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Baby Boomers by Babyboomers.com - 9h ago

<p>You won&rsquo;t want to miss babyboomers.com next week.</p> <p>We&rsquo;re doing more than reminiscing about the songs of summer&hellip;<em>Good Vibrations</em>&hellip;<em>Under the Boardwalk</em>&hellip;<em>School&rsquo;s Out</em>&hellip;we&rsquo;re giving you a chance to win six months of free Sirius satellite radio. Watch for details on June 25.</p> <p>In the meantime, if you&rsquo;re interested in what songs are predicted to be &ldquo;hot&rdquo; during the summer of 2018, check out this <a href="http://time.com/5303790/songs-of-summer-2018/" target="_blank">article</a> from <em>Time.com.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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<p>Medical researchers often work for decades to achieve a small step toward treating or curing disease. So when a major breakthrough was announced recently &ndash; finding that many women with breast cancer do not need chemotherapy -- it was a reason to celebrate.</p> <p>The news is especially good for women over 50. An <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/03/health/breast-cancer-chemo.html" target="_blank">article</a> in the <em>New York Times</em> reported: &ldquo;&hellip;researchers concluded that chemo&nbsp;can be avoided in all women older than 50 with hormone-receptor positive, HER2-negative, node-negative breast cancer and a score of up to 25 on a gene test, which accounts for about 85 percent of women with breast cancer in that&nbsp;age group.&rdquo;</p> <p>The study began in 2006 and eventually included 10,253 women ages 18 to 75 who had breast cancer. &nbsp;These women were given a gene test performed on tumor samples after surgery. The test is generally done for early-stage disease to help determine if chemo is needed. Scores range from 1 to 100. Typically, chemo was not recommended for scores under 11 and was recommended for scores over 25, but there was no definitive opinion on chemo for women in the in between those scores.</p> <p>Following this study, approximately 60,000 women may be affected, helping them avoid the possible side effects of chemotherapy, including hair loss and nausea, as well as very serious consequences such as heart and nerve damage, a higher risk of infection and increased odds of developing leukemia later.</p> <p>Our hats off to the baby boomers and other researchers who didn&rsquo;t give up.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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<p>There&rsquo;s probably nothing more undesirable than a sleepy soldier. So the Army has funded a study to find out how to achieve maximum wakefulness using caffeine. And you thought YOU needed your morning jolt of java!</p> <p>The purpose of the new study is to determine the optimal balance between the amount of caffeine and the time it&rsquo;s consumed. In other words: If you want to stay awake, how much coffee should you drink and when?</p> <p>The study developed an algorithm to find the answers. Data from four past caffeine/sleep studies went into a mathematical model that accurately predicts the effects of sleep/wake schedules and caffeine consumption on simple tasks.</p> <p>According to an <a href="http://bigthink.com/stephen-johnson/us-army-develops-algorithm-that-shows-how-to-get-optimal-alertness-from-caffeine-2?utm_source=Daily+Newsletter&amp;utm_campaign=2c62ff1bc0-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_06_06_10_46&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_term=0_45b26faecc-2c62ff1bc0-44213493" target="_blank">article</a> on <em>bigthink.com</em>, the study found that by using the algorithm to determine when and how much caffeine a subject should consume, &ldquo;we can improve alertness by up to 64 percent, while consuming the same total amount of caffeine.&rdquo; Similarly, if the goal is to reduce caffeine consumption, the study determined how to reduce caffeine by 65% while maintaining the same level of alertness.</p> <p>As many as 90 percent of Americans consume some form of caffeine each day. If you&rsquo;re among them, maybe it&rsquo;s the taste. Maybe it&rsquo;s the socializing at your favorite coffee shop. Or just maybe you&rsquo;re looking to defeat the sleepy sluggish feeling most of us feel at some time during the day&hellip;like mid-afternoon while at a meeting or in a traffic jam. &nbsp;</p> <p>While there&rsquo;s no universal recommendation coming from the study, a simplified version of the algorithm has been developed for general use. We&rsquo;re not recommending or endorsing it, but if you&rsquo;re interested, you can find out more. <a href="https://2b-alert-web.bhsai.org/2b-alert-web/login.xhtml" target="_blank">2B-Alert app</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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<p>Have you ever projected your feelings on to others? If you&rsquo;re human, you probably have, and you probably weren&#39;t even aware of it. Turns out this particular defense mechanism, called projection, can be very harmful to relationships. And since it&rsquo;s usually done without you&rsquo;re knowing, it&rsquo;s good to know what it is and how you can avoid doing it.</p> <p>A defense mechanism operates at an unconscious level and is a psychological manner which enables us to reduce anxiety or avoid unpleasant feelings. A classic example is the defense mechanism of displacement. You&#39;re angry that your boss is making you work late, so you slam the door when you finally leave the office. You displace your anger to the door, because you can&#39;t slam your boss (well, you could, but that wouldn&#39;t end well). Defense mechanisms can help us cope with pain and uncertainty in the short-run, but if used often, can limit our emotional development in the long-run.</p> <p>Projection is the act of denying that certain qualities, feelings or thoughts exist in yourself, while attributing them to other people. Here&rsquo;s an example: in a marriage, if one partner has been thinking about cheating, he or she may accuse the spouse of the same thoughts. An article in Psychology Today states, &ldquo;when people try to evaluate targets&#39; thoughts, feelings, or behaviors, they often project their own corresponding states, thereby arriving at inaccurate social judgments&rdquo;. Believing that your partner feels the same way as you can lead to erroneous conclusions and complicate your relationship.</p> <p>If you constantly try and impose your own wishes and thoughts onto your partner, you won&#39;t have an open-mind and your communication will suffer as a result. Being aware of projection and occasionally conducting a self-check can help you avoid this defense mechanism and the problems that can develop from it.</p> <p>Click Read More to learn more about this topic, as well as an interesting study about stress mindsets and how that plays a role in projection.</p>
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<p>You&rsquo;ve heard and seen the mother that pesters her child about giving her a grandbaby. Maybe it&rsquo;s even you! Some women, and even men, become impatient once their children are grown, as the natural next step seems to be having a grandchild running around. Unfortunately, a lot of us may be left waiting for a while. Why? Millennials &ndash; and a lot of baby boomers&rsquo; children fall into this generation - are postponing parenthood until later in life compared to their parents. The birthrate has hit a record low in the United States and the only age group that has seen an increase in first time births is the 40-44 years old category.</p> <p>This trend, possibly a result of economic insecurities among other things, could pose a big problem for some boomers regarding their retirement plans, says Forbes contributor Joseph Coughlin.</p> <p>The majority of boomers&rsquo; wealth is in their homes, not in banks. Many people&rsquo;s retirement plans hinge on selling their homes - they need to pull the cash out and use it. Just because millennials are putting off having a family, doesn&#39;t mean they aren&#39;t buying homes. They just aren&#39;t buying boomers&#39; homes. And herein lies the problem. Trying to sell larger, family-sized homes in older neighborhoods, built for the needs of previous generations, may prove to be quite difficult. Millennials don&#39;t yet need, want or can afford all that house. With the pool of young, new families shrinking (and the average family size shrinking), so does the chances of selling a big family-sized house. Especially for the price desired to properly fund the costs of living during retirement.</p> <p>Click Read More to be taken to the original Forbes article.</p>
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Baby Boomers by Babyboomers.com - 3d ago

<p>Every now and then when you&#39;re struggling to navigate your new TV remote control, postponing updating your phone&#39;s operating system, and considering the purchase of a vacuum cleaner that runs around your floors on its own, it&#39;s fun to think about the technology we DON&#39;T have to deal with.</p> <p>For your enjoyment, here&#39;s an article with attitude that runs through 20 bright technological ideas that were predicted to transform our world but haven&#39;t and never will. And the writer Ari Notis of bestlifeonline.com shares a scepticism many of us have - that while many technological advances are supremely beneficial, some are...well...unnecessary and ridiculous.</p> <p>Some past far-out ideas are not easily abandoned - such as the flying car (proposed way back in the time of the Jetsons on TV). A flying car prototype has recently been revealed by automaker PAL-V that supposedly will hit the market in 2019 and retail for $621,500. Sign us up! On second thought, our freeways are reckless enough without putting those drivers up in the sky.</p> <p>Another idea made popular on TV and in the movies is some kind of cloak that renders its wearer invisible. According to the article on bestlifeonline.com, Russia&#39;s Future Research Fund allegedly worked on developing a substance that could achieve invisibility. We haven&#39;t seen any sign of that, but then of course, we wouldn&#39;t, would we, since it would be invisible.</p> <p>Since we can&#39;t yet make humans invisible, how about shrinking them? Nope. Or beaming them from one place to another? Hasn&#39;t happened.</p> <p>The <a href="https://bestlifeonline.com/long-predicted-technologies-never-happening/" target="_blank">article</a> takes you through 20 improbable ideas like that and gives the scientific explanation for why they WON&#39;T happen.&nbsp;</p> <p>While being sceptical is sometimes a good thing - so is being open-minded. So now that you&#39;ve seen what WON&#39;T happen, take a look back at what HAS: The 20 greatest inventions of all time, according to <a href="http://bigthink.com/paul-ratner/top-20-greatest-inventions-of-all-time" target="_blank">thinkbig.com</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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Baby Boomers by Babyboomers.com - 3d ago

<p>Every now and then when you&#39;re struggling to navigate your new TV remote control, postponing updating your phone&#39;s operating system, and considering the purchase of a vacuum cleaner that runs around your floors on its own, it&#39;s fun to think about the technology we DON&#39;T have to deal with.</p> <p>For your enjoyment, here&#39;s an article with attitude that runs through 20 bright technological ideas that were predicted to transform our world but haven&#39;t and never will. And the writer Ari Notis of bestlifeonline.com shares a scepticism many of us have - that while many technological advances are supremely beneficial, some are...well...unnecessary and ridiculous.</p> <p>Some past far-out ideas are not easily abandoned - such as the flying car (proposed way back in the time of the Jetsons on TV). A flying car prototype has recently been revealed by automaker PAL-V that supposedly will hit the market in 2019 and retail for $621,500. Sign us up! On second thought, our freeways are reckless enough without putting those drivers up in the sky.</p> <p>Another idea made popular on TV and in the movies is some kind of cloak that renders its wearer invisible. According to the article on bestlifeonline.com, Russia&#39;s Future Research Fund allegedly worked on developing a substance that could achieve invisibility. We haven&#39;t seen any sign of that, but then of course, we wouldn&#39;t, would we, since it would be invisible.</p> <p>Since we can&#39;t yet make humans invisible, how about shrinking them? Nope. Or beaming them from one place to another? Hasn&#39;t happened.</p> <p>The <a href="https://bestlifeonline.com/long-predicted-technologies-never-happening/" target="_blank">article</a> takes you through 20 improbable ideas like that and gives the scientific explanation for why they WON&#39;T happen.&nbsp;</p> <p>While being sceptical is sometimes a good thing - so is being open-minded. So now that you&#39;ve seen what WON&#39;T happen, take a look back at what HAS: The 20 greatest inventions of all time, according to <a href="http://bigthink.com/paul-ratner/top-20-greatest-inventions-of-all-time" target="_blank">thinkbig.com</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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<p>While many people consider &ldquo;inflation&rdquo; a dirty word, its affects aren&rsquo;t all bad. Yet knowing what to expect and how to protect yourself from the rising cost of goods and services is a smart strategy.</p> <p>The main effects of inflation are better interest rates for savings accounts and higher costs of living, but, according to an article on gobankingrates.com, &ldquo;there are several more nuanced effects to watch out for as you manage your money.&rdquo;</p> <p>In addition to better rates for savings accounts, positive effects of inflation include getting more for your money when you travel abroad, inflation offsets the negative effects of deflation (in which sluggish sales can weaken the economy), wages will be higher, and it&rsquo;s likely to result in cost-of-living adjustments for recipients of Social Security.</p> <p>Some of the negative effects of inflation are having to pay more for goods and services, borrowing money becomes costlier, adjustable-rate mortgage rates may rise, and long-term investments paying low interest result in less buying power.</p> <p>Financial advisor and reporter Sarita Harbour writes on gobankingrates.com that the best way to weather any kind of inflation storm is to invest in a balanced portfolio that includes some portion of long-term capital investments, like equity stocks.</p> <p>She also suggests protecting your money from inflation by investing in the following:</p> <ul> <li>Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities:&nbsp;&ldquo;TIPS are bonds, but they are backed by the government and their return is linked to inflation through the CPI.&rdquo;</li> <li>Annuities:&nbsp;&ldquo;Talk to your insurance broker about these investments that often offer an income stream that increases over time.&rdquo;</li> <li>Blue chip stocks:&nbsp;&ldquo;These offer dividends and capital appreciation over the long-term.&rdquo;</li> </ul> <p>The U.S. Federal Reserve considers inflation rates of about two percent per year as healthy for the economy, and rates in that range are predicted for the next five years. And your personal economy can stay healthy too &ndash; if you know how to prepare.</p> <p>Read the full article on <a href="https://www.gobankingrates.com/making-money/economy/causes-inflation-effects-inflation-matter/?utm_campaign=574763&amp;utm_source=aol.com&amp;utm_content=2" target="_blank">gobankingrates.com</a> and inflation rate projections on <a href="https://www.statista.com/statistics/244983/projected-inflation-rate-in-the-united-states/" target="_blank">statista.com</a>.</p>
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<p>Many home barbeque-ers have become masters of meat and virtuosos of vegetables, but if you&rsquo;re looking for something new and unexpected, try grilling cheese.</p> <p>Before we get to tempting ideas from inventive chefs, here are a few cheesy facts:</p> <p>The U.S. leads the world in cheese production, churning out more than 4,000 tons annually.</p> <p>The popularity of cheese has grown over the past decades. According to Kerry Kaylegian, Ph.D., assistant research professor in Penn State&rsquo;s department of food science, one of the reasons cheese is gaining on chicken and potatoes as Americans&rsquo; favorite food is the growing popularity of Mexican and Italian food. However, the Greeks take home top prize as the country with the greatest consumption of cheese (mostly feta) per capita.</p> <p>Beginning in the 1980s, Americans began getting much of their cheese intake from fast food, including pizza, burgers, and tacos &ndash; but a new trend is the introduction of artisanal cheeses. Kaylegian says, &ldquo;Consumers are looking to have more of a connection with their food producers, want more local foods, and are looking for new flavors and textures in their foods.&quot;</p> <p>And maybe that&rsquo;s why we&rsquo;re looking for new ways to prepare and serve cheese to our friends who are cheese-lovers. Here are cheese-grilling ideas, including Grilled Brie with Blackberry Basil Salsa, Grilled 3-Cheese Pimento Pepper Poppers, and Grilled Peach and Haloumi Skewers &ndash; all from <a href="https://www.purewow.com/food/grilled-cheese-recipes?utm_medium=syndication&amp;utm_source=flipboard" target="_blank">purewow.com</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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<p>Debra Lee Baldwin was way ahead of the succulent craze. In fact, she&rsquo;s possibly the main reason for it.</p> <p>She grew up on a California avocado ranch in south Escondido on a hilltop overlooking San Pasqual Valley. As a child, she was introduced to succulents while helping her father plant and care for the hillside garden surrounding their home. Then as a photojournalist on assignment for <em>Sunset</em> magazine, she photographed cacti, agave, aloe, and other varieties and began to appreciate their geometric beauty.&nbsp; Her three best-selling books about succulents, the first &ndash; <em>Designing with Succulents,</em> published in 2007 -- helped people who &ldquo;love flowers&rdquo; think about landscaping and gardening in a whole new way. In an <a href="https://debraleebaldwin.com/succulent-experts/my-san-diego-voyager-interview/" target="_blank">interview</a> with the <em>San Diego Voyager</em>, Baldwin calls it her mission to increase awareness and appreciation of &ldquo;plants that drink responsibly.&rdquo;</p> <p>It&rsquo;s difficult to talk about water conservation as a priority when some areas are experiencing devastating floods, but many consider water &ldquo;the next oil&rdquo; as it becomes an increasingly rare commodity. Already billions of people around the world suffer during dry seasons. By the middle of this century, it&rsquo;s predicted more than half of the world&rsquo;s population will live in &ldquo;water-stress&rdquo; areas.</p> <p>According to Baldwin, it&rsquo;s becoming &ldquo;politically incorrect to have a water-thirsty front yard and a lawn that isn&rsquo;t used for anything but greenery.&rdquo;</p> <p>Enter the succulent.</p> <p>Low-water landscaping, with drought-resistant plants such as succulents -- first popular in places like California and Arizona -- is now popping up all over. Another term you&rsquo;ll see is &ldquo;xeriscaping,&rdquo; defined as landscaping or gardening that reduces or eliminates the need for supplemental watering.</p> <p>Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but succulents have an edgy, textured look many people find appealing. And they have other virtues, according to gardening experts.&nbsp; They&rsquo;re virtually impossible to destroy, they don&rsquo;t attract pests the way other types of plants do, they&rsquo;re easy to maintain (needing far less fertilizer, clipping and pruning, etc.), and some are even fire-resistant.</p> <p>Next time you see a cactus growing in your neighborhood, appreciate it. Just don&rsquo;t sit on it.</p> <p>To learn more about succulents, their history, and their rising popularity, read this <a href="https://www.theringer.com/tech/2018/5/22/17374708/consider-the-cactus-how-succulents-took-over-instagram-and-then-the-world" target="_blank">article</a> from theringer.com.</p> <p>If you&rsquo;re interested in learning more about the global water crisis, read this <a href="https://www.economist.com/briefing/2016/11/05/liquidity-crisis" target="_blank">article </a>in <em>The Economist.</em></p>
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