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AllOutdoor by Dr. John Woods - 3h ago

John J. Woods
Magnolia Outdoor Communications

LUNCH BAG MINI FIRE KITS

Most preppers are probably into recycling as well as many other socially redeeming programs. In our city, we get recycled paper products and plastics picked up once a week that is supposed to contribute of offsetting our monthly water and sewer costs. I’ve never seen evidence of that, but even so, recycling is a good thing.

Though you don’t see classic brown paper lunch sacks much anymore, a few come through the house once in a while. I hate throwing them away or even adding them to the recycle bin. I know they must have many other potential uses. Accordingly I have found one use to suggest to all preppers, campers, hikers and other outdoors people wanting help starting a quick fire.

These brown paper bags can easily be filled with other smaller pieces of waste paper that are easy to set fire to initiate a camp fire, cook fire, warming fire, or just a comfort fire for use out in the wilderness, bug out camp or wherever. Even if nearby tinder is damp or wet, these mini fire kits will help get things going.

What to use to stuff these paper sacks? You know you get tons of junk mail every week at home and work. These worthless sales flyers and promotional documents make excellent fire fodder. That is nearly any paper but the slick photo type paper which often does not burn well. Tear any junk mail in half or strips and drop them into a brown paper bag. The bags only need to be about half to three-quarters full to make them useful for starting a fire.

I pull all the subscription renewal cards out of the magazines as I read them. I stack these up until I head to the garage the next time. I usually have 3-4 bags to fill up at any given time. After dinner if the napkins are only partially soiled, I collect those, too. Same with many paper towels used to wipe up spills or other uses. These burn quickly and clean.

Once the mini fire kit bags are nearly filled, just roll the top down tight to secure it. If you have the time or inclination, you could staple the top closed as well to keep the contents contained, especially if you decide to store several in a vehicle EDC storage box. If you collect paper matchbooks, include one of them, so the fire kit is complete and ready to use, anywhere, any time.

The post Lunch Bag Mini Fire Kits appeared first on AllOutdoor.com.

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Details continue to emerge surrounding the horrific machete attack on the Appalachian Trail last week where one man was killed and another narrowly escaped with serious injuries.

The man responsible for this heinous crime, James Louis Jordan, 30, of Massachusetts, has since been ordered by a U.S. Magistrate Judge Pamela Meade Sargent to undergo a series of rigorous mental evaluations after brutally attacking a group of campers along the Appalachian Trail in Wythe County.

According to The Roanoke Times, an affidavit from FBI Special Agent Micah Childers states Jordan was playing tunes on his guitar while singing and “acting disturbed and unstable” when he made contact with the group of four hikers on Friday, May 10. The group almost immediately recognized Jordan from social media posts about a previous incident last month in Unicoi County, Tennessee, where Jordan allegedly threatened other hikers in similar fashion. None of the previous hikers pressed any charges, however, and Jordan was only arrested on misdemeanor charges, possession of marijuana and criminal impersonation. He was fined, placed on probation and released.

On top of that, Jordan had already made a name for himself along this stretch of the Appalachian Trail – between Smyth and Wythe counties – apparently going by the name “Sovereign,” meaning “supreme ruler.”

This is when things start to sound like a real life slasher film.

BREAKING: Friday’s attack on the Appalachian Trail has turned deadly. One man was killed and a woman is severely injured. The suspect, James Jordan, has been charged: https://t.co/0o5Dm975A7 pic.twitter.com/ITWtZ3LOtU

— News 5 WCYB (@news5wcyb) May 12, 2019

After making contact with Jordan on Friday, the group of four hikers pressed on and tried to get some distance between themselves and Jordan. But he “began randomly approaching the hikers’ tents, making noises and threatening them,” according to Childers’ statement. It was after Jordan threatened to set their tents on fire that the group decided to pack up and get out of there.

But Jordan caught up with them once again, this time wielding a machete.

At this point, two of the hikers (referred to as Hiker #1 and Hiker #2 in the affidavit) in the group took off running, and Jordan followed. He returned to the camp shortly after, and argued with a male hiker from the party, called Victim #1 in the affidavit. Jordan began stabbing him in the upper body while a female watched. The woman, described as Victim #2, then ran away frantically for her life, but Jordan was right on her tail.

“She turned to face Jordan and raised her arms as if to surrender when Jordan began stabbing her and she received multiple stab wounds,” the affidavit reads. She fell to the ground and played dead in a desperate attempt to get Jordan to leave, which he eventually did to go look for his dog.

The woman took advantage and bolted, running south on the trail until she met up with two more hikers. She continued for 6 miles more miles into Smyth County where she would finally call 911.

By that time, the 911 dispatch had already received another call about what was happening – presumably from the first two hikers who escaped.

A little after 6 a.m., a tactical team from the Wythe County Sheriff’s Office entered the camp and located Jordan. He had blood stains on his clothes and they promptly took him into custody. They also found the male victim, who they pronounced dead at the scene of the attack.

All three survivors unequivocally identified Jordan as the attacker.

“I commend local law enforcement in Wythe and Smyth counties for mobilizing successful rescue and tactical operations in this remote region,” U.S. Attorney Cullen said in a statement. “Thanks to their efforts, the suspect was safely apprehended and a seriously wounded victim received critical medical care.”

Jordan made an appearance in the U.S. District Court in Abingdon Monday, where Magistrate Judge Pamela Meade Sargent ordered his psychiatric evaluations be completed by August 1.

The post Chilling Details Emerge in Horrific Machete Attack on Appalachian Trail appeared first on AllOutdoor.com.

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AllOutdoor by Dr. John Woods - 4d ago

John J. Woods
Magnolia Outdoor Communications

IDLE FIREARMS ARE A SHTF LIABILITY

Any mechanical device that goes unused will eventually fall into non-readiness. The same goes for the user. Guns that are bought with the intent of becoming the defensive front line of self-protection during a SHTF event should be used regularly and well maintained.

So many times working gun shows, I work with people looking to buy prepper guns for self-defense, concealed carry, or other uses. When they finally select a gun to purchase, they rarely buy ammunition on the spot. Do they not intend to fire the gun, or even learn to shoot it and practice with it regularly? In many cases that never happens.

Having such a gun in the house if you do not ever intend to use it, is a total waste. In fact the gun in reality becomes a liability. Preppers simply cannot become proficient with any firearm without engaging proper training followed up with regular practice along with the expenditure of ample rounds of ammunition to maintain readiness.

Readiness, of course, is a prime directive to survival. The use of firearms for protection or defense from external threats is a hallmark of prepper planning and plan execution. Therefore, the acquisition of firearms for these uses is far from an end goal. It is the beginning of a long term relationship with the tools of self-protection and their effective use.

Likewise, remember how frustrating it can be every spring to roll out the lawn mower after it has been sitting up in the garage all winter? The battery may be dead, the oil spoiled to a useless fluid, and the spark plug corroded beyond use. The thing won’t start. Oh, heck, you forgot to drain the gas and now everything is gummed up including the carburetor. Off to the shop it goes.

The same can happen to firearms that are left unattended in a closet, safe, or dresser drawer. Gun oils can turn to goo, long time loaded magazine springs weaken, and blued steels start to rust. Even stainless can rust, so it’s not a free ride. Firearms that are used regularly can be monitored for cleaning and other maintenance issues. They need to be kept in ready to roll status.

Ironically, the same can be said for the gun user. If you do not practice on a regular schedule, you can lose whatever skills you honed. They go dull, slow, and non-reactive. Shooting practice is paramount for the prepper to be ready for a potential SHTF threat. So, don’t let yourself or your guns remain idle for very long, lest they become a liability.

The post Idle Firearms are a SHTF Liability appeared first on AllOutdoor.com.

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AllOutdoor by Dr. John Woods - 4d ago

John J. Woods
Magnolia Outdoor Communications

THE A.H. FOX STERLINGWORTH

It should be without reckless abandon to venture into the world of collecting double barreled shotguns. It is wrought with many a lowland swamps designed to sink you to the waist and suck out all of your hard earned deposits. If you get the itch, be careful how hard your scratch.

Of all the stories, tales, renditions, tomes, and sad laments by a multitude of outdoor writers, double gun hunters, and collectors, it seems more tears have wetted the cheeks of well-meaning gentlemen over the buying, selling, trading, and using of twin barrel shotguns than any other gun, save maybe old Winchester levers and Colt Single Action Army’s. It is a realm not to be entered into by the faint of heart or the shallow of pocketbook.

Still the lure is there, and it calls out to us. Every gun show I attend, the moans come from show tables like so many puppies at the rescue pounds crying to “please take me home.” These yearnings for companionship are hard to ignore.

At the last gun show I attended, I was ambushed from behind. Well, truth is I was fully aware of seeing that long tubed double laying on a dealer’s table. The old gun harbinger was noted for hoarding back some select stock. Whatever he was selling was high quality with prices to match. I always studied his wares, but from afar just to be on the safe side. I got too close this time and the double’s pull was just too much to resist.
On the old man’s table was a gun that met my fancy. First, it had 30-inch tubes, the bluing and case-hardening was flawless. The card indicated it was indeed a 12-bore with chokes he gauged at full, and super full. I’m was not sure about that. The card also said the double’s chamber held 3-inch shells. I’m was not sure about that either.

One barrel was marked “Made by A.H. Fox Gun Co.Phila.PA.USA. The opposite barrel was marked Sterlingworth Fluid Compressed Steel. The trigger guard tang revealed the serial number 625XX. The gun is not stamped for gauge or choke. The action is stamped for a No.2 barrel weight. This grade had double triggers.

The walnut stock shows enough figure to quicken the heart rate. A Pachmayr recoil pad was added, but the job was professionally done with a fine edged fit. The forend was the slim type. All the wood has fine cut checkering where it belongs. The gun was a very nice specimen.

Mr. Pete confided he thought the gun to be a duck gun with the tight chokes. He also confessed he had shot it several times. I think he “field tests” all of his trade guns to make certain everything is ok, before he puts them up for sale. His reputation has been trustworthy, but then he is a gun dealer. At least he don’t sell cars or real estate.

He held tight on his price. He told the story of the acquisition just two weeks before. An old gun trading buddy was headed to a divorce and did not want the ex to get money from his guns. So he parted with a whole collection with his final retort that after the split was official, he would be back to buy back as many as he could. I think I would have just hidden them. Pete had already sold several of the guns, so that guy is going to be disappointed if he ever returns.

So, after day one of the show, I went home with research to do hoping the gun would not sell. I knew about Fox guns but not the Sterlingworth models. What I found was a mixed bag of historical information and a confusing trail of manufacturing. I did find that Ansley H. Fox made good guns. Fox started production in the first decade of the 20th Century and sold to Savage Arms Company in 1929. Savage is still making shotguns bearing the Fox name.

Though the Sterlingworth brand models were billed as “good guns, cheap” by some, other sources spoke well of them as hardy, great hunting guns. Turns out the Sterlingworth guns now have quite a following and are sought by collectors. That was good news. Prices I saw listed at various sites were much higher than what Pete had printed on his gun card. I also found that the serial number on Pete’s Fox fell in the 1911 production year, an interesting year in gun history.

So, after a whole weekend of wheeling, dealing, arm twisting, offering dogged out sorry looks, and near begging, the harbinger lowered the ticket below the magic one grand threshold. So, yeah, I fell off the wagon on this one. Sometimes you have to take a risk. That is part of gun collecting.

So, I brought the beauty home. I’ll put it through a good take down cleaning and polishing. At least I now know that 2 ¾ inch and 3-inch shells do fit in the chamber and extract when opening the action. I doubt I’ll shoot the 3’s anyway.

The triggers work, the safety works, and the barrels are chrome shiny inside down the bores. The gun may not be showroom original, but it is a nice piece, and I can’t wait to get back afield to run some shot down the barrels. I just hope the swamp is not too deep.

The post The A. H. Fox Sterlingworth appeared first on AllOutdoor.com.

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I’ve never taken a really serious look at a derringer-type pistol, except to appreciate it as I appreciate all firearms. But some people seem to like them a lot — even when the little handguns go beyond their traditional role of small-caliber, easy-to-handle last-ditch defense sidearms.

For example, Bond Arms makes and sells a line of top-hinged two-shot derringer-style pistols chambered to fire both the 45 Colt and 410 shotgun shells. This sounds ridiculous… these rounds are fairly powerful, and putting them into tiny packages means the shooter will feel one heck of a kick. Even the stumpy little 2.5-inch-barrelled models that take 357 S&W Magnum or 38 S&W Special are a real handful.

The Papa Bear from Bond arms has a 3″ barrel, just barely long enough to accept a 410 shotgun shell. MSRP is $560.
(Image: Bond Arms)

Add to that a hefty price tag that can exceed a thousand bucks (and the lowest MSRP on their website is a whopping $534), and things become even more inconceivable. Why would anyone want such a gun? And honestly, I can’t say I don’t want one… after all, I like all firearms… but for that kind of money I would expect more. And for a carry handgun, why would anyone want something heavy and difficult to grip that only holds two rounds?

I just don’t get it.

Bond arms “Girl Mini” model with 2.5″ 38/357 barrel. MSRP $534.
(Image: Bond Arms)

So… to all big-bore derringer lovers: Why? Why do you like them? What is it about them that pulls your money out of your pocket? Why are you willing to punish your hands with those tiny grips? And finally, do you prefer to carry them instead of toting a revolver or semi-auto pistol?

Let us know in the comments below.

The post Big-Bore Derringers: I Don’t Get it appeared first on AllOutdoor.com.

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This is pretty cool. If you own a farm in the Great Lakes region of the USA (Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Ohio) or in the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, Manitoba, or Quebec, you can have a side-by-side UTV delivered to your farm for a 24-hour real-use test — for free.

It’s from Can-Am, and the vehicle is their Defender, which is available in more than a dozen variations from a bone-stock two-passenger version to the stretched and aggressive “Defender Max X MR.”

From the press release:

  • Can-Am now offering Defender Farm Test program in 5 states and 5 Provinces
  • 24-hour real farm use test of Can-Am Defender side-by-side vehicles
  • Program is free of charge, and includes vehicle drop-off and pickup

Can-Am is expanding its popular Defender Farm Test Program, which allows farmers and landowners to personally experience how a Can-Am Defender can help them on their property.

The program is now available in five states, including Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Indiana, and Ohio. It is also available in Quebec, Manitoba, Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Alberta.

The Defender Farm Test Program is free of charge, and includes a 24-hour test of a Can-Am Defender. To make it as convenient as possible, the vehicle is dropped off and picked up.

People can click the applicable link below to register for the Defender Farm Test Program.

Great Lakes (Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Ohio)

https://can-am.brp.com/off-road/info/defender.html

Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario, Manitoba, Quebec)

canamdefender.ca

The Can-Am Defender lineup can tow up to 2,500-lb, and has up to 1,000-lb cargo box payload capacity. The Defender also features a tight turning radius, removable storage options, and different drive modes to get over any terrain.

For more information on all Can-Am Vehicles, visit www.can-am.brp.com.

Almost makes me wish I had a farm way up there in the land of snow…

The post Farm Owners Can Test a Can-Am Defender SXS For Free appeared first on AllOutdoor.com.

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It’s no secret that Kim Rhode is an excellent shooter. This fantastic female has been winning with her shotgun internationally since age 13! And now at age 39, she’s made history yet again.

I last wrote about Kim here in 2016, after she’d just won a Bronze Medal in Women’s Skeet at the Summer Olympics in Rio. That one win made her:

  • The only woman to ever win individual medals at six consecutive Olympics
  • The only U.S.A. athlete to win six consecutive individual Olympic medals
  • The first U.S.A. athlete to win those medals in six consecutive Summer Olympic Games

On May 10, 2019, she made shooting history yet again… this time at the International Shooting Sport Federation (ISSF) World Cup shooting event in Changwon, South Korea. Kim won Gold for the fourth time in a row, becoming the first person to ever do so. On top of that, she has now won the World Cup 21 times — which is 10 more wins than anyone else has achieved!

In Changwon, Rhode missed only six targets out of 185 between qualifying and Friday’s final. She hit 57 out of 60, including her final 31 shots, in the final to beat Italy’s Diana Bacosi, who hit 54 of 60. Fellow Italian Chiara Cainero won bronze as Italy claimed the two available quota spots for the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020. The U.S. already secured its two quota spots in women’s skeet.

She’s truly a force to be reckoned with.

Rhode, who will turn 40 in July, has won all three 2019 World Cups, as well as the September 2018 stop in Tucson, Arizona.

‘It’s like a flashback to the Rio podium,’ Rhode said from Korea. ‘I’m still in shock and can’t believe I’ve been able to win four straight World Cup golds. With so much talent out there on the line, I still can’t believe I am lucky enough to wear the Red, White and Blue, let alone win gold. Right now, I’m focused on making the 2020 U.S. Olympic Team, so all the rest is just icing on the cake!’

I can attest that Kim Rhode is just as humble in person as she sounds in her public statements. I’ve been blessed to have met and spoken with her a few times and she’s always been down-to-earth and real.

What a great person to represent the USA and the shooting sports.

The post Kim Rhode’s Shooting Excellence Continues to Set Records appeared first on AllOutdoor.com.

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“Bullet is a Fool, Bayonet’s a Bully” said late 18th century Field Marshal Alexandr Suvorov. He wasn’t far off the truth — for the day. Beyond the poor accuracy and low rate of fire of the flintlock muskets, beyond the danger each shot posed to the shooter (the wigs of the time were mainly to protect the hair from burning powder flakes) and the frequent misfires, there was the issue of training. Lead and gunpowder were expensive, so many armies restricted live fire practice to fewer than ten shots annually. Up until the 1830s, marksmanship training was limited to a few jaeger units.

Around the time most armies began conversion to caplock rifles, the issue of infantry competency arose. Switzerland, rather poor at the time, used crossbows fitted with range-adjustable rifle sights. By the 1850s, more and more countries started using some cost-saving methods of getting live fire practice, beginning with sub-caliber inserts for naval artillery and then onto sub-caliber trainers for infantry. A barrel insert with a percussion cap on one end and a BB on the other came into use. In Germany, where firearm marksmanship competitions go back to the early 16th century or further, sub-caliber rifles made by converting older flintlocks or percussion guns to gallery rifles served a double duty of military trainers and arcade or pub entertainment.

In addition to percussion caps and BBs, rimfire BB caps — much the same thing but assembled into a single unit — also became popular. Come of the guns, like the example here, could use both.

This rifle fires a 4mm spherical projectile down a much shorter tube to reduce friction. This tube is countersunk in the longer, wider barrel and so produces negligible report. To reach the cartridge, the firing pins can be up to half of the length of the barrel. The barrels often have up to a dozen lands and grooves, predating Marlin’s Microgroove by a few decades. At short, windless indoor ranges, the accuracy can be excellent. Set triggers and good balance of the guns helps too. Single hold groups at 15 yards aren’t rare.

Calibers of such rifles vary and can reach 4.5mm at the largest. Although no gunpowder is used, velocity ranges from 800 to 1000fps!

Sometimes, factory made ammunition isn’t available, so improvised substitute was made with a different bolt and caps plus 4.5mm air gun pellets that swage down the bore. This example uses Eley 22LR cartridges with bullet and powder removed as the driver for an airgun pellet.

The post Before Olympic air guns — Zimmerstutzen. appeared first on AllOutdoor.com.

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I always liked the worn look on some pistols, not all brands and models, but I think Glock is one that does! So with that in mind, I decided 3 years ago to do this on my 42. I also didn’t want to send it out and have it coated with any type of finish. Sandpaper, steel wool, and FrogLube is all I used.

I started out with 400 sandpaper, then 600 and then 1000 grit. After that, I went over it with steel wool and flitz with the Dremel. The final step to get the look I wanted,  I went over it one more time very lightly with 2000 grit.

Now to see what works to prevent any rusting I treated it 4 times in 8 days with FrogLube. That meant heating the slide with a heat gun. Once it is HOT you coat it with the FrogLube paste. It will melt instantly. At that point, you just let it cool.

Once cool and it dries with a film covering it I added more FrogLube paste and reheated it again and let it all melt on the slide. Once dry and has the film once again I wiped it off with a microfiber towel. I did this a total of 4 times again in 8 days.

Now it has been over 3 years and it has never rusted anywhere at all. Days in the leather holster at a time, in the Hummer as a backup gun, you name it and it has been rust free. I do wipe it now with Lucas gun oil (blue oil) when I clean it.

So after all this time, I thought I should do this to my 43. Through the same process, I have the same outcome. The FrogLube really works for this! I have to say I really like the look and again it is almost a natural look. So I can say if you like this look you can do the same thing without having it painted!

See you soon!
Gunner

The post My “Battle-worn” experiment! appeared first on AllOutdoor.com.

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Paul Harrell is back at it, this time looking at a specific sort of shotgun shell and how it might — or might not — be useful for home defense. He already took a look at birdshot in general for home defense, but this time he focuses on turkey loads… which, for those who may not know, are shotshells designed to kill turkeys, usually at fairly long range… and they’re typically loaded with more pellets than the average birdshot shell.

Fair warning: If you know Paul’s videos, you know he begins each with the caveat that he is working on a live range and he asks viewers to “bear with any gunfire” they may hear in the background. In other videos we’ve heard the occasional shot in the distance, but this time it sounds as if there’s someone just out of view who’s having one heck of a good time firing double-taps and whatnot. So… brace yourself and don’t turn up the sound too high if you like your eardrums.

Paul goes right to his tried-and-true patented meat target, designed to more-or-less simulate a clothed person for the purposes of comparing effectiveness of ammo for defending against bad guys wearing clothes.

He begins with a typical bird shot load, so we can compare that with the turkey loads. At 7 yards it is extremely effective without overpenetrating.

Next up, he goes to the chronograph. Standard Remington bird shot loads with 1.25 ounces of shot averaged 1243 fps, while Remington 1.5-ounce turkey shells averaged 1162, Winchester 1.75-ounce loads averaged 1145, and Federal Premium with 2 ounces of shot averaged 1048.

We can see from this that turkey shells don’t necessarily move any faster — and this makes sense because heavier payloads quite often move slower than lighter ones when fired from the same gauge or caliber.

Then he tosses in a bit of a monkey wrench by deviating from the turkey ammo theme, bringing in some pheasant ammo. Unnecessary in my opinion, but Paul’s gonna do what Paul wants to do.

From there, we hit the meat target once again, and he finds some difference between turkey shells. He seems surprised by the Winchester ammo opening up its pattern quickly, but that’s what it’s designed to do… this is my turkey ammo of choice and it’s meant to produce turkey-killing patterns both near and far.

Beyond that, there’s a bit of digression as he adds more pheasant ammo and a 20-gauge shotgun to the mix. So is this a purely-turkey-ammo video? Nah. But it’s all Paul, and fans will tell you that’s what matters.

Enjoy.

Birdshot for Home Defense Part II: Turkey Magnums - YouTube

The post Paul Harrell on Turkey Ammo for Home Defense appeared first on AllOutdoor.com.

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