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In the 48th issue of Art Reveal Magazine we encourage you to read the interviews with following contemporary artists:
Giovanni Armenio (Italy), Aurélie Crisetig (Switzerland), Dominique Dève (France), Michele Farinelli (Italy), Nina Fraser (UK), Evagelia Hagikalfa (Greece/UK), Maria Letsiou (Greece), Cameron Lings (UK), Katie McGuire (UK), Stacie McCormick (USA/UK), Nemo Nonnenmacher (Germany/UK), Laura Obon (Spain/UK), Georgina Ottaway (UK), Frank Vescio (Canada/France)

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Spazio Faro hosts for the first time in Rome, Slovakian artist Dana Danica Ondrej, the creator of “Fragmented Female”. The solo exhibition is organised under the patronage of the Slovak Institute in Rome and the Italian Institute of Culture in Bratislava. After the vernissage on Thursday 11th July, the exhibition will remain open to the public until 31 July 2019 in via Perugia 24.

In a meeting between two worlds of different shades, Dana’s women move in a persuasive and solitary way. The female subject is prevalent, yet each character investigates and focuses on a different aspect of humanity, reflecting her relationship with contemporary reality. Her Slavic origins and Italian art training are reflected in her original mixed technique. The lines do not mark out as much as they hint at figures that blend into the environment in which they are immersed and from which they emerge at times. Elements taken from everyday life abound: lace and newspaper sheets enter the work with vivacity and frenzy. Women seem suspended in an elsewhere and only by approaching do we realise how alive they are, and at the same time fragmented.

“My artistic universe is primarily represented by women, interpreted through contemporary symbolism and poetics. I am influenced by the many contrasts that life in the city gives us. I am fascinated by the old chapped walls, as well as the chaos of the streets, advertising and street art. These are all aspects that I translate into my poetry through colours and collages, often helping me with newspaper clippings.”

Anet, 60x120sm, acrylic & oil on cotton canvas, 2019

Having graduated in graphic design at the Polygraphic Institute of Bratislava, Dana Danica Ondrej began working as an assistant director for Slovak television. In those years she continued to devote herself to the study of painting, participating in competitions and group exhibitions in Bratislava and Prague. From 2002 she moved to Italy to study at the Brera Academy of Fine Arts where she graduated in Painting and in 2010 obtained a diploma in Organisation and Communication for Contemporary Art. She exhibited in numerous collective and personal exhibitions in Milan before returning to her homeland, Slovakia, where she opened an atelier and devoted herself exclusively to her artistic career.

Vernissage: 11th July from 6:30pm till 10pm
Finissage: 31st July from 7pm till 9pm

Spazio Faro Dana Danica Ondrej
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Opening: June 29th 2019
Exhibition: June 29th – August 20th

LABOR is pleased to announce the first exhibition of Yuri Pattison in Mexico, crisis cast. Pattison’s work explores the multiple relationships between visual cultures, space, communication technologies and the circulation of information.
Pattison uses digital technology to investigate the political and social ramifications of the rapid development of technology and the depth of visual culture in the Internet age. His physical works take advantage of the space outside the web to explore the notions of open communication and the flexibility of labor borders in the modern workspace. The artist creates complex scenarios to construct narratives with fictitious scripts that lean towards the theory of conspiracy and the Science fiction.
In public solitude (crisis cast), Yuri Pattison explores the impact of contemporary technologies on discourses of personal and national security. The advance of high-resolution imaging, social networking and nanotechnology have transformed the ways in which governments and private entities attempt to address anxieties generated by high profile incidents of terrorism and the endless flood of information that ensues from such events. The expanded news cycle created by web-based broadcasting platforms has created an environment in which unitary narratives about events have been replaced by an often overwhelming multiplicity of perspectives and opinions. In such an information ecology, the chasm Jean Baudrillard identified between “information” and “meaning” has grown exponentially. Into this rupture have poured an endless parade of civilian journalists, social media influencers, as well as charlatans seeking to exploit points of information arbitrage.

crisis cast, Yuri Pattison, 2019, Installation views and details, LABOR, Mexico. Images: Courtesy of LABOR and the artist. Photos: Daniela Uribe.

If terror is an aesthetic event, so then is the prevention of terror. The increasing ubiquity of security cameras in public spaces is accompanied by an aesthetics of security involving numerous practically useless “security” procedures being performed because they create a nebulous atmosphere of safety. The relentless documentation of public spaces and security procedures has created a similar surfeit of imagery and discursive fracturing. Conspiracy theories surrounding disaster preparedness videos involving governments and private contractors have become as prevalent as the images themselves.
The question of how risk and security are understood is one of the oldest in modern political thought. To model risk, one must have some conception of what is placed at risk, this is often a highly materialized process.

crisis cast, Yuri Pattison, 2019, Installation views and details, LABOR, Mexico. Images: Courtesy of LABOR and the artist. Photos: Daniela Uribe.

Pattison’s works seek to make visible the vectors of these decisions. In the work that lends its title to the exhibition, Pattison collaborated with a private security firm called CrisisCast to visualize both the visual dimensions of disaster preparedness and the underlying technical infrastructure. Pattison commissioned CrisisCast to produce the preparedness scenario featured in the public solitude video. The firm’s founders use their background as theatre-makers to devise plausible scenarios in which “crises” could emerge.

crisis cast, Yuri Pattison, 2019, Installation views and details, LABOR, Mexico. Images: Courtesy of LABOR and the artist. Photos: Daniela Uribe.

The work Pattison commissioned features the firm’s performers – some of whom are erstwhile security professionals – traversing a simulated airport. Shot from multiple perspectives, the video referencing the disjoint, ostensibly neutral gaze of CCTV cameras, Tower II integrates the viewers into the spectacle of pseudo-security, displaying a live feed of the gallery spliced into the video footage housed in a server rack. Tower II evokes the material architecture that lies beneath notions like the “the Cloud”.
The cameras installed in the gallery are articulated to pan, zoom, and tilt according to automated settings, creating unique “non-human” perspectives on the space.

crisis cast, Yuri Pattison, 2019, Installation views and details, LABOR, Mexico. Images: Courtesy of LABOR and the artist. Photos: Daniela Uribe.

The work, Tower I, included within the Tower II server rack, consists of an emptied server case wherein a miniaturized 3-D model of the “airport” featured in public solitude is positioned, complete with miniature working security cameras reproducing the view inside the modeled space.

The gallery’s infrastructure is included in this process as well, integrating the cabling and lighting for the show within a Unistrut grid installed overhead. The gallery’s lighting structure will also be modified to create lights themselves constitute a work entitled always golden hour somewhere, an ongoing piece Pattison conceived which is designed to mimic the color and light patterns of solar cycle within a circuit of preprogrammed interruptions. Evolved from the lighting schemes used in locations like casinos – where a controlled environment and heavy surveillance are combined to produce a form of carceral entertainment – the work also seeks to reify the global, even galactic, discourses brought to bear on the appurtenances of our contemporary “surveillosphere”.

LABOR
Gral. Francisco Ramírez 5
11830. México DF

LABOR

crisis cast,Yuri Pattison, 2019, Installation views and details, LABOR, Mexico. Images: Courtesy of LABOR and the artist. Photos: Daniela Uribe.

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The New Tretyakov Gallery at Krymsky Val is about to open a new chapter in its operation. The Free Flight exhibition project inaugurates the Museum’s exhibition program at a brand new venue: the West wing of its building previously occupied by the Central House of Artist. It is here that the New Tretyakov Gallery is planning to hold its future large-scale interdisciplinary shows that would explore the most relevant issues and topics through innovative artistic means and media.

The Free Flight show is a result of collaboration between the Moscow-based AZ Museum and the State Tretyakov Gallery. Dedicated to the creative legacy of the renowned filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky and of the Soviet Nonconformist artists, it seeks to present the non-official art of the 1960-1980s within the context of Tarkovsky’s cinematic universe.

From the point of view of layout and architecture, the exhibition has been specifically designed to fit the West wing of the New Tretyakov Gallery building and is meant to become one of the most ambitious and impressive shows of non-official artist to date. The Free Flight is a culmination of a long and extensive project conceived of and carried out by the AZ Museum, a trilogy of shows dedicated to the legendary cinematographer and the artists of his day and age. The trilogy encompassed the show “Foresight” (2016) held at the Stanislavsky Electrotheater in 2016, via the “Breakthrough into the Past” (2017) shown at the State Theater of Nations (new venue) and ultimately, “The New Flight to Solaris” that was exhibited at the Franco Zeffirelli Foundation in Florence and the Royal Villa of Monza in 2018 to wide critical and public acclaim with more than 200 publications in the media.

Still life, eggs and fish. 1955 by Krasnopevcev Dmitriy

Importantly, the new exhibition, Free Flight, is more than simply a sum total of the three earlier shows merged together under the same roof, but an independent project that offers new insights into the subject and presents novel artistic solutions.

Tarkovsky’s creative pursuits, his personality and legacy were of an enormous import for the Soviet cinematography of the 1960-1980s, and had a great appeal for the artists of his time. Moreover, his films are also crucial for the study and true appreciation of the late 20th century European culture. Tarkovsky’s creative output reflected and expressed the spiritual and intellectual ideals of an entire generation, but it also shaped the very scale of artistic values and allowed the viewers and students of his oeuvre to touch upon the new and oftentimes forbidden themes and meanings that were important to the public behind “the Iron Curtain”.

Route, 1977 by Petr Belenok

The scope of ideas and images evoked and explored is what unites Tarkovsky’s filmmaking and the artworks of Soviet non-conformist artists that forged a specific artistic phenomenon called “the Soviet Renaissance”, an extraordinary outburst of non-official art and creativity.

Although Andrei Tarkovsky barely ever crossed paths with any of the artists included into the exhibition, there are obvious affinities between their works. Thus, the Free Flight seeks to introduce the viewers to the world of complex allusions and paradoxical juxtapositions of Andrei Tarkovsky’s cinematic imagery on the one hand, and the paintings, drawings and sculptures of the most eminent Russian artists of the second half of the 20th century as well as with contemporary media- and video-art. These underlying correlations, similarities and overlaps demonstrate that the art that touches upon the “big” existential issues while raising pressing questions of the day can hope to truly transgress the constraints of genres and media.

Active Space, 1977 by Petr Belenok

The structure of the project is built around three famous films of the master: Andrei Rublev, Stalker and Solaris. It is noteworthy, that this year marks the 50th anniversary of Andrei Rublev’s premiere at the Cannes Film Festival and the 40th anniversary of another one of Tarkovsky’s masterpieces, Solaris. In each of his films the famed director constructs an entire artistic universe full of complex meanings, references and symbols that have been studied and variously interpreted by many a generation of scholars and film critics ever since.

The vast (3,500 square meters) space of the West wing at Krymsky Val is about to be transformed into a ‘total’ installation that encompasses around 70 pieces from Natalia Opaleva’s collection. Among them there are artworks by Anatoly Zverev, Dmitry Plavinsky, Pyotr Belenok, Vladimir Nemukhin, Lydia Masterkova, Vladimir Yakovlev, Vladimir Yankilevsky, Francisco Infante-Arana, Yulo Sooster, Ernst Neizvestny, Oleg Tselkov and Dmitry Krasnopevtsev. Platon Infante-Arana created a new video-artwork specifically for the Free Flight exhibition. Media artist Alexander Dolgin worked on the content for 15 projection screens and more than 10 large-screen plasma displays.

The sheer scale of the project and the cutting-edge technology employed in the making of it, follow the curatorial logic of Polina Lobachesvkaya and the seamless stagecraft and design elaborated by Gennady Sinyov that assign a particular direction to the movement of the viewers as the latter explore the grounds of the West wing.

The visitors are expected to pass through three sections of the project: from the spiritual landscapes of Andrei Rublev and the images developed by Dmitry Plavinsky consonant with Tarkovsky’s cinematographic imagery, to the apocalyptic visions of Stalker and Pyotr Belenok’s picturesque eschatology to finally arrive at the futuristic interiors of Solaris filled with artworks directed towards the future of humanity. Courtesy of the Dva Andreya / Two Andreis foundation, the exposition also includes rare and unique archival materials.

The Jack of Diamonds, 1989 by Vladimir Nemuhin

Visitors will also have a chance to watch Irakly Kvirikadze’s film New Flight to Solaris, homage to the project and its participants.

The inauguration of the show will also see the release of two publications: an exhibition catalogue in English and Russian, or rather a guidebook of sorts that includes key exhibits with detailed annotations, and a new book by film scholar and critic Andrei Plakhov dedicated to the trilogy of Tarkovsky’s film that form the three pillars of the exhibition and more generally, to the main artistic milestones of the second half of the 20th century.

The State Tretyakov Gallery is Russia’s first art museum with its very own movie theater (founded more than three years ago inside the Engineering building at Lavrushinsky lane) to launch a sophisticated film programs that explore the links between fine arts and cinematography. That is why the State Tretyakov Gallery places an enormous importance on the realization of the Free Flight project.

Inside the cinema hall, which is part of the exposition, visitors will be able to learn more about the making of the project. Within the framework of the show, the New Tretyakov Gallery movie theater has already scheduled screenings of Tarkovsky’s oeuvre and a special film program designed by film scholar and critic Andrei Plakhov.

AZ Museum State Tretyakov Gallery
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July 6 – 27, 2019
Monday – Wednesday, 4-7 PM, or by appointment
Opening Reception: Saturday, July 6, 4:30-7 PM

Musa Collective
119 Braintree St,
Allston, MA 02134
USA

The US imposed its first sanctions on Iran a few years before I was even born; I’ve been living through them my whole life. The subject has recently been back in the spotlight, though—reading the news has shown me how sanctions have been normalized, even praised as the “humane” strategy.

Through symbolic, mythologic, literary, and embodied experiences, “Collective Punishment” aims to turn the audience’s attention to the imposition of systematic vengeance on “the other” under the guise of human rights and national security. Artists share their ineffable visceral experiences, and invite the audience to look at the intersection of race, nationality, class, and gender in this so-called humanitarian enterprise.

Artists: Mildor Chevalier, Saba Farhoudnia, Golnaz Goodarzi, Kyle Hackett, Nazli Artemia, Niloufar Keyhani, Woomin Kim, Mozhdeh Sajadi, Artemis Akchoti Shahbazi and Amir Tabatabaei

Niloufar Keyhani, Detail of Bloody Red, 24”x 37”x 4″, mixed media, 2019, Courtesy of the artist.

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Institutions and museums around the world mark this year 350 years since the death of Rembrandt van Rijn, organizing various events in memory of the master.

The world we see when we look at a Rembrandt painting has not been portrayed by anyone else. We do not want to recreate this world. How can we do it in a digitized world, a world of neon lights, light boxes, white nights, and explosive colors? We intent to highlight different manners in which light enriches our life today through our “senses and feelings” (R. Arnheim).

Over the years, the human eye has changed, getting to see more and more colors and lights. If in Holland of 1600-1700 the way to illuminate a room was with a candle that offered the indispensable wormth present in Rembrandt’s paintings, today we can enumerate many more ways. To highlight this diversity of contemporaneity, in the Remembering Rembrandt exhibition there are presented four different interpretations of the light.

For the artist Simona Vilău it is about the light-color. Her painting reminds of the strength of the color that the Fauvists speculated in the early 1900s. The easiness and courage with which she uses color in contrast to subjects based on sensitivity, emotion and self-knowledge led her to paint the two self-portraits, Lady Rain and Self-Portrait with cut trees, << exercises of acceptance and love for own body as for the Others’ >> as the artist declares. The artist-model relationship built between Rembrandt van Rijn and his wife, Saskia, based on a noble love that remains immortalized in portraits and nudes, is reinterpreted by Simona Vilău, which invites us to reflect on the human-nature relationship of our time.

The work “Dialogue with the Self” that I’ve painted at the beginning of this year remindsis of the philosophical “mind-body problem”, as a replica to the “Aristotle with a Bust of Homer” painting. In the post-modernity era, the human being considers abandoning the body for something better, for breaking the limits for transcendence. Together with this comes the idea of metamorphosis which I speculate in my art. Everybody can leave the mediocrity to become extraordinary. To make a visual representation to this Nietzshean belief, “I have separated my mind from the body” and I have created so two distinct entities.

But I think Rembrandt’s work is much more about two other entities: light and darkness. Some of my most pleasant memories as a student are the visits to the studio of Professor Aurel Vlad, located just behind the University of Fine Arts in Bucharest. I used to go there from time to time to enjoy an amazing show of warm and cold lights, different according to the moment of the day. For an exhibition dedicated to the light, I really wanted to bring a corner out of his studio and settle it exactly like a play, like the story his characters tell when they are placed next to each other (wooden objects over metal objects), as they can be seen in the studio of the sculptor Aurel Vlad. The main element of the scene created for Remembering Rembrandt is the work called Accident (The Anathomy Lesson). Nine years ago Mr. Aurel Vlad saw an accident that made him think of the Dutch master’s famous painting The Anathomy Lesson. Taking it in a humorously way, the romanian sculptor immortalized the moment.

Mihai Teodorescu, a sculptor of the young generation, chose to build especially for this project a sort of a street lamp with leds, which symbolizes the becoming from the light of Rembrandt’s fire and the cold one, the one of today, encountered at commercials or street lights, << which transform the street contrasts from a dramatic movie into a thriller >> as the artist mentions.

Ioana Niculescu-Aron

Ioana Alexandra Niculescu-Aron Website
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“What Borders Are You Willing to Cross?”


Over 30 artists connected to the international collaborative mixed media platform Global Art Project (GAP) are participating within the CrossingBorders exhibition that will take place from August 31 till September 15 2019 at the Sint-Amanduskapel (Campo-Santo), Visitatiestraat 2, Sint-Amandsberg in Ghent, Belgium.

CrossingBorders is a conceptual collaborative group exhibition project for art professionals affiliated with Global Art Project GAP worldwide aiming on transferring the projects concept to the public and extending the participants professional international networks and art market. The CrossingBorders exhibition aims to bring together Global Art Project affiliated artists from all over the world, who are highly motivated to collaborate with each other across national borders with the ambition to enter each other’s markets artistically. The CrossingBorders exhibition has been curated by the American artist and founder of Global Art Project, Carl Heyward and the Dutch artist and curator Ron Weijers. The curators of the CrossingBorders exhibition, stimulate and expect a conceptual reflection on distances or barriers, included in the perceptual context of a border, a blocking in thinking, acceptance and/or understanding by means of political issues, globalisation, (im)migration, climate change, gender, race, culture, religious racism, terrorism, genocide, war, misogynist behavior, feelings of fear or superiority etc etc… In other words, the GAP artists reflect upon their own conceptions about what constitutes a border or boundary and what it means to cross it.

Furthermore, the CrossingBorders concept also strongly intends to reflect on the role of migration as embodied in works of art. Centring on the physical and conceptual manifestations of the effects of migration and migrants on art. This issue also invites a focus on diasporas of practitioners and their reception by new audiences or consumers. The current ‘refugee crisis’ represents, above all, an international political crisis as lack of coordinated action that for instance has stretched the European Union relations almost to breaking point. In many countries populist right wing parties have been given a new lease of life with increasing numbers of people turning their backs on an open and liberal society. CrossingBorders stimulates reflection on the role of migration as embodied in works of art, material culture and their conservation.

The CrossingBorders exhibition will be on display at the Sint-Amanduskapel (Campo-Santo), Visitatiestraat 2, Sint-Amandsberg in Ghent, Belgium, from August 31 till September 15 2019. The CrossingBorders exhibition will be officially opened on August 31 – 16.00 by Tineke Schuurmans representing museum Verbeke Foundation in Kemzeke in Belgium.

The following group of GAP affiliated artists will participate within this international exhibition (in alphabetical order): Nadi Adatepe – Norway, Lynn Arnold – USA, Brian Auerbach – USA, Francis Beaty – USA, Pat Calabro – USA, Linda Coppens – Belgium, Mar Daines – France, Mikel Frank – USA, Ana Gabiño – Mexico, Carl Heyward – USA, Jennifer Homer-Hynes – USA, Christopher Padgett Hunnicutt – USA, William Jaggers – USA, David Jenowe – USA, Macha Melanie – France, Naomi Middelmann – Switserland, Emmanuel Montoya – USA, Susumu Ohira – Japan, Judith Pauly-Bender – Germany, Compagnie Puls’Art – France, Glen Rogers – Mexico, Isabel Ruiz Perdiguero – Spain, Akiko Suzuki-Heyward – Japan/USA, Patrick Tagoe-Turkson – Ghana, Christine Verhaert – Belgium, Frans van Viegen – the Netherlands, Ron Weijers – the Netherlands, Syporca Whandal – Hungary, Madeleine Wories – USA and Dimitri Xato – France/Spain

CrossingBorders
Location: Sint-Amanduskapel – Campo-Santo
Visitatiestraat 2 – 9040 Sint-Amandsberg – Ghent – Belgium
Timeframe: August 31 till September 15 2019

CrossingBorders is organized for Global Art Project GAP by 10dence

Global Art Project (GAP), founded by Carl Heyward, Akiko Suzuki, Lorna Crane, Chaewon Oh and Vered Gersztenkorn is an international group of artists with diverse interests and backgrounds; their common belief in art making as a natural part of the human condition, and collaboration as a key component, enables them to produce work that embodies a special kind of truth. Like the Fluxus artists, the principles that underlie the GAP philosophy include the belief that trusting the process of making art is fundamental to its creation, that art as a means of communication has a universal, cross cultural reach, and that education is not essential to understanding or appreciating of a work of art. It is unrestricted and available to all, not only those who can afford to purchase art or visit museums where carefully selected precious objects are carefully guarded.

Going beyond the surrealist’s concept of “automatism,” the GAP artists yield to the release of the separate and distinct grasp for the sake of a combined learning and aesthetic experience. Much of the work produced by this group is characterized by raw energy combined with elegant, intuitive, unplanned design. Implicit mutual faith, relinquishing of territorial boundaries, and conviction that the result will reflect the authenticity of the experience are essential to the practice. It is different from “group think”, or individual artists working on a project together. The concurrent action of the workers, without a predetermined program or plan, instigates a communal vision, giving rise to aspects of the unknown which would have otherwise been unreachable. Each mark, stroke, gesture, shape, color, and texture retains its intrinsic qualities while transforming into a collective composition. The process takes time, so there is an element of sequential movement to the work. The time that it takes for the eye to travel around a composition, following the impulses of the various artists involved in its creation, is an interesting variable in this process. While often nonobjective, the content of the collaborative work sometimes contains explicit images of public figures, or recognizable icons juxtaposed with self-contained formal elements. The results present us with an interesting dichotomy because, like all two dimensional art, it is seen instantaneously, but can often be best appreciated over time. The nature of this work is provocative on many levels, and has endless possible routes to the yet to be discovered.

GAP is linked by activity in mixed-media art practice, which may be reduced to working with the materials at hand and has antecedents in collage, assemblage, found-object and related practice. Their affinity with Fluxus, Cobra, and the Dada Art Movement is a recognition of the importance of being attuned to the collaborative future.

Global Art Project (GAP)
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The industrial building on 18-20 Iera Odos currently used as a music venue, is situated within the geographical region of the ancient cemetery of Kerameikos (1100 BC – AD 500). Nine metres below the surface of the modern city and tons of backfills, excavations since 1863 have brought to light parts of inner Kerameikos (potters’ and residential quarters) and outer Kerameikos (cemetery and the Demósion Sema public graveyard).

Zoe Hatziyannaki

The area of the exhibition building lies nine metres above the funerary monuments of prominent Athenians. It is located right above the ancient Hiera Hodos (Sacred Way) linking Athens with Eleusis where the Eleusinian Mysteries took place; on the west bank of the Eridanos river; west of the Dromos, a wide road leading the way to the Platonic Academy and the –later– Christian orthodox church of the Holy Trinity. It is all being now overshadowed by today’s Peiraios roadway and the adjacent buildings of the last century.

The exhibition will negotiate notions with clear references to antiquity yet liberated from an obsessive fixation on the ancient world. It will take into consideration every single metre of evolution and will speculate on all of the possible nine metres of history that will follow.

What may lie nine metres below our feet without us being able to discover it, could equate to a future reality nine metres above. The surfacing of a utopian condition brings forth the imaginary, but at the same time it flirts as a connection link with the idea of passage and transition. A dialogue emerges between realities and it is activated through a crack in spacetime, a crevice that [inter]connects the worlds in one breath.

The transformation of the urban habitat through literal and metaphorical backfills embodies ideas of [dis]semblance, voidance, disdain, corrosion of memory and the empowerment of an [inter]personal mythology and fiction as well as the fabrication of an in-progress identity. The repertoire of an everchanging political, religious and cultural condition is inscribed not only within the historical continuity of this locus but also within a flux of a conscious construction, deconstruction and conflict.

The choreography of the contemporary urban landscape redefines the architecture of life itself. It gives birth to a taxonomy of possibilities with human existence and its hypostasis as the protagonists, undergoing a constant battle with time and their very own selves.

Curator dr Kostas Prapoglou invites 16 contemporary artists from three generations to establish via their cross-disciplinary visual vocabulary (embracing installations, video, sculpture, painting and ceramics) a site and time specific relationship. They will discover in the ground and above the concrete floor themselves as well as the entire world and empower the viewers’ desire to dig with their eyes and build with their dreams.

Participating artists: Lydia Andrioti, Manolis Baboussis, Despina Charitonidi, Evangelos Chatzis, Lydia Dambassina, Diohandi, Kleio Gizeli, Zoe Hatziyannaki, Yannis Kondaratos, James M. Lane, Despina Meimaroglou, Eusevia Michailidou, Evi Savvaidi, Nikos Tranos, Adonis Volanakis, Eleni Zouni.

opening hours:
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday: 14.00 – 20.00
Saturday, Sunday, Monday: closed
address: 18-20 Iera Odos, 104 35, Athens, Greece

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On from the archives…This time last year I had returned from 3 months living in Mexico dicovering the Yucatan peninsular and trying my damnedest to learn Spanish. One of the highlights was a trip to Izamal, one of Mexico’s Magic Towns.

From June 2017:

When I first arrived in Mexico and heard about Magic Towns I was like a kid in a candy shop! I couldn’t wait to learn more and plan a visit. I then discovered Izamal and my heart jumped – a town painted yellow? YES PLEASE!

Jim and I hired a car and off we went. A road trip too…this day is going to be a winner I thought; it didn’t disappoint.

The yellow city, Izamal, nicked named La Ciudad Amarilla, sits about three hours drive from where we are staying in Play Del Carmen. It was great to get out and about in the Yucatan peninsular and visit some older parts of the region.

A Little History Lesson

“What makes a town magical? According to the requirements to be considered magical by the Mexican government, the town or city must be small with rich historical tradition. It must be near other touristically interesting sites or large cities, be accessible with good highways and roads, and there must be willingness by the locals to develop the project.

What makes Izamal a magical town? Just enter the town and that question will be answered. The first thing that any visitor notices is that the town is painted yellow… all the colonial buildings, the market, the huge convent, everything! The next things that stand out are the cobblestone streets and the iron lampposts that give the town a tranquil ambiance.”

Thank you Yucatan Today, I couldn’t of put it better myself – thats why I didn’t!

So why? You may be thinking is Izamal painted yellow?

You might be surprised to know that this information isn’t readily available in the town or online. I did find one source to give the big secret away, thank you to Earth Trippers who did their research and got to the bottom of this conundrum.

I’ve para phrased a little in the following paragraph to give you the jist:

Izamal was looking a little tired and out of shape when Pope John Paul II announced he’d make a visit in the summer of 1993. The whole town sprang to attention and decided that the colour of corn, sunshine and the Vatican flag would be best.

A Little More History

Aside from the European influence in architecture there are also many Mayan ruins in this area and the large ‘Convento de San Antonio de Padua’ is actually built upon, and uses stone from a Mayan pyramid. Popul-Chac once stood where the convent now stands.

Izamal was historically a Mayan pilgrimage site, this tradition remains but in our era the yellow city is now a Catholic place of worship attracting Catholics throughout the year.

Even the cars are trying to fit in around here…

Now to top off the whole day we decided to make the most of our road trip and stop at Valladolid on the way back to Playa Del Carmen. I didn’t realise until we had parked up that Valladolid is the second and only other magic town in the Yucatan peninsular – our lucky day!

I hope I’ve inspired you to travel a little more and explore. Please reach out to me if you have any questions about Mexico, it’s a fabulous country with so much to see and experience!

Kim Youdan

Kim Youdan

 

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Opening Tuesday 4th June, 6:30 – 8:30 pm
Show runs 5th June – 4th July 2019
by appointment only

Eva Masterman, Strange Comfort, 2019 Stoneware ceramic, glaze, brass and steel

Eva Masterman’s exhibition ‘Strange Comfort’ presents a mise-en-scène of clay sculpture and photography, exposing tensions between public and private dialogues. Using autobiographical references to domestic childhood spaces, representational clay objects become characters in an interior narrative that is at once familiar yet disconcerting.

(The house) largely escaped his notice – there had been those stairs, there was a balcony, it was dark, there were many pictures, and these glass cases, it was a bit like a library….this made about the sum of (his) unrecorded perceptions.Malcolm Lowry, Strange Comfort Afforded By the Profession

I stand, as usual, surrounded by the bitter-green smell of geraniums, in this draughty excuse for a Front Room. At least I am not so often alone, there are more visitors here. We could go weeks without a guest, before.

Eva Masterman, Visitor, 2019 Fujiflex print on aluminium dibond, 36x50cm

Some of my old companions have travelled with me, though with some casualties obviously, as this surrogate home is much smaller than the last. The austere photos of those other families dead and gone remain, and Mr ‘Affe Mitt Shadel’, ominous as ever, perches on the glass fronted cabinet full of books that no one ever seems to read. The polished pots in tinny brass and copper are here too, huddling round the empty hearth for warmth, weary of the polish rag that She still wields so regularly. It is not clear who She keeps them shining for, but perhaps it is habit more than anything, something to fill the days.

I certainly do not get the same attention; I’m afraid my own velvet is somewhat faded now, my trim sagging over my once stately legs. I find this rather unseemly and wait for my renovations to be taken up as a Project, but so far, my discomfiture remains unnoticed.

We soak up the silence in this room, hungry for our regular Friday afternoon visitations: the slow creak of young and old bones, the rasp and snip of scissors on fabric, the tinkle of blue china. She sometimes stands at the window and addresses the room directly, not realising we listen. I wonder if there is a strange comfort in our reticence, a familiarity in knowing that no one will answer back. What a thing it would be, to be able to respond!

Lily Brooke
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