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Whether you are a first-time attendee or someone who regularly attends the American Library Association’s Annual Conference, we are confident you will find a session or two centered on Intellectual Freedom to round out your conference experience. Here are a few of our picks:

Intellectual Freedom 101 is offered Friday June 21st at 2:30 PM at the Marriott Marquis, Georgetown University and promises to be a great introduction to the intellectual freedom activities of ALA and affiliated organizations. Start here if you’d like to learn how you can get involved or if you are a first-time attendee as part of an orientation to ALA’s important work.

Don’t miss Pitfalls of Neutrality: What Does Inclusivity Mean in Libraries on Saturday June 22nd at 9:00 AM in the Washington Convention Center. A diverse group of speakers will share how they have handled challenges ranging from collections, displays, and programming to restrooms and building accessibility. Attendees are encouraged to bring questions so the collective brain can offer strategies to consider when addressing issues in their own libraries. Rookie and veteran attendees alike will benefit from this session as it draws upon the speakers’ personal experiences in a program designed for discussion.

Start your Sunday morning off with Censorship Beyond Books on June 23rd at 10:30 AM at the Washington Convention Center. This session is brought to you by a trio of panelists who have all faced challenges to non-book resources. Tools and resources for surviving similar experiences will be shared and discussion will help attendees gain experience in dealing with these types of issues in their libraries. New librarians will want to check this program out for advice in preparing for challenges of this nature and seasoned librarians will want to attend to learn how facing such a challenge changes your approach to your career.

Next, hustle over to PLA Legal Issues in Public Libraries Forum on Sunday June 23rd at 11:30 AM at the Marriott Marquis. Legal issues common in public libraries ranging from patron privacy and patron behavior to copyright and licensing as well as other liability issues will be covered. This new conference resource aims to serve as an informational session and a neutral space in which issues that may be facing your libraries can be vetted.

Take a lunch break, browse the exhibit hall, but make your last session of the day Are You Going to Tell My Parents?: The Minor’s Right to Privacy in the Library at 4:00 PM in the Washington Convention Center. A minor’s right to privacy and confidentiality can be difficult for school and public librarians to navigate, but this session offers a panel of experts who will explore state and federal laws that impact minors’ privacy. Different approaches and procedures will be presented and privacy resources will be provided for attendees to use in their libraries. Any librarians working with youth might want to consider attending this session as the resources shared would be of great value in their toolkits.

Monday June 24th at 9:00 AM in the Washington Convention Center plan to attend Controversial Speaker Planned for Your Library Event? Things to Consider which features a panel of disinvited authors, public relations experts, and librarians who’ve confronted this issue. The many perspectives represented in this program should aide attendees in developing program policies for their libraries, which makes this a great pick for administrators and library managers.

Whether you make it to one or all of these sessions, we hope you have a wonderful experience, feel equal parts inspired and informed, and keep the conversations going in your home libraries!

Appreciative Audience

___________________________________________________________________________________________

Samantha Lumetta, a member of the ALSC Intellectual Freedom Committee, is a Children’s Librarian in the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Ohio.

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The post Top Picks for Intellectual Freedom Sessions @ ALA Annual appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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STEM Teaching and Learning Begins with Preschoolers!

So, I was explaining STEM to my dad, a retired physicist.  He’s skeptical by nature as any good scientist should be.  When I got to the part about teaching it to preschoolers, well, let’s just say I was bombarded by particles.

But hear me out – it really DOES start with preschoolers!  And I can prove it!

Penny Bauder, environmental scientist, teacher and mom of two, points out that “It is never too early to start STEM education, and an ideal way to teach STEM is to go out into nature!”

Boston Children’s Museum, too, points out that children have a natural curiosity.  STEM is a great way to help 3-5 year-olds to focus and refine their naturally inquisitive behaviors.

Linking it up to Summer Reading 2019!

Even a pre-schooler can be a NASA citizen scientist!  Download and install the GLOBE Observer app and start measuring tree heights everywhere!  What does this have to do with anything, Jonathan, you might ask.  Well!  It helps show how carbon moves through ecosystems, and adds to NASA’s databanks all about earth’s cloud and land cover – even mosquito habitats!  Watch the video for more details!

Big kids and librarians alike will get the satisfaction of knowing that the data they send in could also help scientists working on other missions, including the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2), which uses a laser to measure the height of Earth’s surface below.

For out littlest, we can utilize this information to help them understand that more trees = more shade = less global warming.

Cross-Contextual Learning

Cross-contextual learning is a fancy way of saying, use multimedia and different learning experiences (inside and outside the library) to enrich your children’s STEM programming.  Penny Bauder points out that children’s programming like Wild Kratts or SciGirls reinforce the love of investigation with positive examples from media.  I gotta be honest here, I knew all about Wild Kratts, but SciGirls was new to me – can’t wait to introduce the show to my little one!

SciGirls Connect has a whole resources section dedicated to Earth and Space!  You can adapt just about any of the activities listed there for any age group.

Focus on what?

When going through the scientific process with our smallest library patrons, we need to encourage their interest.  To do this we have to do what?  That’s right!  Asking what? based questions as opposed to why, how, etc.  All of the research points to this.  And here’s a handy how-to what:

Hold My Chalk

So, we can link this to summer reading by keeping it simple or making it complex.  Here’s an example of a super simple, just hold my chalk, activity:

Resources

As always, here’s some great resources for you to pillage!

Boston Children’s Museum has:

STEM Guidebook PDF
English | Spanish

Parent Tip Sheets
Engineering PDF English | Spanish
Hearing PDF English | Spanish
Math PDF English | Spanish
Science PDF English | Spanish
Seeing PDF English | Spanish
Smelling PDF English | Spanish
Technology PDF English | Spanish
Touching PDF English | Spanish

STEM Activities
Science: Air Wind
Science: Shadow Play
Science: Bubbles
Technology: Magnets
Technology: Magnifying Magic
Technology: Shape Up
Engineering: Paper Bridge
Engineering: Towers
Engineering: Recycle Art
Math: Color Shape
Math: Fishbowl
Math: Picnic

STEM Family Workbook
Family Activities Workbook

STEM Scientist Workbook
I am a Scientist Workbook

Science Process Skills Worksheet

The post STEM Teaching Begins with Preschoolers! appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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(Image by Thinkstockphotos.com)

It may be tempting to focus on partnerships with the school system just during the traditional school year; however, planning partnerships year round can help ensure planning is collaborative and programs are maximized. For Cumberland County Public Library and Information Center in North Carolina, we have several projects in the planning stages that will serve as opportunities for collaboration between the school system and the public library during the next year.

Cumberland County Coding Camps

Cumberland County Public Library & Information Center partnered with Cumberland County Schools and Workforce Development Board to provide free coding camps to underserved youth in the community to strengthen skills in digital literacy. These week long summer day camps are housed in low income neighborhoods in community recreation centers. Participants gain skills through daily coding sessions on topics of interest to them. Youth gain insight from area speakers sharing details of their military and technology careers and visit Fayetteville Technical Community College and Fayetteville State University during field trips focused on possible career paths. Public library staff share information regarding library programs focused on digital literacy skills such as summer reading and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) resources available through the public library. Youth receive a free book after participating in the coding camp, provided by the Friends of the Library.

2020 Storytelling Festival

The public library has applied for grant funds from the Arts Council of Fayetteville/Cumberland County to provide a storytelling festival with support from the school system. The 2020 Storytelling Festival theme, “Create Your Own Story,” connects to themes of diversity and inclusion. Various authors and illustrators will share their process creating books. The library will host a writing contest for students, and winners of the workshop will have an opportunity to meet an author. Library staff commit to providing individual Storytelling Festival programs emphasizing creativity and diversity at all eight locations of the public library. This project increases the opportunity for cultural arts experiences by providing the only free Storytelling Festival in the community and provides programs at various locations throughout Cumberland County. School staffers have agreed to promote the student writing contest to their classes as well.

The Arts Council of Fayetteville/Cumberland County serves more than 300,000 residents of Fayetteville and Cumberland County. For more than 40 years, the Arts Council has ensured growth in our children’s education, our community’s cultural identity and our economic progress. The Arts Council’s grants, programs and services are funded in part by contributions from businesses and individuals and through grants from the City of Fayetteville, Cumberland County and the North Carolina Arts Council, with funding from the North Carolina Arts Council, an agency of the Department of Cultural Resources.

(Image by Thinkstockphotos.com)

These are just two of the programs we have in the works for this next fiscal year that will involve exciting partnerships with the school system. Sharing ideas often leads to natural collaboration – what plans do you have in the 2019-2020 school year to partner with your school system? Please share in the comments below!

The post No Summer Break When Planning School Partnerships appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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ALA Annual Conference is just around the corner –  June 20-25th 2019 in Washington, DC! Thousands of library professionals, publishers, book creators, and more will be headed to our nation’s capital to learn, celebrate, and explore with other colleagues in libraryland. There will be a variety of amazing opportunities for ALSC members to attend professional development workshops and network with each other. There have been several ALSC blog posts with suggestions on places to eat, visit, and a call from our ALSC Blog Editor, Mary Voors for volunteer bloggers during conference.

However, I want to highlight a few meetings and events within ALSC and beyond that you might want to consider if you plan to attend ALA Annual. Your ALSC Board of Directors will also be hard at work in our multiple board meetings, considering various items to move our Association strategically forward. I’ll emphasize a few of those later in this post as well.

ALSC @ 2019 ALA Annual in Washington DC  & Other Events of Interest at Conference

  • Friends of ALSC Reception. If you have free time on Saturday of Annual, consider pre-registering for the ALSC Member Reception hosted by the ALSC Membership Committee and funded by Friends of ALSC. This is a great opportunity to network with other children’s library, literature, and literacy enthusiasts.
  • ALSC Membership Meeting. The ALSC Membership Meeting will be held on Monday of Annual and provides updates on ALSC initiatives, honors our Distinguished Service awardee Maria B. Salvadore, and presents an opportunity to learn more about forthcoming bystander intervention training offered by ALA as well as how ALSC members can be EDI advocates within children’s library services and our Association.

 

  • ALSC Goodness Abounds at ALA Annual. There are a many more ALSC sponsored and co-sponsored events at Annual. For a full listing ALSC events @ conference click here.
  • Coretta Scott King Awards Turn 50. There are a number of activities at Annual celebrating the 50thAnniversary of the Coretta Scott King Awards. From a gala and a social to programs featuring strategies for connecting communities with these amazing titles, there is something for everyone! More information about these events are available here.
  • EDI Events, Programs, and More at Annual. ALA’s Office for Diversity, Literacy and Outreach Services (ODLOS) has created a Guide to Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Events at Annual. While not completely comprehensive, the guide is a great starting point for members wanting to network with others like themselves or engage in professional development and learning opportunities to make their libraries welcoming for all.
  • ALA Organizational Effectiveness Meetings @ Annual and Online.  The ALA Steering Committee on Organizational Effectiveness (SCOE) will be presenting preliminary recommendations at several meetings during Annual conference. These recommendations are based upon input from ALA members and suggest various redesigns to ALA governance structure and member engagement in Divisions, Roundtables and Special Interest Groups. In Person at ALA Annual in Washington, D.C Dates and times (in ET) for the sessions at Annual are listed below. They will be held in Washington Convent Center, Room 103B.
  1. Saturday, June 22, 12:00pm – 1:30pm
  2. Saturday, June 22, 2:30pm – 4:00pm
  3. Sunday, June 23, 12:00 pm – 1:30pm
  4. Sunday, June 23, 2:30pm – 4:00pm
  5. Monday, June 24, 12:00pm – 1:30pm

A virtual webinar will be available on July 8th at 1pm Central for those unable to attend Annual or these meetings. Information on how to register is available on the SCOE ALA Connect community. Note: ALA Member login is required.

ALSC Board Work at Annual

The finalized ALSC Board agenda and documents for Annual will be posted this week on the ALSC website here (Note: When clicking on the documents you’ll be directed to ALA Connect where your ALA login will be required for viewing.)As a reminder, these meetings are open to conference attendees and a great opportunity to learn more about the bigger picture of all that ALSC’s committees and taskforces are doing, as well as some of the important and pressing concerns facing the Association. What will the Board will be discussing?

  • ALSC Strategic Plan Review
  • Diversifying ALSC Revenue Streams
  • Potential new ALSC whitepaper on outreach
  • ALSC Student Gift Memberships
  • Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Task Force Extension
  • ALSC Awards Program Review
  • ALSC Process Committee Co-Chairs
  • Funding of Coretta Scott King Award Committee Members to attend Morris Seminar
  • ALSC Equity Fellows Program
  • Collecting the History of ALSC
  • Research Agenda for ALSC

Please note that the Awards Program Review agenda item will be held in Executive Session due to partnership, sponsorship, and other privileged information that requires confidential discussion. I realize many ALSC members may not able to attend the Board meetings during conference, but having access to the aforementioned documents allows you to stay updated on policies, issues, and discussion topics influencing the work of the Association. ALSC’s work and success stems from committee activity and the passion and engagement of the individual members reflected in many of these reports.

A Sincere Thank YOU

I hope to see many of you at ALA Annual in June.  As this is my final blog post as ALSC President (President Elect Cecilia McGowan will be seated at the end of the ALSC Board Meeting II on Tuesday of ALA Annual), I would like to earnestly thank the ALSC Board for their conscientious deliberations, the ALSC staff for their diligent dedication and unwavering commitment, and the many actively-engaged ALSC members for their time and talent. Collectively, you are all helping move our association forward as we strive to engage communities to build healthy, successful futures for all children.

Warmly,

Jamie

Jamie Campbell Naidoo

ALSC President

2018-2019

The post Stepping Outside Your Bubble at ALA Annual in DC appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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While you weren’t looking, Washington DC has become one of the best dining destinations in the country. Celebrity chef Jose Andres has been cooking here to acclaim for years, and relatively new upstarts Rose’s Luxury and Bad Saint have won Michelin stars and the James Beard award respectively. Many of these are an easy walk from the Convention Center. We’ll share those, and also some links to other spots slightly further afield for those looking for further adventure.

Just North of the convention center is the Shaw neighborhood, whose Blagden Alley is home to one of my favorite spots. Tiger Fork has  Asian-inspired small plates and delightful “Chinese medicine” cocktails served in a communal setting. Because so much is made for sharing, this is a fun place for small groups. Also in the vicinity is Sundevich, a sandwich and salad carryout. It’s so much more than that description though – clever ingredients and combinations make this superior to your average corner deli, with lots of vegetarian options to boot.  All Purpose Pizzeria makes the lists of the Best in DC regularly, and bakes what it calls “Jersey style pies” as well as antipasta and an extensive (for a pizza parlor) wine list. They also sell desserts from the Buttercream Bakeshop, a great spot for a quick cupcake or cookie pick-me-up between meetings. For a more intense pick-me-up, Philadelphia based La Colombe has a coffee shop also in Blagden Alley. If you’d rather chill out, try Calabash Tea Company, a comfortable spot with a wide variety of teas to drink there or to take back home with you.

South and West of the Convention center is an outpost of David Chang’s  inventive Asian Momofuku and Milk Bar, his bakery of the famous Compost Cookie and Crack Pie.  Longtime Belgian bar Brasserie Beck is your spot for tasty mussels and a quick beer.

We can’t miss the three Jose Andres restaurants that are closeby the Convention Center, Jaleo, his original Spanish tapas spot, Zaytinya, home for Mediterranean food, and Oyamel, with Mexican food and a great happy hour. I’ve eaten many times at all of these over the years and it never disappoints.

Just looking for some e. very day old fashioned, American food? You can’t beat Clydes, in the Verizon Center. Get yourself a crab cake!

Looking for old school Italian that feels like old DC? I once saw James Carville and Mary Matalin eating in Tosca, and many years later, this classic formal spot is still going strong, which is impressive knowing how dynamic this restaurant scene is.

I could go on forever! But there’s only so many meals in the day. Check out Eater DC for more cuisines, places off the beaten path, and places so new and hot I haven’t even been able to check them out yet.

Today’s guest blogger is Diana Price. Diana wrote this piece as a member of the ALSC Local Arrangements committee .

The post Eating in D.C. #alaac19 appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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I attended my first ALA Annual Conference in 2008 as a relatively new children’s librarian.  It was a great experience but also a little overwhelming. Since then, I’ve only missed one Annual for a family trip to Alaska.  Over the years, I have become savvier about creating my schedule for each day.  So, whether it is your first ALA or your 10th, these are some staples to consider adding to your schedule.

Attend ALSC organizational meetings.  They are an excellent way to meet other ALSC members and for non-members to learn more about the work being done by the association.

Celebrate the kidlit award winners on a budget.

Visit the exhibits to see upcoming book releases, the newest in library technology, and meet your favorite authors and illustrators.

Stock up on professional development books, some written by ALSC members!  Discover them at the ALA Store and booths like ABC-CLIO.


Round out your schedule with even more great ALSC events.

What programs or events are a must for your ALA Conference schedule?

This post addresses the following ALSC Core Competency: Vii. Professionalism and Professional Development.

Mary Schreiber, co-chairs the ALSC Public Awareness Committee and she is the Youth Collection Development Specialist at Cuyahoga County Public Library, OH.  She can be reached at:  mschreiber@cuyahogalibrary.org.

Feature image – https://2019.alaannual.org/.

Book covers are from Amazon.

Bio photo – Courtesy of blogger.

The post ALA Annual Musts for Kidlit Aficionados appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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Help Out Your Colleagues who are #leftbehind by volunteering to live blog from the Conference!

Two weeks. In just two weeks, the 2019 Annual ALA Conference will be under way in Washington DC.  Are you one of the lucky people who will be attending?? The ALSC Blog would love your help! We are looking for live bloggers to write about what they are learning and experiencing so those who are #leftbehind can share your excitement and enthusiasm.

We’d love to hear your first-hand thoughts about the information-packed programs you are attending, the people you are meeting, the speakers you find motivating, and the celebrations of books –  such as the Newbery-Caldecott-Legacy Banquet, the Pura Belpré Celebración and the Coretta Scott King Book Award Breakfast – which you attend.

We’d particularly like you to volunteer to live blog if you plan to attend the ALSC Preconference, With Gratitude: Honoring Stories that Connect Us

Are you attending the ALA Annual Conference in DC? Are you interested in being a live blogger for the ALSC Blog?  We’d love to have your contributions!

For more information about how you can become a live blogger, contact Mary Voors, ALSC Blog manager, at alscblog@gmail.com.

The post Going to #ALAac19? Live Blog! appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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In February, the ALSC Children and Technology Committee blog post presented the criteria for the newest Youth Media Award, the Excellence in Early Learning Digital Media Award [EELDM]. It also featured the 2019 winner, PBS’s Play & Learn Science and the first of two award honorees, Tinypbop’s Coral Reef. Today I want to take you through the second honoree, Pop Pop Pop’s Lexi’s World, to highlight some of the features that stood out to the committee particularly related to the award selection criteria.

Lexi's World: introduction demo - YouTube

The Skills Required to Navigate and Explore the Media Should Be Developmentally Appropriate and Suitably Challenging for the Intended Audience

In order for an application to receive the Excellence in Early Learning Digital Media Award, the media must make the navigation and exploration developmentally appropriate and suitably challenging for the intended audience. Lexi’s World offers the child a simple provocation—a keyboard, a girl named Lexi, and a world. The idea is that the user will fill Lexi’s world. No matter the letter the child begins with, the app suggests the next letter in the word that, when fully spelled out, functions as a command. If the word is an animal or object, down it drops from the sky! If the word is a verb, such as “rain,” it happens. If it is a human action that Lexi can do, such as “sneak,” “run,” or “stop,” she’ll do it.

The animals move around the world upon which Lexi is perched and the user can spin it, as you would a globe, to follow the animals and objects as they wander Lexi’s world. What’s more, is that the animals provide hints about words the children can type to cull up something they interact with—a horse thinks of an apple because then the horse will eat the apple; bunnies and rabbits think of carrots; leaf cutter ants think of leaves. Children can repeat their favorite words if they simply recall the first letters of the words they are looking to replicate. In this sense, the application offers children a good balance of support, structure, and challenge.

Respects the Audience’s Intelligence and Imagination by Offering a Rich and Diverse Experience

The award selection committee was particularly pleased with the ways in which Lexi’s World offered a rich and diverse experience to the audience. At first, we figured that there was one object, animal, or action for each of the 26 letters of the alphabet, but then we discovered more! We enjoyed the range of real animals mixed with a few fantastical ones–our test users particularly fancied the “unicorn” that dropped from the sky after they pressed all the computer-prompted letters that need to be pressed to spell “unicorn.” The best part about this is that the unicorns (and most animals) come in different colors so the child is surprised to see what drops from the sky. We believe that there is no pattern here in the order in which the colors appear and that the code in the app programming utilizes a “RANDOM” command for each animal’s color/pattern, which keeps children coming back to try to figure the pattern and get their favorite. The rainbow unicorn is the favorite in my research context, as is the spotted dog.

The coolest thing is that the animals and objects interact with one another, but the children have to understand a bit about conditional programming first. If there is an “elephant” and you type “water” the elephant will drink the water and spray it up into the air. No other animals will do this. If you try to add “water” before the “elephant, “you only get the option for the other word beginning with “w,” “worm.”

Kids will learn to spell as they are trying to figure out how to get Lexi and the animals and objects to do specific things that give them joy. I have a five-year-old who is writing “balloon” on EVERY piece of paper she gets her hands onto. I watched her play balloons with Lexi for quite some time so I’m sure she learned to spell “balloon” from this game. After Lexi had too many balloons, she lifted up off the ground like Mary Poppins and we tried to type “pop” (to pop the balloons) and Lexi came back down. I was so pleased to see new word learning transfer from inside the game to outside in the real world as part of my child’s emergent writing!

Guest blogger, Katie Paciga, PhD Associate Professor of Education Columbia College Chicago

The post 2019 Excellence in Early Learning Digital Media Award Honoree Spotlight on Pop Pop Pop’s Lexi’s World appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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Please join us in Washington, D.C. at the ALSC panel The Urgency of History: How Librarians Prepare Kids for Their Times. The panel includes Gennifer Choldenko, Varian Johnson, Marissa Moss, Sharon Robinson, and Elizabeth Partridge. Check out the details below.

Our acclaimed authors have been debating many difficult questions. Today we want to focus on just one. How is something in one of your books about the past relevant today?

Photo provided by author

Gennifer Choldenko responds:

Right now, we are in the middle of a measles epidemic, caused by people who are terrified to vaccinate their children. In 2019, the science behind the effectiveness of the measles vaccine is irrefutable.  But politics, fear, and misinformation has caused this measles crisis.  Chasing Secrets is historical fiction which looks at a real-life plague outbreak in San Francisco in 1900.  In 1900, the case for vaccination was less compelling than it is now, but the way in which politics, fear, misinformation, racism, and greed interfered with the eradication of the plague in San Francisco has haunting echoes today.

Gennifer Choldenko is best known for the Newbery Honor Book Al Capone Does My Shirts and “the Tales from Alcatraz” series which have sold more than 2 million copies and the Focal-award winning Chasing Secrets. You can find her on the web at www.gennifercholdenko.com.

Photo provided by Scholastic

Sharon Robinson responds:

On May 2, 1963, one thousand children walked out of their schools and marched peacefully toward downtown Birmingham protesting racial segregation. Six hundred children were arrested that first day of the Children’s Crusade.

In Child of the Dream: A Memoir of 1963, I tell the story of how, one thousand miles away, I watched the news with my parents, horrified that the Birmingham police used dogs and powerful fire hoses against the children.  My parents and I talked a lot about those children and what they were doing—and the difference it made. They inspired me to figure out how I could get involved and helped me find my voice.

I am proud of the children today who studied history and found inspiration in the 1963 Children’s Crusade. I joined some of the survivors of the Parkland shooting for a local march and later cheered on the young people who participated in the massive demonstration in Washington, D.C.

Across the country, young people are speaking up and sharing what matters to them. It is my hope that Child of the Dream will inspire children to recognize the power they can have, give them the courage to find their voice, and help them understand the importance of fighting for justice and equality.

Sharon Robinson, daughter of baseball legend and civil rights icon Jackie Robinson, is an acclaimed author as well as an educational consultant for Major League Baseball. You can find her on the web at www.sharonrobinsonink.com.

Would you like to weigh in?

We would love to see you at our panel, The Urgency of History: How Librarians Prepare Kids for Their Times.

When: Saturday, June 22, 9am—10am

Where: Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Room 150B

What: Details here.

See you there!

Our guest blogger today is Susan Faust, Moderator/Reviewer/Librarian. Susan writes a monthly column of children’s book reviews in the San Francisco Chronicle. Active in the Association of Library Service to Children, she has served on numerous book award committees, including Batchelder, Caldecott, Newbery, and Sibert, plus on Notable Books for Children. Most recently, she served on the 2018 Children’s Literature Legacy Award committee. She was the Lower School Librarian at Katherine Delmar Burke School in San Francisco for thirty-three years.

This post addresses the following ALSC Core Competencies: Professionalism and Professional Development.

The post The Urgency of History: How Librarians Prepare Kids for Their Times. appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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Often it can be uncomfortable to think about or talk about the end of one’s life. None of us really wants to consider our own death, let alone how we want our assets handled after we are gone. However, such conversations are not only important but necessary. We may think that only celebrities or wealthy people need to worry about estate planning, but if you own a home, have a savings account, a life insurance policy, or even a few stocks, no matter how small, you should have an estate plan.

While each person has their own considerations for such planning, I’d like to share an idea, a new program created by ALA. Named for the year of ALA’s founding, the 1876 Club is a planned giving program for ALA members under 50 years old. Planned giving, often called legacy giving, is a way to leave a specific amount of money or a percentage of one’s estate to a non-profit organization. I spoke to Courtney Young, University Librarian at Colgate University and Andrew Medlar, Director of BookOps, who were instrumental in founding 1876 Club, to learn more about this.

How did the idea for the 1876 Club come about?

Courtney: Staff in the ALA Development office worked with member leaders from ALA’s Executive Board to create a planned giving program for members under the age of 50. By designating ALA or any of the divisions, offices, round tables, scholarship funds, or other programs, we are taking care of the parts of ALA that mean the most to each of us.

How did you become involved?

Andrew: As I was completing my service on the ALSC Executive Committee in 2017, I really wanted to find a way to commemorate what was for me an incredible five years and to give back to ALA for all of the impactful experiences I had during that time. (Not to mention before and after that time!) I really appreciate the Development team and our phenomenal member-leaders, such as Courtney, who conceived and created this great opportunity which was perfect timing for me and an ideal, long-term, way to contribute to our profession.

Courtney: I think I was still ALA President-Elect when I had a conversation with a previous Development Office staff member about developing a planned giving category for my generation of members. Towards the end of my term as ALA President, and then as Immediate Past President, I worked with a new head of Development and my colleagues on the plan, including coming up with the name a tree logo. I’m proud to say I’ve been part of this idea from its inception. –Courtney

Why should librarians under 50-years-old consider the 1876 Club?

Courtney: It allows us to demonstrate the importance of advocacy for libraries, librarians, and the public. We, too, want to ensure libraries of all types remain an integral part of our communities.

What are the benefits of membership?

Andrew: I appreciate the camaraderie with the other dedicated members; the satisfaction of knowing you’ll be helping our colleagues, association, and profession into the next generations; and, of course, who doesn’t love having another fantastic badge ribbon to wear at conferences!

Courtney: I, too, am proud to be a part of a cohort, a generation of library and information professionals who, too, can stand together in support of the work we do. We’re able to distinguish ourselves as members who also value the association although we may still be early-to-mid career.

Are these funds earmarked for specific initiatives? Can a member designate their gifts for specific programs?

Courtney: Yes, members can designate where their gifts go within the Association. You can designate one area, two areas, or multiple areas.

Once a member joins 1876, can they change their mind?

Andrew and Courtney: Sure, you can absolutely contribute more!

Is there anything else members need to know to help make this decision?

Andrew: I think about it as commemorating the past, celebrating the present, and supporting the future!

Courtney: It’s a great time to get started and invest in the present and future of the association. I thought it would be complicated and that I would not be able to give until later in my life, but it is very easy to do, and the commitment is the most important thing.

For more information about 1876 Club or to participate, visit http://www.ala.org/aboutala/donate/plannedgiving/1876club

Today’s guest post was written by Maegen Rose, a current member of the ALSC Budget Committee.

The post 1876 Club – An Interview with Courtney Young and Andrew Medlar appeared first on ALSC Blog.

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