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The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has taken a hotelier in Devon to Court following breaches of the asbestos regulations. Major refurbishment works were carried out at The Park Hotel in Barnstaple between October 2016 and May 2017. The work involved refitting and refurbishing bathrooms and bedrooms. The legacy of asbestos Parts of the hotel were constructed in the 1960s and 1970s, this was when the use of asbestos was at its peak. Due to its versatile nature and fire-resistant properties, asbestos was used extensively in construction until it was banned in the UK in 2000. Therefore, any building constructed before this time could contain asbestos. Asbestos concerns Concerns were raised at an early stage of the works when an employee questioned the presence of asbestos-containing materials. Although enquiries were made, no testing of the suspected materials was done and the work continued. It was not until several months later when external contractors were working on the refurbishments that the materials were tested and the presence of asbestos-containing materials was confirmed in February 2017. HSE investigation The HSE began investigating, and during this investigation a further incident was identified where asbestos-containing materials had been disturbed. This was found to be due to an inadequate assessment before work had begun. Once the asbestos-containing materials were correctly identified, remedial works were carried out. Guilty of Health and Safety breach The company, Percy R Brend and Sons (Hoteliers) Ltd, pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2(1) and 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. The Court fined them £80,000 and ordered costs of nearly £15,000. HSE inspector, Jo-Anne Michael said after the hearing; “The dangers associated with asbestos are well known and a wealth of advice and guidance is freely available from HSE and other organisations. Identification of the hazard is key. Duty holders should not undertake any work which either exposes or is liable to expose their employees to asbestos unless they have carried out a suitable and sufficient assessment as to the presence, location and condition of asbestos in the premises.” We hear all too often about companies failing to carry out the proper checks before works are carried out, resulting in people being exposed to asbestos. Although anyone exposed at the hotel is unlikely to suffer with asbestosis, pleural thickening or asbestos lung cancer in the future, they are now at risk of developing mesothelioma. This is a cancer which can be caused by low levels of asbestos exposure and for which there is currently no known cure. The regulations are in place for a reason and following these to the letter is the only way to protect workers and prevent asbestos-related conditions. If you require assistance in pursuing an asbestos compensation claim for mesothelioma or other asbestos disease then please contact us today on our freephone number 0800 038 6767. Alternatively, head over to the ‘Contact Us’ page, complete the form and we will be in touch.

The post Hoteliers fined after breaching asbestos regulations appeared first on Asbestos Justice.

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The annual Global Asbestos Awareness Week took place last week. It is a campaign run by the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organisation (ADAO), the largest independent asbestos victims’ organisation in America.  The aim of the campaign is to raise awareness of asbestos and its dangers and prevent exposure. By bringing together experts and victims from around the world it is hoped that they can share information and experiences from which they can learn and take action. The focus of this year’s campaign The focus of this year’s week was on:
  1. Banning the mining, manufacturing, and use of asbestos;
  2. Preventing asbestos exposure;
  3. Increasing compliance and enforcement of existing laws and regulations;
  4. Strengthening international partnerships.
As part of the week, there was a conference in Washington, D.C., featuring many experts from around the world together with input from victims of asbestos disease and family members. As well as a screening of the asbestos documentary “Breathless”, a film telling the story of a man whose father worked for a Belgium asbestos company and lost both parents and two brothers to mesothelioma, there was also a march for justice and remembrance. The ongoing legacy of asbestos use UKATA, the UK Asbestos Training Association, is a not-for-profit organisation and is a leading authority on asbestos training. Their Chief Operating Officer, Craig Evans, says, “We still have a long way to go to tackle the global issue. Asbestos was banned in the United Kingdom in 1999, over 1.5 million buildings in the UK alone may still contain asbestos. Government statistics confirm asbestos is responsible for over 5,000 deaths in the UK”. As long as asbestos is present in buildings there is a risk that hazardous exposure will continue. As long as hazardous exposure continues, the risk of people developing asbestos-related diseases continues.  We hear on a weekly basis of the regulations regarding asbestos being ignored and people being exposed negligently and unnecessarily. Global awareness needs to be increased to prevent this from happening. Calls for a worldwide ban As well as exposure to asbestos still occurring in the UK, the use of asbestos is still legal in many countries, including Russia, India and China. Global Asbestos Awareness Week is committed to educating people on the risk of asbestos and how to manage it in order to prevent asbestos-related diseases such as mesothelioma. This is a form of cancer which affects the linings of the body’s organs and for which there is currently no cure. Research continues but treatment is mainly focused on extending life expectancy. People on a worldwide basis are campaigning for asbestos to be banned in every country. Linda Reinstein of The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) said “It is exciting to see the global community unite and collaborate for Global Asbestos Awareness Week. Thank you for joining us during this week of learning and community!” If you require assistance in pursuing an asbestos compensation claim for mesothelioma or any other asbestos disease then please contact us today on our freephone number 0800 038 6767. Alternatively, head over to the ‘Contact Us’ page, complete the form and we will be in touch.

The post Global Asbestos Awareness Week appeared first on Asbestos Justice.

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It is thought that animals which have swum the oceans for at least 16 million years have evolved to become entirely immune to cancer. It is hoped that studies on the evolution of great white sharks, which measure up to 20 feet in length and weigh up to 3 tonnes, could assist experts in identifying a cure for asbestos-related cancers and others forms of the disease. Why might sharks have the answer? Early indications are that the first map of the shark’s DNA showed a range of mutations which protect against cancer and other age-related conditions, as well as enhanced wound-healing. Research has shown that various molecular changes in genes connected to DNA repair and damage tolerance have taken place within the genetic make-up of the animals. Such changes have resulted in sharks’ genome remaining stable. Unfortunately, humans suffer higher rates of genome instability which is caused by accumulated DNA damage. This makes people more susceptible to developing various forms of cancer, including asbestos-related malignancy. Those leading the study believe that examining the way great white sharks have evolved to allow their genome to remain stable and resist cancers, could potentially lead to ground breaking treatment. What the researchers say A co-leader of the American study, Dr M Shivji of the Save our Seas Foundation Shark Research Centre, Nova Southeastern University, Florida stated: “Not only were there are surprisingly high number of genome stability genes that contained these adaptive changes, but there was also an enrichment of several of these genes, highlighting the importance of this genetic fine-tuning in the white shark.” Dr Shivji continued: “Genome instability is a very important issue in many serious human diseases. Now we find that nature has developed clever strategies to maintain the stability of genomes in these large-bodied, long-lived sharks. There’s still tonnes to be learned from these evolutionary marvels, including information that will potentially be useful to fight cancer and age-related diseases and improve wound-healing treatments in humans, we uncover how these animals do it.” We regularly report on the advances in treating asbestos-related lung cancer and mesothelioma. Those treatments include immunotherapy and vaccine therapy. It is very much hoped that this new genetic research will go even further in the hope that a cure for asbestos-related cancer will soon be found. In the meantime, we will continue to help people recover the cost of the latest forms of private treatments as part of their claims for asbestos disease compensation. If you want to find out more about claiming mesothelioma compensation to cover the cost of private treatment or have any questions regarding any other potential asbestos claim then please contact us today on our freephone number 0800 038 6767. Alternatively, head over to the ‘Contact Us’ page, complete the form and we will be in touch. Source:  Nova Southeastern University. "Great white shark genome decoded: Huge genome reveals sequence adaptations in key wound healing and genome stability genes tied to cancer protection." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 February 2019. 

The post Do sharks have the teeth to tackle asbestos-related cancers? appeared first on Asbestos Justice.

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In the recent case of R v SQUIBB GROUP LTD (2019), the Court considered a company’s conviction under the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 s.2(1). The company was found to have breached its duty towards it employees by failing to do all that was reasonably practicable to protect them from exposure to asbestos.

Why was the company convicted?

The company had been involved, as a contractor, in the refurbishment of a school that required demolition work. Part of the demolition work was carried out in April 2012 during the school’s Easter holidays and the work carried on in July. The day after the work started again in July, one of the company’s employees was inspecting an area above a suspended ceiling and discovered what he thought was asbestos-containing materials.  A new asbestos survey was done which showed widespread asbestos sprayed on ceilings and confirmed that parts of the school that had already been demolished contained asbestos. As a result both employees of the company and others involved in the school’s refurbishment had been exposed to a risk of inhaling asbestos dust and fibres. This risk puts them at risk of developing an asbestos-related disease.

The charges made

The company was charged on count 1 under s.2(1) for failing to comply with its duty to ensure, so far as reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare of its employees, and on count 2 under s.3(1) for failing to conduct its undertaking in such a way as to ensure, so far as reasonably practicable, that persons not in its employment who might be affected were not exposed to risks to their health and safety.

The conviction

The company was convicted by a jury of the offence under count 1 of breach of its duty towards its own employees, but acquitted of the offence under count 2 of breach of its duty to others. The company was fined £400,000.

The appeal

The company appealed against the conviction and the sentence. In terms of the conviction, they argued that the verdicts on the two counts were inconsistent and if a not-guilty verdict was found in respect of one, it should be for both.  They also argued that the fine was excessive and had been based on categorising the risk in a higher category than was justified on the evidence.

On appeal it was held that the jury had been entitled to find that the employees had been exposed to much higher levels of asbestos than any of the other people on site.  Evidence had been produced that showed the company had managed the works in a way which reduced the risks to others.

In terms of sentencing, the court had been required to follow the Definitive Guideline for Health and Safety Offences issued by the Sentencing Council.  The court had to consider the offending company’s culpability and the risk of harm, and assess which category the offence fell into.  The judge had assessed the culpability as high and, given that he had heard all the evidence at trial, it was not justifiable to change his assessment. He had then assessed the risk of harm as medium but it was held that there was no proper basis for this conclusion. The judge had given no reason for disagreeing with the company’s expert’s evidence of risk to its employees of developing an asbestos-related disease as a result of their likely level of exposure. It was held that he had been wrong to do so. Instead it was held that the offence fell in harm category 3, for which the starting point for an offence involving high culpability committed by a medium-sized organisation was £210,000. So whilst the appeal against the conviction was dismissed, the appeal against the sentence was allowed and the fine was reduced. Making a similar adjustment from the starting point as the judge had for mitigating factors, the appropriate fine was £190,000.

Our thoughts

It is encouraging that convictions for such breaches are regularly being made in relation to asbestos exposure. However, we are concerned to learn of so many instances of workers and members of the public alike being exposed to asbestos to this day and wonder whether the level of fines is sufficient to encourage changes. The incidence of the asbestos related cancer, mesothelioma, is expected to peak around 2020. However, if exposure continues, as in this case, people will still be at risk of developing the fatal cancer far into the future.

If you require assistance in pursuing an asbestos compensation claim for mesothelioma or other asbestos disease then please contact us today on our freephone number 0800 038 6767. Alternatively, head over to the ‘Contact Us’ page, complete the form and we will be in touch.

The post Fine for a company’s breach of asbestos regulations held excessive appeared first on Asbestos Justice.

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The latest test case

A court in America was due to assess whether Johnson & Johnson’s talcum powder products are responsible for causing another person to suffer with mesothelioma, during late August of 2018.

This was the sixth test case of its type involving the well-known company, which has been pursued by thousands of sufferers of ovarian cancer.

The latest test case, has been pursued by Carolyn Weirick who was sadly diagnosed with pleural mesothelioma during 2017. Her legal team have argued that her disease was caused as a result of breathing in harmful amounts of asbestos fibres from Johnson & Johnson’s shower and baby powder over the course of many years.

The Defendant company has always counter argued that their talc products are entirely safe but the Claimant’s specialist asbestos disease lawyer, Jay Stuemke told the court:-

“Talc is not as pure as people would like to think. You can’t process asbestos out of talc.”

Both asbestos and talc are minerals with a different chemical make-up and shape. Talc contains magnesium, silicon and oxygen.

The problems faced by the Defendant company in this action, as well as others that manufacture talc, is that talc deposits and asbestos deposits are often in close proximity to one another, therefore increasing the probability that the talc rocks, which are smashed up to form the powder, will be chronically contaminated with amounts of asbestos fibre.

What was the verdict of the jurors?

The case ended with the jurors unable to agree on a verdict. One of the company’s lawyers, Christopher Vejnoska, said, “After five or six days of deliberations following weeks of hearing evidence, the jury still found that the plaintiffs couldn’t carry their burden of proof on the very fundamental question of whether Johnson & Johnson had acted negligently, which I think fits with the fact that people have been using Johnson & Johnson baby powder for over a century with no problem. I think that the jury’s result we got is consistent with that fact.”

What are the risks?

It is accepted here in the UK, that there is no “safe level of asbestos exposure” and even inhalation of one asbestos fibre can lead to a traumatic diagnosis of asbestos-related mesothelioma in later life.

Researchers have commonly reported that the more frequent the exposure, the higher the risk of mesothelioma developing will be.

It is thought that any product which contains talc possesses the possibility of consisting of small amounts of asbestos fibre, although purification processes used to extract asbestos from talc are used.

The American Cancer Society confirm that findings have been mixed in relation to whether purified talc can cause ovarian or lung cancer. No strong connection has been made between talc dust exposure and other forms of cancer.

In contrast, the inhalation of asbestos fibres has, of course, been associated with the risk of developing the deadly cancer, asbestos-related mesothelioma for decades as well as other diseases including asbestosis, diffuse pleural thickening, pleural effusions and pleural plaques.

Despite asbestos use in talc being effectively outlawed for home use in the 1970s, it is thought that talcum powder is not an isolated product still containing asbestos fibres.

In the last 12 months, various forms of makeup and crayons have also been found to contain some asbestos fibres, raising further concerns about the risks of developing mesothelioma.

If you require assistance in pursuing a mesothelioma claim or believe you have a valid asbestos claim for any other asbestos disease then please contact us today on our freephone number 0800 038 6767. Alternatively, head over to the ‘Contact Us’ page, complete the form and we will be in touch.

Sources:

Sammon, John, “Trial opens accusing Johnson & Johnson talc powder causing mesothelioma” 21/08/2018.

Siegel, David, “Sixth Johnson & Johnson Talc Powder Mesothelioma Trial Begins in California”, 21/08/18 – Courtroom View Network.

Talcum Powder & Cancer, American Cancer Society Website.

The post Johnson & Johnson talcum powder update appeared first on Asbestos Justice.

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Mesothelioma is notoriously difficult to treat. Thanks to ongoing research people are living for longer, with a better quality of life.

There are several treatments available to mesothelioma patients and whilst these can improve quality of life and life expectancy, there is yet to be a definitive cure for mesothelioma.

Surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy?

A lot of patients opt for surgery with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. The surgery aims to remove as much of the cancer as possible while the chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy prevents the spread or regrowth of the cancer.

The study

Researchers from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have been working on another treatment to further extend the survival rate of mesothelioma patients after surgery. The treatment is a spray-on biodegradable gel that boosts the immune system.

Currently the treatment has only been tested on mice with advanced melanoma but the results are promising with around half of the mice not having recurrence of cancer after surgery.

Cancer cells release a protein, CD47, which protects them from the body’s immune system. The spray-on gel contains calcium carbonate which has been loaded with immunotherapy drugs which stop cancer cells from releasing this protein and allow the immune system to fight the cancer. When the cancer cells are attacked, they cannot reseed and so the cancer cannot spread.

The lead researcher, Zhen Gu said of the results, “Around 90% of people with cancerous tumors end up dying because of tumor recurrence or metastasis. Being able to develop something that helps lower this risk for this to occur and has low toxicity is especially gratifying.”

What do the results mean?

Although, so far, the gel has only been successfully tested with mice, the results are positive. Mesothelioma is a notoriously difficult cancer to treat and while surgery is possibly the treatment that yields the best results, it does carry the risk of the cancer reseeding and spreading. If the spray-on gel can be developed and used following mesothelioma surgery, the survival rate of patients post-surgery will only get better.

If you require assistance in pursuing an asbestos compensation claim for mesothelioma or other asbestos disease then please contact us today on our freephone number 0800 038 6767. Alternatively, head over to the ‘Contact Us’ page, complete the form and we will be in touch.

Sources:

Chen, Q, et al, “In situ sprayed bioresponsive immunotherapeutic gel for post-surgical cancer treatment”, December 10, 2018, Nature Nanotechnology, https://www.nature.com/articles/s41565-018-0319-4

Gu, Zhen, “Sprayable gel could help the body fight off cancer after surgery”, December 10, 2018, https://cancer.ucla.edu/Home/Components/News/News/1230/1631

The post Immunotherapy spray after mesothelioma surgery improves survival appeared first on Asbestos Justice.

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Shortness of breath is a common symptom of pleura mesothelioma. One cause of breathlessness is fluid build-up around the lungs, this is also known as a pleural effusion. As fluid builds up, pressure is put on the lungs making it difficult to take deep breaths.

How are pleural effusions treated?

One way to treat a pleural effusion is a thoracentesis or pleural aspiration. This involves a catheter which is a small tube, being inserted into the chest cavity. The tube is then attached to a bag for the fluid to drain into. Once drained, the fluid can be analysed. Pleural effusions can return after they have been drained and so further procedures may be required.

Another treatment for pleural effusions is a pleurodesis. First the fluid is drained through thoracentesis and then the cavity between the lining of the lungs is filled with talc. This causes irritation and scarring which fuses the two layers together so no further fluid can build up. This is a painful procedure and is not always successful. However, many patients find that in the long-term, it is preferable to multiple thoracentesis procedures.

What is an indwelling pleural catheter?

A further treatment for pleural effusions is an indwelling pleural catheter. This is usually considered for patients with recurring pleural effusions or those whose pleurodesis was not successful. The procedure is similar to a thoracentesis in that a tube is inserted into the chest cavity, however, the catheter has a one-way valve at the end. This allows fluid to come out but stops air from going in. The catheter then allows patients to drain as needed, without having to attend hospital each time.

An indwelling pleural catheter can increase a patient’s quality of life. Patients can drain fluid in accordance with their breathing symptoms and do not have to go back into hospital each time this is needed.

The study

Unfortunately, a new study in Canada has found that there may be serious negatives to having an indwelling pleural catheter if you have pleural mesothelioma. After reviewing 90 cases where mesothelioma patients had indwelling pleural catheters, it found that 24 patients developed catheter trace metastasis. This is when new mesothelioma tumours occur at the insertion site of the catheter.

The study showed that it took, on average, 457 days for the new tumours to develop.

While the study shows that there is a risk of developing tumours at the catheter site, it does not look at the treatment of these, although studies have looked at this in the past, further research is needed.

When discussing treatment options, mesothelioma patients need to take many factors into consideration and this study highlights the need to think of the long-term side-effects of indwelling pleural catheters.

If you require assistance in pursuing an asbestos compensation claim for mesothelioma or other asbestos disease then please contact us today on our freephone number 0800 038 6767. Alternatively, head over to the ‘Contact Us’ page, complete the form and we will be in touch.

Source: Hosseini, S, et al, “Catheter tract metastasis in mesothelioma patients with indwelling pleural catheters”, European Respiratory Journal, Vol 52, Issue suppl 62, 2018, http://erj.ersjournals.com/content/52/suppl_62/PA3379

The post Negative side-effects of pleural catheters for mesothelioma appeared first on Asbestos Justice.

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Researchers have been investigating whether the sugar supplement, mannose, can slow the growth of cancers, including mesothelioma. Mannose is a sugar monomer and is important in metabolism. It can be found naturally in some fruits and vegetables, including cranberries, oranges, apples, broccoli and green beans. It is also sold as a supplement. A study by Cancer Research UK and Worldwide Cancer Research has tested the effect of mannose on the growth speed of tumours in mice. How does mannose slow growth? All body cells need sugar to grow – including cancer cells. Mannose alters the glucose and limits how much sugar the cells can use. Mesothelioma cells need more glucose than healthy cells, and so by using mannose to control the sugar, the growth can be controlled. The study The study used mice which had lung cancer, skin cancer or pancreatic cancer. They were given a sugar supplement through their drinking water. The results showed that, in the mice given the supplement, the tumours grew at a much slower rate. Additionally, the mice who were given the mannose supplement did not suffer any obvious side effects. The research is in early stages but the results are encouraging, particularly for mesothelioma patients. Mesothelioma tumours grow very quickly. Sadly, not all patients are able to have surgery or chemotherapy to reduce the size of the tumours. Therefore, this mannose supplement could be invaluable in slowing growth and allowing mesothelioma patients to live longer and with a better quality of life. How can we help? If you require assistance in pursuing an asbestos compensation claim for mesothelioma or other asbestos disease, then please contact us today on our Freephone number – 0800 038 6767. Alternatively, head over to the ‘contact us’ page, complete the form and we will be in touch. Source: Gonzalez, P, et al, “Mannose impairs tumour growth and enhances chemotherapy”, November 21 2018, Nature, https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0729-3

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A recent study has found that chemotherapy is the best treatment for pericardial mesothelioma. Pericardial mesothelioma is one of the rarer forms of mesothelioma – only a few hundred cases have ever been reported. This form of mesothelioma affects the tissue lining the heart. A study by doctors at the University of Texas has looked at 103 cases of pericardial mesothelioma. They found that, whilst surgery is the most common treatment, chemotherapy gives patients the best survival rate. On average, patients survive for around 6 to 10 months after they have been diagnosed with pericardial mesothelioma. Unfortunately, pericardial mesothelioma is a very rare form of cancer, which means that there is still a lot that we do not know about this type of mesothelioma. The study: The cases reviewed looked at patients who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2016.  The median age at diagnosis was 55 and the median survival rate was six months. There are a number of factors that can affect the survival rate of a mesothelioma patient. This includes the patient’s general health, age at diagnosis and their cancer stage. The study found that there were two factors which affected the survival rate for pericardial mesothelioma – how much the cancer had spread and whether the patient had chemotherapy. Lead author, Elizabeth McGehee, MD, said: “A survival benefit was noted in those that received chemotherapy (median survival, 13 months vs 0.5 months). In multivariate analysis, only the receipt of chemotherapy was associated with improved survival.” In other words, the patients who had chemotherapy treatment lived for an average of 13 months. This is in comparison to those who did not have chemotherapy, who lived for an average of just 2 weeks. Whilst the results of this study do appear to show that chemotherapy is the best treatment to extend survival rate, other factors must be considered. For those who did not have chemotherapy, it may be that they were diagnosed when their cancer had progressed to a later stage, where their survival rate was significantly reduced in any event. How can we help? If you require assistance in pursuing an asbestos compensation claim for mesothelioma or other asbestos disease, please contact us today on our Freephone number – 0800 038 6767. Alternatively, you can head over to our ‘contact us’ page, complete the form, and we will be in touch. Source: McGehee, E, at al, “Treatment and Outcomes of Primary Pericardial Mesothelioma: A Contemporary Reviewing of 103 Published Cases”, November 29 2018, Clinical Lung Cancer, https://www.clinical-lung-cancer.com/article/S1525-7304(18)30304-8/fulltext

The post Chemotherapy is the most effective treatment for pericardial mesothelioma appeared first on Asbestos Justice.

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We are pleased to report that we have recently recovered a large amount of asbestosis compensation for Mrs S, who sadly lost her husband to the condition in June 2018. Read on to learn how her husband was exposed to asbestos and how we supported Mrs S throughout the claims process. What is asbestosis? Asbestosis is a chronic lung disease which normally only develops after you have been exposed to a large amount of asbestos dust over many years. Sadly, there is no cure – if you have asbestosis then your lungs are permanently scarred. This scar tissue stops your lungs from expanding and contracting normally. Unfortunately, asbestosis can lead to damaged lungs and subsequent heart failure. Often, people like Mr S, who develop asbestosis, have been unjustly exposed to asbestos throughout their working life. We help these people to claim compensation. Exposed to asbestos as an apprentice Before his death in June, Mr S told his family that he had regularly been exposed to asbestos when he worked as an apprentice for Edwin J Hassell Limited between approximately 1965 and 1969. Mr S’s job was to install boilers and carry out commission work. He regularly worked near fitters who were removing asbestos lagging from boilers and pipes. In the 60s, asbestos lagging was frequently used as a form of heat insulation. As the lagging was removed large amounts of asbestos dust would be released into the working environment. Mr S was often working in confined spaces with little or no ventilation. He could not help but breathe in the asbestos dust. Often, he would only be several feet away from the fitters as they stripped asbestos lagging. When the fitters stripped the lagging, dust would rise and cover the room, including his clothes, hair and skin. Mr S was never given any protective equipment to wear whilst carrying out his job nor was he warned of the dangers of being exposed to asbestos. Unfortunately, we could not pursue a claim against this first employer. This is because we were unable to locate employer’s liability insurance covering the time period that Mr S worked for the company. Further workplace exposure As well as the above employment, Mr S also worked for a company called Pinnock Brothers (Thatcham & Kintbury) Limited between approximately 1970 and 1990. He was employed as a boiler engineer, responsible for servicing, installing and maintaining boilers. This employment, once again, involved working in confined and unventilated boiler houses where asbestos was present. Mr S had to brush past or knock the asbestos lagging with his bare hands on a daily basis in order to gain access to the boilers he was servicing. This caused asbestos to rise into the air, which he inevitably inhaled. Again, Mr S was never provided with any protective equipment by this company, nor was he warned about the dangers of asbestos exposure. The claim Initially, when we spoke to the coroner about this case they would not order a post mortem into Mr S’ death because they believed he had died of natural causes. Unwilling to give up, we told Mrs S that a post mortem was vital if she wanted to make an asbestosis claim. Subsequently, the coroner ordered the post mortem to go ahead. The reports were clear – Mr S died from asbestosis, chronic heart disease, COPD, and bronchopneumonia. Initially the company’s insurers disputed that the deceased’s death was caused by asbestosis, citing his other health problems as being the main cause.  We used our knowledge as specialist asbestos disease solicitors to refer to previous court cases, including the case of Bonnington Castings v Wardlaw [1956], and argued that the asbestosis had “materially contributed” to his death. We successfully recovered £115,000 in compensation for Mr S’s wife only 6 months after her husband’s death. Whilst no amount of compensation can reimburse Mrs S for her loss, she was pleased that the insurers were held accountable following the devastating passing of her husband. How can we help? If we can help you with pursuing a claim for asbestosis compensation then please contact us today on our free telephone number 0800 039 6767. Alternatively, you can visit our ‘'Contact Us’ page, complete the online form, and we will be in touch.  

The post Asbestosis claim success within 6 months appeared first on Asbestos Justice.

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