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turmeric ginger iced tea lemon spritzer

Make this one a double! Two (or more!) delicious drinks with a single recipe, that is. These immune system boosting Turmeric Ginger Tea and Lemon Spritzer recipes are simple to make and full of health benefits. It’s so versatile, too! The Turmeric Ginger Tea can be served hot or cold, or chilled and mixed with honey, lemon, and soda water for a refreshing Lemon Spritzer. Whether you’re soothing a sore throat or wanting a refreshing summer BBQ spritzer, this recipe is perfect for you.

While the Turmeric Ginger Tea creates a comforting drink, for me, as we kick off the summer, this recipe shines as a crowd-pleasing mocktail. The Lemon Spritzer version of this tea recipe is subtly sweet, slightly spicy, and refreshingly effervescent. It will dazzle your tastebuds and your BBQ guests.

What is Turmeric Ginger Tea?

A combination of water steeped in fresh turmeric root and ginger root, Turmeric Ginger Tea is a great way to help balance your body’s inflammatory response. Turmeric root gets the majority of its benefits from curcumin, a powerful compound that extremely promising studies have shown to be highly effective at reducing inflammation. Cucurmin in turmeric also helps to maintain optimal blood pressure levels. Ginger root also is effective at reducing inflammation, and improving cholesterol levels.

Does this Tea Have Caffeine?

Absolutely not! Although it is called tea, there aren’t any tea leaves in this drink, which means it is caffeine free. The concentrate is high in antioxidants and contains vitamin c, beta carotene, and flavonoids. It also supports a healthy inflammatory response, promotes a healthy immune system and respiratory function, balances blood pressure, and helps maintain optimal cholesterol levels. It’s a delicious powerhouse you can whip up on the weekend and share with friends or enjoy all week.

Turmeric Ginger Iced Tea and Lemon Spritzer
Ingredients
  • Turmeric Ginger Iced Tea
  • 3 quarts filtered water
  • 4 inches fresh ginger root
  • 4 inches fresh turmeric root
  • Lemon Spritzer
  • 6 cups Turmeric Ginger Iced Tea
  • 6 cups plain soda water
  • 1/3 cup lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup honey omit if following a Candida diet or SIBO diet
  • Fresh basil and lemon slices for garnish (optional)

Servings:

Units: MetricUS Imperial

Instructions
    Turmeric Ginger Iced Tea
    1. Add water, peeled ginger root, and peeled turmeric root to a large stockpot and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low, and simmer for about 40 minutes, stirring occasionally until the liquid is reduced to about 64 ounces, and is a light golden color.
    2. Remove from heat. Using a wire mesh strainer, strain water into a 2-quart glass jar with a lid, and refrigerate at least 4 hours to chill.
    3. For a single serving of unsweetened Turmeric Ginger Iced Tea, pour 12 ounces over a pint glass filled with ice.
    4. Garnish with a lemon slice and fresh basil if desired.
    5. Store covered in the fridge for up to a week.
    Lemon Spritzer
    1. For the Lemon Spritzer option, combine lemon juice, honey, and Turmeric Ginger Tea in a blender carafe or a large pitcher.
    2. Use a blender or hand mixer to combine.
    3. Pour into a pitcher, add soda water, and serve over ice.
    4. Garnish with a lemon slice and fresh basil if desired.

    The post Turmeric Ginger Iced Tea and Lemon Spritzer appeared first on Amy Myers MD.

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    Amy Myers MD by Clare Conway - 1w ago

    A warm and delicious fruit crisp could be just what you need for one of those surprisingly chilly spring nights. This Salted Caramel Apple Crisp is a healthy treat that will fill your home with the fragrant scent of spices.

    Apples are tasty sweet and tart fruit that’s available all year round. However, you can switch them out with blueberries or cherries if you prefer, and the fruit will still taste absolutely amazing with the protein-rich topping.

    Not only do you get the benefits of fiber and vitamins from fruit; there are also a couple of secret ingredients that will boost the nutrient profile of the crumble topping. Tigernut flour is rich with fiber, potassium, and vitamins C and E, so the flour is an excellent, AIP alternative that provides a rich texture and extra flavor. And it’s mixed with my new Salted Caramel Paleo Protein, which is so delicious, and so good for your digestion and overall health. It has all of the essential amino acids your body can’t produce on its own and 20 grams of paleo protein. Did I mention it makes the whole kitchen smell like mapley, caramel goodness!?

    Don’t wait for fall to put this Salted Caramel Apple Crisp in the oven. It’s perfect any time of the year.

    Salted Caramel Apple Crisp
    Ingredients
    • 3 medium apples sliced thin
    • 2 Tbls tapioca starch
    • juice of 1/2 lemon
    • 1/4 cup coconut sugar
    • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
    • 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
    • Topping
    • 1 cup tigernuts slivered
    • 2 scoop The Myers Way® Salted Caramel Paleo Protein
    • 1/2 cup coconut sugar
    • 4 Tbls palm shortening
    • 1 tsp vanilla extract
    • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

    Servings:

    Units: MetricUS Imperial

    Instructions
    1. Preheat oven to 375˚F
    2. In a bowl, mix together apples, tapioca starch, lemon juice, coconut sugar, cinnamon, and nutmeg.
    3. Place into the bottom of an 8x8 square baking dish.
    4. In a separate bowl, stir together tigernuts, paleo protein, coconut sugar, palm shortening, vanilla, and cinnamon until it forms a crumbly mixture.
    5. Sprinkle on top of apple mixture. Bake for 35-40 minutes or until topping is golden brown.

    The post Salted Caramel Apple Crisp appeared first on Amy Myers MD.

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    Imagine a kitchen where you can reach into the pantry and pull out the perfect food. One that’s ideal for The Myers Way®, AIP approved, paleo friendly, and fun for the whole family. That can be a reality and I’m going to tell you how it’s done: with tigernuts.

    You might be thinking, “Wait. A nut? Those aren’t even AIP!” You’re right. Nuts such as almonds, cashews, and hazelnuts are not autoimmune diet approved, nor are they included in the 30-day protocol of The Myers Way®. Despite this, tigernuts are a great addition to your diet because they’re not really nuts! Tigernuts are a tuber that grows below the ground,1 however they resemble a nut in size, shape, and flavor. The grooves on the peel give them a striped appearance, which is how they got their name. Tigernuts are gluten-free, dairy-free, nut-free, paleo, and they are a fantastic tool for maintaining a healthy weight, or even when you want to lose some weight.

    People have been eating this sweet and nutty tuber for over 6,000 years.2 The hardy crop was brought to Spain from the Sudan and Egypt during the middle ages. Tigernuts can also be found here in the United States, where their plant is occasionally considered a pesky weed.3 Despite that, the plant, also known as yellow nutsedge, is a very serviceable crop that can be utilized in many diet plans. You may have seen them in my recipes, and now I want to tell you why they are the ideal food for you and your family.

    Different Ways to Use Tigernuts

    As with nuts and starchy tubers such as cassava, tigernuts can be enjoyed in many ways. Raw, dried tigernuts are a tasty, gluten-free snack on their own. This ancient food can also be made into a delicious beverage or used as an ingredient in AIP baking and cooking.

    Raw Tigernut Snack

    Tigernuts, available peeled and unpeeled, are great for when you’re craving something crunchy. Although the whole, unpeeled form has more fiber (about 10% more), chewing them can take some serious jaw work. You can soak the raw tigernuts for about four hours to make them softer on the outside and crunchy on the inside. Tigernuts are also an excellent snack when you want to lose some stubborn weight. They reduce blood sugar spikes and keep you full longer than many other snacks. They make a great healthy snack for kids and adults alike.

    Tigernut Milk

    Spanish horchata, or horchata de chufa, is a delicious drink made with tigernuts and water, lightly sweetened, and spiced up with a dash of cinnamon.4 A popular treat along the Mediterranean coast,5 it’s high in calcium, vitamins C and E, completely dairy-free.6 and easy to make with a few simple ingredients. Additionally, tigernut milk, free of added sugars and artificial sweeteners, contains more iron and magnesium than cow’s milk and can be a quick way to get more of these nutrients in your diet.

    Tigernut Flour

    Conventional white wheat flour puts stress on your immune system and can result in chronic inflammation from gluten.7 Fortunately, tigernut flour, a gluten-free flour, can replace wheat flours at a 1:1 ratio in the foods you love to make and eat. It’s one of the flours I recommend in the essential foods to swap for AIP-friendly cooking and it’s featured in many recipes in The Autoimmune Solution Cookbook.

    Because tigernut flour is naturally sweet, you can reduce the amount of honey, maple syrup, or other natural sweeteners in the recipe. On top of all that, tigernut flour has more protein, vitamins, and minerals than wheat flour because its source, the tigernut, is also rich with these healthy components. So it’s great for baking AIP snacks, paleo snacks, and all your baked goods.

    Tigernut Oil

    This byproduct of the allergen-free tuber is a flavorful oil that can be compared to olive oil. As an added bonus, the high levels of oleic acid, a monounsaturated healthy fat, make tigernuts a great addition to your skincare routine as a way to increase skin elasticity and promote a smooth, youthful appearance.8 Compared to the price of some natural skin oils, this is an affordable alternative that can be used to nourish your body inside and out.

    Packed with Nutrients

    Tigernuts are small, however, one serving packs in A LOT of nutrients. They’re not just an allergen-free snack that’s easy to take on the go, they’re also a great energy booster. A 1 oz (30g) serving of about 25 tigernuts contains:9

    • 120 calories
    • 7g of fat (82% of which are unsaturated fats)10
    • 9g of carbohydrates
    • 10g of fiber
    • 2g of protein

    Tigernuts outshine tree nuts such as almonds and cashews as a healthy snack for dieters and wellness enthusiasts in more areas than calorie count. Their nutrient profile holds an impressive percentage of the vitamins and minerals necessary to improve your overall health.

    Fiber

    If you’re not meeting the daily recommendations for dietary fiber, tigernuts could be the food you need. Fiber stimulates your digestion and helps prevent gut-related afflictions such as constipation. Unfortunately, most Americans are not getting enough fiber in their diet.11 a single ounce of tigernuts contains 10 grams of fiber, which is almost 40% of your daily recommended fiber12 (that’s almost as much as my Coconut Joy Fiber Bars!). For those of you who struggle with stubborn weight linked to an underactive thyroid, slower metabolism, or chronic stress-related weight gain, munching on raw tigernuts will keep your blood sugar levels stable, support your digestion, and improve cholesterol levels (in more ways than one!).13

    Vitamins C & E

    The Vitamin C and E present in tigernuts help support your body’s immune response and protect your cells from damage. The 1.8 mg of vitamin C in one serving of tigernuts is used by our bodies to make skin cells, blood vessels, ligaments, and tendons, as well as support your body’s response to wounds.14 Tigernuts are recommended for healthy skin, weight management, and fertility—all because of vitamin E.15,16,17 Vitamin E is also important for eye and skin health due to its antioxidant properties.18 The incredible 3 mg of vitamin E in one serving of tigernuts is about 278% of the daily recommended value.

    Magnesium

    Magnesium plays an important role in supporting digestive, heart, and brain health, and the absorption of nutrients such as calcium and potassium. Inflammation from gluten, soy, yeast, and dairy irritate the digestive tract and result in reduced magnesium absorption and then an even greater need for it. Luckily, 100 grams of tigernuts provides 13-17% of the daily recommended dose of magnesium19 to help you get off this merry-go-round of inflammation and magnesium deficiency.

    Potassium

    Eating 100 grams of tigernuts will provide you with more potassium than 100 grams of banana. Your body needs potassium for proper kidney and heart function, muscle contraction, and nerve transmission.20 Getting ready to head to your next workout and need a quick pick-me-up? Grab a few tigernuts to fuel your body with the nutrients it deserves.

    Amino Acids

    Amino acids are the building blocks used to help the body process food and repair tissue.21 Some of the most abundant amino acids found in tigernuts are Glutamic acid and arginine. These amino acids promote cognitive ability, combat fatigue, and stimulate the immune system. Arginine also boosts the production of nitric oxide to increase blood flow and lower blood pressure.22,23 You can drink tigernut milk to get a concentrated amount of amino acids, including the essential amino acids your body cannot produce on its own.24

    Monounsaturated Fatty Acids (MUFA)

    Tigernuts are a delicious way to include a satisfying, low-calorie, high-fat food in your diet for smart, allergen-free snacking. Monounsaturated fatty acids are a healthy type of fat, and replacing some of the nasty trans fats from processed oils with MUFAs may offer various health benefits.25 In fact, just one ounce of tigernuts has 16 grams of monounsaturated fats and 2 grams of polyunsaturated fats (both are good!).

    So What Are Tigernuts Missing?

    That’s easy. Just two items that I advise everyone to avoid: Gluten and dairy.

    Gluten

    Tigernuts are a gluten-free food that eliminates your risk of an inflammatory response brought on by gluten proteins. Gluten causes your immune system to become overly stressed to the point that it begins attacking your body’s own tissues to try and combat the source of inflammation. This state of chronic inflammation can lead to leaky gut and leave your body open to gastrointestinal distress, seasonal allergies, and autoimmune disease.

    Dairy

    Sometimes I turn over a bag in the store and see that there is “whey,” “whey powder,” or “casein,” on the list of ingredients. These are names for the proteins found in milk and can result in inflammation. The natural process of tigernut harvesting leaves no room for contamination by dairy.

    In fact, tigernuts actually promote a healthy response to the bloating and digestive distress brought on by these inflammatory foods. The tubers contain digestive enzymes such as catalase, lipase and amylase, which help alleviate indigestion and gas.26 It’s hard to believe—a gluten-free and dairy-free food that also combats uncomfortable symptoms associated with constipation, belly bloat, and gut infections such as SIBO and Candida overgrowth.

    They’re Not A Common Allergen

    In many of my articles, I recommend avoiding grains and legumes, tree nuts, and seeds due to their high lectin content, phytates, and phytic acid. Tree nuts are notorious in the world of food allergies and food sensitivities. One in every 13 children has a food allergy27 that could trigger an allergic reaction, leading to inflammation, swelling, and in extreme cases anaphylactic shock.

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    Amy Myers MD by Clare Conway - 1w ago

    Like many of you, I chose to be a mother. It was one of the best decisions of my life and out of all my titles—MD, Medical Director, CEO, New York Times best-selling author— the title “mother” is the one that I cherish and value the most. Also like most of you, I celebrate my mom and the many other women in my family who nurtured me, on the second Sunday of every May. Although most of these women—including my beloved mother—are no longer with me physically, their impact on me is on my mind as I celebrate my third Mother’s Day as a mom.

    In March 2017, my husband Xavier and I traveled to Wisconsin to finalize the adoption of our daughter, Elle. We spent 3 weeks holed up in a hotel room in the freezing cold and snow. It was a crazy time for us Southerners! Finally, the time came to begin our real lives as a family. Xavier drove the 18 hours all the way home on his own, while Elle and I went to the O’Hare airport to fly to Texas.

    I was alone with Elle for the first time. I’m sure many of you also remember this milestone as clearly as the day it happened. I was terrified and excited. Being a doctor doesn’t make you immune to the anxiety that comes with being a mother. I was so frightened that she would get sick in the airport that I had a muslin cover over her baby carrier. However, that made it very difficult to see her. And she was so quiet that I worried she wasn’t breathing.

    I had strapped her into the seat next to mine. Still, I couldn’t hear her at all and I didn’t want to raise the muslin. So while Elle (a great traveler right from the start!) slept through the flight, I sat up in my seat with my hand on her chest, so I could feel her breathing. It may not have been the most comfortable flight I have taken, however, I didn’t care! I was totally in love.

    What I Learned from my “Moms”

    I’ve been fortunate enough to have more than one “Mom” in my life, and they were all incredibly courageous, well-educated women. My mom had two master’s degrees, one of which was in art history. She was also very creative: she was an artist, fashion designer, and an architect. Despite our differences, I’m thankful for all the ways that we are similar—my mom was a force of nature and I like to think I am too!

    My extended family of my great-grandmother, my grandmother, and my aunts all played a significant role in my life. They all lived near my mom and me (my great-grandmother even lived in the same apartment building), and we were all very close. My great-grandmother was really something special. She went to college, had a job, and she was brave enough to get a divorce in the early 1900s. She raised my grandmother, who had a master’s degree in English in the mid-1900s. These were the women I was raised with: strong, nurturing women who valued education and making a difference. They were incredible role models.

    Passing it Forward

    I chose medicine as a profession because caring for people and helping them is a part of my nature. I want to make their lives better. That’s what I want to do for Elle, too. Although I am the CEO and founder of a company that empowers hundreds of thousands of people, and I can’t always spend as much time as I would like with her, I make sure the hours we are together are focused on her alone so that I can help her grow and learn, and become a strong, compassionate young woman when she grows up. I actively make that time to show her how important she is and help her grow into a confident woman. I am trying to parent as my parents taught me, and there are many things I want to share with Elle that my mom shared with me.

    Healthy Living

    My mom and I gardened together. I remember growing sprouts and all kinds of herbs, fruits, and vegetables. For Elle’s second birthday, I gave her an herb garden kit, watering can and gardening tools. I like to think that this will help her appreciate the good foods that help our bodies grow and thrive. I think it’s working too! Elle eats exactly what Xavier and I eat. It’s great to see her eating vegetables, wild-caught salmon, grass-fed beef, pasture-raised chicken and eggs, and berries, fruit, and coconut yogurt. On her 2nd birthday, I offered her one of her homemade gluten-free and dairy-free cupcakes however she claimed she did not like and didn’t eat it.

    Elle helps me in the kitchen, which reminds me of how I would help my mom make homemade bread and yogurt when I was a child. I love that I’m able to share the experience of cooking and baking with Elle as well. Being in the kitchen, and loving healthy food, and making smoothies together—these are things I want Elle to remember when she grows up.

    Learning

    I also want to encourage her love of books. Elle loves to read! My mom and dad read to me every night, and nothing makes me smile more than seeing Elle with all of her books. She has so many! She just carries them around, and then we’ll read them together. Our nighttime routine is taking a bath, brushing our teeth, and reading three books. Reading was really big in my family, and I’m glad that’s something Elle can be excited about.

    Travel & Dreaming Big

    I believe this a big part of her day-to-day upbringing. We’ve been able to travel and see the beautiful world around us. Elle has been to New Zealand and Australia and seen all kinds of animals in the wild. She’s just beginning to understand that there are differences from one place to another. My aim is to create a strong, independent young woman by exposing her to the world at large and letting her see all the amazing places she can go.

    Girl Time

    We didn’t have a lot of money growing up, so my mom and I were not able to do some of the fun “girly-girl” things that moms and daughters often do. I’m really looking forward to spending time with Elle at the spa or going shopping together. These might sound a little cliché, but I believe they become important memories for mothers and daughters. I can imagine that if my mom were still here, she’d want to be with Elle and me, getting our nails done, and celebrating the amazing women we’ve become.

    With Thanks and Gratitude

    So much has happened in my life, and a lot has changed since I became a mother. I’m looking forward to all the years of motherhood to come. Right now, I’m happy to have this time with Elle and do all that I can to set a good example for her. This special day really makes me stop and think about all the moms in the world. It’s so much more than biology—it’s all the women who care for their families, for other people’s children, for each other, and for our world.

    I’m wishing a fabulous day to all of you who care for others, and sending gratitude to all our mothers near and far, present and departed. Where would we be without our wonderful moms and mom-figures?

    Happy Mother’s Day!

    The post Dr. Myers On Being A Mom appeared first on Amy Myers MD.

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    Amy Myers MD by Clare Conway - 2w ago

    It’s the time of year for the refreshing and delightful dishes that make the season spring to life! The next time you host a healthy brunch, put this Shaved Radish Cucumber Salad on display. The vibrant color and crisp flavor will lighten up the whole table.

    Radishes and cucumbers don’t have to be a garnish in the salad bowl. They have a ton of health benefits from improving digestion, to promoting weight loss. Both of the bright vegetables contain fiber and cucumber’s high water content work to hydrate your body and your digestive tract.

    Don’t forget the olive oil! You won’t want to miss out on the addition of this incredibly flavorful, healthy fat. Throw these refreshing vegetables together with my oil-based dressing in this Shaved Radish Cucumber Salad for a beautiful, nutritious dish.

    Shaved Radish Cucumber Salad
    Ingredients
    • 1 English cucumber
    • 2 bunches radishes
    • 1/2 red onion
    • 1/2 cup olive oil
    • 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
    • 1 Tbls frsh thyme
    • 1 tsp sea salt
    • 1 tsp ground black pepper

    Servings:

    Units: MetricUS Imperial

    Instructions
    1. Slice cucumber, radish, and onion very finely with a knife or a mandoline. Combine together in a bowl.
    2. In a separate bowl, whisk together olive oil, vinegar, thyme, salt, and pepper. Pour over vegetables and toss. To coats.
    3. Place in refrigerator to chill for 30 minutes to an hour.

    The post Shaved Radish Cucumber Salad appeared first on Amy Myers MD.

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    If you’ve read my books or my blog, participated in a webinar, watched a live event, or listened to one of my podcasts, you’re probably familiar with these words: conventional medicine failed me and it is my mission to not have it fail you too. It truly is my mission to help you avoid the pitfalls of conventional medicine and help you take control of your health. I have a vision of creating a clear path to optimal health and wellness, something that is better than what we all know through conventional physicians and medications.

    The Beginning Paraguay: 1996, Louis

    This vision first started in 1996 during the time I was a Peace Corps Volunteer in rural Paraguay. A little boy covered with pustules and with a fever of 105˚ lay on a bed, breathing shallowly. His name was Louis. No one seemed to care about how sick he was. After hours of searching for help, I finally managed to get him to a hospital two hours away by tractor for the treatment that saved his life. Later I realized it wasn’t that no one cared—it was just that the death of a sick child was a normal part of life for them.

    I knew there had to be a better way! I would become a doctor.

    Bay Saint Louis: 1999, Betty

    A few years later, in 1999, my mother, Betty, was having severe back pain. Her doctor wasn’t running a lot of tests because my mom didn’t have much money or health insurance. Finally, we found out she had metastatic pancreatic cancer. Four months to the day that she was diagnosed, I held my mother’s hand as she took her last breath. My mother, much to my dismay, had opted for conventional treatment. I’m convinced to this day that the conventional treatment killed her much quicker than if she had done nothing at all.

    I knew there had to be a better way! I would become a researcher.

    Instead of sitting at home wallowing in my sorrows, I became a researcher and studied Noni juice, a natural angiogenesis inhibitor for which I hold a US patent.

    Learning to Heal New Orleans: 2002, Amy

    In my second year of medical school, I started to experience weight loss, anxiety, and insomnia. I was eventually diagnosed with Graves’ disease, an autoimmune condition of the thyroid. Conventional medicine’s solution was to ablate or kill, my thyroid with radioactive iodine. It’s the biggest regret of my life.

    I knew there had to be a better way! I would prevent others from going through what I did.

    Baltimore: 2005, Jessica

    It was the first year of my emergency medicine residency program. While on my ICU rotation, I had a patient named Jessica. She was in her twenties, was newly engaged, and had rheumatoid arthritis. She was also in liver failure from an immunosuppressant drug called Remicade. If she didn’t get a new liver, she was going to die. I stayed up all night checking her labs and updating her family. In the final hours just before her liver completely failed, the transplant team found her a liver. Jessica, who was in the prime of her life, should never have gotten to this point.

    I knew there had to be a better way. I had to get back to my Why.

    New York: 2009

    I went to a conference in New York and heard a physician speak for the first time about functional medicine. Functional medicine looks to find the root causes of disease and reverse, rather than treating symptoms with pills.

    I found a better way!

    I took all the courses that The Institute for Functional Medicine had to offer. In 2010, I left the ER and opened my own functional medicine clinic, Austin UltraHealth. I developed The Myers Way®; a functional medicine approach that focuses on the individual, finding the root cause for their illness, and treating more than just the symptoms. Patients came to me from all over the world.

    The First Successes

    I’d like to share with you the stories of a few of those patients, whom I discuss in greater detail in my New York Times bestseller, The Autoimmune Solution.

    Jennifer was one of my first patients who was really, really complex. At one point, she had been in a wheelchair; she had something called polymyositis. She was on three immunosuppressive drugs, and they weren’t working for her.

    After working with Jennifer for several months, I was able to help get her off all of her medications and all of her lab tests returned to normal. She has been symptom-free, medication free, and living an optimal and happy life since then. I was able to help give Jennifer her life back.

    Susan came to my clinic with transverse myelitis, a condition similar to MS. She had two grandchildren who lived in California. She was in so much pain, she couldn’t even play with them.

    Susan had a cream that she found worked really well for her, but her body would eventually become immune to it. Despite a sharp-shooting nerve pain, she went two days each week without using the cream in order to curb the immunity. These two days were incredibly painful. She couldn’t even sleep; she was so miserable because she was in so much pain.

    Just after her third visit, she called me from California. I could hear her grandkids in the background; she was with them on the playground. She had called to tell me she didn’t even need her cream anymore. She was able to get back to playing with her grandchildren after working with me through only three visits.

    And then there’s James—my dad. He told me that I saved his life. He too had polymyositis, and for a long time, he didn’t want to listen to me or use a functional medicine approach. Eventually, he had to go in for surgery. He was on three immunosuppressive drugs just like Jennifer, which he had to stop taking in preparation for his operation.

    I said, “Well, why don’t you just give The Myers Way® a try? You have 30 days before your surgery,” and he did. After his surgery, he was able to stay off all of his medications for two years until he had a flare. Within six months of that flare, he passed from pneumonia as a complication of the drugs he was given.

    There is a better way, and it’s the Myers Way®.

    A Wider World

    I set out to help Louis, Jennifer, Jessica, Susan, myself, my mom and my dad, and the millions of others in the world. In 2015, my clinic was growing, and I formed amymyersmd.com with just a few people on staff. In 2017, we launched our first program, The Autoimmune Solution Program. It was a huge hit! That same year, however, my father passed away, and my husband and I adopted our daughter, Elle. So much was happening. After thinking long and hard about how many people I could reach by seeing patients individually, and how many more people I could help through my company, I made the tough decision to close the clinic.

    The company has grown exponentially since then and I believe it’s because everyone here focuses on our core values:

    SERVE: We go above and beyond to be of service.

    EFFECT: We actively look for a way to make a positive impact.

    EMPOWER: We empower people and deliver quality results.

    This is our mission: We empower people to take back their health by providing them with the tools to understand the root cause of their symptoms, and a solution to live by.

    Our vision is: To inspire a healthier, more informed world, where chronic illness is a thing of the past, and our tools are used by millions around the world to achieve optimal health.

    Remember, conventional medicine failed me and it is my mission to not have it fail you too. You can take control of your health and your life!

    The post Conventional Medicine Failed Me and it is My Mission to Not Have it Fail You Too appeared first on Amy Myers MD.

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    Crepes are a versatile breakfast or dessert available at restaurants, farmer’s markets, and food trucks everywhere! For those of you following The Myer’s Way®, that doesn’t make them easy to get your hands on. Luckily you can still enjoy these Crepes with Coconut Cream and Berry Compote without straying from any gluten-free protocol.

    A basic crepe recipe uses flour, water, and salt, while more popular variations include eggs, sugar, milk, and butter too. That’s a lot of inflammatory foods in one thin pancake! My Crepes with Coconut Cream and Berry Compote use cassava flour, coconut milk, vanilla, and coconut oil. These ingredients are all great foods to optimize your diet and provide you with a sweet treat. I’ve also used the best egg-replacement around with The Myers Way® Gelatin. Your crepe won’t give you any trouble with rips and tears.

    My go-to fruit is used to make a simple, AIP berry compote. Choose your favorite berry for this or create a mixed-berry compote. Now, the icing on top of the crepe so to speak is the coconut cream.

    I love this recipe because it’s so fun and simple. You can pour a cup of Dandy Tea, and bring a little AIP crepe cafe into your home.

    Crepes with Coconut Cream and Berry Compote
    Ingredients
    • Topping
    • 2 cups berries of choice (i.e. strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, etc.)
    • 2 Tbls water
    • 1 tsp lemon zest
    • 4 Tbls coconut cream
    • 1 tsp honey
    • Crepes
    • 1 cup cassava flour
    • 1/4 cup tapioca starch
    • 1 1/2 - 2 cups coconut milk
    • 1/2 tsp aluminum-free baking soda
    • pinch of cinnamon
    • 1 scoop The Myers Way® Gelatin
    • 1 tsp vanilla extract
    • 1 Tbls coconut oil plus additional for pan

    Servings: people

    Units: MetricUS Imperial

    Instructions
      Topping
      1. In a saucepan, add berries, water, and lemon zest. Bring mixture to boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to low and muddle berries with a spoon. Continue to cook over low heat for 5-10 minutes until mixture is slightly thickened. Remove from heat.
      2. Combine coconut cream and honey in a small bowl. Set aside.
      Crepes
      1. For crepes, place all ingredients in the bowl of a blender. Blend until fully combined. If the batter needs to be thinned, add additional coconut milk.
      2. Heat a large frying pan over medium-low heat. Add 1/2 tablespoon of coconut oil to the pan.
      3. Spoon out about 1/4 cup of batter onto the pan and swirl around pan to make a thin layer. Cook for about 4 minutes until the cooked side is slightly browned. Flip and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Remove and set aside.
      4. Repeat with oil and batter.
      5. Fold or roll each crepe into desired shape. Top with berry compote and coconut cream and serve.

      The post Crepes with Coconut Cream and Berry Compote appeared first on Amy Myers MD.

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      Omega-3s. You’ve probably heard of them. However, do you know why they are so important and so different from any other type of fat? Let me clue you in: It’s because unlike most fats, which your body can make from other fats or from raw materials, your body can’t make Omega-3 fatty acids on its own. The only way to get them is to eat them. Food really is medicine!

      So what? Well, getting enough of them is critical because they’re important to every single one of your cells. They’re involved in the formation of cell membranes throughout your body, and serve a lot of other important functions too. Let’s hit the highlights of their benefits, and then we’ll talk about the best sources of these essential fatty acids.

      Benefits of Omega-3s

      Thyroid Function

      I discuss the many benefits of Omega-3s on your thyroid in this article, however, it bears repeating: Omega-3s are critical to a healthy thyroid. And that matters because your thyroid gland not only produces the hormones that regulate your metabolism, it also plays an important role in heart health and digestion.

      Inflammatory Response

      This is a big one. Autoimmune diseases are a result of an inflammatory response in which your body attacks itself. In addition to creating healthy cell membranes, Omega-3s help you create prostaglandins all over your body. These lipids, or fats, are very similar to hormones. They are made at the site of tissue damage to help you deal with injury and illness. Without the appropriate levels of Omega-3s to create prostaglandins, your body’s inflammatory response cannot be properly modulated.

      Your Gut and Immune System Health

      Did you know your gut wall is only one cell layer thick? The health of that wall is critical to your overall health because about 80% of your immune system is housed in your gut. You not only want your immune system to stay put, you also want to prevent your gut wall cells from pulling apart, and allowing food particles and bacteria into your bloodstream in a condition called leaky gut. As key components of your cell linings, Omega-3s help you keep everything where it should be for optimal gut and immune system health.

      Blood Clotting

      Believe it or not, some blood clots are good! When a blood vessel is injured, the prostaglandins that Omega-3s help you produce create blood clots to seal off the damaged area. Just as importantly, they also stand guard to reduce blood clotting as you heal, and to take away clots that are no longer needed.

      Heart Health

      A flexible, strong blood vessel is a healthy blood vessel, and healthy blood vessels enable your heart to move blood around your body efficiently. We touched before on Omega-3s impact on your body’s inflammatory response (and that includes blood vessels), and their role in managing the blood clotting process. They are also thought to help support a healthy heart rhythm.

      Mood

      Recent studies have shown that just 1 gram a day of Omega-3s can be a mood lifter. To put that into perspective, that’s roughly the equivalent of eating three salmon meals per week. How does it work? Researchers are still studying this, however, they believe it’s linked to improving the body’s inflammatory response. Interestingly, one of the reasons that researchers even thought to study this is because cultures that tend to eat a lot of fish report a lower incidence of mood disorders.1

      Eye Health

      Once again, researchers turned to populations that eat a lot of oily fish. They found that people who ate the types of fish that are packed with Omega-3s at least once a week were less likely than those who don’t to develop something called “wet” macular degeneration. This is a condition in which vessels leak blood or fluid into the eye.2 Omega-3s also impact dry eyes. Women are more prone to dry eyes than men. Women who ate tuna at least twice per week were significantly less likely to experience eye dryness than women who ate tuna only once per week, or not at all.3

      Sleep

      If you are concerned about getting a good night’s sleep, then you’ll want to know this: Omega-3 consumption has been linked to improved sleep. One of the most interesting things about this is that the improvements seem to cross all ages. That is, Omega-3s support a good night’s sleep for adults and children alike. And these groups have very different sleep patterns and issues.4 Here, too, researchers suspect cell membrane health may be involved.5

      Pregnancy and Nursing

      We all know nutrition plays a vital role in pregnancy and childbirth. Not only are Omega-3s used by your body to help produce breast milk after your baby is born, they’re thought to play a vital part in determining the length of gestation and in preventing perinatal mood imbalances.6 Even more importantly, Omega-3s also give rise to DHA, which is needed for the development of the human brain7 before and after birth.

      Bone Health

      Omega-3s are good news for your bones as well! That same DHA that we just talked about in terms of infant development continues to be important throughout your life. It affects the calcium balance in your body8 and impacts membrane function. It also plays a role in bone strength.9

      Sources of Omega-3s Food

      If you’ve read this far, you’ve probably figured out that oily fish such as tuna, salmon, mackerel, Atlantic herring, mussels, anchovies, swordfish, and Alaskan pollock all contain Omega-3s. Many people think that only ocean fish contain this essential fatty acid. However, you may be surprised to learn that trout is an excellent source as well. In fact, it, and the smaller fish like anchovies, herring, and mackerel, are among the best natural sources for pregnant and breastfeeding mothers.

      That’s because the larger fish, including tuna and swordfish, eat the smaller fishes. So while those big fish have higher concentrations of Omega-3s, they also have higher levels of heavy metals such as mercury in their flesh.10 For the best, cleanest, wild seafood, I order from Vital Choice (use the coupon code AMYMYERS for 10% off.) We’ve been shown time again that fish is one of the best foods for your heart, so finding healthy sources is a great thing you can do for yourself and your family.

      You can also get Omega-3s from plants. Some of the best plant sources are chia seeds, flax seeds,11 walnuts, and their oils, as well as pumpkin seeds, and hemp seeds.12 However, plants are actually sources of something called alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) which your body must convert to Omega-3s in your liver. This isn’t a very efficient process so it’s best not to rely on plant sources exclusively.

      Fish Oil Supplements

      Even though my family eats a lot of fish (often salmon fillets as in this delicious baked salmon recipe), my husband Xavier, our daughter Elle, and I all take a fish oil supplement every day. It’s the best way to ensure I’m getting the right amount of Omega-3s because the content in fish depends on what the fish ate.

      The Complete Omega Softgels in my store are specially formulated by me to be a high-potency, emulsified fish oil with advanced bioavailability. My fish oil is non-GMO, antibiotic-free, and certified sustainable from the pristine Scandinavian arctic waters which I believe are the very best sources of fish oil.

      I designed these Softgels with 1000mg of EPA/DHA in every capsule for even greater potency than before, and they don’t have any fishy aftertaste. EPA/DHA are the main beneficial components of Omega-3. No other fish oil capsule on the planet can claim to be higher quality than this Nordic fish oil softgel.

      The one thing I didn’t change is my patented lipid absorption technology that allows for a three times greater EPA/DHA absorption rate than an equivalent dose of any other leading fish oil. My Omega-3 softgels are absorption-ready and directly assimilated in the intestinal tract for maximum benefit. This makes it a fantastic choice for anyone with digestive, gallbladder, or pancreatic challenges.

      Whether you’re a fish fan or not, don’t skip getting your Omega-3s! They’re critical to every cell in your body and promote your optimal health overall. To make it easy for you, my Complete Omega Softgels are 15% off this week. Give them a try!

      The post The Top 10 Health Benefits of Omega-3s appeared first on Amy Myers MD.

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      Amy Myers MD by Clare Conway - 1M ago

      For those of us raised on a low-fat diet, it may have taken a while to understand that there are different kinds of fats, and they are truly good for us! We know fats are critical for brain development and cell growth, and we’re aware that some fats lower bad cholesterol and offer protection from coronary artery disease and other cardiovascular issues. But what about their impact on other body systems? You may be surprised to learn that your thyroid benefits from the right kinds of fats, too.

      Your thyroid is a 2-inch-long, butterfly-shaped gland that sits at the base of your neck. It’s the “mastermind” of your metabolism and a key component of your cardiac and digestive function, muscle control, brain development, and even your mood through the production of the T3 and T4 hormones. Let me walk you through the different types of fats, and then I can explain how this relates to your thyroid.

      Good Fats vs. Bad Fats

      For the most part, fats can be divided into two kinds: saturated and unsaturated fats. Saturated fats come mainly from animal sources such as red meat, poultry, and full-fat dairy products. Some data suggests that when consumed in excess, they can drive up total cholesterol, particularly the more harmful LDL cholesterol, which can prompt blockages to form in arteries in the heart. However, a recent meta-analysis of 21 studies said that there was not enough evidence to conclude that saturated fat increases the risk of heart disease.1

      On the other hand, unsaturated fats—polyunsaturated fats and monounsaturated fats—can help lower LDL cholesterol levels and reduce your risk of heart disease. Omega-3s are one type of polyunsaturated fat and are called an “essential” fatty acid. The human body can’t make these, so we have to obtain them through our diet. Omega-3s are further broken down into three major essential fatty acids. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is found in plants. Two other types, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are found in fish and are most readily used by your body.

      There are lots of reasons why fatty acids are important to our health. First, they’re the main components of the cell membranes. They’re also used in the production of prostaglandins, which are similar to hormones. Prostaglandins are involved in cell growth, vascular health, and in regulating a healthy inflammatory response.

      This healthy response to inflammation is the key. The root cause of many chronic illnesses is inflammation.2 Chronic inflammation has been linked to autoimmunity, gut issues, cancer, cardiovascular issues, depression, pain, swelling, and more. The toxins that surround us in our modern world, our sedentary lifestyles, and the processed, chemical-laden foods in our Western diet contribute to inflammation. Thyroid dysfunction is rooted in chronic inflammation.

      Thyroid Disorders

      Many conventional doctors often attribute the signs of thyroid dysfunction to aging, depression, or stress. And even when properly diagnosed, the treatment is often harsh drugs or even the removal or destruction of the gland. To learn more about your thyroid and how getting it to a healthy state through natural methods will help you lose weight, think more clearly, and have more energy, check out my book The Thyroid Connection. For now, let’s take a quick look at the two main types of dysfunction.

      Hypothyroidism occurs when your body doesn’t make enough thyroid hormone. It slows down your metabolism, causes low body temperature, makes you gain weight, feel sluggish, have poor concentration, low libido, and can even cause depression. In severe cases, you may experience Hashimoto’s disease.3

      Hypothyroidism Symptoms:

      • Fatigue
      • Weakness
      • Cold intolerance
      • Muscle aches/cramps
      • Constipation
      • Weight gain/difficulty losing weight
      • Poor appetite
      • Goiter (enlarged thyroid gland)

      On the other hand, hyperthyroidism is an overproduction of thyroid hormones and symptoms including irritability, weight loss, a racing heart, anxiety, insomnia, loose stools, and general body weakness. If this situation prolongs, it could turn into Grave’s disease.4 This is the condition I had.

      Hyperthyroidism Symptoms:

      • Appetite change (increase or decrease)
      • Difficulty sleeping
      • Fatigue
      • Frequent bowel movements/diarrhea
      • Heart palpitations
      • Heat intolerance
      • Increased sweating
      • Irritability
      What Omega-3s Can Do

      A recent study has shown that EPA and DHA, two of the fatty acids found in Omega-3s, give rise to metabolic by-products (and remember, your thyroid controls your metabolism) called resolvins. Resolvins can not only reduce inflammation but also stop it from occurring. These substances impact inflammatory cell function in four ways:

        • They influence complex lipid, lipoprotein, metabolite, and hormone concentrations that in turn act on inflammation.
        • They act directly on inflammatory cells via surface or intracellular “fatty acid receptors.”
        • They can combine chemically with oxygen on the cellular level to form new substances that affect inflammatory cells.
        • They assist in the regulation of many cell and tissue responses, including aspects of inflammation and immunity by physically altering membranes and by affecting cell signal pathways.5

      That’s a lot of information, I know! The message here is that these substances don’t just affect your inflammatory response in a single way, they do it in many.

      To recap, fatty acids are a necessary component of all cells, including those of the thyroid gland. They also relate to thyroid health in that a deficiency (and up to 90% of Americans are deficient in Omega-3s!)6 will usually result in inflammation. That inflammation can continue triggering the autoimmune response, which in turn will cause the release of thyroid antibodies. Finally, your thyroid controls your metabolism and resolvins (those helpful inflammation fighters!) are metabolic by-products, so their creation is related to your thyroid.

      Where to Get Omega-3 Fatty Acids

      There are lots of ways to get your Omega-3s. Plant options include flax seeds, chia seeds, walnuts, canola oil, and wild rice. A lot of these plant sources are not only high in Omega-3s, they also contain vitamins, minerals, and dietary fibers in addition to magnesium, and calcium. However, your liver must convert plant sources of Omega-3s (ALA) into EPA and DHA and the conversion rate varies from 8% to 21%, with women having a better conversion rate due to the presence of estrogen.7

      The Omega-3s found in fish are the most readily available for our bodies, however, the amount in fish varies widely because it depends on the food that the fish consume, and unfortunately, a lot of seafood contains heavy metal toxins;8 including mercury. Eat fish lower in mercury such as the cold water fatty fish including salmon, anchovies, herring, shad, sardines, Pacific oysters, trout, and Atlantic and Pacific mackerel. Less fatty fish such as bass, tilapia, and cod, contain Omega-3s, but at lower levels. Omega-3s from fish have been linked to reducing inflammation, blood pressure, arrhythmia, and embolism. I buy my fish from Vital Choice for seafood that is free of hazardous levels of mercury.

      Omega-3 Supplements

      Studies show most Americans do not get the recommended levels of Omega-3 fats9 of 1.6 grams for men and 1.1 grams for women.10 As much as I encourage you to eat a healthy diet, in the case of Omega-3s it’s important to take a supplement, too. It’s very difficult to get the health benefits from diet alone and the best food sources may be contaminated with heavy metals. If you have an MTHFR mutation as I do, you have a hard time flushing out toxins and heavy metals such as mercury, so clean sources of Omega-3s, such as those found in supplements, are especially important.

      I recommend my Complete Omega-3 Softgels. The Omega-3 fatty acids in these softgels can be directly assimilated by your small intestine for maximum absorption at a rate that’s three times greater than other leading fish oils because of the patented lipid absorption technology. It features IFOS five-star certified monoglyceride fish oil to ensure the world’s highest standards for purity, potency, and freshness and is third-party tested to ensure it’s mercury and arsenic free. The fish oil it contains is non-GMO, certified sustainable from pristine arctic Scandinavian waters, and antibiotic-free. Just like a high-quality multivitamin, fish oil should be a part of nearly everyone’s daily regimen.

      The post Omega-3s and Your Thyroid appeared first on Amy Myers MD.

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      Amy Myers MD by Clare Conway - 1M ago

      During spring and summer, there are a lot of carnivals, summer parties, and picnics. With them comes the tantalizing smells of the sweet summer treats: Kettle Korn, caramel apples, and salted caramels everywhere! There are also fancy iced-coffee drinks with these tempting flavors. However, most of these sweets and their drink variations don’t have a place in a healthy diet. This AIP Salted Caramel Frappuccino is the answer to your summer sweet dilemma.

      My Salted Caramel Paleo Protein is a limited edition product that smells and tastes amazing! The flavor is out of this world and it’s packed with 21 grams of protein. You’ll be getting a tasty summer drink, and the fuel to keep your body moving throughout the day.

      On top of the protein in this recipe, the full-fat coconut milk will help keep you full. Coconut milk also lends a creamy texture to this decadent, AIP Salted Caramel Frappuccino. Top your blended carnival in a cup with a dollop of delicious coconut whipped cream, and you’ll be set for summer!

      Salted Caramel Frappuccino
      Ingredients

      Servings:

      Units: MetricUS Imperial

      Instructions
      1. Combine all ingredients except coconut cream in a high-speed blender. Blend until combined.
      2. For a thinner consistency, add more coconut milk as needed.
      3. Pour into a glass and top with coconut cream.

      The post Salted Caramel Frappuccino appeared first on Amy Myers MD.

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