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From the fashionable to the functional, we round up the best Father’s Day gifts for every type of dad.

We don’t mean to alarm you, but Father’s Day 2019 is only a matter of weeks away. However, if like us you’re a bit of a Last-minute Lucy when it comes to gift buying (let’s be honest, shopping for someone else just isn’t as fun, is it?), there’s no need to stress just yet. We’ve scoured the internet for all the best Father’s Day gifts and ideas.

Whether you’re on the hunt for the perfect present for your other half, or a dad looking to point your kids in the right direction, there’s something for every type of father figure in our 2019 gift guide.

When is Father’s Day 2019?

Father’s Day falls on the third Sunday of June. This year, it is on Sunday 16 June.

Father’s Day Gifts Cotton Shorts from Stitched Shorts

With everyone’s fingers crossed for a long, hot summer there’s no better time to treat Dad to a wardrobe upgrade. A fresh take on a summer staple, each pair of these cotton boasts a flash of bright colour with the signature contrast stitching and lining.

The Babylon Sky Blue Cotton Shorts, £69. Biscuiteers.com.

It’s long been considered that dads and BBQs go together like fish and chips, bread and butter and tea and biscuits. Why not combine the two this Father’s Day with a delicious tin of Biscuiteers biscuits delivered straight to the door.

If BBQs are more of a safety hazard than a summer tradition in your household, the biscuit aficionados at Biscuiteers have a whole collection of hand-iced treats dedicated to dads.

Golf Letterbox Biscuits, £20. Galagojoe.com.

Kid’s Navy and Magenta Gorilla Trunks, £35. cityoflondondistillery.com.

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Enter our latest competition for the chance to win a Silver Cross Jet pushchair

As the summer holidays are just around the corner, we’re celebrating by teaming up with Silver Cross to offer the perfect travel companion – the clever Silvercross Jet pushchair.

This ultra-compact lightweight buggy – suitable from birth up to 15kg – folds up so small that it can be stowed away in an overhead locker, and its nifty design means you wheel it like a small suitcase! It also comes with a handy cover to keep things tidy.

Mini globetrotters will love features like the soft, padded lie-flat seat, multi-position recline and adjustable calf support, designed to keep them super comfortable. The lockable front swivel wheels and dynamic spring suspension provide a smooth ride, and the five-point safety harness keeps your precious one safe and secure.

We love the fully extendable UPF50+ hood, which has an air-flow ventilation system, pop-out sun visor and viewing window, while the flip-flop-friendly brakes are a doddle to use.

To be in with a chance of winning, simply enter your details in the form below. Good luck!

Ts & Cs: The competition closes at 11:59pm on 18 June.

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Enter our latest competition for the chance to win a two-night stay at Cary Arms and Spa in Devon

Sitting pretty in the sheltered haven of Babbacombe Bay on the south Devon coast, Cary Arms and Spa on the Beach is bursting with coastal charm, making it the perfect spot for your last holiday as a two, or your first family holiday with babe in arms.

Combining all the personality and values of a traditional English inn with the style and comfort of the best luxury hotels in Devon, guests of all ages will appreciate the outstanding setting and breathtaking views all year round.

This wonderful boutique hotel is offering a fantastic prize to one very lucky Baby magazine reader – after all, if you’re carrying a baby or are now fully-fledged proud parents, then you deserve a well-earned break.

The winner will receive a two-night stay in a luxury room with a hearty breakfast to set them up each morning, and as a real treat, choose from a 50-minute Tailored Body Massage, Tailored Thalgo Facial or Thalgo Pregnancy Massage at the glass faceted sea-facing spa, which boasts a waterfall hydrotherapy pool, relaxation area, steam room, sauna, exotic experience shower, gym and three treatment rooms.

For one evening, enjoy superb seaside gastro dining, with a three-course meal for two included in the prize. If you’re joined by baby, fear not: the relaxed atmosphere is to be enjoyed even by the youngest of diners as the inn still holds the charm and character from when it was originally built in the 1880s.

Foodies can expect seasonal and locally sourced dishes with superb Devon beef, Lyme Bay lobster and line-caught seafood sitting alongside delicious traditional English heritage plates. A stay at Cary Arms and Spa is just the ticket for relaxation, hearty food and sublime views.

To be in with a chance of winning, simply enter your details in the form below. Good luck!

Ts & Cs: The competition closes at 11:59pm on 18 June. The prize is subject to availability Sunday to Thursday and excludes school holidays and bank holidays. Must be redeemed by 23 December 2019.

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Welcome to the Neev Spencer column. Each month, DJ and presenter Neev she shares her latest adventures in motherhood. First up, Neev talks babymoons and brings us her top picks from the worlds of beauty and baby.

Hi there, welcome to my new online column! I hope you’re enjoying this glorious time of year. I have just returned from a week’s babymoon in Tenerife which was absolute pure bliss.  

We stayed at the family-friendly Luxury Ritz Carlton Resort and I wish I could turn back time and do it all over again. Our last family break just the 3 of us was so memorable.

As I go into my 7th month of pregnancy I’m relishing in the time I have with my daughter Genevieve, I feel everything is going to change soon and I’m trying to make sure I give her as much of my time as I can.

Genevieve enjoying the sun in Tenerife.

A few things really got us through our travels this month. The Silvercross Jet lightweight buggy was great for the airports & sleepy toddler moments. It easily folds into aircraft overhead locker cabin size so takes away that hassle of trying to check in the buggy or wait for it to be placed in the hold.

The heat is really messing with my body at the moment, I found using cooling gels and non-tight maternity wear so helpful.  I loved the Asos Maternity range for all my posey babymoon shots and Tiffany Rose for the dinner time dress-ups and stylish day wear.

Toddler fashion wise M & Co do the cutest summer wear and it’s really affordable. For something a bit more special Rachel Riley has the dreamiest dresses for little girls.

Convenience is everything for me right now so our new Toyota Magenta Aygo town car has been a total godsend for all the local nursery trips and supermarkets runs. With the new car arriving I decided to change my little girl’s car seat so her old one could be put aside for the new baby.

Toyota Aygo

After much research I went for a Mothercare Exclusive,  the Joie Every Stage 123 fx. It’s always important with something like car safety to go to a renowned brand like Mothercare that have rated the various seats so you can really investigate what suits your needs.  

That pesky pregnancy insomnia and evening achiness has now kicked in. I’m going to up my weekly pregnancy yoga at Yoga West with Rebecca Tieken to try and relieve my body and mind of some of these new stresses.  

In the meantime, however, the Bloom & Blossom Night Time Ritual Trio has been working wonders. Taking a lukewarm bath before bed and using the products have definitely helped me and bump ease off into a better slumber.

I’ve also been using their Toddler range as Genevieve has started experiencing nightmares for the first time. I love their Roald Dahl range for kids and our new bedtime ritual of ‘banishing bad dreams’ with the help of their ‘magic’ Dream Catchers Pillow Spray is really working!

Neev’s Top Picks Bloom & Blossom Night Time Ritual

My new night time routine! I take a lukewarm bath before bed then use Bloom and Blossom Night-Time Ritual Trio. It has definitely helped me and bump to ease into a better slumber.

Sleep Night-Time Ritual Trio, £24, Silvercross Jet Stroller 

Silvercross Jet Stroller, £225. Buy now from Mothercare.

Rachel Riley Dresses for Girls

Flamingo Jersey Dress, £45.

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What to expect at 13 weeks pregnant. Everything you need to know as you reach the end of your first trimester.

At 13 weeks pregnant your first trimester is now over and you’re heading into your second. There have been lots of changes going on in your body and your baby has been rapidly developing over the last few weeks. This has brought on new feelings, emotions and side effects you may not have experienced before. Thankfully, you might notice some of the unpleasant symptoms from the early stages of pregnancy easing off at this point.

However, as your baby continues to grow, and your body produces varying levels of pregnancy hormones, there are still a number of pregnancy symptoms you’re likely to experience at week 13. Read on for everything you can expect from your body and your baby at 13 weeks pregnant.

Think you missed something? Re-visit what to expect at 12 weeks pregnant or head over to our pregnancy week by week guide for more information at every stage of your pregnancy.

Your Baby at 13 Weeks Pregnant

By the end of your first trimester, your baby is about the size of a lemon. At 13 weeks pregnant, the foetus is usually 2.9 inches (just over 7cm) and weighs nearly 23 grams. Your baby’s body is lengthening, and so now the head equates to about 1/3 of its body size. Although their eyes are now forming, they still won’t open for another few weeks. At this point, your baby’s eyelids are fused shut.

After developing the ability to suck over the previous couple of weeks, your little one may begin sucking their thumb and fingers at this stage. Additionally, your baby will start to swallow the amniotic fluid. This is mainly just water, but also contains vital nutrients needed for further growth and development. Your baby will also start to pass the remaining fluid as urine produced in his kidneys.

At 13 weeks, if you’re having a girl she will have finished developing her ovaries and they will now contain around two million eggs. If your baby is a boy, his testicles will have formed but his penis is still growing.
13 Weeks Pregnant Symptoms

As you head into your second trimester, your early pregnancy symptoms may settle and many woman claim they discover a new lease of energy after the three-month stage.

However, there are still a number of side-effects and symptoms that may affect you at 13 weeks pregnant and beyond.

Dizziness and feeling faint

The extra blood pumping around your body can cause you to feel light-headed, dizzy and even faint. To ease these symptoms, try and remember to stand up and sit down slowly and keep sugar levels up with regular (healthy) snacks. If you feel faint, make sure you take a seat and rest up as soon as possible.

Visible veins

The increased blood flow will also cause your veins to become more visible. Although, you might not appreciate this aesthetically, it’s a good sign as it means there’s an increased blood supply to your growing baby.

Heightened sense of smell

You may notice that you’re still sensitive to certain smells and tastes at three months pregnant.

Food cravings

As you approach your second trimester, your fluctuating hormones might lead to a hankering for unusual foods and strange culinary combinations.

Constipation

As progesterone levels increase, one side effect can be constipation. This often occurs around the second and third month but may worsen as your pregnancy continues.

Bloating, indigestion and heartburn

This pesky progesterone has a lot to answer for. Increased levels of the hormone in your body can also cause bloating at 13 weeks pregnant. This is because it slows down the digestion process so that there’s more time to pass the nutrients on to your baby. However, in doing so, your growing uterus will squash and press onto your stomach and intestines. Your hormones also relax the valve between your stomach and esophagus, causing heartburn.

Higher energy levels

One positive symptom many women experience as they enter their second trimester is a lease of energy. This is because the placenta begins to kick into action and takes over the job of providing nutrients for your baby.

Increased sex drive

Another plus, with higher energy levels and a new rush of hormones, you may find yourself with increased libido. It’s said your new-found high sex drive can even have health benefits for you and your baby. These include improved mood, better sleep and tightening of your pelvic floor muscles – which can help speed up your recovery after birth. However, doctors advise you should abstain if you have a history of early labour miscarriage.

Your Body at 13 Weeks Pregnant

By the end of your third month of pregnancy, your placenta will be fully developed. This means it will take over the role of making sure your baby gets enough oxygen and nutrients via the umbilical cord. It’s also responsible for getting rid of waste products and producing the hormones needed for the rest of your baby’s development.

For some women, the 13-week stage is when you might start to see the beginnings of a baby bump. It’s normal to start showing anywhere between 12 to 16 weeks, however, other women might not have a bump until well into their second trimester.

13 Weeks Pregnant Ultrasound

This is where things get exciting. From about 10 or 11 weeks you’ll be ready for your first of two very important scans. This is known as the ‘dating scan’.

Although often dubbed the 12-week scan, this can take place anytime between 10 and 14 weeks. At this appointment, a sonographer will carry out an ultrasound which will be used to give you an estimated due date.

The scan will also look at a few other things. These include:

  • Size of your baby – they’ll check your baby is growing and developing correctly.
  • Number of babies – at this scan you may find out you’re expecting twins (or more!!).
  • Heartbeat – this is usually the time you’ll be able to hear your baby’s heartbeat.
  • Vital organs – the sonographer will also make sure you’re baby’s organs are developing.

Read more: Everything you need to know about the harmony test

For more information on development and milestones at every stage of your pregnancy, visit our pregnancy week by week page.

Read more: What is Cranial Osteopathy?

Want more information and inspiration on everything parenting and lifestyle? Hit ‘Like’ on our Facebook page, follow us on Instagram and join the conversation on Twitter. Oh, and don’t forget to subscribe to Baby Magazine!

This post (13 Weeks Pregnant: Symptoms, Ultrasound and Baby Bump) was written by Ruby Norris and first appeared on the Baby Magazine website.

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What to expect at 12 weeks pregnant. Everything you need to know about your changing body and growing baby as you reach the end of your first trimester.

Congratulations, you’ve survived your first trimester. For many women, twelve weeks pregnant is usually the time when you start to share your pregnancy news with extended family and friends. A lot of expectant mothers choose to wait until after the 12-week scan, as this is when you are considered to be out of the miscarriage ‘danger zone’.

At this stage, you might start to notice some of the early signs and symptoms of pregnancy wearing off. Many mums-to-be claim they really start to enjoy their pregnancies as they approach the second trimester. However, there are still a lot of changes going on in your body at 12 weeks pregnant.

Read on to find out more about what’s happening with your baby and body in week 12.

Think you missed something? Re-visit what to expect at 11 weeks pregnant or head over to our pregnancy week by week guide for more information at every stage of your pregnancy.

Your Baby at 12 Weeks Pregnant

As you approach the last week or so of your first trimester, your baby will be about the size of a lime. At 12 weeks, the foetus is just over two inches long and has doubled in size over the last three weeks.

In terms of development, your baby will be reaching a lot of milestones by the three-month mark. Now that their tiny little fingers and toes have formed, at 12 weeks your baby will be able to curl them. In fact, your little one is now moving around quite a bit. The eye muscles are able to clench and your baby can make a sucking motion.

Moreover, if you press into your tummy, you’re baby will react. It’s unlikely you’ll be able to feel it, but the foetus has developed a startle reflex (known as the Moro reflex). This also means your baby can hear and react to sounds by opening and closing its arms and legs.

Your baby is also busy making white blood cells in its bone marrow to build up the immune system and help fight off all those germs they’ll pick up from other mucky toddlers.

12 Weeks Pregnant Symptoms

It’s said that many women start to really enjoy their pregnancy as they enter into their second trimester. This is because they’re able to wave goodbye to their pesky early pregnancy symptoms and side effects which have plagued them in their first three months.

Unfortunately, as every woman and every pregnancy is different, this is not always the case. Additionally, you may still experience the below symptoms at 12 weeks pregnant.

Dizziness and feeling faint

The extra blood pumping around your body can cause you to feel light-headed, dizzy and even faint. To ease these symptoms, try and remember to stand up and sit down slowly and keep sugar levels up with regular (healthy) snacks. If you feel faint, make sure you take a seat and rest up as soon as possible.

Headaches

Your lower blood sugar levels can also lead to headaches. Again, snacking can help keep your sugar levels stable. However, if your headaches persist, it’s worth consulting your doctor. They’ll also be able to advise on pregnancy-safe painkillers.

Fatigue

Although many women experience a new burst of energy in their second semester, you may still experience bouts of fatigue as your baby continues to grow.

Heightened sense of smell

You may notice that you’re still sensitive to certain smells and tastes at three months pregnant.

Bloating, indigestion and heartburn

This pesky progesterone has a lot to answer for. Increased levels of the hormone in your body can also cause bloating at 12 weeks pregnant. This is because it slows down the digestion process so that there’s more time to pass the nutrients on to your baby. However, in doing so, your growing uterus will squash and press onto your stomach and intestines. Your hormones also relax the valve between your stomach and esophagus, causing heartburn.

Your Body and Bump at 12 Weeks Pregnant

By three months pregnant, you may have a small baby bump. However, it is still normal not to be showing at this stage.

At 12 weeks, while your baby is the size of a lime, your womb is approximately grapefruit-sized and growing.

In the coming weeks, your uterus will push above your pelvic bone, which leads to a more prominent baby bump. In the meantime, with your waist thickening and appetite increasing, you may start to feel your clothes becoming snug. If so, it might be time to start shopping around for your maternity wardrobe.

Read: All of our favourite pieces from the Zara UK maternity collection

Ultrasound: 12-week Scan

This is where things get exciting. At 12 weeks you’ll be ready for your first of two very important scans, known as the ‘dating scan’.

Although often dubbed the 12-week scan, this can take place anytime between 10 and 14 weeks. At this appointment, a sonographer will carry out an ultrasound which will be used to give you an estimated due date.

The scan will also look at a few other things. These include:

  • Size of your baby – they’ll check your baby is growing and developing correctly.
  • Number of babies – at this scan you may find out you’re expecting twins (or more!!).
  • Heartbeat – this is usually the time you’ll be able to hear your baby’s heartbeat.
  • Vital organs – the sognographer will also make sure you’re baby’s organs are developing.

Read: Everything you need to know about the harmony test

For more information on development and milestones at every stage of your pregnancy, visit our pregnancy week by week page.

Read more: What is Cranial Osteopathy?

Want more information and inspiration on everything parenting and lifestyle? Hit ‘Like’ on our Facebook page, follow us on Instagram and join the conversation on Twitter. Oh, and don’t forget to subscribe to Baby Magazine!

This post (12 Weeks Pregnant: Symptoms, Ultrasound and Baby Bump) was written by Ruby Norris and first appeared on the Baby Magazine website.

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Delve into five common postnatal problems many women experience after birth, as postnatal yoga pros Hannah Barrett and Finola Burrell talk us through the solutions.

Your baby is finally here and your body has just done something utterly incredible. You’ve made a tiny human and all around, your life is more than hectic. But have you checked in on what is going on in your body? After delivery a baby your body changes both physically and emotionally and needs time to heal. Below we look at five common postpartum issues and things you can do to help.

Postnatal Problem: Prolapse and Incontinence

A prolapse involves the organs of your pelvis (uterus, bladder and bowel) dropping down into the vagina. Symptoms of this can include:

  • Lower abdominal pain
  • Low backache
  • A lump in your vagina
  • Problems passing urine
  • A feeling of heaviness around the vagina area, usually worse at the end of the day
  • Faecal or urinary incontinence

It’s also common to experience postpartum incontinence (although this does not need to become your new normal).  Incontinence and prolapse happens due to a weakness of the pelvic floor muscles and supportive tissues. During pregnancy and when breastfeeding, the hormone relaxes the ligaments which reduce the support of the pelvic area. The weight of the baby, experience of childbirth itself and a sudden increase in activity after giving birth can all weaken and overload the area further.

Solution

To compensate for this common postnatal problem, pelvic floor muscle strengthening is vital. Symptoms can usually be improved with pelvic floor exercises. To activate your pelvic floor, take a deep inhale, then as you exhale engage your pelvic floor by imagining gently pulling up your front and back passages (as if trying to stop yourself passing urine and flatulence) without clenching your buttocks.

You don’t want to feel a pushing down sensation. If this happens take a few deep breaths into the stomach to relax and try again.  Continue to breathe normally while holding for five seconds.  Relax and repeat ten times, a few times a day.

If you suspect you have prolapse we strongly advise speaking to your GP or a women’s health physiotherapist. Prolapse is one of those things people don’t like to talk about, but it is a common postnatal issue. Know that if you’re suffering from prolapse, you are not alone and help is out there.

Postnatal Problem: Diastasis Recti (aka mum-tum)

Another common postpartum issue is Diastasis Recti. This is the separation of the abdominal wall. It can happen in pregnancy due to stretching and thinning of the linea alba, which is the tissue that connects the left and right abdominal muscles.

It has been suggested that 2-2.3cm (approximately 2 fingers width) above, around and below the belly button is considered greater than normal. The gap can reduce on its own within a couple of months. However, it is still important to strengthen these muscles.

The abdominals are essential for core control and function. If Diastasis Recti is not addressed, it may lead to lower back pain, and you may be more susceptible to ‘mummy tummy’. Try not to worry as exercises have proved to be effective in treating most cases. The main aim of exercises for diastasis is to increase tension in the linea alba and activate the transverse abdominals (deep abdominals), before rectus abdominal activation (for example with crunches) to close the gap.

Solution

To activate the transverse abdominals, take an inhale, then as you exhale imagine your hip bones are magnets and are being drawn in towards each other and pull in your stomach gently as though you are trying to put on a pair of jeans. Hold as you breathe normally for five breaths. Inhale to relax and then repeat ten times a couple of times a day.

Postnatal Problem: Pelvic Floor Over-Activation

Most people think of the pelvic floor being under-active as is found with incontinence and prolapse, but these muscles can also become over-active. This can result in a variety of symptoms including difficulty opening your bladder and bowels, back pain, constipation and a feeling of pressure or pain in the area.

This happens for a few different reasons postpartum. Stress and anxiety can cause muscles to tighten up including the pelvic floor muscles. It can also happen if you try to keep your stomach pulled in and the abdominals remain under tension during the day.

Solution

To help with this there are a few simple techniques you can try. One is the full yogic breath where you focus on breathing starting from the stomach, which causes the deep muscles to relax.

Come into a seated position, place one hand on your stomach and the other on your chest.  Take a deep inhale breathing from the base of your stomach, feeling it rise underneath your hand.  Then send the breath up into your chest feeling the ribs moving frontways, sideways and backwards.  Lastly, fill the lungs as much as you can feeling the collarbones slightly lift.  Take five slow deep breaths like this, each time trying to extend the exhale even longer.  Try this a few times per day and after performing pelvic floor or core strengthening exercises.  As well as relaxing the pelvic floor and deep abdominals it will help to reduce anxiety and relieve stress.

Postnatal Problem: Upper Back Pain

Whether you are breastfeeding or not, holding your newborn requires constant use of your upper back, neck and shoulder muscles. Staying in prolonged positions and postures can easily provoke pain in the upper back and shoulder areas. By conditioning your muscles through exercise they are more able to cope with the increased demands on your body.

Solution

Here are some extra quick tips on how to reduce and prevent pain here in the meantime:

  • When feeding, sit in a chair with your back and arms supported by pillows
  • Place a pillow under your baby to support their weight
  • Whenever possible, during breastfeeding, lie on your side
Postnatal Problem: Tears and Episiotomies

Vaginal tears and episiotomies during childbirth are common. An episiotomy (a surgical incision) may be required to increase the diameter of the vaginal outlet to allow space for the baby’s birth. It is normally done during the last part of the second stage of labour or delivery. This procedure is done with scissors or a scalpel and requires repair by suturing. There are different types and grades of spontaneous tearing, with a fourth-degree tear being the most severe.

Solution

Unless told otherwise by a health professional, starting gentle pelvic floor exercises will be very helpful. It improves circulation to the area to help with healing and swelling, as well as reactivating and strengthening the pelvic floor which is weakened during delivery and after a tear or episiotomy. They can be started the first day after birth, once you have passed urine for the first time or once your catheter has been removed. It may feel more comfortable lying on your side to perform your pelvic floor exercises and whilst breastfeeding as it avoids pressure on the stitches. For those with 3rd or 4th-degree tears’ gradually build up the amount of pelvic floor exercises you do as comfort allows.

Please stop any exercises that result in pain, difficulty controlling wind, loss of bladder or bowel control, an increased sensation of pelvic pressure or if your lochia becomes redder or heavier. This may be a sign that you are overdoing things.

Strength Through Yoga by Hannah Barrett and Finola Burrell is available for £39.99 at

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What to expect at 11 weeks pregnant. Here’s everything you need to know about your changing body and growing baby as you approach the end of your first trimester.

Your first trimester is almost over, and at 11 weeks pregnant, you’re probably already up to speed with all the signs and symptoms of early pregnancy. By this stage, some of the initial (and unpleasant) symptoms, such as nausea and vomiting may start to ease off.

However, your body is still adjusting to pregnancy at eleven weeks. As you approach your second trimester, you may still experience a number of common early pregnancy systems. By this point, your baby is developing at a rapid rate, which may also affect your body and energy levels. Read on for everything you need to know about your baby and body and 11 weeks pregnant.

Think you missed something? Re-visit what to expect at 10 weeks pregnant or head over to our pregnancy week by week guide for more information at every stage of your pregnancy.

11 Weeks Pregnant Baby Size

By week eleven, your baby – officially a foetus – is about the size of a lime. At this stage, your little one is starting to look more and more like a tiny a human.

The foetus’ head now accounts for nearly half of its body length and a number of big developmental changes are underway. The torso is developing and your little one has distinct fingers and toes. Clear facial features are beginning to take shape and your baby’s ears are moving into their correct position.

Your Baby at 11 Weeks Pregnant

The skin is still thin and see-through but is starting to become more opaque. Other distinct human-like features have developed at this stage including a teeny, tiny tongue and palate in the mouth, little nostrils and nipples. Your baby will also begin to grow tooth buds, hair follicles, and nail beds. Although it’s possibly still too early to physically tell the gender of your baby, ovaries will develop if you’re having a girl.

11 Weeks Pregnant Symptoms

For some women, many of the early pregnancy symptoms begin to wear off as you head into your second trimester. However, at 11 weeks there are still some pregnancy side effects and symptoms to look out for.

Morning sickness: nausea and vomiting

Morning sickness is one of the most common pregnancy symptoms, although not everyone will suffer from it in their first trimester. Fortunately, most women notice the symptoms easing off as they head into the second trimester. However, this is not always the case.

Constipation

As progesterone levels increase, one side effect can be constipation. This often occurs around the second and third month but may worsen as your pregnancy continues.

Bloating, indigestion and heartburn

This pesky progesterone has a lot to answer for. Increased levels of the hormone in your body can also cause bloating. This is because it slows down the digestion process so that there’s more time to pass the nutrients on to your baby. However, in doing so, your growing uterus will squash and press onto your stomach and intestines. Your hormones also relax the valve between your stomach and esophagus, causing heartburn.

Fatigue

With fluctuating hormones, changes to your body and not to mention the fact you’re growing a whole new human in your belly, it’s no wonder you might feel exhausted during the first three months. At eight weeks, your body is also producing more blood for your baby. This causes your blood pressure and blood sugar levels to dip, leaving you feeling more tired than usual.

Increased urination

As your uterus continues to expand, it can press on your bladder and result in what feels like endless trips to the toilet. The increased blood flow to your kidneys means you’ll produce more up to 25% more urine, too.

Dizziness and feeling faint

The extra blood pumping around your body can cause you to feel light-headed, dizzy and even faint. To ease these symptoms, try and remember to stand up and sit down slowly and keep sugar levels up with regular (healthy) snacks. If you feel faint, make sure you take a seat and rest up as soon as possible.

Vaginal discharge

During the first trimester, you might notice a milky white discharge from your vagina. This is normal and nothing to worry about.

Your Body at 11 Weeks Pregnant

As the morning sickness (hopefully) starts to waver, you might start to feel more energised – and maybe a little hungrier.

Your appetite will probably start to increase, and your baby will also demand more nutrients. However, while the saying suggests you’re ‘eating for two’,  it’s not healthy to binge or over-indulge too quickly. It’s important you gain weight steadily and healthily during your pregnancy.

Your uterus is also expanding. You may see your lower abdomen starting to protrude and the beginnings of a baby bump form.

11 Weeks Pregnant Ultrasound

You may have your ‘booking appointment’ in week 11. This is when you’ll meet with your doctor or midwife to discuss your pregnancy and birth plans.

You may also be ready for your dating scan. This will most likely take place between 10 and 14 weeks and is the first opportunity you’ll have to see your baby and hear the heartbeat with an ultrasound. It’s often when a provisional due date is given.

For more information on development and milestones at every stage of your pregnancy, visit our pregnancy week by week page.

Read more: What is Cranial Osteopathy?

Want more information and inspiration on everything parenting and lifestyle? Hit ‘Like’ on our Facebook page, follow us on Instagram and join the conversation on Twitter. Oh, and don’t forget to subscribe to Baby Magazine!

This post (11 Weeks Pregnant: Symptoms, Ultrasound and Baby Size) was written by Ruby Norris and first appeared on the Baby Magazine website.

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Fearne Cotton opens up about the problems with parenting advice and maternal mental health.

In our eyes, Fearne Cotton is up there with the likes of Victoria Beckham, Beyoncé, and the velour tracksuit-clad mum off of Mean Girls when it comes to being a cool mom. We’re (half) joking, but there’s no denying she’s a bit of a mega babe. A TV presenter, radio DJ, author and podcast extraordinaire, Fearne’s also recently designed a new kids clothing range promoting positivity and kindness. Didn’t we tell you she was pretty darn cool?

Ahead of the launch of her latest Shop Fearne by Fearne Cotton at Boots Mini Club. 

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This post (Fearne Cotton Opens up About the Problem With Parenting Advice) was written by Ruby Norris and first appeared on the Baby Magazine website.

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What to expect at 10 weeks pregnant. Everything you need to know about your changing body and baby as you approach the end of your first trimester.

By 10 weeks pregnant you may have already had your first midwife or GP appointment, or have your booking appointment coming up. At this stage, you’re approaching the end of your first trimester, and thankfully, may start to notice some of the pesky early pregnancy symptoms ease off.

However, as the morning sickness and tiredness begins to wear off, you might pick up on some new pregnancy symptoms and changes to your body. Read on to explore all the changes to your body and baby at 10 weeks pregnant.

Think you missed something? Re-visit what to expect at 9 weeks pregnant or head over to our pregnancy week by week guide for more information at every stage of your pregnancy.

Your Baby at 10 Weeks Pregnant

By week ten, your baby is growing and developing quickly. Now officially a foetus, your baby is around 30mm long and about the size of an apricot or a prune.

The head is growing at a faster rate than the body, and facial features are continuing to develop. Although the eyes are still half-closed, they are beginning to react to light. The jaw bone is also starting to take shape and a tiny nose and ears are also forming.

Your baby’s heart is beating fast – at around 180bpm.

10 Weeks Pregnant Symptoms

Although you are heading towards your second trimester, at 10 weeks pregnant you may still be experiencing some early pregnancy symptoms.

Bloating

At 10 weeks some women might start to see the beginnings of a baby bump, but your clothes may also be feeling snug due to bloating. The increased progesterone levels cause the muscles in your womb to relax and expand. However, this also loosens the muscles in your digestive tract. This can lead to heartburn, bloating and wind.

Nausea and Morning Sickness

Morning sickness is one of the most common pregnancy symptoms, although not everyone will suffer from it in their first trimester. Unfortunately for some women, the eight-week mark can be when nausea and vomiting are most intense.

Sore Breasts

Breast tenderness is another common symptom at this stage as the pregnancy hormone levels in your body continue to change.

Increased Urination

As your uterus continues to expand, it can press on your bladder and result in what feels like endless trips to the toilet. The increased blood flow to your kidneys means you’ll produce more up to 25% more urine, too.

A Heightened Sense of Smell

You may notice that you become much more sensitive to certain smells during the first trimester of your pregnancy. This, along with nausea, is a pretty hellish combination for some women during the first couple of months of pregnancy. Thankfully, symptoms tend to wear off as you progress through your second trimester.

Strange Food Cravings

From around 5 weeks some early pregnancy cravings might start to kick in and you could find yourself hankering for gherkin sarnies and lemon slices.

Metalic Taste in Your Mouth

The changing hormone levels can also lead to your experience a strange, metallic taste in your mouth during the first three months.

Thicker and Shinier Hair

One benefit of your increasing hCG levels and hormone changes is great hair! Read more about how your hair can change during pregnancy here.

Fatigue

With fluctuating hormones, changes to your body and not to mention the fact you’re growing a whole new human in your belly, it’s no wonder you might feel exhausted during the first three months. At eight weeks, your body is also producing more blood for your baby. This causes your blood pressure and blood sugar levels to dip, leaving you feeling more tired than usual.

Spotting

Spotting at eight weeks can be alarming, but for some women light bleeding in the early months is common and nothing to worry about. However, bleeding can also signal a miscarriage. If you have been experiencing cramps, and the bleeding is more than light spotting, you should contact your GP or visit your nearest hospital.

Change in Your Discharge

During the first trimester, you might notice a milky white discharge from your vagina. This is normal and nothing to worry about.

Chloasma Faciei – dark patches on your skin

This sounds a little scary, but it is just the name given to the darkening of areas of your skin or brown patches on your face. It means ‘mask of pregnancy’ and is very common among women in their first trimester.

Your Body and Baby Bump at 10 Weeks Pregnant

As you approach your second semester you may start to notice some physical changes to your body. Your may be thickening and a baby bump might be starting to develop. At this point in your pregnancy, your uterus has expanded to the size of an orange. However, the bloating and changing hormone levels may leave your feeling bigger – and uncomfortable in your pre-pregnancy clothes.

10 Weeks Pregnant Ultrasound and Dating Scan

It’s time for a visit to your midwife or GP. A ‘booking appointment’ usually takes place between 8 and 12 weeks, and it’s usually the first time you’ll meet with your doctor or midwife to discuss your pregnancy and birth plans.

You may also be ready for your dating scan. This will most likely take place between 10 and 14 weeks and is the first opportunity you’ll have to see your baby and hear the heartbeat with an ultrasound. It’s often when a provisional due date is given.

At 10 weeks pregnant, your baby is starting to move around in jerky movements, which can also be picked up on the scan.

For more information on development and milestones at every stage of your pregnancy, visit our pregnancy week by week page.

Want more information and inspiration on everything parenting and lifestyle? Hit ‘Like’ on our Facebook page, follow us on Instagram and join the conversation on Twitter. Oh, and don’t forget to subscribe to Baby Magazine!

This post (10 Weeks Pregnant: Symptoms, Ultrasound and Baby Bump) was written by Ruby Norris and first appeared on the Baby Magazine website.

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