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Avid Blogs by Henrik Andersson Vogel - 4d ago

There’s just no way around the fact that in most music genres, the vocals are front and center. Therefore, getting the vocals right is one of the most important tasks for any producer. And therefore, a tool that lets you do that quickly, easily and with perfect quality is one of the most important tools to include in your arsenal.

Watch this video to find out how Revoice Pro 4 can take a production from OK to stellar, and help you deal with a number of common issues you’ll face when working on vocal tracks. Time align background vocals without any manual editing, pitch correct a little or a lot, reduce sibilance and breath noises, and also create realistic sounding doubles to fatten up your tracks—you can do this and more with Revoice Pro.

Revoice Pro 4 for Music Producers (w Pro Tools) - YouTube
Get Revoice Pro 4.1 here
Make your mark with Pro Tools Create music or sound for film/TV and connect with a premier network of artists, producers, and mixers around the world.

The post Video: Get Perfect Vocals With Revoice Pro 4 appeared first on Avid Blogs.

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Just a few weeks ago we revealed Media Composer 2019 at Connect 2019 and the NAB Show. We were pleased with your excitement about the new version—but not too surprised. We relied on your feedback to decide which features to change, add, or keep. The newest Media Composer is a direct response to what you have been telling us you want and need.

Media Composer 2019: Movie Editing Software for Makers - YouTube
A modern, customizable user experience

You were clear: you don’t want to work with a dull or dated-looking interface. It’s not just a question of aesthetics: newer users and users who work with other applications are accustomed to a different look. Schools in particular told us that although students love using Media Composer, the learning curve was daunting. Seeing so many buttons and options and choices, and so many overlapping windows, as soon as you launch, can be intimidating. Getting up to speed on Media Composer is faster when the UI is more modern and intuitive.

Media Composer 2019 concept art

On the surface, you’ll notice we updated the color scheme and followed modern conventions, such as a flat UI. We’ve added task-oriented workspaces that allow you to see just the tools you need to use and hide what you don’t. The new paneled UI automatically links up windows in a clean, streamlined view that adjusts as you resize the panels, with no overlap.

Unless, of course, you want the overlap. Customers also told us that they want to work the way they want to work, so the UI is fully customizable. Not only can you drag, drop, and rearrange the panes of the paneled UI, you can float one or all of them over the top and create a workspace that fits your needs precisely.

One of our biggest UI changes came from a request broadcast to all NLE makers. ACE editor Alan E. Bell put out an open call online asking for a solution for the disorganized mess that occurs when a bin fills up with too many clips. We called him the next day and started developing a new bin mapping system, based directly on his request. If you like the new bin mapping feature in Media Composer, where you can see exactly which section of the bin you’re currently viewing, much credit is due to that vocal and inventive editor.

More performance where you want it

A lot of customer feedback understandably boils down to wanting more speed and more efficiency. For example, one longstanding request has been native support for OP1a wrapped media. In the past, users would have to rewrap and reprocess their media, which not only used up more storage, it takes time that could be better used elsewhere. Especially for our broadcast and sports customers, who have media that needs to be turned around very quickly for live broadcast. With the new release, Media Composer editors can link to and import OP1a media directly into their bins and projects, without rewrapping.  New OP1a media can also be created through transcodes, consolidates and mixdowns, and all of it benefits from native playback and processing performance.

Another feature developed directly with a customer is Media Composer | Distributed Processing. Some users voiced frustration with the time it takes to process super high resolution and high frame rate media, customers wanted a way to speed things up. Distributed Processing allows you to offload GPU and CPU intensive processes – like render and transcode – to dedicated systems used just for processing these jobs. This offloading increases a user’s efficiency simply by allowing them to continue working rather than waiting for a process to finish. Even better, by splitting up a process over multiple machines, the time is also cut down to a fraction of what it used to take. Something that takes 10 minutes on one machine may take only 2 minutes when using 5 machines.

Finishing capabilities for any media

Many of you are creating media for OTT services, which have very specific requirements for delivery. In order to meet those requirements, some users were faced with learning a new tool or moving to another application in order to complete their projects to the required specifications. From content creators to distributors, our customers wanted to make sure they could continue to hire the best talent, using the best editing tool. So, we made sure that this release was aligned with the most common standards for delivery and packaging. Now you can create and deliver SMPTE-compliant simple IMF packages straight from Media Composer. We also expanded the capabilities of Media Composer to ensure the content that’s delivered is of the highest quality, starting with the 32-bit full float color pipeline, support for reading Open EXR media, and the expansion of the DNx family to DNxUncompressed 32 bit.

For customers who don’t want to take the time or resources to export to an external application, they can work start to finish in Media Composer. But when you need to use an external application for grading or effects, you won’t lose any color data or quality. With this most recent release, Media Composer has also become the first video editor to join the ACES (Academy Color Encoding System) Logo Program under the Editing and Finishing category, to help maintain consistent color accuracy without sacrificing efficiency.

Creating a Media Composer for every user

While a lot of you value the expansiveness of Media Composer, we’ve also heard requests for a simpler, parred-down video editor. Some larger broadcasters would like to give an editor to journalists in the field with just the elements needed for them to do their jobs. We also heard from schools that a de-featured version of Media Composer could help students learn more quickly, without being overwhelmed by all the options until they’ve developed some mastery.

As we considered this request, one of the biggest challenges was determining which features to keep given the wide range of user needs. The solution was not a simplified version of Media Composer, but instead a version of Media Composer that could be customized by users for their users, however they saw fit. Using role-based deployment, an organization can create a Media Composer environment for a specific individual or a type of user, so regardless of the physical computer they log into, the experience is always the same. A journalist might just need a few tracks of video and audio and a few bins, without access to features they’ll never need like stereoscopic 3D. Schools could adapt the environment according to the class. A production can create profiles for producers, directors, craft editors and others according to their specific needs.

Apart from making work easier for the user, role-based deployment allows organizations to reduce training time, because they’re only training on the tools that user needs. They can also turn off access to codecs or permissions that could allow an inexperienced user to create the wrong type of media or put something in the wrong place. Turning off the ability to export for certain roles or individuals can prevent leaks that might diminish the value of an asset.

Getting customer feedback

We’ve always looked for customer feedback when updating Media Composer, from idealized user wish lists to direct collaboration. We rely on our customers to help us test the changes we make, whether that means talking through an idea or using a prototype in the alpha and beta versions. We count on those users not just to find bugs, but to tell us if the changes that looked great on paper are working in a real-world environment.

Getting input from the ACA and the ACA vote has only augmented our customer relationships. We’ve found that, since the start of the ACA, we get information from a wider range of customers, especially independent editors, smaller production companies, and schools. Information from the ACA vote also helps us adapt more quickly, so we can look at the long-term product roadmap and make adjustments sooner. It’s one more way that we can ensure that Media Composer delivers exactly what users expect while giving them the features they need to succeed in this ever-changing media environment.

The New Media Composer Experience all the new capabilities the minute they’re ready.
We listened to you, what you liked, what you didn’t and what was missing.

The post For the Makers! How You Helped Us Create Media Composer 2019 appeared first on Avid Blogs.

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In order for sound and dialogue to truly compliment your visual material, it’s important that it’s intelligible and properly balanced – especially in cases where dialogue has to compete with background audio. Evening out audio level inconsistencies can be a tiresome, time-consuming process.

Until now, that is.

Meet Accusonus’ ERA Voice Leveler, a single knob tool that uses new, patent-pending algorithms to automatically detect audio level problems in voice recordings and correct them in real-time. Now, you can instantly achieve incredibly natural results with the turn of a simple dial.

In this video, we used ERA Voice Leveler to easily fix the dialogue levels on a product video that combines footage from 3 different interviews.

ERA Voice Leveler: Detect and correct audio level problems in Media Composer - YouTube
  • Use the tight mode to make the voice stand out from background
  • Choose the emphasis mode to improve
  • Enable the breath control to detect breaths and keep them at a lower

We know that every bit of your time matters, especially if you’re a professional working with deadlines. With ERA Voice Leveler, you no longer need to spend hours making manual gain adjustments. All you need to do is turn the ERA Voice Leveler knob!

Get ERA Voice Leveler free ERA Voice Leveler is now included in Avid Loyalty Rewards

The post Detect and Correct Audio Level Problems in Voice Recordings with ERA Voice Leveler appeared first on Avid Blogs.

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I started out as an assistant editor four years ago and was constantly switching between different nonlinear editing systems such as Final Cut Pro and Premiere. I had a basic knowledge of Avid Media Composer but knew that to step up my game and become a feature film editor, I would have to master the art of Media Composer.

To do that, I enrolled in an Avid training course at VET Post Production in London in January 2014, took the Avid Certified User exam and became the first certified Media Composer editor in Jordan.

Not long after that, I got my first feature as main editor on Zinzana. Initially the producers were looking for an editor to cut together the first 10 scenes so they could make sure they were getting the material they wanted, and I was in the right place at the right time, with the right set of skills. I wasn’t briefed before I started work; I just received a hard drive containing the footage.

I cut the scenes, and a couple of days later, I got a call from the director, Majid Al Ansari. I went to the set the same day, and he was very excited about the sequences I had sent. He said they were exactly what he had in mind for the edit, so I was brought on board to edit the rest of the film.

“Zinzana” means “cell” in Arabic, and the setting for the film is a cell in a rural police station in Jordan. The story revolves round Talal (played by Saleh Bakri), who is a recovering alcoholic and is in custody. Events take a bizarre turn with the arrival of a charismatic but clearly insane police officer (Ali Suliman) who wreaks havoc and threatens Talal’s family. From there, it becomes a game between the two men.

The film was shot on one set/location, so it was important to establish the environment without making the shots feel repetitive. I would sometimes resize them and shift their positions to make sure that the audience’s eyes follow the movement from one cut to the next, engaging them in the story despite its confined setting.

At the beginning I was working without an assistant, and I set up the project by myself in the way I’m comfortable with — syncing the footage, labeling the clips and organizing the bins. I was using Media Composer v8.4.2 on a Mac Pro with Nitris DX. The great thing about Media Composer is it allows me to do all that easily and efficiently, without holding up the assembly cut. I imported the footage as DNxHD36 and synced the audio instantly based on timecode using the Auto-Sync function, creating grouped clips for multicam shots.

The Commit Multicam Edits feature is one of my favorite functions. I would switch between camera angles in grouped clips as I was editing and then would use the Commit Multicam edit just before export to commit to my final choice of camera angle.

I always work with the standard Avid keyboard settings, but I map out the shortcuts Shift F5 and F6 to toggle between the Source/Record Editing workspace and Effects Editing. I had saved that shortcut to my command set a while ago, and now it’s a natural hand motion for me on the keyboard.

In terms of effects, Zinzana has a major sequence in which one character spits alcohol on a lit match to set someone else on fire. I had plates of the stunts blowing out real fire on set, so I used Animatte to isolate the flame and composite it on to the clean shots of the actors. Temp effects make it much easier for me as an editor to visualize the scene better and pace it accordingly.

The flashback scenes were probably the most challenging scenes to edit. They were shot against a black background and were not giving the right emotion for the story; instead of coming off as an ethereal, dream-like sequence, it was dark and confusing. I had to experiment a lot with the scene using crossfades, superimposing the footage and intercutting, as well as ramping time with key frames and adding audio effects to the dialogue. I managed to get the scene as close as possible to where we wanted it to be emotionally, which helped the director determine the exact shots and pace he would get in the reshoot, and it turned out beautifully.

Majid and I trusted each other from the beginning, and he let me complete the rough cut without any guidance or direction. I had the first cut ready within three or four weeks, and Majid and I worked on it at Optix, a post-production facility in Dubai. He had specific ideas of what he wanted to achieve, and he communicated his thoughts very clearly, which made editing a breeze.

Since completing Zinzana, I have been working on The Worthy, another Image Nation production that is set in a dystopian future. It was shot entirely in Romania, so for the duration of the shoot, I was working with a post team in Bucharest. We had two Avid stations set up and connected through a network server. The assistant editor, Natalia, would sync the material — which would include eight camera set-ups at times — and then save the bins for me in a folder on the server. This was very efficient for the tight shooting schedule that we had and proved even more useful when I had to move the edit to Dubai and still receive bins from the post team in Bucharest. I couldn’t have asked for a more comfortable and efficient workflow on what was a VFX-heavy film with a tight schedule.

Discover Media Composer Accelerate storytelling with the tools embraced by top movie, television, and broadcast editors. And power through HD and high-res editing faster and easier than ever.

The post Building an Editing Career with Avid Media Composer appeared first on Avid Blogs.

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It is great when we need to create wild sounds such as spaceships or monsters, but many times, the biggest challenge is to recreate ordinary sounds, the ones we are constantly hearing in real-life. The main problem is that all humans are experts in such sounds. Every person knows what sounds natural and what doesn’t sound natural. Thus, how can sound professionals create ordinary sounds which sound natural? Well, you need to use natural sounding tools… such as Doppler+Air.

Doppler + Air is a bundle with 2 plugins: Doppler, to create Doppler effects; and Air, to simulate distance by applying air absorption equalization.

Doppler

When we released Sound Particles software, our users loved the Doppler sound. I recall David Farmer (Lord of the Rings/The Hobbit) telling me that it was the best sounding Doppler software he had ever used, to which I replied “Really!?”. I thought Doppler was one of those effects which were already perfectly handled by several plugins. However, most Doppler plugins are based on pitch-shifting, which needs to create in-existent audio blocks, resulting in lower quality sounds. In real-life, Doppler is mainly a variable delay, and with Sound Particles we implemented Doppler with a very high-quality variable delay, since we didn’t used the usual shortcuts to obtain better performance, which end-up having impact on audio quality.

Imagine that you want to record a specific Doppler kind of sound, for instance, a car passing by. During the recording, you choose the mic setup; its position; you give instructions to the driver about the desired velocity, etc. Doppler works in a similar way, recreating a real-life situation, with real-life parameters. Instead of a knob for pitch variation or smoothness, you will see velocity, mic distance, and similar things.

Sound Particles - Doppler plug-in - Audio Demos - YouTube

The screen is divided in 4 main areas. On the left, you specify the behavior of the moving sound: its velocity, direction, and acceleration (constant velocity, accelerating, breaking). Once the sound is moving, the next section defines the behavior of the air, including air absorption and distance EQ (yes, Doppler includes an Air plugin inside). The third section is about the microphone: how far is the mic, which mic setup to use, and its desired rotation. Different stereo pairs will result in completely different sounds. For instance, I love the ORTF pair, because the capsules are slightly apart, thus the resulting pitch variation on each channel is slightly different (like in real-life). The plugin also supports complex setups like 5.1, or 7.1.2, or up to 3rd order Ambisonics. The last section is mainly about time: when does the sound peak? It can either be specified in timecode (“I want the peak at 1:08:34:01”) or based on the signal (“3 seconds after detecting a signal”).

There might be some Doppler plugins with more “bells and whistles”, but if your major concern with a Doppler plugin is its sound quality, search no further.

Air

As sound travels thru the air, the higher frequencies start to suffer attenuation, and as distance increases, more and more frequencies are attenuated. Air is a very special filter that truly replicates the behavior of air absorption, based on distance. You specify the distance, and the plugin applies the right amount of EQ to recreate that exact behavior (yes, we are science geeks).

Some may be thinking “Can’t we recreate the same exact behavior with a low-pass filter or any ordinary EQ?” Eventually, if you have the time and the skills, the same way a painter can almost recreate a real picture by using a brush, instead of using a photo camera. However, in this case, Air will give you much better and faster results.

Sound Particles - Air plug-in - Audio demo - YouTube

The use of the plugin is straight forward: you use the big knob to specify the distance. If you want an even more accurate result, you can specify the temperature and/or humidity. Although everyone knows temperature values, humidity is slightly more complicated to know, so the plugin also includes some temperature/humidity presets (e.g. “London in the Spring”).

At some point, some users asked us if we could also add a global distance attenuation parameter, to allow them to automate distance to control both EQ and volume. As such, we added the distance attenuation parameter: zero if you want only EQ, any other value to add volume attenuation with distance.

Although Doppler seems to catch more attention than Air, many Hollywood professionals report that Air ends up being used much more, because they are constantly adding a sense of depth to most sounds on their mix.

Get 50% Off Doppler+Air Explore the unique features of sound and movement and get the most natural sounding emulation for your work. Get it now for only $99 USD (reg. $199 USD). Act now—offer valid between May 14 to June 14, 2019

The post Achieving Natural Sounds with Doppler + Air appeared first on Avid Blogs.

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We’re pleased to announce the immediate availability of our May 2019 release of Sibelius, building on the recent releases in January and April This release improves stability, playback and audio engine performance, printing and PDF export accuracy, and more; all done in direct response to user feedback.

Although the development team is fully underway with the next feature releases for our Sibelius desktop and cloud products, we’ve been able to promote up several changes to give you a worthwhile release with a good number of improvements to the current feature set.

In case you missed it, here’s a summary of our recent releases:

January 2018 Automatically add lines across multiple staves and voices, add and change different barlines at once, enhanced Find in Ribbon

LEARN MORE

April 2018 Add and edit multiple text, Complete overhaul of note spacing, Sibelius is now FAST esp. when handling large scores!

LEARN MORE

June 2018 New Gracenote spacing and further refinement of note spacing

LEARN MORE

November 2018 Upgrade, modernization and re-engineering under-the-hood. Full Retina and High-DPI UI. Renewed support for Accessibility

LEARN MORE

January 2019 Review Mode, Half-speed playback, quick score navigation and Timeline features
.

LEARN MORE

April 2019 New Loop Mode, musical Scrub, Mark up your score in Review mode, FlexiTime with NotePerformer
.

LEARN MORE

For those who can’t wait to get up and running with the latest version, you can automatically download and install the update via Avid Link. If you need the full installers to download, you can do so from your Avid account at my.avid.com/products. The update is available to all those with a current upgrade plan or subscription and applies to all three flavours of Sibelius | First, Sibelius and Sibelius | Ultimate.

We would like to express our gratitude to all those who have been in touch recently to help provide the valuable feedback we needed to make so many improvements in the last month or so.

Playback & Loop

Following on from the introduction of the new Loop mode in April, there are several small improvements in the way music is Looped:

  • Looping extremely large sections is nice and snappy
  • For playback devices that have large latency, Sibelius now uses the built-in latency compensation to correctly position the playback line during loops. This is really noticeable when using NotePerformer.
  • Sibelius is now no longer really slow to display the Playback Devices dialog when using a Playback Configuration that contains very large sound sets (such as NotePerformer).
  • Sibelius used to only play a single MIDI note when two notes are on the same pitch in different voices. Sibelius now plays the correct complement of notes in this case.
  • A selection that contains an incomplete nth time repeat now always plays the loop as though it’s the last-time repeat. Previously, it would loop more than what was selected.
  • In some cases, the first note of a loop could sound louder or sound like a grace note after starting playback within a looped section.
PDF Export and Printing

Exporting to PDF (via File > Export > PDF, File > Export > Graphics > PDF and through the OS print dialog) and Printing are now much more consistent with each other, and better precisely represent what’s in the score. All fonts, especially those which don’t have dedicated styles for Italic and Bold so are synthesised, now print and export to PDF correctly. In addition to this, we’ve fixed a problem where the metadata inside the PDFs now correctly reports the operating system.

The Norfolk and Pori fonts benefit from these improvements too. If you haven’t tried these out, we thoroughly recommend them by heading over to the NYC Music Services website where you can download these fonts for free (donations welcomed). They come with a full set of instructions and use Styles for Sibelius, making it really easy to fit to your existing scores and be part of your new scores too. We are grateful to Bernie Cossentino and Jeff Kellem for putting these fonts together.

Angle Slash Chords from the Pori Chords, Norfolk Chords, and Norfolk Chords Sans fonts now print correctly. Image courtesy of Scoring Notes.

Stability and more

On the whole, you should find Sibelius much less likely to crash. As you may have seen, a crash reporting window pops up in the unfortunate event crash with a section to write comments to describe what was happening just before the crash. With the information that’s provided here, it has allowed us to fix many of the top problems in each update we release, and today’s release is no different. In summary, the fixes are:

Sibelius no longer crashes:

  • on exit in rare cases when the replay marker is shown in the timeline
  • when playing the score back after exporting audio
  • when the metronome click is enabled in Loop mode

Since April’s release, we’ve been seeing an increase in audio related problems. These could range from not being able to select your preferred output for devices with several outputs, to ‘Audio Engine Error’ errors on startup, to crashes on exit. The good news is that we’ve tightened this all up these problems are now very unlikely to happen. Related to this, Sibelius is no longer really slow when opening the Audio Engine Options dialog when using the MBox ASIO drivers on Windows.

Windows only: If not already on your computer, Sibelius now installs the latest Microsoft Visual C++ Redistributable for Visual Studio 2017. If you don’t have this installed, Windows will restart your computer to complete the installation.

Other Improvements in this Update

As well as the changes mentioned above, we’ve thrown in another handful of nice fixes too:

  • Non-transposable notes do now correctly truncate when using the ‘R’ key (depending on the Preference set in File > Preferences > Note Input). Related to this, if you have the preference to “Truncate notes at end of bars when using repeat”, you’ll now be pleased to know this happens when you repeat multiple notes at once.
  • For a long while now, having 2 consecutive repeat signs used to cause problems with playback, bar numbers wouldn’t display and the Timeline would display the infinite loop that would happen when you played the score back. Now, all these problems have been fixed.
  • When working in parts, the colouring notes operation is now correctly added to the undo queue.
  • When opening a MIDI file, the ‘Show metronome marks’ option now works as it should when clicking OK from the MIDI File tab.

And that’s it for now. We hope you enjoy these new improvements and we look forward to letting you know about the next major feature release of Sibelius in due course.

Express yourself with Sibelius Create beautiful, captivating scores more quickly than ever before with the world’s best selling notation software.

The post What’s New in Sibelius — May 2019 appeared first on Avid Blogs.

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Audio level inconsistencies are very common in vocal and dialogue recordings. Drawing volume automations manually might be the most secure way to make vocals or dialogue sit at the proper level in a mix, but it’s definitely not the most efficient solution.

Accusonus’ ERA Voice Leveler is a single knob tool that uses new patent-pending algorithms to automatically detect audio level problems in voice recordings and correct them in real-time. It helps you achieve natural results with the turn of a simple dial without having to leave your Pro Tools environment. The ERA Voice Leveler doesn’t use compression and therefore it preserves the natural sound of your vocals.

ERA Voice Leveler: Fix Vocal Level Inconsistencies in Pro Tools - YouTube

One of the features that sets ERA Voice Leveler apart from other similar plug-ins, is the Emphasis feature which is designed to compensate for differences in frequency balance caused by a vocalist or narrator moving around the mic during recording.

The tight mode provides a more focused radio sound. This is especially useful to make the voice stand out from background music. Enable the breath control to detect breaths and keep them at a lower level.

Pro Tools tutorial: Dealing with uneven voice recording levels using ERA Voice Leveler - YouTube

We know that every bit of your time matters, especially when you’re a professional working with deadlines. Accusonus’ ERA Voice Leveler is powerful tool and a real time-saver that definitely deserves a spot in your vocal chain!

Get ERA Voice Leveler free ERA Voice Leveler is now included in Avid Loyalty Rewards

The post Fix Audio Level Inconsistencies with ERA Voice Leveler appeared first on Avid Blogs.

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Avid Blogs by Freddy Vinehill-cliffe - 2w ago

By most estimations, revenue from music streaming now exceeds that of downloads, CDs and vinyl combined. Whether you think this is an exciting new development or a tragedy, it makes sense to optimise your mixes and masters accordingly.

By now, you’ll know that the major streaming services use loudness normalisation to play out all tracks at the same perceived loudness. This is great for the listener in many ways, especially for anyone listening to music from a wide variety of artists, genres and time periods, all of which are likely mastered very differently. But it’s one thing tweaking older releases to sit nicely alongside each other – how about considering the effect this might have on new releases moving forward?

You could choose to ignore the loudness targets; there is no obligation to submit tracks which conform to a platform’s loudness standard, and the major streaming services generally apply a straightforward dB offset to the entire song, with no further dynamics processing. In a sense, this is no different from a listener turning their volume up for a quiet master and down for a loud one, it’s just automated – but consider the effect it has on headroom!

For an engineer accustomed to producing CD masters, which frequently weigh in around -9 or -10 LUFS, the loss in headroom could be huge. Normalised for Apple Music, a -9 LUFS master gets turned down 7dB to reach the target of -16 LUFS. That’s 7dB of unused headroom, extra headroom which could have been taken advantage of for more transient detail and a wider dynamic range. Even on YouTube – one of the loudest major streaming services with a -13 LUFS target – you would still lose 4dB headroom.

In a Spotify playlist where every track is normalised to play out at -14 LUFS, no track is technically louder than another, but a track with the widest dynamic range – one which takes advantage of all available headroom – will certainly appear to “pop” more. In many ways, this turns the loudness war on its head, encouraging engineers to produce the most dynamic master rather than the loudest master. Thankfully though, this is unlikely to develop into the same kind of mutually assured destruction as the loudness wars, because fixed targets have been set. There is no incentive to keep producing yet more and more dynamic masters because beyond a certain point this makes no difference; a track which falls significantly below a platform’s loudness target is simply turned up even more, and eventually limited if necessary (i.e. the unnecessary dynamics processing we were all working so hard to avoid!). How dynamic is too dynamic? There’s your answer.

A plug-in like MasterCheck allows you to make an informed decision about dynamics processing in your mixes and masters. You can easily measure the loudness of your track, see how much each streaming service will turn it up or down, and audition how that will sound in real time using the ‘Offset to match’ function. If you like how your -9 LUFS master sounds even when turned down 7dB, great! If not, you can tweak to compensate. MasterCheck also allows you to audition the codecs used on major streaming platforms, so you can also preempt any distortion or other artefacts, and tweak accordingly for total peace of mind.

An Introduction to MasterCheck - YouTube
Get 50% Off NUGEN MasterCheck NUGEN MasterCheck provides the tools you need to ensure your tracks sound great for streaming audio delivery services, including Spotify, Apple Music, YouTube, and more. Act now—offer valid May 3 to 31, 2019

The post MasterCheck: How Dynamic is Too Dynamic? appeared first on Avid Blogs.

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With the introduction of Pro Tools 2019, we are pleased to announce support for macOS Mojave! You can now use Pro Tools on any qualified Mac running Apple’s latest OS. As a team, we want to extend our thanks to our customers for being patient as we worked hard to bring you the best Mojave compatible version of Pro Tools possible.

Now that Mojave compatibility has arrived, we are excited to report that we are seeing significant performance improvements—as much as an 800% boost—with some machines running Pro Tools 2019.5 and Mojave 10.14.4.

With increased power on hand, you can create and mix with more effects plugins and virtual instruments and fewer CPU limitations. Results may vary depending on your system, but as an example, compare the power of Pro Tools | Ultimate 2019 + HDX on macOS Mojave vs. Pro Tools | Ultimate 2018 + HDX on macOS High Sierra:

* Testing conducted using 2018 iMac Pro machines running macOS Mojave 10.14.4, Pro Tools | Ultimate 2019.5, and Pro Tools | HDX. Performance tests are conducted using specific computer systems running plugins natively at low buffer sizes and reflect the approximate performance. Please refer to Pro Tools System Requirements for full details on compatibility. 

Over the last few months, Avid’s Pro Tools team has been working closely with Apple to ensure that Pro Tools 2019 performs smoothly, reliably, and effectively on macOS Mojave. This level of performance improvement is a direct result of our partnership and collaboration.

Alongside the other new capabilities in this release, the significant performance improvement with macOS Mojave makes Pro Tools | Ultimate 2019 our most powerful release yet.

To learn more about the latest features in Pro Tools 2019, please visit our What’s New page.

The post Pro Tools 2019: Mojave Support and Improved Performance appeared first on Avid Blogs.

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Pro Tools 2019 introduces improvements that allow users to create faster and more easily during playback.

When you’re being creative, it’s important that your DAW feels transparent.  Previously, when adding a track, plug-in, or send, playback would briefly stop whilst Pro Tools performs the action. This can be a little annoying and distracting but it also disrupts the creative flow. And this is particularly true is you are playing back live MIDI tracks. The momentary disruption will put any loops that are playing out of time and you then have to wait for a whole loop cycle to complete before things come back into alignment.

Make creative choices during playback

Pro Tools 2019 introduces continuous playback features that allow you to perform timeline and track interactions without hindering your creativity. Whether you are on Pro Tools software or running an HD Native or HDX system, drops in playback should no longer occur while making simple changes to sessions and projects. These include:

  • adding and removing sends and plug-ins
  • moving inserts and sends to different slots on the same track
  • dragging sends and inserts between tracks
  • adding and removing tracks
  • dragging tracks up and down
  • making tracks active/inactive
  • making changes to your I/O

This is not to say that Pro Tools will never glitch on playback. If you insert a particularly heavy instrument plug-in or delete several tracks at once, then you may get a brief pause but you will see improvement in the majority of regular interactions with Pro Tools.

Working with Dynamic Transport

Dynamic Transport has been in Pro Tools for some time now. It is primarily aimed at music production workflows and offers ways of working with loop playback that are not otherwise available.

In short, Dynamic Transport lets you decouple the playback location from the Timeline selection. When it is engaged, you can position the Play Start Marker independently of the Timeline Selection and the Play Start Marker can be repositioned during playback and playback continues from the new location.

Dynamic Transport is useful in conjunction with Loop Playback mode. For example, you can set a loop of, say, four bars and then have the ability to start and stop playback within the loop. Pro Tools 2019 significantly improves this workflow by allowing you to adjust the start and end points of your loop or move the loop position without interrupting playback.

To learn more about the latest features in Pro Tools 2019, please visit our What’s New page.

Make your mark with Pro Tools Create music or sound for film/TV and connect with a premier network of artists, producers, and mixers around the world.

The post Pro Tools 2019: Be More Creative During Playback appeared first on Avid Blogs.

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