szpilka Photo by Shaun Brooks/Action Plus via Getty Images

The 35-year-old Chisora (30-9, 21 KO) is a weird, inconsistent fighter, and now a veteran who is what he is: a solid second-tier heavyweight who, on the right night, can be a very tough out.

Back in 2011-12, Chisora lost four of five fights, dropping bouts against Tyson Fury, Robert Helenius (this one was a robbery), Vitali Klitschko, and David Haye. Then he won a few, then he lost to Fury again. Then he won a few, then he lost to Kubrat Pulev and Dillian Whyte in 2016. He lost to Agit Kabayel in 2017, he lost to Whyte again in 2018.

Now working with trainer Dave Coldwell, he came back in April and won a deadly dull decision over Senad Gashi. Gashi had no intention of engaging with Chisora, who was happy to coast, working under some idea that in his mid-30s he could become a boxer first instead of a brawler.

But if anyone can bring out the crazy old brawling Chisora, it’s Artur Szpilka. Szpilka (22-3, 15 KO) picked up a little hype years back, then lost to Bryant Jennings in 2014, and to Deontay Wilder and Adam Kownacki in back-to-back fights in 2016-17. Like Chisora, he is what he is, but he can be fun to watch.

At their cores, both Chisora and Szpilka are pretty wild dudes, the type who can rather easily get into a batty dust-up where the fists are just flying. Chisora may not come in with that plan, but Szpilka is the type who can pull it out of him. If we’re lucky, it’ll be a war, and if Szpilka gets his way, that should be what it is. But you never know, Chisora’s been in some snoozers over the years.

Dave Allen vs David Price Photo by James Chance/Getty Images

Allen (17-4-2, 14 KO) and Price (24-6, 19 KO) are a couple of likable heavyweight fighters who don’t waste time trying to jab and play defense, so I wouldn’t expect this one to last too long.

The big reason is that Price, once a blue chip prospect but long busted, has about three or four rounds of fight in him anymore. His chin isn’t much and his stamina isn’t any better. So if he doesn’t blast opponents out pretty early, or they aren’t hopelessly overmatched, he’s just not going to win. At 36, Price has accepted what he is, and so has everyone else.

Allen, 27, has always been easy to root for, a funny and genuinely charismatic guy, both things kind of rare for boxing. Even more rare, he’s always been candid about his setbacks and shortcomings. He’s a blue collar everyman sort, and for years, frankly, he looked like one — a bit doughy in the midsection, wouldn’t easily be mistaken for a bodybuilder. After turning pro in 2012 with a weight of 232, he got up to 272 for a fight in May 2018, and then was over 260 for a loss to Tony Yoka in June 2018.

Over the years, it looked as though Allen would just be a solid journeyman type. He lost to Dillian Whyte and Luis Ortiz in 2016, Lenroy Thomas in 2017, Yoka in 2018. But then last July, a month after losing to Yoka, something changed for Allen in the ring.

He was matched with unbeaten prospect Nick Webb, and knocked Webb out in the fourth round. He won two more fights to close out the year, then was 13 pounds lighter than his previous fight when he faced Lucas Browne in April, a main event fight at London’s O2 Arena. Looking in the best shape he’d been in in quite a while, Allen drilled the old veteran with a body shot and knocked him out in three.

It’s true that Browne is/was quite well past it, but it was still a career-best win for Allen, and as he’s said a few times, in boxing but especially the heavyweight division, you’re always just a couple fights away from maybe getting a world title shot. This matchup with Price is one he should win, and then maybe you match him with the Chisora-Szpilka winner later this year. By the end of 2020, if he keeps winning, Dave Allen of all the people could be in a world title fight.

Bad Left Hook will have live coverage of Whyte vs Rivas starting at 1 pm ET on Saturday, July 20, streaming live on DAZN
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images

The event takes place at Staples Center in Los Angeles

Good news: awesome doubleheader. Bad news: pay-per-view.

Lance Pugmire reports that the long-brewing welterweight unification between Errol Spence Jr. and Shawn Porter will take place September 28th at Los Angeles’ Staples Center, while Mike Coppinger adds that David Benavidez will challenge Anthony Dirrell for the WBC super middleweight title in the pay-per-view co-feature.

According to Pugmire, an official announcement could come “by this weekend.”

We’ve known about both fights for a while; Dirrell (33-1-1, 24 KO) vs. Benavidez (21-0, 18 KO) was originally thought to be part of the Deontay Wilder-Luis Ortiz II undercard, but that fight was recently pushed back to November. Spence (25-0, 21 KO) vs. Porter (30-2-1, 17 KO), meanwhile, had been tentatively linked to Barclays Center, which both men have frequently patronized in recent years.

From a matchmaking and entertainment standpoint, this is a terrific pair of fights. Can’t say I agree with locking the card behind a paywall, though, especially since PBC will want as many eyes on Spence as possible while they work on a Terence Crawford unification. Plus, Benavidez has the tools to be a star, so he could use as much exposure as possible.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

The fight will take place in the United States

Guess they weren’t kidding about it being “nearly finalized.”

IBF light heavyweight champion Artur Beterbiev took to social media today to announce that he’d signed a contract to fight WBC champion Oleksandr Gvozdyk on October 18th.

Good news! I signed a contract for unification fight with Oleksandr Gvozdyk @alex_gvozdyk for #IBF and #WBC belts. The bout will be on 18 October, USA.

У меня отличная новость! Я подписал контракт на объединительный бой с Александром Гвоздиком @alex_gvohttps://t.co/ZVv11RJrX7 pic.twitter.com/QPvc7UKHTi

— Artur Beterbiev (@ABeterbiev) July 17, 2019

As far as probably locations, your guess is as good as mine; Beterbiev (14-0, 14 KO) usually competes in either Chicago or California, while Gvozdyk (17-0, 14 KO) has fought all around the States. Beterbiev was last seen beating Radivoje Kalajdzic in Stockton, Gvozdyk defeating Doudou Ngumbu in Philadelphia. We do know it’ll air on either ESPN+ or ESPN, seeing as both men fight under the Top Rank banner.

Not much more to say that we haven’t already. It’s still a terrific fight between two dangerous, skilled, and highly entertaining light heavyweights that can end a fight at any given moment. We’ll pass along anything we hear in the coming weeks, which by the looks of things could be quite a lot.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Mayweather Promotions

Miller faces Corrales on July 27’s Showtime card.

Lightweight Ladarius Miller is set to return to action on July 27, facing former 130-pound titleholder Jezzrel Corrales in Baltimore on the Gervonta Davis-Ricardo Nunez card, which airs on Showtime.

Miller (19-1, 6 KO) has won 10 in a row since a loss in 2016, and now is hoping to emerge as a real contender at 135. The 25-year-old fighter, based in Las Vegas, spoke about the upcoming fight from training camp.

Ladarius Miller

“Building off of my last camp and fight, which was on the Gervonta Davis vs Hugo Ruiz card, and bringing that energy into this camp has really helped. My goal is to do everything better, go harder, and add a few things that will help to better prepare me but also to work smarter.

“The main thing is we’ve been working hard and going the extra mile. Whether it’s more rounds on the bag and in sparring or extra miles during my runs. I’ve sparred with some veterans who have helped me tweak little things here and there. I had the chance to work with some of the younger top-level guys.”

“Floyd (Mayweather) has come in the gym a few times and watched me work and gave me some pointers while I was working the bag, he’s always helped me throughout my career to get better as a fighter. Leonard (Ellerbe) always makes the time to give me motivation any time he sees me. They both watch me to see how I’m developing as a fighter and keep me focused.”

“I’ve faced many of the toughest contenders in my division. It shows that I can be one of the best in my weight class as long as I continue to work hard. Having said that, preparing for a guy like Corrales who’s also a former world champion isn’t anything new for me, but I don’t look past him as an opponent.”

“I’ve watched a few (of Corrales’) fights. I’ve seen a few mistakes he’s made and I know what he does well. I’m really prepared for this fight. I know I’m going to win. I’ve prepared myself to perform at my highest peak. Whatever he decides to show in the ring, I’m prepared for it all.”

“The fact that I can see myself getting closer to my dream and goal of becoming a world champion is motivation enough. Each morning I wake up and it’s the first thing on my mind and it’s the last thing on my mind when I go to sleep. No matter how tired I may get in camp, knowing what’s right in front of me is the motivation. These are life-changing opportunities ahead for me and I want that title shot and I’m going to get it.”

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

Despite some controversy, Keith Thurman has done his job selling Saturday’s showdown with Manny Pacquiao.

Keith Thurman gets an A for his pre-fight performance in the arena of talking and hyping up his Saturday clash against Manny Pacquiao.

As when he asserted, in bold and convincing fashion, Tuesday: “I’m living a dream. I’m not Martin Luther King, but he said it for us all,” said the 30-year-old hitter from Florida, who owns a 29-0 record.

“Years ago, that he had a dream, that a young brother like me could be great in America. I’m striving for greatness. I’m fighting a great fighter, a legend in the sport,” he continued, pacing his oratory masterfully. He understands the power of the pause, how boldness of delivery effects perceived credibility. “My moment is here, my moment is now.”

And with that, my perception of the welterweight battle shifted a portion of a point. Thurman seems to be a man on a mission. And I recall his wording after his fight against Josesito Lopez, at Barclays Center, in January. He then told media post-fight that Floyd Mayweather had influenced him, that several years into his pro career, he understood how Floyd did it.

He didn’t need to win every second of every round, gun for KOs, risk more to potentially give more bang for the buck to the patrons. No, he’d lose a round here or there, all the better to marshal his resources, his stamina. He called Floyd Mayweather “the best seven-round fighter ever.” I expect Thurman will seek to do that come Saturday. is that the right POV, being that maybe Manny Pacquiao is the cash cow fave and also the sentimental favorite in Vegas? Time will tell.

Thurman, he’s been A-grade in the talk department. Well, some might argue his July 14 statement on “Inside PBC Boxing,” hosted by Kate Abdo, who was joined on set by Mikey Garcia, and Shawn Porter, wasn’t totally exemplary.

He said he was enjoying the heck out of the pre-fight buildup, but yeah, he does get strained at times with all the questions and such. Porter asked Thurman about being on such a PPV card, and noted that his wife will be present on site for the first time.

From a remote location, in Tampa, Thurman sort of stepped in it, according to some folks who didn’t dig it when he said, “According to the bookies, I’m the B-side, right? We’ve been talking, now, I started off on the A-side, now you go to the B-side, but the performance hasn’t happened yet, right? You can look at it many different ways, you can look at it as a lot of people don’t like how Keith Thurman’s been talking. Maybe I didn’t get underneath Manny Pacquiao’s skin, but I got under the skin of a lot of different Filipinos. We know that the Asians like to gamble, Shawn (Porter). You’ve been through the casinos, you know the Asians are in there bettin’ money all day. So they live, they live, they hyped. They don’t like what Keith Thurman has to say, they wanna see Keith Thurman go down. And he started off as the underdog, at first there was some money to make, now the odds are a little bit shifted, but it’s still not bad odds if you like betting Manny Pacquiao. You know, Vegas is a betting city. At the end of the day, I’m happy, cause when I go to cash in, I’m gonna get paid this time.”

Yes, he went there, he tossed out a contention, which is a stereotype, about Asians. Now, I do not off-hand know the level of truth in his assertion from the perspective of a breakdown on gambling habits of particular races/ethnicities/groups of people. To be sure, Thurman isn’t the first person I’ve heard state that he thinks Asians love to gamble. Google it, you will get hits. But in the age we are in, with social media giving a bigger megaphone to average Joes and Janes, there is greater likelihood that someone will get counter-punched for engaging in stereotyping. These are contentious times we live in, almost across all the boards.

Yes, Thurman has been vocally very active in this leadup to the big bout, and no, that’s not at all bad for business.

Ultimately, though, the chatter, the controversy, all of that will fade, and the quality of the battle, of the two men in that arena, will override. Unless, of course, we get a controversial decision, and on Sunday morning, at 1 am, we are all abuzz with talk about yet another black eye for boxing.

Boxing, theater of the unexpected, can actually be described as rather predictable, in that the black eyes pop up all the time. The unexpected part, I guess, is from what angle they are delivered.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
https://twitter.com/SkySportsBoxing/status/1151473898287980544

Whyte has been the WBC #1 contender for over 600 days

This Saturday’s London tussle between Dillian Whyte and Oscar Rivas will, as expected, have both the WBC interim heavyweight title and a future crack at champion Deontay Wilder on the line.

Eddie Hearn goes into a bit more detail here.

WINNER FACES WILDER? @EddieHearn confirmed @DillianWhyte will become WBC mandatory if he beats Oscar Rivas and that fight could happen in May or June 2020 ✅ pic.twitter.com/B8zEdXqJtw

— Sky Sports Boxing (@SkySportsBoxing) July 17, 2019

As Hearn mentions, though the WBC mandates that Wilder face the winner by the end of May 2020, there’s a bit of a timing issue. “The Bronze Bomber” presently has his eyes on rematches with Luis Ortiz and Tyson Fury, the former of which is looking more likely for November than the original planned date of September 28th. Two fights in six months isn’t unreasonable, all things considered, but this is the modern age of boxing.

In any event, Whyte (25-1, 18 KO) is probably the most interesting Wilder foe to not hold a belt at the moment, so I’d be perfectly fine watching the two go at it, and if Rivas (26-0, 18 KO) pulls off the upset, then I’d say he’s earned hsi shot.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images

Canelo was expected to fight on Sept. 14, but now will not.

Canelo Alvarez has taken pride over the years in fighting on the two major Mexican holiday-associated fight weekends — Cinco de Mayo in May, Mexican Independence in September — but this year, he won’t.

Alvarez (52-1-2, 35 KO) did fight on May 4, beating Daniel Jacobs via decision, and was expected to return on Sept. 14, but he’s postponing his return, and will not be in action in September after all.

Golden Boy says the “decision was made in an effort to secure the right opponent and to do justice to the level of promotion required for a boxing star of his magnitude.”

On paper, fair enough. Alvarez, 28, has been attached to several possible opponents for the September date, but that’s now two months away and by all reports, no deal is even close to done.

“As a Mexican, it’s a responsibility and an honor to represent my country in both May and September,” said Canelo. “Those are my dates. However, as a world champion in multiple weight classes, I also have the responsibility of delivering the most exciting and competitive fights possible. That’s why Golden Boy and my team have decided to postpone the date in order to do right by my fans by promoting the best fight possible and with the best opponent possible.”

As for the Sept. 14 date, I wouldn’t be at all surprised to see Canelo rival Gennadiy Golovkin slip in and take that for himself with a fight on DAZN. And for Alvarez, a November or December return seems most likely, which when you combine that with other fights seemingly destined for that time frame — Ruiz-Joshua II, Wilder-Ortiz II, maybe Tyson Fury’s return — could make for a pretty big bang at the end of the year.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Photo by J. Yim/Getty Images

PBC airs it’s promotional video ahead of this weekend’s welterweight title fight between Manny Pacquiao and Keith Thurman.

Ahead of their July 20th fight on FOX PPV, WBA welterweight titleholder Keith Thurman sits down with future Hall of Famer Manny Pacquiao to talk about this weekend’s title fight. Check out some excerpts of their face-to-face meeting below...

Pacquiao on if he’s taken Thurman’s trash talk personal, with Thurman saying he wants to send him into retirement:

“For me, like I said, all those words give me more inspiration and determination, encouragement to work hard. Believe me.

“It’s nothing personal. I’ve been in this business more than two decades so we’re gonna do our job in the ring.”

Thurman’s responds to Pacquiao:

“This is my moment and this is my fight! He’s fighting for my belt and yet it’s as if the world has forgot. So I wanted to stab him a lil’ bit, hit him where it hurts, because if he didn’t feel it, oh, his family felt it. Oh, when I said I’m gonna crucify the man they said ‘Ooohhh. Aahhhh.’ It’s almost as if they had a crown of thorns on them themselves. They felt it.

“Now we all know that Jesus Christ was resurrected, but not to walk this earth again. He was in spirit, he gave messages, he gives guidance, he forever love, right? And Manny Pacquiao, when he retires, he too will be forever loved.”

Pacquiao on Thurman’s Jesus talk:

“Well, I keep my mouth shut. Let him talk. Let my fists talk in the ring.”

Thurman:

“...or let his fists do absolutely nothing when I dodge everything, you know.

“Deep down Manny Pacquiao’s saying ‘I’m gonna fuck you up,’ but he doesn’t wanna say it. Deep down he’s saying ‘I’m gonna knock you out too,’ but he doesn’t wanna say it. But at the end of the day I just believe the hour glass is almost finished. He doesn’t have much left. Go play basketball, Manny! You say you like to play basketball everyday, go shoot hoops with the guys, man.”

Pacquiao:

“After July 20.”

Pacquiao on if any of Thurman’s talk is getting to him:

“No.”

Thurman:

“Words don’t penetrate defense, offense penetrates defense. Manny Pacquiao’s one of the few fighters that knows that best.”

Thurman on if he’s worried about ‘poking the bear’ with Pacquiao:

“It’s not a bear. It’s closer to a dinosaur, you know what I mean? I already said he has the T-Rex arms. Everybody’s talking about how fast he is. Manny Pacquiao, T-Rex arms, ‘bop bop bop’ and they’re like ‘Wooohhh! Pacquiao’s ready, Pacquiao’s gonna knock out Thurman!’ You know, he doesn’t have to say it, the fans say it for him on his account. They already back him, he feels the love, he feels some of the hate. But just like me, hate, you flip it around, it motivates. I hope my words motivate him to fight a harder fight because to me it’s just gonna make it an easier night.”

Pacquiao on if he thinks Thurman is trying to bait him:

“...like I said, more than two decades in the boxing, I experienced all those hardest fights in life. Like when I fight De La Hoya, I fight Miguel Cotto, I fight Morales, Marquez, Hatton, Margarito — which is much, much taller than me — nobody will intimidate me.”

Thurman:

“It’s impossible. I can see it, you know. But that’s because I’m a champion too, right. It’s just a fight...it’s not the first, it’s not the last, but this will be the first time you’ve experienced my punch. It’s gonna be the first time I experience your punch. I’m looking forward to it, I know you’re looking forward to it, [the fans] should be looking forward to it.”

Pacquiao on what made him select Thurman as his next opponent:

“That’s the reason I pick him, to be my opponent, because of his style. He love to fight toe to toe and he throw a lot of punches. I love that.”

Thurman:

“What I’m looking forward to is seeing how badly Manny backs up the few words that he says, which is that he wanted to be exciting, he wants to trade, he wants to exchange. But in that last fight when they said to him ‘Manny, how do you feel?’ He said ‘I feel good.’ In my head, at home, I said ‘man, he felt good because he didn’t get punched in the face. He felt good because he didn’t get hit to the body.’ How good is he gonna feel after 12 rounds foo boxing with your man right here, Keith ‘One Time’ Thurman?”

Pacquiao on how much he respects what Thurman will be bringing to the ring:

“I always respect my opponent. Every opponent I have, I have respect for them. And in the ring, that’s different — doing my job in the ring to make the fans happy.”

Pacquiao on now being 40 years old but not showing much signs of slowing down:

“It’s not happening. Boxing’s my passion and I love to continue my journey.”

Thurman:

“You know, I’ve watched Manny for many years. The first time truly being face to face and I’m trying to look for some grey hair, you know, I don’t really see much. You know, he doesn’t look too aged. He’s got that Asian blood in him, he still looks like he’s almost 15 years old here, you know. But does he move like he’s 15? After he gets punched is he gonna be able to recover like a young fighter. But the few words that Manny said, I can already tell he’s addicted to the fight game. He says he loves it too much. He says he’s ready for it, I hope so, because I’m gonna bring it.”

Pacquiao on if he thinks Thurman is still the same fighter he was before the injuries:

“As a boxer I understand what happened to him. Two years of layoff from boxing, it’s hard to come back right away...but it’s good for him because he survived the last fight. But I’m pretty sure he’s different for this fight. He’s already come back and he will work hard. He work hard for this fight. I know he’s focused and thinking he need to train hard to make sure 100% conditioned.”

Thurman:

“It’s been a long time since we’ve seen Manny Pacquiao severely hurt and injured in that ring. I would love to be the man that destroys Manny Pacquiao. He could’ve picked Shawn Porter, he could’ve picked Danny Garcia, they got Mikey Garcia, you got Errol Spence. I don’t think any of the fights, the critics — speaking like a critic — would say ‘Manny Pacquiao beat every welterweight in the welterweight division today.’...

“He wants to be a champion and prove that age is nothing but a number, that some athletes are special, and that they can achieve things that some people can barely think is possible. I believe that’s what inspires him to step in the ring with me come July 20th.”

Thurman on if he thinks he can stop Pacquiao:

“Of course. I mean he’s like this big. You know, he’s this big and my punch is THIS BIG. You feel me? Manny Pacquiao, I told you, It’s ‘One Time’, he’s gonna feel it from the first round. I’m not AB, I’m not all about defense. He’s gonna have to survive my offense.”

Pacquiao on what weaknesses he sees in Thurman:

“I saw his weakness but I won’t tell you that.”

Thurman:

“He sees weakness in me, I see weakness in him. Not in the fighting spirit, of course. You know, this is nothing new for me, this is nothing new for him. I can’t wait, I wish the fight was tomorrow.”

Pacquiao on what he thinks this fight will look like inside the ring:

“All I can say is more action, a lot of boxing in the ring. Gonna be a war in the ring. It’s gonna be a lot of boxing.”

Thurman:

“‘Bam, bam, bam, bam, bam.’ That’s what you can expect.”

On who Thurman thinks has the speed advantage:

“I think my speed is underestimated. I think Pacquiao is fast but what makes him so fast is that he’s relentless, this hand, that hand...and then the combination, you get to see it continuously come out as fast as he can let ‘em fly. I don’t know if my combinations look that fast, but when I’m in the ring with people I know that I get right in between [their punches] in those special moments. And it’s my speed that opens up other opportunities in that ring.”

Pacquiao on if he thinks he has the overwhelming speed advantage:

“...we know the fact that I’m faster than him. We know that.”

Thurman on who has the power advantage:

“How many knockouts you got, Manny? You have so many fights. You have so many fights, champ. How many knockouts you got?”

Pacquiao:

“40.”

Thurman:

“40? Tremendous. Tremendous. Look, Manny Pacquiao is great, he will forever be great, and it will be great to defeat him on July 20th. I’m truly looking forward to it.”

Pacquiao on how he sees the fight with Thurman ending:

“It’s gonna be a lot of boxing, good fight, more action in the ring.

“Good fight. I mean, both of us are working hard in training so we will use that in the ring.”

Thurman on his prediction:

“I predict a great fight just like Manny Pacquiao. I predict that he will be broken down at some point in the fight. And ultimately, when that final bell rings, the verdict will be ‘AND STILLLL UNDEFEATED...’ Keith ‘One Time’ Thurman.”

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Keith Thurman talks about this weekend’s title defense against Manny Pacquiao.

With just a few days left before Keith Thurman defends his WBA title against Manny Pacquiao, Thurman makes his grand arrival in Las Vegas and chats with reporters on his thoughts on the fight. Check out some of what Thurman had to say...

Thurman on his matchup with Pacquiao:

“You know, I remember growing up and doing some strength work and they used to say if you have short arms and you’re lifting weights, there’s an advantage against — you know, if you’re lifting 250 comparison with someone like yourself, with these long arms trying to lift the same 250, right, short arms can just keep pumping out a little quicker, a little easier. It’s as if they’re built for heavy lifting, okay.

“I also believe that short arms accumulates in speed as well, right? If you’ve got long arms like Muhammad Ali and, you know, Muhammad Ali was fast, Roy Jones Jr. was fast — they had tremendous speed. But can you compare that speed to a lightweight fighter? And we all know that Manny Pacquiao is a lightweight fighter. So lightweight fighters, not only do they have higher punch outputs on average, but they come into the ring with tremendous hand speed.

“The advantage is, he does have short arms. So if he wants to hit me he has to be in a zone that I can hit him. And to make up for those short arms he’s utilized a tactic throughout his career that’s also very fast, and that’s his in-and-out movement, his feet. So not only does Manny Pacquiao have fast hand work, he has fast footwork. Ultimately it can be a problem. He might slip a few good punches in. He might catch me off guard. Like I said in the face-to-face, it’s just another fight. It’s just another black eye. Ain’t nothing that we ain’t never felt before. If he gets be down he better have me out because I’m coming. I wanna trade with Pacquiao, ‘cause like Ben Getty used to tell me ever since I was 13, 14 years old: “I don’t care who it is, boy, you hit him with 8oz gloves, they gonna do a pretty lil’ dance.” Manny Pacquiao’s no different.”

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Bad Left Hook by Patrick L. Stumberg - 1d ago

Khan recently announced that Pacquiao had signed to fight him on November 8th in Saudi Arabia

In what’s sure to be shocking news, Amir Khan appears to be full of it.

“The Dibstroyer” put together a press conference today to announce that Manny Pacquiao had signed a contract to fight him in Riyadh on November 8th. As it turns out, he either jumped the gun or forgot the gun entirely. Pacquiao’s publicist, Fred Sternberg, emphatically denied the claims.

But Pacquiao’s spokesperson Fred Sternberg told BBC Sport: “Manny has not signed any contract.

”As far as I know it hasn’t been even discussed,” Sternberg added on Tuesday.

Pacquiao himself seemed dumbfounded when asked about Khan’s comments. The Filipino legend takes on Keith Thurman for the WBA “super” welterweight title this Saturday.

Mocking Khan is a beloved pastime here at Bad Left Hook, but I feel like we’re playing into his hands, as controversy is all the former Olympic silver medalist has left. Since surviving Marcos Maidana in 2010, Khan’s most notable victories have come against Devon Alexander and Chris Algieri, both of whom had suffered recent losses; he has just one victory over a currently ranked fighter, his 2014 decision against present WBO #10 Luis Collazo. He stays in discussion by saying dumb things and challenging people he’ll never actually fight.

Once this idiocy blows over, I anticipate a fresh flood of idiocy regarding Kell Brook.

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview