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<img src="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/far-west-projects/servicearizona9953e078c8006c57b531ff0000a35efc.jpg?sfvrsn=0&amp;MaxWidth=550&amp;MaxHeight=&amp;ScaleUp=false&amp;Quality=High&amp;Method=ResizeFitToAreaArguments&amp;Signature=F919044641F3061FA0915B14D3581AC0" data-displaymode="Custom" alt="ServiceArizona" title="ServiceArizona" data-method="ResizeFitToAreaArguments" data-customsizemethodproperties="{&quot;MaxWidth&quot;:&quot;550&quot;,&quot;MaxHeight&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;ScaleUp&quot;:false,&quot;Quality&quot;:&quot;High&quot;}"><br><strong><br>By Doug Nick / <em>ADOT Communications</em></strong><br><br>Having a driver license suspended is a serious matter, to say the least, and the repercussions can go further than restricting someone’s privilege to drive.<br><br>Since many people rely on their license as a state-issued ID, having it suspended often means needing a temporary replacement. Fortunately, the Arizona Department of Transportation Motor Vehicle Division <a href="https://azdot.gov/media/News/news-release/2019/05/16/temporary-i.d.-card-now-available-online">has made it less complicated to order a temporary ID card</a> by introducing an online ordering option through <a href="http://ServiceArizona.com">ServiceArizona.com</a>.<br><br>We know that people often need a valid ID in order to buy items at the store, go to the bank, and apply for a job among other things When customers are faced with a suspended license, it makes having a temporary ID card vital.<br><br>By adding this to our growing menu of online services, we’ve eliminated one more reason to be compelled to visit an MVD office. That speeds the process for all of our customers because it reduces traffic at MVD offices so we can better serve everyone who needs to come to one of our locations.<br><br>To get a temporary ID card, a customer must first have a suspended Arizona driver license. The expiration date on the suspended license must be beyond the six months the temporary ID is valid. Also, the customer must already have an Arizona license photo that has been taken within the past 12 years on file with MVD in order for the temporary ID to be produced.<br><br>To learn more, go to&nbsp;<a href="http://www.servicearizona.com/" target="_blank" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.servicearizona.com&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1558474566035000&amp;usg=AFQjCNEt7vPIgCH7GP5Fuj8y1RDLvTFomw">ServiceArizona.com</a>.<br><br>
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<strong><a href="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/azdot-blog/511-business-logo.jpg?sfvrsn=0"><img title="511-business-logo" style="vertical-align: middle;" alt="511-business-logo" src="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/azdot-blog/511-business-logo.jpg?sfvrsn=0&amp;MaxWidth=550&amp;MaxHeight=&amp;ScaleUp=false&amp;Quality=High&amp;Method=ResizeFitToAreaArguments&amp;Signature=C6D781FAC9E2DB635C6F302627E9F358" data-openoriginalimageonclick="true" data-displaymode="Custom" data-customsizemethodproperties="{&quot;MaxWidth&quot;:&quot;550&quot;,&quot;MaxHeight&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;ScaleUp&quot;:false,&quot;Quality&quot;:&quot;High&quot;}" data-method="ResizeFitToAreaArguments"></a><br><br>By Tom Herrmann&nbsp;/ ADOT Communications</strong><br><br>By now, Arizona drivers are accustomed to seeing blue signs along our highways that let us know what services are available at the next exit.<br><br> This summer you will begin seeing new blue signs with a new message for travelers but the same positive impact on local businesses and Arizona roads.<br><br> Instead of identifying local businesses like the current signs, the <a href="https://www.azdot.gov/media/News/news-release/2019/05/13/businesses-invited-to-sponsor-adot-511-travel-information-signs">new 511 Logo Signs</a> will remind drivers that highway information is available by calling 511. <br><br> For businesses, the signs represent an opportunity to gain exposure 24 hours a day and promote their brands along state highways. Sponsoring businesses – categories eligible to participate include food, gas, lodging, camping, attractions and 24-hour pharmacies – will have the area to themselves. Each sign will carry only one sponsor.<br><br> The signs will be posted first in the Phoenix and Tucson areas, then expand to Yuma and Flagstaff and later to other areas around Arizona.<br><br> As beneficial as the signs will be for the businesses represented on them, they may be just as much of a boost to the state. Proceeds from the program will go to the Arizona State Highway Fund to repair and maintain roads. The original blue signs have raised more than $6 million for that purpose over the past decade. And while it’s too early to predict the economic impact of the new program, every dollar in proceeds mean a dollar less is needed from state taxes to improve Arizona roads.<br><br> Business owners are invited to contact program representatives at 855.712.4500 to discuss their needs and potential signage solutions. Interested business owners can learn more about the program at <a href="http://511logosigns.az.gov/" target="_blank">511LogoSigns.az.gov</a>.<br><br> To see ADOT’s newly redesigned Arizona Traveler Information website, please visit <a href="https://www.az511.gov/">az511.gov</a>.
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<a href="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/far-west-projects/i-40-paving.jpg?sfvrsn=0"><img title="I-40 paving" alt="I-40 paving" src="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/far-west-projects/i-40-paving.jpg?sfvrsn=0&amp;MaxWidth=550&amp;MaxHeight=&amp;ScaleUp=false&amp;Quality=High&amp;Method=ResizeFitToAreaArguments&amp;Signature=B5FC20211B0D2162868B1765A072A684" data-openoriginalimageonclick="true" data-displaymode="Custom" data-customsizemethodproperties='{"MaxWidth":"550","MaxHeight":"","ScaleUp":false,"Quality":"High"}' data-method="ResizeFitToAreaArguments"></a><br><br><strong>By Ryan Harding / <em>ADOT Communications</em></strong><br><br> Hibernation is over for bears, chipmunks and snakes – and now highway projects in northern Arizona.<br><br> As temperatures warm up to the proper levels for paving, ADOT will start or continue work from last year on repairing winter weather damage to pavement along state highways.<br><br> Work on a 17-mile stretch of Interstate 40 is picking up from last summer with crews repairing the ramps at the Grand Canyon Boulevard interchange in Williams. They will also lay new pavement down along the interstate creating a smooth ride for travelers and truckers.<br><br> Another project picking up from last summer is work on the last 28 miles of northbound Interstate 17 to Flagstaff. Last year, crews rebuilt the highway from milepost 312 to 315 and replaced the bridge structures in each direction at Willard Springs Road with <a href="https://www.azdot.gov/media/News/news-release/2018/10/29/value-engineering-increases-value-reduces-delivery-time-for-i-17-bridge-project">a new, innovative technique</a>.<br><br> Crews will pave the rest of the stretch of highway, repairing worn out pavement and smoothing over filled potholes created from freeze-thaw cycles.<br><br> With pavement improvements to the main interstates in the Flagstaff area pretty well in hand, ADOT will turn its attention to improving pavement conditions along a 13-mile stretch of State Route 89A from uptown Sedona to the Pumphouse Wash Bridge. This project is expected to begin later this summer.<br><br> While there’s a lot of highway work to do during the summer weather window, ADOT takes steps to minimize the impact to traffic during the weekends – even stopping work on major summer holidays like Memorial Day weekend, the Fourth of July and Labor Day weekend.<br><br> As you keep an eye out for bears and other wildlife now up and about while exploring the high country, keep up-to-date on highway projects as well by visiting <a href="http://www.az511.gov/">az511.gov</a> or calling 511.
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<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FAZDOT%2Fposts%2F2698087040262982&amp;width=500" width="500" height="634" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe>
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<img src="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/far-west-projects/interchange.jpg?sfvrsn=0&amp;MaxWidth=700&amp;MaxHeight=&amp;ScaleUp=false&amp;Quality=High&amp;Method=ResizeFitToAreaArguments&amp;Signature=A1126034ADF5A742D74AEF5C35C8D5E2" data-method="ResizeFitToAreaArguments" data-customsizemethodproperties="{&quot;MaxWidth&quot;:&quot;700&quot;,&quot;MaxHeight&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;ScaleUp&quot;:false,&quot;Quality&quot;:&quot;High&quot;}" data-displaymode="Custom" alt="interchange" title="interchange"><br><strong><br><strong><em>EDITOR'S NOTE: During&nbsp;</em></strong><a href="https://infrastructureweek.org/"><strong><em>Infrastructure Week 2019</em></strong></a><strong><em>, we're&nbsp;highlighting aspects of construction, improvement and maintenance that are part of Arizona's $22.4&nbsp;billion&nbsp;investment in state highways. Today, our director shares his thoughts.&nbsp;<br></em></strong><br>By John Halikowski / <em>ADOT Director</em></strong><br><br>Every second of the day, we rely on countless systems to provide us with everything from energy and phone service to reliable transportation options and a strong internet connection.<br><br>We expect that we’ll have water when we turn on the tap or light when we switch on a lamp. Similarly, when we head out to work each morning, we expect roads and bridges to travel on during our commutes. Unless something’s not working the way it should, most people don’t spend a lot of time thinking about the infrastructure that’s so vital to our daily lives and our productivity.<br><br>But we need to be thinking about it, now more than ever. Specifically, we need to realize the importance of our infrastructure and protect its value by making investments for the future.<br><br>At ADOT, we’re trying to do just that.<br><br>Once a road or a bridge is built, the job’s not done. We have numerous professionals who work every day to repair, support and maintain every single part of the system. This agency continues to invest a majority of our limited resources to maintain the state’s highway system, now valued at $22.4 billion.<br><br>Making infrastructure a top priority requires public support, which is why ADOT is proud to recognize Infrastructure Week (May 13-20). Now in its seventh year, the week is designed to raise awareness about the importance of infrastructure to the nation’s economy, workers and communities.<br><br>The economy relies on effective and efficient methods to bring goods and services to market. Infrastructure plays a critical role in making sure grocery store shelves are stocked, online purchases can get delivered and coast-to-coast trade routes are maintained.<br><br>In honor of Infrastructure Week, I challenge you to think about the ways you rely on some form of infrastructure. I hope you will agree with me on the importance of infrastructure and how vital it is to our future.<br><br> <hr> <br> <strong><em><img src="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/far-west-projects/1b5eb6c5f48be78c8006c57b531ff0000a35efc.tmb-thumbnail.jpg?sfvrsn=2" displaymode="Thumbnail" alt="1b5eb6c" title="1b5eb6c" style="float: left;"><br> <br> &nbsp; &nbsp;This post originally appeared on ADOT Director John Halikowski's&nbsp;<br> &nbsp; &nbsp;<a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/john-halikowski-52250027">LinkedIn page</a>. He has led the agency since 2009.</em></strong><br> <br>
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<style>.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }</style><div class="embed-container"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed//5h_6VLxuW1A" frameborder="0"></iframe></div><br> <strong><strong><em>EDITOR'S NOTE: During&nbsp;</em></strong><a href="https://infrastructureweek.org/"><strong><em>Infrastructure Week 2019</em></strong></a><strong><em>, we're&nbsp;highlighting aspects of construction, improvement and maintenance that are part of Arizona's $22.4&nbsp;billion&nbsp;investment in state highways. Today's Throwback Thursday post takes you back to some of the many ADOT projects in recent years that have improved the quality of life around Greater Arizona.</em></strong><br><br>By Steve Elliott / <em>ADOT Communications</em></strong><br><br>Here at the ADOT Blog, there's just nothing better than video to illustrate how transportation investments benefit communities around the state. Case in point: the video above from a 2017 project that used an innovative technique&nbsp;<a href="https://azdot.gov/media/blog/posts/2017/03/24/a-faster-look-at-a-very-quick-and-innovative-bridge-project">to create a bridge in in just 96 hours</a>&nbsp;in northwestern Arizona.&nbsp;<br><br>So without my words getting in the way, at least too much, let's continue Infrastructure Week 2019 with a Throwback Thursday exploration of some projects completed in recent years around Greater Arizona, as&nbsp;featured in ADOT videos.&nbsp;<br><br> It's no secret that we're awfully excited <a href="https://azdot.gov/media/blog/posts/2018/10/18/drones-provide-awe-inspiring-perspective-on-highways-projects-landscapes">to now have drones</a>, funded by a federal grant, to help tell ADOT's story. That led to this aerial view from February explaining a project improving traffic flow and safety on State Route 347 in Maricopa. The work, finishing later this year, includes creating a bridge carrying traffic over the Union Pacific Railroad tracks.<br><br> <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FAZDOT%2Fvideos%2F2251765378215736%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=476" width="476" height="476" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe><br><br>This September 2018 video used one of our new drones, along with some magic at the production end, to highlight improvements that are part of a <a href="https://azdot.gov/projects/southcentral-district-projects/i-10-sr-87-to-town-of-picacho-widening-and-improvement-project">project widening several miles of I-10 near Eloy</a>. The work has advanced considerably since this video was made, and the project will be wrapping up later this summer.<br><br><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DViRAuTQff0" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture"></iframe><br><br>Next up is a May 2018 video explaining a project, now wrapping up, in which ADOT worked closely with businesses in Seligman on <a href="https://azdot.gov/media/blog/posts/2018/06/11/there's-a-convenient-route-to-seligman-with-a-bridges-upgrade-underway">a project reconstructing the decks of three bridges</a> along one of two routes between the Route 66 community and I-40. In addition to a project timed to affect just one summer, the community will have bridges ready for additional decades of use.&nbsp;<br><br> <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AQgzjFEGAlw" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture"></iframe><br> <br> ADOT invests in preserving highways around the state, but sometimes a full rebuild is in order, as was the case with a project that replaced 5 miles of I-40 in each direction just west of Williams. The pavement in this area was stressed from years of freezes and thaws common to highways in Arizona's high country. This 2017 video, made a year before work wrapped up last fall, shows what went into <a href="https://www.azdot.gov/mobile/media/news/2018/10/11/adot-project-rebuilding-stretch-of-i-40-wins-national-award">the $34 million project</a>.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br><br><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/k5zDZf1hSP8" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture"></iframe><br><br> Sometimes making an improvement, such as <a href="https://www.azdot.gov/mobile/media/news/2016/06/27/new-sr-89-bridge-at-hell-canyon-opens-to-traffic">creating a modern State Route 89 bridge at Hell Canyon</a> between Chino Valley and Ash Fork, requires removing what came before. This 2016 video shows the demolition of the previous Hell Canyon Bridge.&nbsp;<br><br><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/izrd3hYOcP8" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture"></iframe> <br> Infrastructure and jaw-dropping surroundings make for incredible video, as was the case with a $27 million project, completed in 2016, that <a href="https://www.azdot.gov/mobile/media/news/2016/07/08/interstate-15-bridge-at-virgin-river-gorge-renovations-complete">rehabilitated Interstate 15's Bridge No. 6</a> in the Virgin River Gorge of far northwestern Arizona. Do note that <a href="https://azdot.gov/media/News/news-release/2019/05/08/bridge-improvements-will-narrow-i-15-to-one-lane-in-each-direction">another project to upgrade other bridges</a> in that stretch is scheduled to begin after Memorial Day.<br><br> <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zGOzMakv2Uo" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture"></iframe><br><br> It's been several years now, but I'd be remiss to feature videos of improvements in Greater Arizona without showing ADOT's efforts to restore US 89 after a catastrophic landslide south of Page. This 2015 video provides&nbsp;<a href="https://www.azdot.gov/mobile/media/news/2015/03/27/us-89-south-of-page-repaired-and-open-to-traffic">two views of this project</a>.<br><br> <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vKA0wT9lqoE" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture"></iframe> <br><br>And these videos are just a start. To see more, please visit and subscribe to ADOT's YouTube channel at&nbsp;<a href="http://youtube.com/ArizonaDOT">youtube.com/ArizonaDOT</a>.&nbsp;
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<section data-redirect-url="https://www.linkedin.com/uas/login?session_redirect=https%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Elinkedin%2Ecom%2Fpulse%2Fvoting-open-adot-safety-message-contest-john-halikowski"><p><img src="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/far-west-projects/signcontest.jpg?sfvrsn=0&amp;MaxWidth=550&amp;MaxHeight=&amp;ScaleUp=false&amp;Quality=High&amp;Method=ResizeFitToAreaArguments&amp;Signature=D79B2983B1BBC4423AC7E578D2F80654" data-method="ResizeFitToAreaArguments" data-customsizemethodproperties="{&quot;MaxWidth&quot;:&quot;550&quot;,&quot;MaxHeight&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;ScaleUp&quot;:false,&quot;Quality&quot;:&quot;High&quot;}" data-displaymode="Custom" alt="signcontest" title="signcontest"><br><br><strong>By John Halikowski / <em>ADOT Director</em></strong><br><br>There’s a lot that I like about ADOT’s Safety Message Contest.</p><p>I like seeing the tremendous public engagement with traffic safety. An incredible 3,200 entries were submitted this time and you can vote for your favorite at&nbsp;<a href="http://azdot.gov/SignContest" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noopener">azdot.gov/SignContest</a>&nbsp;until May 20.</p><p>I like seeing the clever and creative messages conjured up by Arizonans. Some of you, my goodness, must have careers as comedy writers, and many of you are fans of “Game of Thrones” and “Avengers.”</p><p>One of the most interesting things, though, is reading the messages and comments and finding out what really matters to people when it comes to transportation safety. Many of you are fed up with speeders, distracted or drunk drivers, and want to see more courtesy on the roads.&nbsp;</p><p>Here’s a sampling of comments left by contestants:</p><p>Gerline wrote, “I am a bus driver and each time I use the turn signal because I need to change lanes, people behind me are speeding up to pass me as if my blinker would be an invitation to pass!”</p><p>Yvonne wrote, “Way too many people consider the posted speed limits a suggestion rather than the rule.”</p><p>Anthony wrote, “I have noticed that a great number of drivers do not use signals when changing lanes.&nbsp;This easily causes accidents.”</p><p>Joel wrote, “I had a friend in junior high that was killed by a drunk driver and it has stuck with me to this day.”</p><p>Melissa wrote, “I want people to have more attention to using their seatbelts and stay off their phones so they can be aware of their surroundings while driving. Anything can happen.”</p><p>There are hundreds more comments like these, each one recalling a personal experience, citing an observation or cleverly referencing a movie, concert or TV show. These are reminders that the best way to make safer the roads we all travel on is that we have to change our own driving habits and encourage those around us to change theirs.</p></section> <hr> <br> <strong><em><img src="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/far-west-projects/1b5eb6c5f48be78c8006c57b531ff0000a35efc.tmb-thumbnail.jpg?sfvrsn=2" displaymode="Thumbnail" alt="1b5eb6c" title="1b5eb6c" style="float: left;"><br> <br> &nbsp; &nbsp;This post originally appeared on ADOT Director John Halikowski's&nbsp;<br> &nbsp; &nbsp;<a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/john-halikowski-52250027">LinkedIn page</a>. He has led the agency since 2009.</em></strong><br> <br>
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<a href="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/far-west-projects/2019-05-07_1413.png?sfvrsn=0"><img title="2019-05-07_1413" alt="2019-05-07_1413" src="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/far-west-projects/2019-05-07_1413.png?sfvrsn=0&amp;MaxWidth=550&amp;MaxHeight=&amp;ScaleUp=false&amp;Quality=High&amp;Method=ResizeFitToAreaArguments&amp;Signature=48032BDCC02D693B2676A1B0AA67E636" data-openoriginalimageonclick="true" data-displaymode="Custom" data-customsizemethodproperties="{&quot;MaxWidth&quot;:&quot;550&quot;,&quot;MaxHeight&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;ScaleUp&quot;:false,&quot;Quality&quot;:&quot;High&quot;}" data-method="ResizeFitToAreaArguments"></a><br><em><strong><br>EDITOR'S NOTE: During <a href="https://infrastructureweek.org/">Infrastructure Week 2019</a>, we're&nbsp;highlighting aspects of construction, improvement and maintenance that are part of Arizona's $22.4&nbsp;billion&nbsp;investment in state highways. Today, examine the straddle bent and its role in freeway interchanges.</strong></em><br><br><strong>By Dustin Krugel / <em>ADOT Communications</em><br></strong><br>Creating the Loop 202 South Mountain Freeway’s interchange with Interstate 10 in west Phoenix is no small feat of engineering, starting with the need to have supports for flyover ramps straddle existing lanes of traffic.<br><br><a href="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/far-west-projects/2019-05-07_1352.png?sfvrsn=0"><img title="2019-05-07_1352" style="float: right; margin-bottom: 5px; margin-left: 5px;" alt="2019-05-07_1352" src="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/far-west-projects/2019-05-07_1352.tmb-mediumwide.png?sfvrsn=1" data-openoriginalimageonclick="true" data-displaymode="Thumbnail"></a>As is the case at other freeway-to-freeway interchanges around the Valley, this is being done with a structure known as a straddle bent. This is a helpful alternative when a typical one-column pier carrying a ramp would need to be in the middle of an existing roadway. The straddle bent has multiple columns supporting a wide top, or cap, that in turn supports a ramp.<br><br>In construction, “bent” refers to a structure providing lateral as well as vertical support. In all, the South Mountain Freeway/I-10 interchange in west Phoenix uses seven straddle bents, including the ones shown at top and at right.&nbsp;<br><br>Straddle bents are part of the freeway connections Valley motorists use every day. The flyover ramp from eastbound I-10 to northbound State Route 51 (Piestewa Freeway) in central Phoenix has a bent straddling the westbound lanes of I-10, while HOV ramp connections between those two freeways use three straddle bents over westbound I-10.<br><br>After completing&nbsp;the straddle bents and piers, crews placed girders to support ramps that will connect the freeways. We shared recently that crews had <a href="https://azdot.gov/media/News/news-release/2019/05/01/last-girder-set-for-south-mountain-freeway-interchange-in-west-phoenix">placed the last girder for the interchange</a>, though plenty of work remains to finish the ramps.<br><br>Straddle bents create some very artistic views along freeways, as our John Dougherty shared in <a href="https://azdot.gov/media/blog/posts/2017/08/10/the-straddle-bent-where-freeway-infrastructure-meets-art">this 2017 blog post</a> and in the photos used to create this slideshow:<br><br><div style="margin: 0px auto; width: 560px;"><iframe width="560" height="420" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FAZDOT%2Fvideos%2F1604306636307700%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="true" style="border: currentColor; overflow: hidden;" allowtransparency="true"></iframe></div><br>
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<a href="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/azdot-blog/jersey-barriere960df78c8006c57b531ff0000a35efc.jpg?sfvrsn=0"><img title="Jersey-barrier" style="vertical-align: middle;" alt="Jersey-barrier" src="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/azdot-blog/jersey-barriere960df78c8006c57b531ff0000a35efc.jpg?sfvrsn=0&amp;MaxWidth=550&amp;MaxHeight=&amp;ScaleUp=false&amp;Quality=High&amp;Method=ResizeFitToAreaArguments&amp;Signature=4E675BDD4EEDFB417D5168F34C7501DF" data-openoriginalimageonclick="true" data-method="ResizeFitToAreaArguments" data-customsizemethodproperties="{&quot;MaxWidth&quot;:&quot;550&quot;,&quot;MaxHeight&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;ScaleUp&quot;:false,&quot;Quality&quot;:&quot;High&quot;}" data-displaymode="Custom"></a><br><br><strong><em>EDITOR'S NOTE: During </em></strong><a href="https://infrastructureweek.org/"><strong><em>Infrastructure Week 2019</em></strong></a><strong><em>, we're&nbsp;highlighting aspects of construction, improvement and maintenance that are part of Arizona's $22.4&nbsp;billion&nbsp;investment in state highways. Today, we examine the Jersey barrier's role in construction and improvement projects. <br></em></strong><br><strong>By David Rookhuyzen / <em>ADOT Communications</em></strong><br><br>If you've ever driven through a construction zone, then odds are you're familiar with the humble Jersey barrier, even if you didn't know its name.<br><br>Valley residents may have seen them recently as our crews have set these short concrete walls up along the Loop 101 Pima Freeway to prepare a safe zone for crews to get started on <a href="https://www.azdot.gov/projects/central-district-projects/loop-101-(pima-freeway)-improvement-project-i-17-to-pima-road">a widening project</a>, as seen in the photo above.&nbsp;<br><br>This type of barrier was developed in New Jersey in the 1950s. Since then it's become ubiquitous around the country due to its modular design and functionality. Its most obvious purpose is separating lanes, including those heading in opposite directions.<br><br>And we need a lot of them. For some perspective: one barrier is 20 feet long, so that means 264 barriers per mile of any given project, according to Highway Operations Superintendent Ray Baca.&nbsp;<br><br>More engineering goes into these barriers than might meet the eye. The original Jersey barrier is a little less than 3 feet tall, with the first 2 inches rising straight up, then 10 inches rising at a moderate slope and then the&nbsp;rest rising nearly vertically.<br><br>"For the more common shallow-angle hits, the (New Jersey barrier)-shape is intended to minimize sheet metal damage by allowing the vehicle tires to ride up on the lower sloped face," Charles F. McDevitt wrote in <a href="https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/publicroads/00marapr/concrete.cfm">a 2000 article about concrete barriers for Public Roads magazine</a>.<br><br>He explained that at higher impact angles&nbsp; the bumper hits the barrier and begins to slide upward. As the vehicle moves in this direction it becomes nearly parallel with the barrier, allowing the wheels to then be able to contact the lower slope. <br><br>"Modern vehicles have relatively short distances between the bumper and the wheel; as a result, bumper contact is followed almost immediately by wheel contact," McDevitt said.<br><br>Either way, the vehicle doesn't get through the barrier and is deflected.<br><br>Other variants have now been created, such as the higher "Ontario Tall Wall" or the "F barrier," which has a different slope to be more effective during crashes involving smaller cars and pickup trucks. The latter is ADOT's preferred barrier, though the original Jersey barrier is still also acceptable.<br><br><br>
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<iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FSouthMountainFreeway%2Fvideos%2F1914778215359712%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe><br><strong>By Dustin Krugel / <em>ADOT Communications</em></strong><br><br>South Mountain Freeway crews are wasting no time moving onto the final phase of construction for the 40th Street traffic interchange in Ahwatukee.<br><br><a href="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/far-west-projects/40th-st-closure-photo.jpg?sfvrsn=0"><img src="http://www.azdot.gov/images/default-source/far-west-projects/40th-st-closure-photo.tmb-mediumwide.jpg?sfvrsn=1" data-displaymode="Thumbnail" alt="40th St Closure Photo" title="40th St Closure Photo" data-openoriginalimageonclick="true" style="float: right;"></a>Less than 24 hours after closing 40th Street south of Cottonwood Lane, work has begun on milling and removing the asphalt pavement along 40th Street between Cottonwood Lane and Pecos Road.<br><br>The good news for motorists: When work is completed in September, the future 40th Street intersection will have increased capacity and will enhance traffic flow to and from the Loop 202.<br><br>The intersection is being widened to 92 feet with a 4-foot median and will include two southbound through lanes and two left-hand turn lanes, and two northbound through lanes and one right-hand turn lane. A traffic signal will also be installed at Cottonwood Lane.<br><br>The 40th Street closure occurred simultaneously with a Pecos Road traffic shift onto the future Loop 202 South Mountain Freeway’s westbound lanes between 32nd Street and the Interstate 10/Loop 202 Santan Freeway interchange.<br><br>The 40th Street closure through the South Mountain Freeway work zone is scheduled to remain through September. Alternate north-south routes include I-10 and 24th and 32nd streets.<br><br>Despite the ongoing construction, the 40th Street/Pecos Park-and-Ride will remain accessible by using 40th Street from the north. In addition, Wild Horse Pass Hotel and Casino and the Phoenix Premium Outlets remain accessible via I-10 to Wild Horse Boulevard.<br><br>Over the next few months, crews will be paving the on-and-off ramps for the 40th Street interchange, making cross-street improvements, installing new traffic signals and completing additional grading and drainage work.<br><br>
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