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AZ Utopia by Azutopia - 3w ago
★★★★☆ Moderate / Alpine

Cross Aspen groves, butterfly dotted meadows and “wailing” forests on this alpine hike. The Escudillo Hiking Trail ascends Arizona’s third highest peak, passing healthy forests and areas burned out in the 2011 Wallow fire. Outstanding views await by the watchtower at the top.

TRAILHEADs: Forest Road 56, north of alpine    DIFFICULTY: moderate  •  DISTANCE: 3 MILEs (6 miles RT) •  APPROX. TIME: 3-4 HOURS  •  ELEVATION GAIN: 1317 FEET (94 STORIES)  •  APPROX. CALORIES BURNED: 900-1,020 RT •  BEST TIME OF YEAR: may – october  •  PETS: YES  •  KID FRIENDLY: no  •  FACILITIES: none  •  FEES: none

Despite Escudillo Mountain’s status as AZ’s third highest peak, the trail to the summit is a brief 3-miles long and not difficult. It kicks off towards the top of the mountain, between lush Aspen Groves.

A little over 1-mile into the hike, gorgeous Tool Box Meadow opens up onto windblown pines and excellent views of the area.

After crossing Toolbox Meadow the path reenters, what is now the burned out remains of, the forest. On breezy days, an eerie wailing sound is resounds as the wind passes through the barren trunks.

Another meadow appears shortly thereafter. It ascends a gentle hill on an old service road.

During Spring and Summer this meadow is filled with colorful wildflowers, and literalyl hundreds of happy butterflies.

Reentering another stretch of burned out forest, the trail veers left. This next mile holds an unusual beauty, as thousands of felled trees shimmer silver and gold in the sunlight.

The trail ends just below a damaged, and now unmanned watchtower. In front of the tower epic views hundred-mile-views stretch to the horizon.

Total Nerdery

In 1965 Arizona’s very last grizzly bear was killed on Escudilla Mountain. Black bears still live in the Apache Sitgreaves National Forest. But no grizzlies.

Resources

Click here to download a trail map. (Courtesy of US Forest Service, Apache Sitgreaves National Forest)

Directions From the intersection of US 191 and US 180 (in Alpine), drive 5.5 miles north on combined US 180/191 to Forest Road 56. Turn right on FR 56 and continue 3.6 miles to a fork in the road at Terry Flat. Take the left fork and drive 0.5 mile to the trailhead on the right side of the road.

The post Escudillo Hiking Trail appeared first on AZ Utopia.

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AZ Utopia by Azutopia - 1M ago
★★★★★ Moderate / Flagstaff

Epic views of the San Francisco Mountains and Sunset Crater earn this hike a rare favorite status. Located 20 miles north of Flagstaff, the O’Leary Hiking Trail follows a primitive service road to the top of a towering lava dome. With each step the views get increasing long and ridiculously good.

TRAILHEADs: Forest Road 545A, flagstaff    DIFFICULTY: moderate  •  DISTANCE: 4.85 MILEs (9.7 miles RT) •  APPROX. TIME: 4.5-6 HOURS  •  ELEVATION GAIN: 1995 FEET (143 STORIES)  •  APPROX. CALORIES BURNED: 1455-1650 RT •  BEST TIME OF YEAR: april – November  •  PETS: YES  •  KID FRIENDLY: no  •  FACILITIES: none at trailhead, but yes at nearby O’Leary campground (no water) •  FEES: none

Located alongside famous Sunset Crater National Park, O’Leary mountain features many of the area’s crazy volcanic formations. For starters, the hike’s first mile skims the edge of a 15′-high, pitch black, once flowing, lava field.

This jagged black pumice wall sits in stark contrast to shimmering white aspens, slowly pushing their way through the stone. The landscape is beautifully surreal.

After the first easy mile the O’Leary Hiking Trail begins to climb. Little by little the vastness of the now frozen Bonito Lava Flow and immense mounds of ancient volcanic cinder come into view.

As the trail switchbacks up O’Leary Mountain, views back towards Humphreys Peak and the San Francisco Mountains are phenomenal.

At various intervals, the volcanic debris lining the trail morphs from deep black to bright red and then back again. And tall Ponderosas offer intermittent shade.

A manned watchtower sits at the top of the road and trail. Pass underneath to reach a couple of small lookout areas, each with insanely long views of the Painted Desert, San Francisco Mountains and beyond.

Awesome views both over and into Sunset Crater can be had from this vantage point. Truly the best available from land!

Total Nerdery

8,916′ high O’Leary Peak is a volcanic lava cone, while 8,029′ Sunset Crater was formed by volcanic cinders.

Resources

Click here to download a trail map

Directions From the intersection of 40A and US 89 (in Flagstaff) drive north on US 89 for 11.7 miles to Route 395 and the entrance for Sunset Crater National Park. Turn right onto 395 and continue 1.75 miles to Forest Road 545A, just before the entrance into Sunset Park. Drive 1/4 mile to a small parking lot for the trailhead to O’Leary Peak Hiking Trail.

The post O’Leary Peak Hiking Trail appeared first on AZ Utopia.

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AZ Utopia by Azutopia - 1M ago
★★★★★ Difficult / Sedona

Hands down, Sedona’s best views are caught atop the Bear Mountain Hiking Trail. This absolutely gorgeous trail keeps the heart-pumping. And the entire hike is punctuated with roaringly-good 360° views!

TRAILHEADs: Boynton Pass Road, Sedona    DIFFICULTY: Difficult  •  DISTANCE: 2.3 MILEs (4.6 miles rt) •  APPROX. TIME: 3-4.5 HOURS  •  ELEVATION GAIN: 1,800 FEET (129 STORIES)  •  APPROX. CALORIES BURNED: 782-874 RT •  BEST TIME OF YEAR: Year round (hot in summer)  •  PETS: Allowed, but not recommended  •  KID FRIENDLY: No  •  FACILITIES: yes, but no water •  FEES: $6 red rock pass (or national parks pass)

The Bear Mountain Hiking Trail starts across the street from its trailhead parking lot. A quarter-mile ahead, Bear Mountain’s hulking form fills the horizon. The approach is an easy stoll. The trail cuts across a flat, grassy plain, lumbering in and out of a few sandy, rain-carved washes.

At the base of the the mountain, the trail takes on a more ferocious character. The next quarter-mile switchbacks up a steep rocky slope, to a sandstone rim, midway up the mesa.

Atop the rim, the path curves around a number of huge hoodoos, then veers left. This area is popular with rock climbers. And it’s common to see them tooling around on the cliffs. The Bear Mountain Hiking Trail then plods along the rim for 1/3-mile, before clawing its way upwards once again.

For the next quarter-mile, the trail shreds the mountain on a series of steep switchbacks, rock scrambles and short chutes. These reach the top of the mesa and a short side canyon. Looking backwards, there are jaw-dropping views south over Doe Mountain and the red rocks of Sedona.

The Bear Mountain Hiking Trail now ambles north for 3/4-miles – crossing a high plateau. Lush Manzanita fields line this moderately steep section.

A couple of narrow passes serve up phenomenal north-south views, over wildly plunging, hoodoo filled canyons.

At the end of the plateau, the upper portion of Bear Mountain becomes visible. The trail dips down, crosses a narrow pass, and starts another savage climb.

The last leg of the hike definitely keeps the heart pumping! The trail ascends a topsy-turvey “sidewalk” of wide sedimentary stones, layered one atop another. It reaches a false peak and then continues on to the summit. The views at the top of Bear Mountain are amazing! Humphreys Peak is visible to the north. And, to the south, Sedona’s colorful spires and mesas fill the horizon. Take a well-deserved break. And then return the way you came.

Total Nerdery Bear Mountain is named for its bear shaped peak.

Resources Click here to download a trail map. 

Directions From the intersection of Routes 89A and 179, take 89A west 3.2 miles to Dry Creek Road. Turn right on Dry Creek Road (which becomes Boynton Pass Road). At 2.9 miles, turn left at the first T-intersection, to remain on Boynton Pass Road. Continue another 1.6 miles to a second T-intersection, and turn left again to remain on Boynton Pass Road / FR 152C. Drive 1.2 miles to the shared Bear and Doe Mountain trailhead parking area on the left. Cross the street to the access the Bear Mountain Trail.

The post Bear Mountain Hiking Trail appeared first on AZ Utopia.

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★★★☆☆ Easy / Phoenix

This mostly easy trail meanders up a pretty valley, to a mountain top lookout. At just over a mile-long, South Mountain Park’s Kiwanis Hiking Trail is perfect for a day out with family. Near the top, Telegraph Pass Lookout offers awesome north-south views!

TRAILHEADs: Piedras grandes drive, south mtn. park    DIFFICULTY: mostly easy (with moderate spots)  •  DISTANCE: 1.25 MILEs (2.5 miles rt)  •  APPROX. TIME: 1.5-2 HOURS  •  ELEVATION GAIN: 700 FEET (50 STORIES)  •  APPROX. CALORIES BURNED: 325-375 RT •  BEST TIME OF YEAR: October-April  •  PETS: YES  •  KID FRIENDLY: yes  •  FACILITIES: YES (no water) •  FEES: none

The Kiwanis Hiking Trail starts at the base of a mile-long scenic South Mountain valley. From the trailhead a wide pathway curves into the mountains between boulder and Saguaro lined hills.

The trail ascends mildly. It meanders up the valley on a series of long easy stretches, interspersed with short moderate knolls.

About halfway up the Kiwanis Hiking Trail, the backwards views are fantastic! Do a 180, and you’ll catch long views over downtown Phoenix.

After one mile, the Kiwanis Hiking Trail officially ends at Telegraph Pass Road. But don’t stop here!

Past Kiwanis Trail to Telegraph Lookout

Right across the street is the moderate National Hiking Trail. And a short quarter-mile further is Telegraph Pass Lookout! This only-accessible-by-foot lookout is a lot less crowded than Dobbins, and a worthwhile add-on.

You’ll be glad made this short hike. The views from Telegraph Pass Lookout are completely drool-worthy! To the north, downtown Phoenix glistens below. While to the south, hundred-mile views roll out over the fields of Maricopa. On a clear day you can see all the way to Tucson’s Santa Catalina Mountains. Turn around here, to head back to the Kiwanis Trailhead.

Total Nerdery

In 1925, 70 members of the Kiwanis Club built this trail in 6 hours! Half the crew started building from the top. And the other half from the bottom. At 2:00 they met in the middle and, ta da, trail was complete!

Resources

Click here to download a trail map

Directions Take Interstate Truck Route I-10 (in South Phoenix) to 16th Street / exit 195A.  Turn south on 16th Street and drive 4.4 miles to Dobbins Road. Head right / west onto Dobbins Road and drive 1.4 miles to Central Ave. Turn left / south on Central Ave. and continue for 1.5 miles into the park. Turn left on Las Lomitas Drive (the second left, after the main gate). Then turn left again on Las Piedras Grande Drive. The well marked trailhead at the center of this loop.

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AZ Utopia by Azutopia - 1M ago
★★★★☆ Moderate / Scottsdale

With its long views, and great mix of moderate & easy sections, the Windgate Pass Hiking Trail is anything but boring! Kicking of from busy Gateway Trailhead in north Scottsdale’s McDowell Sonoran Preserve, this trail first climbs to gorgeous Inspiration Point. Here there are excellent views over the city. The trail then gently ascends to equally stunning Windgate Pass, on the far side of the preserve.

TRAILHEADs: GATEWAY TRAILHEAD,18333 N. Thompson Peak Pkwy., scottsdale    DIFFICULTY: Moderate  •  DISTANCE: 4.5 MILEs (9 miles rt) INCLUDING ACCESS TRAILS •  APPROX. TIME: 3.5-4.5 HOURS  •  ELEVATION GAIN: 858 FEET (61 STORIES)  •  APPROX. CALORIES BURNED: 930-1,055 RT •  BEST TIME OF YEAR: October-April  •  PETS: YES  •  KID FRIENDLY: No  •  FACILITIES: YES •  FEES: none Gateway Trailhead to Windgate

As an interior trail, the Windgate Pass Hiking Trail is only reachable by hiking one of six McDowell Sonoran Preserve access trails. The most popular access (described here) is via the Gateway Loop Trail, from Gateway Trailhead. From the Trailhead, the super-easy, half-mile Saguaro Trail leads to the Gateway Loop Trail. Turn left to reach the Windgate Trailhead, one mile around the loop. This leg is, by far, the busiest part of the hike! The Hyper-popular Gateway Trail is moderately steep, with great views of Tom’s Thumb hanging out in the distance.

Once on the Windgate Hiking Trail, the crowds quickly disappear! The Windgate steepens slightly as it curves upwards between the mountains towards Inspiration point. Views of Toms Thumb are replaced by the rocky slopes of Drinkwater and McDowell Mountains.

Inspiration Point to Windgate Pass

Less than 3-miles into the hike, the Windgate Pass Hiking Trail reaches Inspiration Point. This gorgeous lookout, complete with stone benches to rest on, sits at an impressive 2,714′ elevation. Lots of hikers make Inspiration their turnaround point for a quick 6-mile out and back.

Looking back over the trail there are beautiful views of North Scottsdale. While, to the north, Toms Thumb is again visible, along with its namesake trail.

For those looking for a longer hike, the trail continues past Inspiration Point to Windgate Pass. This one-mile long section is less steep than the first section of the trail.  At 3,031′, Windgate Pass is the highest point of the hike. From here, there are epic views both west, over Scottsdale and the McDowell Mountains, and east, over Fountain Hills.

Windgate Pass to Bell Trail

From Windgate Pass to the trail’s end, at the Bell Pass Hiking trail, the hike is now either flat or downhill. The mountains open up to wide eastward views of Fountain Hills, with Four Peaks far off on the horizon. Hikers can either turn around at Bell Pass Trail and head back the way they came. Or they can do a 9.4-mile loop by continuing on Bell Pass, to Gateway Loop, to Saguaro Trail. This route also returns to the Gateway Trailhead, and is only 0.4 miles longer than heading back on the Windgate Pass Trail. See the trail map at the link below for details.

Total Nerdery

At 30,500 acres the McDowell Sonoran Preserve is the largest Urban Park in the United States!

Resources

Click here to download a trail map. 

Directions

From the intersection of AZ Loop 101 and Bell Road (in Scottsdale) turn east onto Bell Road. Continue for 1.66 miles on Bell Road to N. Thompson Peak Parkway. Turn left/north onto N. Thompson Peak Parkway and drive 0.5 mile to the entrance to the McDowell Sonoran Preserve Gateway Trailhead. It’s clearly marked on the right side of the road.

The post Windgate Pass Hiking Trail appeared first on AZ Utopia.

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★★★☆☆ Moderate / North of Fountain Hills

Huge, upright boulders and a “sometimes” stream grace this NE Phoenix trail. The Ballantine Hiking Trail kicks off just north of Fountain Hills, alongside busy Beeline Highway. As the trail curves away from the road, the sight and sound of traffic disappears. In their place is surprising tranquility & tons of cool rock formations.

TRAILHEADs: AZ 87, North of Fountain Hills    DIFFICULTY: Moderate  •  DISTANCE: 3.4 MILEs (6.8 miles rt) •  APPROX. TIME: 3.5-4.5 HOURS  •  ELEVATION GAIN: 1,460 FEET (104 STORIES)  •  APPROX. CALORIES BURNED: 1,020-1,150 RT •  BEST TIME OF YEAR: October-April  •  PETS: YES  •  KID FRIENDLY: No  •  FACILITIES: none •  FEES: none Ballantine & Pine Creek Loop Trail

Parking at the Ballantine / Pine Creek trailhead, right off AZ 87, it’s hard to imagine the quiet hike ahead. The Ballantine Hiking Trail heads left, paralleling the noisy highway for a half-mile. It then curves into the mountains and (Wow!) changes character completely. Suddenly, rolling hills frame the path and silence (yes silence) fills the air. A signpost, a mile further on, marks the intersection of the Pine Creek Trail. Turn right here for a short 3-mile loop back to the trailhead. Or turn left, (recommended) to continue to Boulder Flat.

Ballantine Trail to Boulder Flat

Turing left, the Ballantine Trail now starts to climb for real. It passes an immense field of giant hoodoos, tall stacks of granite boulders, and ginormous wildly balanced rocks.

After cresting a granite strewn peak, the trail slowly dips, then even’s out for the next mile. The tranquility in this area is palpable, as the path winds between dramatic rock-faced hills.

An ancient fence, of barbed wire and worn branches, outlines cattle grazing land alongside the trail.

At 3 miles, the Ballantine Hiking Trail reaches a T-intersection with the Pipeline Trail. Turn right to continue on the Ballantine Trail to Boulder Flat. A half mile further on, the surrounding area opens wide and flattens out. Camp Creek crosses the area, flowing by after a good rain. There are fantastic views of the surrounding rock lined hills. Turn around here to return to the trailhead. Or continue another 6.6 miles to the end of the Ballantine Trail, at the Cline Trail.

Total Nerdery The area surrounding the Ballantine Hiking Trail was severely burned in 2005, in the Cave Creek Fire. Some signs of the damage are still visible.

Resources Click here to view or download a trail map.

Directions From the intersection of Shea Blvd. and AZ 87 (in Fountain Hills), head north on AZ 87 for 21 miles. The Ballantine / Pine Creek Trailhead is clearly marked, on the right / east side of the highway.

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★★★★★ Difficult then Moderate / Supai

At just under 200 feet high, Mooney Falls is the most intensely beautiful cascade in all of Havasu Canyon! It thunders over a cliff one mile past the canyon’s namesake fall, and eleven miles from the Havasu Hiking Trailhead at Hualapai Hilltop. The Havasu Hiking Trail follows turquoise blue Havasu creek eight miles past Mooney Falls. As the trail winds down the canyon, it passes gorgeous Beaver Falls and endless mini-cascades. Finally Havasu Trail, Creek and Canyon come to their dramatic end at the mighty Colorado River.

TRAILHEAD: Havasupai Campround, supai    DIFFICULTY:  difficult at start, then moderate  •  DISTANCE: 8 MILEs to Colorado River (16 miles RT) •  APPROX. TIME: 8-12 HOURS RT  •  ELEVATION GAIN: -1,000 FEET (-71 STORIES)  •  APPROX. CALORIES BURNED: 2,080 – 2,400 RT •  BEST TIME OF YEAR: feb.-nov. (hot in summer)  •  PETS: no  •  KID FRIENDLY: no  •  trailhead fACILITIES: yes, but no water  •  FEES: pre-purchased Havasupai tribe permits required! price based on length of stay.

NOTE: Getting to Mooney Falls, first requires traveling 11 miles through remote Havasu Canyon. Havasupai Falls Permits are required to enter the canyon and hike the Havasu Falls Trail. Click here for information on getting a Havasupai Falls Permit. Click here for details on the 11 mile hike to Mooney Falls.

Mooney Falls Hike


Eleven-miles down remote Havasu Canyon, Mooney Falls crashes 196 feet to the canyon floor. From the cliff top, at end of Havasupai Campground, the view over the fall is majorly impressive! Water-worn canyon walls appear to “drip” straight downwards to the sand and turquoise pools below. The short “hike” to the base of Mooney Falls is the steepest part of the entire Havasu Hiking Trail! Not recommended for people with vertigo.

This hiking section is really an almost vertical, mist-soaked climb down the canyon wall. A series of short switchbacks, narrow tunnels, carved “steps” and wooden ladders lead the way. There are metal pegs and heavy chains to hang on to for balance. The trail can get a bit hairy when crowded with people going up and down. Head out in early morning for fewer people on the trail.

But OMG! The steep climb to the base of Mooney Falls is totally worth it! Standing below this powerful waterfall, in the middle of stunning Havasu canyon, is beyond words fantastic! A perfectly centered stone forms an Instagram-worthy photo platform. Fair warning that the spray from Mooney Falls drenches everyone at its base. No need to even get in the water.

Beaver Falls Hike

Passing Mooney Falls, the Havasu Hiking Trail continues down the canyon. It first descends a rocky hill. Then, for the next 3 miles, follows an easy, soft, sandy, vine lined, path. Here the lush green riverbank sits in stark contrast to the towering red and purple canyon walls. Look for Big-Horn Sheep in this area, grazing along the trail.

As Havasu creek swerves through the canyon, it brushes up against either sandy, treelined expanses or steep canyon walls. To continue onwards, the Havasu Hiking Trail crosses the creek numerous times. Cairns mark most crossings. And simple wooden bridges have been laid in some spots. But wading is often the easiest way to get from side to side.

Three and a half miles past Mooney Falls a wooden ladder starts a modest climb up the side of the canyon. The ladder sits just behind a huge Palm. A bizarre plant to come across in the middle the Grand Canyon!

The Havasu Hiking Trail ascends another half mile, offering lushious views over the creek. About 4 miles past Mooney Falls, gorgeous Beaver Falls comes into view. A short side trail leads to its base. Multiple cascades and stone platforms make Beaver Falls a fantastic place to hang out and play.

Colorado River Hike

Passing Beaver Falls, the Havasu Hiking Trail continues its journey towards the Colorado River. A small sign, just past the Beaver Falls side trail, marks the crossover into Grand Canyon National Park. The path continues one mile, along the side of the canyon, high above the creek. It then makes a steep, narrow descent back down to the water. From the cliff base, cairns mark the way through the creek to the trail’s sandy continuation around a bend.

For the next 2 miles the Havasu Hiking Trail is sandy and mostly flat. It crosses the creek a few more times, where the water curves around tall stone cliffs. The canyon is narrow and dramatically beautiful. Sunlight filters in from high above.

Just a few hundred yards from the Colorado River, the little bit of land alongside the creek completely disappears. In its place, steep walls line the water’s edges. Hikers can wade a short distance through the creek. But take care, as the current gets strong and dangerous as it approaches the Colorado. To see the confluence, climb up the ridge on the left side of the canyon and follow the trail to the River. Rafting tours often anchor here. It’s incredible to witness Havasu’s turquoise blue water blending with the teal water of the Colorado River, in the middle of the Grand Canyon. To return to Mooney Falls and the Havasupai Campground, turn around and make the same stunning 8-mile hike along Havasu Creek.

Total Nerdery

Mooney Falls is named after prospector Daniel Mooney’s sad story. He died in1882 trying to descend the fall. His repelling rope was cut in two by the canyon’s rough stone walls. And he fell to his death. In 1883 Mooney’s team returned. They blasting out existing caves, created tunnels, and pounded spikes and chains into the rocks to reach the base. The current trail is the result of their efforts*.

*source: GrandCanyonSecrets.com

Resources

Click here to download a trail map

Directions: From the intersection of I-40 and Railroad Avenue, in Seligman, turn right / north onto Railroad Ave. At the end of Railroad Ave., turn left / west onto historic Route 66. Continue for 30 miles to Indian Route 18. Turn right / north onto Indian Route 18 and drive for 60 miles to its end at Haulapai Hilltop. Keep an eye out for free roaming cattle and horses along this gently rolling, fully paved road! Haulapai Hilltop has ample parking, a ranger station, small heliport, vault toilets and the Havasu Falls Trailhead. All visitors to Havasu Falls are required to validate their pre-purchased permits and register with the ranger before entering the Havasu Canyon. The top of Mooney Falls is 11-miles down the canyon, on the Havasu Hiking Trail.

The post Havasu Hiking Trail to Mooney and Beaver Falls, and Colorado River appeared first on AZ Utopia.

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Havasu Falls

Spectacular, 100′ high Havasu Falls is a bucket-list worthy destination! Its icy, turquoise blue waters thunder through a remote dessert canyon. Here, big horn sheep graze beside a spring-fed creek. And endless cascades form a magical oasis. A stunning contrast to the soaring canyon walls around them. This hidden land has been the sacred home of the Havasupai Tribe for as long as time can tell. And it’s with the tribe’s permission only that visitors are allowed to share in the beauty of this incredible, far-flung place. A Havasupai Falls Permit is required to enter the reservation, to make the 10-mile hike to Havasu Falls, and to stay in the canyon. These permits are checked at the only access point for the falls, the Havasu Falls Trailhead at Hualapai Hilltop. Only indiviudals with valid permits are allowed to enter.

How to get a Havasupai Falls Permit

The Havasupai Tribe makes a limited number of Havasupai Falls permits available each year. These permits go on sale February 1st, at 8:00 a.m. and sell out quickly. Permits may be purchased either by visiting the tribe’s official website, or by calling the Havasupai Tourist Office (928) 448-2121. If you’ve heard rumors that it’s almost impossible to get through on the phone, it’s true! The office is teeny and the line gets flooded. So reaching a human is a matter of both luck and persistence. Plan to redial, redial and then redial some more.

A Havasupai Falls Permit includes the fees for the permit, entry to the Havasupai Reservation, camping and taxes. Permits fees are calculated per person / per day, with a maximum 4-day-stay allowed on each permit. Havasupai Falls Permits are non-refundable and non-transferable, so trip insurance is recommended. Spring and Fall are the most popular seasons to visit Havasu Falls and sell out first. Once you are at the falls, you’ll be thankful you made the effort!

If you prefer to visit Havasu Falls with a group tour, there are a number of companies that conduct guided tours into the canyon. Pre-purchased permits are included within the tour package price. These tours also sell out quickly. So be sure to make your reservations well in advance. Group tours generally include equipment rentals, mule transport of supplies, camp setup, food and cooking services, and guided hikes.

Overnight Options in Havasu Canyon


Havasupai Falls Campground

The Havasupai Falls Campground is a beautiful, flat, mile-long stretch on the Havasu Canyon floor. A Havasupai Falls Permit is required to camp. The camping area starts just past Havasu Falls, 10-miles from the Havasu Hike Trailhead. It ends before the top of stunning 150′ Mooney Falls. Turquoise blue Havasu Creek babbles through the middle of the campground, while the high walls of Havasu Canyon frame the sides. The Havasupai Falls campground accommodates about 100-150 tents, or 200-300 campers. There aren’t designated camp sites. So permit holders set up in lovely nocks and crannies: under the ample shade trees, alongside the creek, by sandy pathways or below canyon walls. A few large clearings are generally filled by tour groups. Multiple picnic tables are scattered throughout the campground. And drinking water is available from a tapped fresh-water spring. There are regularly cleaned and supplied vault toilets at both ends, and in the middle, of the campground. Campers are required to take all of their trash out with them.

The Havasupai Lodge

If camping isn’t your thing, the quaint Havasupai Lodge is another option. This small, rustic lodge, with a central courtyard, is the only hotel in this remote location. It’s located in Supai Village, 8-miles from the Havasu Falls Trailhead. The Lodge is 2 miles from Havasu Falls. It is air conditioned, with running water and basic electricity. There is no food available. So you will need to bring your own, purchase it at the small general store, or eat at the sporadically open local cafe. Reservations can be made by calling (928) 448-2111 or (928) 448-2201. The purchase of a Havasupai Falls Entry Permit is also required to stay in the Lodge. It is sold along with the room reservation. Note: In 2018, the Havasupai Lodge will be closed for renovations from Jan. 1 – March 31.

The Trek to Havasu Falls

Havasu Falls Hiking Trail

The 10-mile hike to Havasu Falls is astoundingly beautiful! And a fantastic part of the experience. The Havasu Falls Hiking Trail starts at remote Hualapai Hilltop. It descends quickly in the first 2 miles, then continues gently downwards through Hualapai, then Havasu, Canyons. Click here for a detailed description of the trail.

Havasupai Helicopter

A private helicopter makes frequent trips between Haulapai Hilltop and the small landing pad in Havasu Canyon’s, Supai Village. It’s primary purpose is to carry supplies in and out of this remote village and provide transport to the Havasupai People. The helicopter flies Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays and Sundays, between 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. When space is available, it’s possible to pay to be flown in or out of Supai village, on a first come, first serve basis.

Other Havasu Canyon Features


Havasu Falls is the most recognized feature of Havasu Canyon. But spring-fed Havasu Creek is plush with seemingly endless cascades. Its turquoise blue waters crash first over impressive 50 Foot Falls, followed by Little Navajo, Havasu, Mooney and then Beaver Falls. There are tons of smaller cascades all along the creek’s course to the Colorado River. It is worth taking a few days to hike to, and explore, each of these stunning locations. Click here for details on the hike past Havasu Falls.

Pre-Trek Accommodations

Because of Havasu Trail’s remote location, many people choose to spend the night in the area before heading into the canyon. The three closest options are The Grand Canyon Inn, The Haualapai Lodge, or sleeping in a car or tent at Hualapai Hilltop. Both hotels are about an hour drive from the trailhead. A sliver of space behind the parked cars on Hualapai Hilltop can accommodate small tents.

The Road to Haulapia Hilltop

The final 60-mile drive to Havasu Falls Trailhead, on Indian Route 18, is both remote and beautiful! The fully paved road gently rolls through Hualapai Reservation ranch land, passing free roaming cows and horses. The road ends at the trailhead parking lot at Haulapai Hilltop. You can’t miss it!

Further information on recommended supplies and more is in the works. Please check this post again for the link.

The post Ultimate Guide to Havasupai Falls Permits and Havasu Falls appeared first on AZ Utopia.

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AZ Utopia by Azutopia - 1M ago
★★★★★ Difficult / North of Seligman

Turquoise blue water and a thundering 100′ waterfall make Havasu Falls one of Arizona’s most spectacular places. Winding through a remote desert canyon, the Havasu Falls Hiking Trail descends into a magical land – almost surreal in its beauty. Deep in the canyon, a treelined, icy blue creek, and roaring falls, flow between narrow 1,000′ canyon walls.

TRAILHEAD: Route 18, Hualapi reservation, north of seligman    DIFFICULTY: difficult  •  DISTANCE: 10 MILEs (20 miles RT) •  APPROX. TIME: 6-8 HOURS, each way  •  ELEVATION GAIN: -3,350 FEET (-240 STORIES)  •  APPROX. CALORIES BURNED: 1,380-1580 each way •  BEST TIME OF YEAR: feb.-nov. (hot in summer)  •  PETS: no  •  KID FRIENDLY: no  •  trailhead fACILITIES: yes, but no water  •  FEES: pre-purchased Havasupai tribe permits required! price based on length of stay.

Standing at the Havasu trailhead, on Hualapai Hilltop, it’s hard to imagine the turquoise blue creek flowing 6.5 miles below. Stunning red canyons and dry, rocky desert fill the horizon. And not a hint of water can be seen. Please note that hiking Havasu Falls Trail is not allowed without a pre-purchased, Havasupi Falls permit! A ranger at the trailhead station confirms I.D.s, and checks them against a daily list of permit holders, before allowing hikers onto the trail.

Stepping over the Haulapai Hilltop rim, the Havasu Falls Hiking Trail kicks off dramatically. A series of steep switchbacks descend 1,300′ to the Hualapai Canyon floor, on the first 1.75 miles of the hike. This is the most difficult leg. Not bad on the way down. But grueling on the way up. Post-early-morning, this section is fully exposed to the sun. The trail is shared with fast moving mule trains, carrying supplies in and out of the canyon. Be sure to move aside as you hear them approach. Their drivers are located far in back. And the mules are on auto-drive, paying little attention to hikers.

Once on the canyon floor, the Havasu Hiking Trail becomes mostly flat and easy. The next two miles follow a wide, gravely arroyo through an open section of Hualapai canyon. Expect full sun exposure, and gorgeous upward views.

As the hike continues its gentle descent through Hualapai canyon, the walls gradually increase in height. Intermittent shade begins to grace the trail as the path winds from side to side. The trail passes wacky rock formations and pockmarked boulders, decorated with small rocks by passing hikers.

At five miles, Hualapai Canyon narrows beneath dramatically soaring cliffs. This is my favorite part of the hike! Wonderfully deep shade cools this section. And it’s not surprising to step around shallow pools of water, left by past monsoons. The echos here are fantastic! Distant mules trains can be heard clomping up the trail, way before they can be seen.

After 6.5 miles, Hualupai Canyon comes to its end at the t-shaped confluence with Havasu Canyon. A rustic signpost points left to Supai Village, and the landscape suddenly transforms! The sound of rushing water is heard. And the trail converts to soft sand as it follows the shady banks of Havasu Creek.

One mile further and the Havasu Hiking Trail enters remote Supai Village – the sacred home of the Havasupai tribe. Nestled between ancient Cottonwoods and sandy streets are the tourist office, Havasu Lodge, a small cafe, local store, heliport and a number of small private homes. Hikers must stop at the Tourist office to register and get their wrist and tent tags. A tribal representative periodically walks the campground and fall areas to check these items.

After registering, hikers can continue on through the village.  A signpost marks a righthand turn to the campground. This mildly descending, mile-long stretch is lined with deep, soft, beach-like sand.

At around 9 miles, the Havasu Hiking Trail first passes 50-Foot Falls, and then Navajo Falls. These beautiful cascades are only partially visible from the trail, and definitely worth a visit!  Finally, the trail reaches the top of 100′ Havasu Falls. The path steepens as it descends along the side of the fall to its base. The views are incredible. And after the long trek it’s great to have finally arrived!

From the base of Havasu Falls, the sandy trail continues along the creek. It passes an Indian Fry Bread stand, a ranger station, a mule train loading stable, and finally enters the campground. The narrow, mile-long Havasupai Falls Campground is gorgeous! Both sides are flanked by the soaring walls of Havasu Canyon. There are ample Shade trees. And the refreshing babble and cooling air from Havasu Creek, flowing through the center, make it insanely beautiful. Drop that backpack and set up camp in any of the lovely nooks and crannies. Camping is allowed anywhere between the fence, at the start of the campground, and the flat area just before the drop off of Mooney Falls.

Havasu Trail to Mooney & Beaver Falls & the Colorado River

The Havasu Falls Hiking Trail continues another 8 miles through the canyon. It makes a steep descent down Mooney Falls, then continues on to popular Beaver Falls. Both Havasu Creek and Hiking Trail end at the confluence of the Colorado River.  Click here for details on Havasu Hiking Trail’s last 8-miles. 

Total Nerdery

Havasupai roughly translates into people (pai) of the blue-green water (havasu). The stunning turquoise hue of Havasu Creek is the result of a high calcium content, which leaches into the 30,000 year old underground spring feeding the creek. A natural aquifer, deep within a limestone cavern at the mouth of Havasu Canyon, houses this spring,

Resources

Click here to download a trail map.

Directions: From the intersection of I-40 and Railroad Avenue, in Seligman, turn right / north onto Railroad Ave. At the end of Railroad Ave., turn left / west onto historic Route 66. Continue for 30 miles to Indian Route 18. Turn right / north onto Indian Route 18 and drive for 60 miles to its end at Haulapai Hilltop. Keep an eye out for free roaming cattle and horses along this gently rolling, fully paved road! At Haulapai Hilltop you’ll find  ample parking, a ranger station, small heliport, vault toilets and the Havasu Falls Trailhead. All visitors to Havasu Falls are required to validate their pre-purchased permits and register with the ranger before starting the hike.

Getting a Permit for Havasu Falls

Click here for information on getting a permit for the Havasu Falls Hiking Trail and details on planning your trip.

The post Havasu Falls Hiking Trail appeared first on AZ Utopia.

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AZ Utopia by Azutopia - 1M ago
★★★★☆ Difficult / Cave Creek

This short, steep hike ascends a craggy slate trail & pays off with epic north valley views! Tucked behind Cave Creek’s western-style town, the Black Mountain Hiking Trail is one of the valley’s best butt-kicking hikes. This trail gets less crowds than central Phoenix’s Piestewa or Echo Canyon hiking trails. But is an equal match for a sweat-inducing workout with excellent views.

TRAILHEADs: North Schoolhouse road, cave creek    DIFFICULTY: difficult  •  DISTANCE: 1.25 MILEs (2.5 miles RT) •  APPROX. TIME: 2.5-3.5 HOURS  •  ELEVATION GAIN: 1,165 FEET (83 STORIES)  •  APPROX. CALORIES BURNED: 425-475 RT •  BEST TIME OF YEAR: October-april  •  PETS: YES (note: trail is steep and rocky)  •  KID FRIENDLY: no  •  FACILITIES: None  •  FEES: none

Any visitor to Cave Creek has noticed the tall mountain framing the southern edge of town. Unbeknownst to most tourists and Harley riders hanging at the local saloons, Black Mountain has one of the valley’s best workout trails. From the trail parking lot, it’s an easy quarter-mile jaunt up the road to reach the trailhead. At the base you can choose to head left on the more scenic trail, or continue straight on the gravel road. Both paths come together a third of the way up the mountain.

Beyond where the paths meet, the Black Mountain Hiking Trail gets increasingly steep and rocky. The path ascends on jagged slate outcroppings, requiring high steps and a solid heart-rate! 

Keep on trucking to reach a short reprieve. After three-quarters of a mile, the trail reaches a short saddle with fantastic views over Cave Creek. From here, the path turns moderate and less rocky for a stretch, as it ascends the mountain’s upper slope.

A quarter mile more and the the Black Mountain Hiking Trail reaches its peak. An American Flag marks the top.

360° views are a choice reward for the climb. To the east and southeast are views of Four Peaks and the McDowells. While Piestewa, Camelback and even the Superstition’s Weavers Needle are visible to the south.

Total nerdery

Black Mountain is named for the black hue created by its rocky slate surface.

Directions From the intersection of 101 and Scottsdale Road (in north Scottsdale), head north on Scottsdale Road (which turns into Tom Darlington) for 12 miles. At the T-intersection of Tom Darlington and Cave Creek Road, turn left / west onto Cave Creek, and continue 1.4 miles. At the stop sign, turn left / south onto North Schoolhouse Road. Parking for the trail is a quarter mile further on both sides of Military Road.

The post Black Mountain Hiking Trail appeared first on AZ Utopia.

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