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This tree was purchased as nursery stock and I have been impressed by the rate the trunk thickens in a bonsai pot.

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Continuing with the photos of my Australian native bonsai, this one is a sticky wattle and I think everyone who is interested in Australian plants as bonsai has one of these tucked away somewhere.

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I think this is called the prickly tea tree from memory, but my memory isn’t that good. I bought this with a number of other tube stock Australian natives from a nursery in Tumut about ten years ago, so this tree has been pot grown for its whole life. Again, I hope one day it will be part of an Australian native shohin display at an exhibition. Love the flaking bark and the tiny flowers. Has been trouble free so I hope it continues along those lines.

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This is another one of the shohin Australian native plants that I hope will one day be part of a five or seven point shohin display. The photo was taken last November while it was in flower, showing off really.

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I bought a nursery plant a couple of years ago and this is part of my desire to have a shohin display of Australian native plants at an exhibition soon.

This plant has responded very well to bonsai culture and I hold out hope for its future.

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I dug this tree a while ago so I don’t know what variety it is unfortunately. I decided to dig it just because it had some trunk movement which appealed to me as most gums have a relatively straight trunk, at least the ones I see in the wild. I wasn’t good at keeping records of this tree so I don’t know when it was dug but it would be at least 4 years. I have made a new pot for this tree and I will repot it this year.

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I enjoy making bonsai display stands and especially from recycled timber. My recent additions to the collection were made from timber I got from the tip some time ago. Old timber does appear to be much more “stable” and I think its just due to its age.

Anyway, these are the new additions and I hope to be using them this year.

Recycled floor boards Recycled bookcase Recycled chook shed shelving Another one from recycled floor boards
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On 2 February 2019 a couple of bonsai tragic’s went to dig a couple of bottlebrush from a property half way between Goulburn and Canberra. They were going to be removed the next week to make way for road extensions on the property and even though it was hot, very hot, we set off to see if we could dig these successfully. There were only two as it turned out but that was one each. Following the dig I took mine home and potted it up. It was unfortunate timing as I was going away for a month but the tree lived with morning and evening watering together with other bonsai.

I was pleasantly surprised on returning home that the tree was going well and didn’t appear to have missed a beat. I should say that the tree wasn’t the best I have dug but it was interesting to see if a tree dug in mid summer would survive. It not only survived but grew and flowered (which was handy in trying to identify the species). The long term plan is to reduce the size considerably over the coming years and take advantage of the movement in the lower part of the trunk.

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I recently joined the Victorian Native Bonsai Club and this was following the AABC convention conducted by the club that featured only Australian native plants as bonsai and to say the least I was hooked. I have had an interest for some time but this exhibition really excited me in what can be done. To celebrate my acceptance into the club I thought I should post a few of my Australian natives just in case other members have a look at this blog. Hopefully I will post one every week for a while (it won’t take too long to get through all of them as I don’t have a great number).

This Callistemon pityoides was purchased as tube stock some years ago and has always been pot grown. It grows well in the conditions here and has flowered for the past few years. It is currently in a Pat Kennedy pot that is a bit too big for it but at the next repot a further reduction in pot size will occur.

This photo was taken at night with a flash and that accounts for “different” coloring.

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Its not quite winter yet but the wind has been blowing a gale, its raining (sideways) and its freezing cold. That’s all the ingredients necessary for a bonsai to be blown off the bench and that is what happened.

The spruce that hit the deck was due for a repot this spring but this early in the season is not what it needed.

This is how I found it this morning

It was in an old Japanese pot and needed one slightly larger but alas I haven’t got another Japanese pot so during the emergency repot it was placed into a Chinese pot as a temporary measure. I hope that in the spring (the proper repotting time) I can slip it out of its temporary home and put it in a new home more in keeping with the tree.

It needs better alignment in the pot and hopefully when spring comes I can manage that.

Old Japanese pots are difficult to find now so if I’m looking a bit sad, that’s the reason. Looking on the bright side, no branch damage to the tree so now it gets a little rest before the next intervention.

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