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A big, hearty soup that is made super easily in your instant pot! Thick and filled with veggies this gluten and dairy free soup will be winter’s best friend. This Gluten & Dairy-free Instant Pot Chicken, Mushroom & Wild Rice is also free of: egg, fish, shellfish, peanuts and tree nuts, with a soy free option too!

This post contains affiliate links.

My all-time favorite soup growing up was cheese and broccoli. Just kidding. I hated that and persecuted my mother any time she made it. Now I get how it feels to have kids that complain. I’m so sorry mom!

Now, that we’ve gotten that apology out of the way–my ACTUAL favorite soup of my mom’s was her Chicken & Wild Rice. If I recall right, it used butter and used Uncle Ben’s Wild Rice packets–which have wheat in them.

So, for the first few winters after my son’s food allergy diagnosis, I was so bummed to face the cold weather without my favorite soup to cuddle up with.

I was relieved when I came up with a stove top rendition a few years ago. Anyone remember it–any tried and true fans reading this? It was a little complicated–sorry–this blog is definitely about evolving. And, it took FOREVER for the brown and wild rice to soften–but I’d make it all of the time regardless since I loved it so.

Once I got my instant pot for Christmas last year, I knew one of the first recipes I did had to be to make my favorite soup a little bit easier. And, I’ve done that–and it is once again my favorite soup–but now it’s gluten and dairy free!

I even served the soup to my whole family for Christmas Eve dinner since we wanted something easy and filling, so we could get onto decorating cookies for Santa. My mom approved of the soup and it just felt very full circle.

If you’d like to see a video of how to make it, watch the video below, or on my YouTube!

I hope that this is a comforting soup you and your family can enjoy as well. Allergy-friendly soups are so needed during the bleak winter months and this’ll get ya through! (I also have a round up of 20+ allergy-friendly winter soups!)

Also–I get my wild rice from a local grocer Unfortunately, the company does not sell it on Amazon, but you can get it directly from their website (unsponsored). Or, just look for a similar gluten-free one. I like this one because it has dehydrated vegetables herbs and spices so it cuts out having to add additional ones in the recipe. If you can only find a plain wild rice mixture,  you’ll need to add additional spices. I’d suggest starting with a teaspoon each of parsley, garlic salt, and salt at a minimum and go up from there.

Gluten & Dairy-free Instant Pot Chicken, Mushroom & Wild Rice
 
Prep time
10 mins
Cook time
25 mins
Total time
35 mins
 
A big, hearty soup that is made super easily in your instant pot! Thick and filled with veggies this gluten and dairy free soup will be winter's best friend. This Gluten & Dairy-free Instant Pot Chicken, Mushroom & Wild Rice is also free of: egg, fish, shellfish, peanuts and tree nuts, with a soy free option too!
Author: Allergy Awesomeness
Recipe type: Instant pot soup
Serves: 5-6 servings
Ingredients
  • 1 Tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 yellow onion, diced finely
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 3 carrots, diced
  • 2 celery stalks (we can't do celery, so we omitted this--but it'd be great with it if you can!)
  • 2 chicken breasts, raw
  • 1 cup long grain rice & wild rice combo *see blog post above
  • 1 package of button mushrooms, sliced
  • 4 oz dairy-free cream cheese (be sure to check the label as many have soy--we can do soy, but if not find one that isn't)
  • 5 cups water + 3 and ½ Tablespoons chicken bouillon (or follow whatever the directions are for the type of bouillon you use to match 5 cups of water. I calculated it off of my favorite kind.)
  • salt and fresh pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Push the "saute" button and add your olive oil. Add your garlic cloves and onion and stir frequently until fragrant, about 1 minute. Turn off the "saute" function and add in the rest of your ingredients.
  2. Hit "manual" and set it for 25 minutes.
  3. Once it's done, allow for a quick release and then take out your chicken. Shred it, and then add it back into the soup. Mix well, and smooth out any remaining lumps from the dairy-free cream cheese. Adjust salt and pepper to taste. Serve immediately.
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Looking for more allergy-friendly soup recipes? Here’s some more delicious ideas:

Allergy-friendly Taco Soup (red meat free!)

Gluten & Dairy-free Thai Coconut Soup

Potato & Sausage Instant Pot Soup

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Next month it will be officially five years since my son was diagnosed with eosinophilic esophagitis (also known as EOE, previously known as EE). We’ve tried lots of things and settled into our rare disease life. Because of the publicity of this blog, I often receive lots of questions about how we’ve handled it, and so I thought it’d be helpful to share what we’ve done and learned along the way, in one easy-to-find article.

*Please note that this was just our experience, and that I in no way think this is the one and only way to handle the treatment of this disease. This is merely to help you see how another family has managed the disease and give you talking points to discuss with your own doctor as you decide your own care with practiced medical professionals.*

What is eosinophilic esophagitis?

The American Partnership for Eosinophilic Disorders (a super helpful resource!) defines it as: “…a chronic, allergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus (the tube connecting the mouth to the stomach). It occurs when a type of white blood cell, the eosinophil, accumulates in the esophagus and persists despite acid-blocking medicine. The elevated number of eosinophils cause injury and inflammation to the esophagus. This damage may make eating difficult or uncomfortable, potentially resulting in poor growth, chronic pain, and/or difficulty swallowing.”

I often describe it in plain terms like this: My son has regular food allergies, and because of a rare disease his esophagus also has allergies. If he eats the foods that triggers his esophageal allergies, then it damages his esophagus and can cause him pain, his esophagus to swell, and even cause food to get stuck.

What were his symptoms?

This is the most frequently asked question, and I’ll go into detail to be helpful. Around 2 months, my son started getting big, red rashes on his cheeks after I’d nurse him (see pic below). He also had mucous in his stools and they were extremely runny and he’d have blow outs after every diaper (note–diaper issues alone don’t always mean there is anything wrong) and machine-gun-like gas.

We were told that he most likely had an immature immune system and for me to go on an elimination diet to see if there was anything that I was eating that was bothering him, since he was exclusively breastfeed. I don’t know why, but my pediatrician chose (because these are not the top-8-allergens, but rather an odd assortment): dairy, nuts, eggs, whole grains, citrus, corn, strawberries, tomato and chocolate. She had me take all of those out for two weeks to clear my system, then I would bring in one food at a time (starting with chocolate and working my way backwards). I’d eat that food for three days–if my son didn’t react to them, then they were considered OK to keep in my diet.

He ended up reacting to eggs, soy and wheat–so I avoided those for the year that I nursed him.

As we started giving him more and more solid foods we noticed that he did not care for them, and that he vomited frequently. The rashes on his cheeks often came back, and his weight percentiles started dropping. He was almost off the entire growth curve by the time we were able to see his allergist.

How was he diagnosed with EOE and how old was he?

The only official way to be diagnosed with EOE is to have an EGD (Esophagogastroduodenoscopy–also known as a scope) taken with biopsies, and then a pathologist looks at the biopsies to see if there are eosinophils present in the tissue.

Up to this point, at eleven months, my son had had an anaphylaxic reaction to the first time he had dairy, and with his history of also needing eggs, soy and wheat taken out of my diet while nursing him, my allergist decided to do blood work. His blood eosinophil count was so high he said he might either have EOE or leukemia and that either way we needed to get him scoped soon. –Note–blood work does not always match what is going on in the individual tissue of the esophagus, so this was just a predictor, but tissue samples must always be taken to know how the particular area is doing.

Allergists cannot preform an EGD, so we went and found a pediatric GI doctor to do the procedure. After it was done, and a pathologist confirmed and he was given the diagnosis of EOE at 14 months old.

How does your child do after an EGD (scope)?

He does great. I believe he has a high pain tolerance, and that they aren’t the worst procedures. They are quick–15 minutes or so is all they’re under–and the instrument that they use to take the samples, I’ve been told, is like the size of the tip of your pen. I’m sure the pain level also varies depending on how damaged your esophagus is, and how many they have to take, and how long it’s been since your last scope. There was one scope where he said he had been bleeding after he took a sample because it was fragile, and he ended up vomiting because of the blood on his empty stomach when he came out of anesthesia. He is always drinking before he leaves the hospital, and then we try to give him soft foods for about a day–but other than Tylenol (and sometimes he doesn’t even care for any) he is fine.

How did you figure out his EOE triggers?

This is a tricky question–as it can feel like finding a needle in a hay stack. Plus, recommendations have changed since we first started. But, below is how we went about it.

Our allergist from Primary Children’s in Salt Lake City was running off of the Cincinnati Hospital’s recommendations (one of the top EOE clinics, other than Denver) to do patch testing. So, literally at least twice a week (unless his back needed to heal) we were driving 45 minutes each way to have my son first undergo prick testing–to make sure that the foods were not going to cause an anaphylaxic reaction. If he passed that, then we would patch test him. He’s had over 100+ foods tested on him (I stopped counting after 100), as we were told he had to have every single thing he’d ever eat tested to. It was long and arduous. My poor son spent the majority of his second year in a doctor’s office. He got to the point that the prick testing for anaphylaxis didn’t even phase him. He wouldn’t even flinch when he’d get the poke. He is the definition of a trooper.

For those unfamiliar with patch testing, (also known as atopy patch testing) it is where they take the actual food and make a paste with it (I was never told the proportions of food to saline), place it on a little disc and then tape that disc to your back. They would put a control one with just saline, and then foods on the other discs. I was bringing in grocery bags of food for things they didn’t have in the office, and my allergist let me prioritize what foods and in what order we tested, according to what I’d cook with most.

The premise of patch testing was to see how skin tissue would react to a prolonged exposure to the food protein–to try and mimic how the esophagus handles foods. We would have to leave these patches, with a bunch of tape stuck to his back for two days. We even did it over summer. The poor kid could not swim or bath during this time, and he was so good to not itch. He’d honestly cry the most when I’d take it off since it’d pull his fine back hairs. I’d dread it and we’d both tear up. Man, those were hard months.

Two days after them being placed, I’d take them off at home, and take pictures (some doctors make their patients come in, but our doctor didn’t make us drive that far since he trusted how I’d handle it). Then, you let it air out for a day (no bathing). You finally go in on the third day and have them “read”. If there was raised skin, redness or irritation, that was considered a fail.

If my son passed both prick and patch testing, he was allowed to try the foods orally. Keep in mind–he had tried lots of fruits and vegetables in purees as a baby–but now we felt that they were “safer” for him to consume and might not possibly trigger his EOE and cause damage to his esophagus. Even though he had eaten a decent number of foods we re-tested EVERYTHING so that we weren’t assuming anything. Since, whatever he had previously been eating was causing damage.

Since we could get quite a few on his back at one time, we would fill it up, as to not waste an appointment. Then, if he passed any (there were fails every time–those were some disappointing 45 minute drives home. I’d often call and cry to my mom or best friends). We’d allow him to eat that one single food once a day, for several weeks, keeping track of any reactions to his skin, bowls, eating habits or throwing up. (Doing that for each food he passed.)

Thankfully, we only had one time when we got to the oral stage that seemed to affect him negatively, which was green beans of all things. It caused him horrible constipation, so we just considered that a fail and didn’t bother continuing to feed it to him or scope him.

I should mention that most medical literature nowadays does not recommend prick or patch testing as they feel it does not correlate. I do feel it was helpful for us (it is known to have a higher success rate in children than adults)–for example, he had a horrible reaction to mustard, one we would have never guessed and after several years of avoiding it we tried giving it to him again and he was clearing his throat and coughing for days. That said–I think we were one of the lucky few as most people did not feel it was helpful. It would have saved us a lot of time and hassle not having done it–but we were doing was told was cutting edge at the time (although I always thought–who in the world came up with taping food to someone’s back??).

Do you scope to more than one food at a time?

Yes. And, we understood that this was a gamble. Because, if he were to fail, we would have no idea what food caused the fail. Because of lots of prayer, mother’s intuition and because we were so careful with our approach and calculated by the time we got to foods he was eating regularly and ready to scope we felt he was doing fine, and would pass and just wanted confirmation. We felt we had weeded out the bad ones by that point, if that makes sense. There is nothing wrong with doing it the slower way, but where he was down to so few foods we took the risk. It’s a totally personal decision.

Also–we try and never scope when it’s high pollen season, since there is the idea that swallowing pollen can also cause a reaction. So, we tried to wait until winter when we can rule that factor out as well.

What do you think helped you the most?

Support, support and knowledge. We had a good team of doctors, an allergist who specialized in EOE with a GI who could pass notes to each other since they were both a part of the same Primary Children’s. We had a great dietitian (more on that later) and really great friends and family who were willing to sympathize and listen to me cry on the long drives home. They were also willing to alter what we ate when we’d do get-togethers to show further support. I joined two local support groups–one for EOE and a general food allergy one (Utah Food Allergy Network) that had yearly conferences. I made friends with moms who had been dealing with EOE longer so I could bounce ideas off of them. I also joined several support groups online on Facebook so I could ask questions to a broader audience. And, without my faith in God and His purpose and plan for me and my family I wouldn’t have made it through so many disheartening times.

Would you recommend a dietitian for EOE?

Yes. But, not all dietitians are created equal. We found one who was used to pediatric patients with limited diets–that way she wasn’t questioning why he was down to ten foods but was bent on figuring out how he could get his daily needs met. She would have me keep a dairy of all the foods he’d eat in three days. This would include every ingredient and how much. Then, she’d calculate from that how much iron, protein, vitamins…etc. he was getting. Then, she’d calculate what he was deficient on and how we could meet that (multi-vitamins, iron supplements, fortified rice milk, more quantity…etc.). It was so comforting to know that even if he was limited that he was still growing (she’d weigh and measure him every time with just his underwear on) and getting enough nutrition. It really gave me peace of mind.

Has your son ever had a feeding tube due to EOE?

No, but close. And, this can be common, especially if you’re put on elemental formula. When he was down to such a little number of foods, we were suggested to go on the elemental formula so many EOE patients are on. But, I was hell bent (maybe for the wrong reasons–because now I realize that they can be a huge help) to spend my time in the kitchen than have him get a feeding tube.

Thanks to our dietitian we realized he was OK, and since we were testing so often and constantly adding foods–first ten, then twenty, then all of the sudden fifty safe foods!–we knew he’d be OK. Plus, he was old enough and had been nursed long enough we knew he wouldn’t drink the elemental formula, so he would most likely have to be on the feeding tube and would not accept it orally since it tastes so horrible.

I’m grateful we didn’t have to put him through it, but I really had a perspective change when an older friend who had horrible eating problems said–if you didn’t have to deal with the pain and hassle of eating if it’s such a tortuous process, a feeding tube can be such a Godsend. I know there’s a lot of stigma, and I was once there myself, but now I realize there really is a time and a place for them.

How did you make sure he was getting enough calories?

Dietitian, blending his food, adding oils–is the simple answer. We tried to do anything extra fatty. Full fat coconut milk. Chicken thighs and dark meat versus chicken breasts. We were the opposite of dieting. As I mention elsewhere, we’d blend up his food, which allowed us to give him black beans, chicken, asparagus and brown rice in one sitting, whereas as a toddler he definitely wouldn’t have eaten those things on..

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Moist red velvet cake topped with the most ethereal icing to ever hit the vegan world: sticky marshmallow icing. This adaptation of cloud frosting uses aquafaba instead of egg whites yet tastes exactly like marshmallow fluff and is what red velvet should have been paired with a long time ago. This Valentine (or anytime, really!) confection is allergy-friendly because it is free of: wheat, gluten, dairy, egg, soy, peanut & tree nuts. It’s vegan and top-8-free too!

This post contains affiliate links.

It was a classic recipe that was missing from my blog. Heck, it was even my best friend’s wedding cake flavor (hey Yesenia!). So, I knew once I posted it, it’d have to be a good one. After all, it’s beloved by so many.

So, I went to one of the culinary top sources in my opinion: America’s Test Kitchen. I feel like they have some well tested recipes up their sleeves, so I figured, if I could make theirs allergy-friendly I’d be winning. And win, I think I did.

If you follow me on Instagram (if not–why?? It’s my favorite platform!) you’d see that I actually made this a few weeks ago, but was appalled at how the photos turned out and so I didn’t post it. I know some of you said to post it anyways and that you just wanted the recipe, but believe me–who wants to look at ugly cake? #ABitofAPerfectionist (Seriously though–have you tried photographing a dark red cake with bright white icing?? How do you even begin to expose for that…sigh. And before you say it–I know, I know–I need to break out of my white dish obsession. If only I had as big of a kitchen as I do in my dreams. #BustingOutOfIt)

And, unlike some bloggers, I don’t like to make recipes over and over back-to-back. I’ll sit on it for months at a time before I try it again because we actually try to eat everything I make and I hate getting sick of things. But, I just felt so bad in my heart of hearts having you guys go ANOTHER Valentine’s Day without some allergy-friendly red velvet cake.

So, with just a few days to spare, I caved and made it again. I hope you’ll forgive me for the last minute posting. When I asked my boys if they’d mind me making “red cake” again they didn’t seem to mind at all!

I originally made it in a 13×9 dish–because that’s how I like most of my cakes. I rarely bother with layered cakes and that just fits my typical home-cook style. It’s easy and no fuss. But, it just wasn’t pretty on camera. So, note that you can bake this in a 13×9 too–it doesn’t have to be a bundt, but there is something so antique and fancy about the shape of a bundt. Plus, I think it really shows off the stark icing to the rich red color well with the fun way it slides down the sides. Totally up to you!

And this vegan sticky marshmallow icing??? Tell your mom, tell your friends and tell your grandma because every vegan needs to know about this. It may be my greatest achievement in my vegan baking days. No joke.

Let me back up a bit and say that I have loved marshmallow fluff since I was a child. I kid you not when I say that I asked Santa for some as a treat in my stocking one year (seriously–ask my mom). So, when I saw the whole “7-minute frosting” or “cloud frosting” (as it’s often called in normal baking) floating around I just couldn’t stand it any longer. I knew I had to try to make it without egg whites to make it vegan.

Thank goodness for aquafaba (also known as chick pea brine) and the way that beauty whips up just like egg whites. It did just the trick.

A thing to note about this vegan sticky marshmallow icing: It will not pipe. It’s more of a thick glaze–which is why it frosts this bundt so perfectly. You’ll notice that it leaves a LOT leftover if you do a bundt cake. It should frost it just right if you do a 13×9. I prefer to have extra leftover because I literally ate the ENTIRE rest of it with a spoon, minus a few spoonfuls to my kids. Wish I was kidding. If you’d like to half it, that’s fine. I did this amount because my stand mixer has a hard time reaching only a little amount, so it’s easier if I have more aquafaba liquid to begin with. You probably can’t go wrong.

So–let this be an extra special treat for your Valentine or just your gal-pal, friend, or amigo that loves classic red velvet cake, but happens to have food allergies or other dietary restrictions. I hope this will be a staple and a go-to for many celebrations hereafter. Enjoy this Gluten-free Vegan Red Velvet Bundt Cake with Sticky Marshmallow Icing. (Seriously, you’ll wonder why you ever did cream cheese frosting. But, just in case, here’s my recipe for dairy-free vegan cream cheese frosting.)

Gluten-free Vegan Red Velvet Bundt Cake with Sticky Marshmallow Icing
 
Prep time
15 mins
Cook time
25 mins
Total time
40 mins
 
Moist red velvet cake topped with the most ethereal icing to ever hit the vegan world: sticky marshmallow icing. This adaptation of cloud frosting uses aquafaba instead of egg whites yet tastes exactly like marshmallow fluff and is what red velvet should have been paired with a long time ago. This Valentine (or anytime, really!) confection is allergy-friendly because it is free of: wheat, gluten, dairy, egg, soy, peanut & tree nuts. It's vegan and top-8-free too!
Author: Allergy Awesomeness
Recipe type: Dessert
Serves: 10-12 slices
Ingredients
  • RED VELVET CAKE:
  • 12 Tablespoons vegan butter, room temp
  • 1 and ½ cups granulated sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons cocoa powder
  • 1 and ½ teaspoons baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon xanthan (omit if your flour blend already includes this)
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 2 and ¼ cups gluten-free flour
  • 1 cup rice milk + 1 Tablespoon lemon juice
  • 2 flax eggs (equals 2 Tablespoons ground flax seeds + 5 Tablespoons water)
  • 1 Tablespoon white vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 Tablespoons red food coloring (more or less to your liking)
  • STICKY MARSHMALLOW ICING:
  • 4 aquafaba "egg whites" (6 Tablespoons of the liquid from a can of garbanzo beans)
  • pinch of salt
  • ⅔ cup sugar
  • 1 and ½ cup light corn syrup
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • TOOLS:
  • Bundt baking pan
  • Wire cooling rack
  • Fine mesh strainer
Instructions
  1. FOR THE CAKE:
  2. In a bowl, combine all of the liquid ingredients which comprise of: the food coloring, vanilla, white vinegar, flax eggs, rice milk and lemon juice. Set it aside.
  3. In a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, cream the butter and sugar. Next, add in the baking soda, salt and xanthan. Using a fine mesh strainer shift in the cocoa, to ensure there are no clumps. Stir to combine.
  4. Next, alternate adding in the flour and the bowl of liquid until everything is incorporated.
  5. Bake in a heavily greased bundt pan for 25-30 minutes, or until done.
  6. Allow to cool in the pan for 5 minutes, then invert on a wire rack and remove the bundt pan. Allow it to cool completely while you make the icing.
  7. FOR THE ICING:
  8. In a stand mixer with the whisk attachment, beat on high the aquafaba and salt until it reaches soft peaks.
  9. Once it's hit the soft peak stage (when you pull the whisk out, it will form a peak that curves and falls over softly). Keep the mixture running and slowly add in the sugar and ensure it's beat it enough to incorporate it (so it won't be grainy.)
  10. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan over high heat, heat your corn syrup until it's boiling.
  11. Turn the mixer back onto high and slowly pour in the corn syrup mixture. Beat for at least five minutes on high. You will notice it will become glossy and become thicker.
  12. Add the vanilla and stir for one final minute.
  13. Be sure to scrape the sides of the bowl and then bowl pour gently onto the cake.
  14. The top of the icing will set, so if you ever want to do sprinkles, be sure to do them immediately. The icing does not keep well, so plan to serve the cake within the day it's made. Enjoy the rest with a spoon!
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Allergy Awesomeness by Allergyawesomeness@gmail.com - 3w ago
A hamburger-free, taco soup that has a gluten-free, homemade taco seasoning that gives a sweet and spicy punch. I know there are many taco soup recipes out there, but this one is by fare my favorite. This Allergy-friendly Taco Soup is free of: wheat, dairy, egg, soy, peanut & tree nuts. It’s top-8-free too.

Taco soup has been a staple my entire life. My mom made it growing up. Unfortunately, she’d use a taco seasoning packet that had wheat in it, so for a long time, we went without.

I was so glad when I discovered an easy, but DELICIOUS homemade taco seasoning mix that really gives this taco soup a pop. It’s more spice than I’ve ever had in the typical taco soup (take that pre-made packets!), so now I don’t know that I could eat anyone else’s–they might seem too bland. But, don’t worry it’s not too powerful, as I’m quite a baby.

Another trick that sets this allergy-friendly taco soup apart is that it uses brown sugar–which matches the spices and gives it a perfect sweet heat combo.

And lastly, since my son is allergic to beef, we do not use red meat. With all of the recalls on hamburger, I am often glad we don’t eat it anymore. So, we use ground chicken instead for a leaner cut of meat. It still has that same ground texture, and with all of the seasoning you’d never know it wasn’t hamburger. It’s a pretty magical substitute.

OK, I lied–there is one more trick up my sleeve to make this the best taco soup yet. I use an entire Tablespoon of minced garlic. I know this might seem like overkill, but it really isn’t and matches the potency of the spices to give it a well-rounded flavor.

Before I take all the credit, I have to say I got these tweaks from my best friend, Alicia. She is such a wonderful cook. And, that’s saying something since growing up her mom made maybe three recipes over and over. She is self taught and makes so many wonderful recipes for her family. I love it since it goes to show you don’t have to have this great background and that you can teach yourself how to cook.

Another reason I love her so much and am basically writing a love letter to her with this recipe is because we eat together a lot…and she has ALWAYS made things safe for my son. She doesn’t wait for me to think of ideas, but she is proactive and reads labels, checks things with me and always adapts things so that he is included. Her house is one of the few I go to without any reservations and I’m not nervous at all because I trust her completely. She is so thoughtful and loves my son like he’s her own. I am so fortunate to have her. Every allergy mom needs an Alicia in their life.

Taco soup is such a great and easy dinner that takes less than 30 minutes to make and is so filling and leaves lots for leftovers. If you’re looking for a great side dish to have with it try my The Best Top 8 Free Cornbread.

If you’ve had taco soup before, give this new one a try and it’ll bring back a childhood classic for you like it did me, with some extra enhancements and twists! Enjoy my Allergy-friendly Taco Soup and be sure to share it with your other allergy moms!

Allergy-friendly Taco Soup
 
Cook time
25 mins
Total time
25 mins
 
A hamburger-free, taco soup that has a gluten-free, homemade taco seasoning that gives a sweet and spicy punch. I know there are many taco soup recipes out there, but this one is by fare my favorite. This Allergy-friendly Taco Soup is free of: wheat, dairy, egg, soy, peanut & tree nuts. It's top-8-free too.
Author: Allergy Awesomeness
Recipe type: Soup
Serves: 6 servings
Ingredients
  • Olive oil
  • 1 pound ground chicken
  • 1 Tablespoon garlic
  • 1 batch homemade taco seasoning (see below)
  • ¼ cup brown sugar
  • 1 can black beans, liquid and all
  • 1 can kidney beans, liquid and all
  • 1 can corn, liquid and all
  • 1 can diced tomatoes, liquid and all
  • 1 small ( 8 oz) can tomato sauce
  • HOMEMADE GLUTEN-FREE TACO SEASONING:
  • 1 Tablespoon chili powder
  • ¼ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ¼ teaspoon onion powder
  • ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • ¼ teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1½ teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon salt
Instructions
  1. In a large stock pot over medium heat, add the olive oil. Next, add your garlic and stir for up to 1 minute until it's fragrant. Add in your ground chicken and brown. When it's almost done browning add in the taco seasoning and brown sugar. Once it's fully cooked, dump in all of the cans.
  2. Simmer for 10 minutes, or until heated through and the flavors have melded.
  3. Serve warm, with allergy-friendly cornbread. This makes enough to feed 6 adults, so if there are leftovers, store in teh fridge in an air-tight container. This also freezes well.
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If you’re looking for other allergy-friendly, taco-inspired dishes, check these out:

Chicken Enchilada Pasta (Gluten, dairy, egg, soy, peanut & tree nut free; top-8-free)

Slow Cooker Green Chile Enchilada Pasta (Gluten, dairy, egg, peanut & tree nut free)

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Specialty food allergy ingredients can often be 2-3xs the price of regular ingredients–which can make grocery shopping on a budget feel impossible. I’m going to share my top five tips on how I stay within budget even while having to avoid over 30 foods for food allergies and EOE. I’ve got a video where I show you exactly what I bought for an entire week of groceries for a family of five and what I’ll use it for. From one allergy mom to another–we can do this!

I’ve summarized my tips below, but be sure to watch the video for all the details.

TIPS FOR GROCERY SHOPPING WITH FOOD ALLERGIES:
  1. Plan out your dinners–It can be time consuming to plan out your dinners, I get it! But, one thing that helps me is having one night a week set aside to do it, so that it becomes a habit and I have the time for it built into my schedule. I do it every Sunday night–that way I can do grocery pick up in the morning and I know I’ll have the rest of the week’s dinners planned. I promise you it’s worth the effort because I know I’d never stay on budget if I didn’t go into grocery shopping with a game plan!  And you might say, “Well…I write a meal plan, buy the stuff and then don’t make it. So now what?” One way I get around this is I write on each day’s line what we’re doing that day if there is an activity around dinner time, that way I can see that I might need a quicker meal (sheet pan dinner, slow cooker) since that day we have dance or soccer to make sure I have enough time to actually execute it.
  2. Use up your pantry–This goes hand in hand with step #1. After I write down all of my daily dinners, I write down all of the ingredients each dinner needs. Then, I go through my pantry and fridge and cross off anything I already have. Maybe I see I have some cilantro, but it’s looking a little sad, so I’ll move up taco night to ensure we can use that up before it goes bad, instead of buying another bunch. And so on, and so forth! By shopping from myself first I find I actually don’t need as much as I thought I did!
  3. Eat leftovers—I know, I know. Insert eye rolling here. But, if you throw out what you worked hard on–what a waste! Plus, it’s the EASIEST lunch. I eat leftovers almost every day for lunch. If I go to the trouble to cook a dinner from scratch–why do I want to make lunch for myself too? No thanks. I’d rather pop some leftovers in the microwave and have a healthy, allergy-friendly lunch. The money you can save by using up your food is crazy. I’d rather not have my absolute favorite lunch every day and actually take my kids to do fun things instead. You gotta weigh it out like that to help you swallow it (literally!)
  4. Buy as many regular ingredients as you can—I LOVE me some allergy-friendly specific brands. I would die if I didn’t have the convenience and ease of an allergy-friendly granola bar–but I consider those a luxury and not a weekly shopping item. My kids have learned to snack on things that are regular foods and not crazy expensive (IE: chips and salsa) instead. I try to only go to specialty grocery stores every few weeks, because it’s too temping to find all of the specialty foods and want to buy them ALLLLLLLLLLLL.  (If you need a list of the allergy-friendly snacks my kids eat on the regular, check out this post.)
  5. Freeze what you don’t use and use what you freeze! If I make a big batch of soup then I’ll freeze the extras (especially if I already have a ton of leftovers I still need to eat up, so our fridge can actually shut!). It’s great when someone is sick (especially me!) then all I have to do is just warm something up. We can’t just call in a pizza order or go out to eat like most people, so make your own convenience foods. It’s so nice to have something easy to pull out of the freezer that you know is safe for days when real life hits! I like to also keep a running list on my freezer where I write down what I’m putting in it, so they don’t get shoved in there and forgotten. Then, the next time I’m making fried chicken, I can remember I have half a loaf of corn bread we can eat with it!

I give the most details in the video, so be sure to watch it below (or on YouTube)!

———->And, if you’ve never tried grocery pick-up, like I love and mention in the video, then you’ve gotta try it! If you use my affiliate link, you get $10 off your first order at Wal-Mart’s grocery pick up!

If you’d like to make the exact meal plan I did, here’s a link to all of the dinner’s I bought groceries for, so you too can find the ingredients:

*****Also, if you’d like a two week’s dinner menu with a grocery shopping list, all under $200, then be sure to purchase my e-book!*****

Lastly, be sure to leave your tips for how you stay on budget while grocery shopping with food allergies below to help future readers.

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Do you want some inexpensive treats you can make yourself for food allergies? Here are a few of our go-to snacks and treats:

How to Make Jello Pudding Dairy Free (Top-8-Free Too!)

Allergy-friendly Rice Krispies (Top 8 Free)

Happy Trails Mix (Nut, DF, Top 8 Free)

Gluten, Dairy & Oat-free Energy Balls

What in the World Do You Feed Your Kids: Candy

The post Tips for Grocery Shopping on a Budget with Food Allergies appeared first on Allergy Awesomeness.

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Allergy Awesomeness by Allergyawesomeness@gmail.com - 1M ago
No bake, clean ingredients and crazy delicious–I’m talking I could tell my kids these were cookies and they’d have no idea they’re packed with B vitamins, protein, omega-3 fatty acids and fiber. This is also free of: grains, gluten, dairy, egg, peanut, tree nuts and oats. Yes, an energy ball that is oat free! These can also be easily made vegan too.

This post contains affiliate links.

If your child needs to be grain-free or has food allergies–it can be super tough to find filling snacks. I feel like my friends’ kids live of crackers, nutrigrain bars and protein bars–(jealous!) all of which can be next to impossible to find or super expensive to find something comparable that’s safe for my kids.

I’ve been on the hunt for awhile now to have something homemade that actually fills them up (IE–has lots of protein) and that they’ll actually eat.

I kept seeing these “power balls” or “energy balls” float around the Internet for the past two years or so. I’d always be sad and wish that my son could have them–but I’ve only seen them made with oatmeal, and my son is allergic to oatmeal so I figured we’d never get to experience the no-bake bliss of these rolled wonders.

Lately, I’ve discovered the magic of buckwheat–it’s not even a grain, or related to wheat–someone just had a really bad idea to name it. I always figured it wasn’t safe until I realized only the name was misleading. It’s the best grain substitute and so I figured I’d try it in this super popular energy ball recipe and see if it’d still bind and taste good.

And it is WONDERFUL. Truly. Even my husband who doesn’t like the taste of SunButter really liked these balls. My kids will legit eat 3-4 in a row, and I don’t even mind. It’s a snack I don’t feel like I have to put limitations on because it has no refined sugar and it’s full of good stuff. I even find myself downing a bunch at a time. I basically need to start doubling the batch each time because we go through sixteen balls in one day. (Note–you can use any nut butter that works for your diet–there is a soy butter and of course almond, peanut–whatever works).

The texture is even fabulous! The crunch from the chia seeds and buckwheat groats gives it a nice chew (reminiscent of the days when we could have that lovely snap from nuts), so that it’s not this soft, wet ball–like a lot of them look like. And by all means, if you’d rather not include chocolate, craisins would be just as yummy too!

I see myself adding these to lunches when I have to pack them next year and just always having them on hand.

Having hungry kids complain there is nothing to eat is one of the most frustrating things a mom can hear–especially when you have hungry boys who are bottomless pits. Don’t get me wrong–they love to snack on carrots and apples and such–but those never fill them up and five minutes later they’re scavenging the kitchen. It’s even more stressful when you feel like you don’t have a lot of options due to food allergies. I’m so grateful I’ve found a homemade, easy snack that is allergy-friendly!

I hope your family enjoys these Gluten, Dairy & Oat-free Energy Balls too!

Gluten, Dairy & Oat-free Energy Balls
 
Prep time
10 mins
Total time
10 mins
 
No bake, clean ingredients and crazy delicious--I'm talking I could tell my kids these were cookies and they'd have no idea they're packed with B vitamins, protein, omega-3 fatty acids and fiber. This is also free of: grains, gluten, dairy, egg, peanut, tree nuts and oats. Yes, an energy ball that is oat free! These can also be easily made vegan.
Author: Allergy Awesomeness
Recipe type: Snack
Serves: 16 balls
Ingredients
  • 1 cup buckwheat groats (slightly broken down in the blender)
  • ½ cup SunButter (or any variety of a nut or seed butter that works for your diet)
  • ⅓ cup honey--if vegan swap for agave
  • ¼ cup shredded unsweetened coconut
  • ¼ cup mini chocolate chips (craisins)
  • ½ scoop vanilla protein powder (can be omitted--but I like the extra protein--use whatever brand is safe for your diet)
  • 1 Tablespoon chia seeds
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • dash of sea salt
Instructions
  1. In a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, add all of the ingredients and mix until everything is incorporated.
  2. Using a cookie scoop, scoop one ball at a time and place them on wax paper. (I find sometimes I have to use my hands to help roll it into a ball if it's a bit crumbly.)
  3. Chill for 30 minutes. Can be stored room temp or in the fridge, covered.
Notes
3.5.3208

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Looking for other buckwheat recipes? Try these:

Blender Buckwheat, SunButter & Banana Waffles (Gluten, dairy, egg, soy, peanut & tree nut free; top-8-free; vegan)

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A semi-homemade (read: easy!) pasta dish that takes less than 30 minutes. Spicy Italian sausage sits in a creamy marinara bath that envelopes your favorite gluten-free pasta. This Gluten and Dairy-free Spinach & Sausage Pasta will help you enjoy an old classic despite any new dietary restrictions. Classic comfort food without any of the top eight allergens.

My parents come and visit us every six months. Once in the summer for a few weeks and again around Christmas. It’s fun, because I like to cook for them and show off any new recipes I’ve figured out while they’ve been gone.

I was super excited this Christmas to show off this delicious pasta recipe. Both my mom and I agree it tastes a lot like lasagna–except allergy friendly and a lot easier! No layering, but it still has that creamy, cheesy feel to it.

Did you make any yummy comfort meals during your Christmas break?

I know a lot of people expect skinny or healthier recipes at the first of January, but I just couldn’t sit on this recipe any longer. Yes, you need healthy meals. I’m also for moderation, and considering the rough start we’ve had for 2018–sometimes you need a warm, comforting bowl of carbs in the winter.

And, this definitely fits the bill!

My favorite part is that you can use any jarred marinara sauce you prefer. I’ve found many to be allergy-friendly, and it’s sooo nice to have a store-bought component to the meal.

And, in case you’re not familiar with using jarred, full-fat coconut milk in place of heavy cream as a substitute–no fear, it does not taste like coconut. I’m not a fan of the flavor of coconut, and this just adds the thick, creamy texture to the sauce. **Be sure to use full fat, canned coconut milk found in the Asian isle for best results. The carton coconut milk from the dairy section will be a lot thinner, as will the light canned coconut milk.** Sometimes, you gotta let yourself indulge. I’m sure it’s the good fats…right?? Someone tell me I’m right??!

I hope this quick meal of Gluten & Dairy-free Spinach & Sausage Pasta will help you enjoy a comforting, allergy-friendly pasta dish this winter!

 

Gluten & Dairy-free Spinach & Sausage Pasta (Gluten, dairy, egg, soy, peanut & tree nut free; top-8-free)
 
Prep time
10 mins
Cook time
10 mins
Total time
20 mins
 
A semi-homemade (read: easy!) pasta dish that takes less than 30 minutes. Spicy Italian sausage sits in a creamy marinara bath that envelopes your favorite gluten-free pasta. This Gluten and Dairy-free Spinach & Sausage Pasta will help you enjoy an old classic despite any new dietary restrictions. Classic comfort food without any of the top eight allergens.
Author: Allergy Awesomeness
Recipe type: Dinner
Cuisine: Italian
Serves: 5 servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Fill a large stock pot with salted water and turn it on high. Once it is boiling, boil your pasta for the recommended time on the package. Reserve ½ cup of the pasta water and drain the rest.
  2. While the pasta boils, heat the olive oil over medium heat and add the onion. Soften for 1-2 minutes. Then, add the Italian sausage and cook until browned. You can then either drain the fat, or keep it. I prefer to keep it for flavor.
  3. Add the garlic, marinara sauce, coconut milk, nutritional yeast and pasta water. Once that has been stirred, add in the spinach and cook until it's wilted. (I prefer the spinach leaves whole, but for little kids, I find it's easier if it's torn.)
  4. Finally, add in the al-dente pasta and stir to coat.
  5. Serve warm. Leftovers keep well 1-2 days in an air-tight container.
Notes
Adapted from Kelsey Nixon
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Craving some more gluten-free pasta dishes? Check out my other favs:

Dairy & Gluten-free Creamy Lemon Chicken Pasta

Allergy-friendly Tuscan Pasta Salad

Basil, Lemon & Avocado Creamy Pasta

Allergy-friendly Ragu

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Allergy Awesomeness by Allergyawesomeness@gmail.com - 2M ago
The easiest tree decorating you’ll ever do. And no blinking lights or replacing bulbs! This festive, no-bake holiday treat is easily made allergy-friendly to involve your favorite allergy kids. Simple decorating helps little hands enjoy this fun Christmas treat. These Allergy-friendly Rice Krispie Christmas Trees are free of: gluten, dairy, egg, peanut & tree nuts. They can be vegan too!

This post contains affiliate links.

I am suffering with being torn you guys! If you’re a female, chances are you know what I mean!

My mom came early due to my Uncle’s death (hopefully you’re following along on my Instagram stories to know what I’m talking about). So, she gets to stay with us for over three glorious weeks.

Because she is an angel in disguise, she is sooo supportive and is like, “go lock yourself in your room and work and I’ll wash dishes/kiss babies/feed children/ and play transformers with your kids”.

And, so you’d think I’d be cranking out a million projects–but I sit up here and feel guilty! On one hand, I feel like because I don’t have family near by and stay up way too late and kill myself to run this little blog and keep littles alive, that I should take FULL ADVANTAGE of a free nanny. But, then I want to just spend my time with my mom and enjoy time with my son while he’s off of school. And then on the other hand, I just want to enjoy kid-free quiet time and binge watch Netflix’s The Crown alone in my room instead of work. UG.

Do you see why I’m torn??

Which is why once again–I’m posting yet ANOTHER rice krispie holiday treat (seriously, it’s adult play doh for me, look at the bottom of the post for other recipes). So, if you’re feeling torn and stretched this holiday season you can still give out cute, festive treats without spending all day baking.

It was great that this doubled as a way to spend time with said family and get a post done for you guys. Have I mentioned how much I love multi-tasking??!!

We did an assembly line and I would cut the krispies into triangles, and my mom would put the gluten-free pretzel in them, I would frost them and my kids would put the skittles on them. Easy, and fun!

Then, to hand out to neighbors, I simply put them in little cellophane bags and tied them with ribbon. Done and DONE!

Now, to the allergy-friendly ingredient questions I know you’ll have:

  • For pretels:
    • We used Synder’s gluten-free pretzels. No, this is not sponsored, in fact–I’ve tried emailing them and they’ve never responded. So, if you know them–please let them know of my undying love for them.
    • Glutino also has a straight pretzel.
    • Quinn snacks (I have not tried them, but a friend has) also has straight pretzels.
    • Unfortunately, I’ve never found a pretzel that doesn’t have soy, hence why these are not top-8-free.
    • If you know of any other gluten-free pretzels, please let me know!
    • *If you can’t do pretzels/soy I think these would still be cute without the pretzel at the bottom.*
  • For cereal: Regular and generic brands of rice krispies use barley in all the brands I’ve ran across. (So they are wheat free, but not gluten-free). I’ve found Malt-0-Meal & Erewhon are great gluten-free substitutions.
  • For food dye: I’ve been asked by many what food coloring I use. So, confession: I used Wilton’s food coloring gels long before I was smart enough to check their label. I don’t know why I didn’t think food coloring might have something in it! I have called Wilton before, and the person I talked to said they’ve added a may contain label if there is something in the same facility.  So, we’ve used it and never had an issue–BUT–only do what you’re comfortable with for your own food allergies and go with what your allergist tells you. I’ve heard (but not personally tried) that AmeriColor has allergy-friendly food gels.
  • For marshmallows: If you’re needing this to be vegan, be sure to use appropriate marshmallows like Dandies. (Does anyone know them–I seriously should work with them since I’m always touting their product!)
  • For ornaments: We used Skittles. You could use any colored candy, really. Surf Sweets jelly beans would also work well.
  • For frosting: Welp–just look in the recipe card, silly! Just kidding, here it is.

I hope that we can all put away some of the mom guilt and enjoy this holiday season a little more. It’s hard balancing it–but how lucky are we to have amazing things to be balancing?! Have a safe, allergy-friendly holiday dear readers–I truly appreciate you stopping by my little corner of the internet. Every click you make helps my family out.

Allergy-friendly Rice Krispie Christmas Trees
 
Prep time
15 mins
Cook time
10 mins
Total time
25 mins
 
The easiest tree decorating you'll ever do. And no-blinking lights! This festive, no-bake holiday treat is easily made allergy-friendly to involve your favorite allergy kids. Simple decorating helps little hands enjoy this fun Christmas treat. These Allergy-friendly Rice Krispie Christmas Trees are free of: gluten, dairy, egg, peanut & tree nuts. They can be vegan too!
Author: Allergy Awesomeness
Recipe type: Christmas dessert
Serves: 20 trees
Ingredients
  • 3 Tablespoons of coconut oil (or if you can't do coconut, shortening can work too)
  • 6 cups of gluten-free crispy cereal (see post for details)
  • 1 package of marshmallows (if you need a vegan option, see post)
  • Green food dye
  • Half a batch of my best dairy-free vanilla frosting
  • Skittles
  • Gluten-free pretzels of choice (see post for options)
Instructions
  1. In a stock pot over medium-low heat, melt the coconut oil. Then, add the marshmallows and stir until they're melted. Add in your green food coloring until it's your preferred shade of green. Take it off the heat and stir in your cereal until everything is coated.
  2. Pour the finished cereal onto a flat, greased surface. Flatten and shape into a large rectangle, or square with wet or greased hands.
  3. While the cereal is cooling, make the frosting.
  4. When the frosting is ready, put it into a baggie and snip the corner. Cut the cereal into triangles. Place a pretzel in the bottom, and frost the top in zig-zags. Place skittles along the frosting.
  5. Keep in an air-tight container until you serve or eat. If you do use coconut oil, they can toughen when they get cold, because coconut oil is temperamental to temperature changes, so be sure you keep them room temp when storing.
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BE SURE TO PIN IT, SO YOU DON’T LOSE IT. ALSO, BE SURE TO CHECK OUT MY OTHER ALLERGY-FRIENDLY PINTEREST BOARDS.

Looking for other no-bake, allergy-friendly Christmas treats? Check these out:

Christmas Rice Krispie Roll (Gluten, dairy, egg, soy, peanut, tree nut free; top-8-free; vegan)

Allergy-friendly Reindeer Rice Krispies (Video too!)

Dairy-free Peppermint Patties (Gluten, dairy, egg, soy, peanut & tree nut free; top-8-free; vegan)

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If you love eggnog, you will just die over these eggnog cupcakes with a spiced eggnog frosting. Tender, soft cupcakes with the rich frosting are what holiday dreams are made of. These Eggnog Cupcakes with Eggnog Frosting are free of: gluten, wheat, dairy, egg, soy, peanuts and tree nuts! They are top-8-free and vegan too!

This post contains affiliate links.

It’s happened you guys! It’s finally happened! My son has tasted his first drink of eggnog and I could not be happier. I think until you’ve had your child down to only ten foods and have had to fight and claw your way to more safe foods that you realize how truly splendid sharing holiday food with your child is.

And you may think I’m crazy to try and make an eggnog treat that is not only egg free, but dairy free–but it CAN be done!

I’d seen last year that there were several non-dairy eggnogs out there online, but was having a hard time finding one in a store close to me. And then, Winco of all places (not a national chain, sorry!) that’s not even like a health food store had some. I was soooo excited! So, you never know–go ask your grocer to carry it. If you want to see all of the kinds (some made with soy, coconut, various nuts…etc.) there is a great list on GoDairyFree.com.

As you can imagine, trying something for the first time–especially being a kid, I knew there was a chance my son might not like it. But I hoped he would. Which is kind of silly–it’s OK for us to like different things, but for me, it’s extra fun when we can like and share in food moments together. So, I was thrilled when he liked it.

It was after I saw how much he liked it that I KNEW I wanted to bake with it. I’d seen some eggnog cupcakes floating around on Pinterest and just PRAYED that I could turn them into a gluten-free vegan version. And, honestly–this is one of the tasted cupcakes I’ve ever made in my entire life.

I’m literally wondering if it would be OK to stockpile dairy-free eggnog and just make the cupcakes year round, because I’m not going to want to stop making and devouring them after the holidays are over!

And, if you’ve never heard of aquafaba–then I am about to change your life. It’s one of the best egg replacers I’ve ever found and I used it in the cupcakes and they are so tender and moist! It’s literally as easy as opening a can of garbanzo (or chick peas) and then draining and measuring out the liquid. That stuff is gold! Do not drain and rinse the beans like I used to. Use up that good stuff!

The frosting alone may be my greatest gifts to the culinary world. There was some leftover and I used it to frost snickerdoodles. Yeah–the fun just keeps on going at the Allergy Awesomeness household!

I had to borrow some vanilla from a sweet neighbor to make these (why am I ALWAYS running out of vanilla??!) and so to say thank you I gave her and her boyfriend the cupcakes and they loved them. It’s always a huge win when someone who eats normally says that your cupcakes are good. And seriously–you’ll agree!

I hope these gluten-free, vegan and allergy-friendly eggnog cupcakes help you have an extra Merry Christmas!

Eggnog Cupcakes with Eggnog Frosting (GF & Allergy-friendly!)
 
Prep time
20 mins
Cook time
20 mins
Total time
40 mins
 
If you love eggnog, you will just die over these eggnog cupcakes with a spiced eggnog frosting. Tender, soft cupcakes with the rich frosting are what holiday dreams are made of. These Eggnog Cupcakes with Eggnog Frosting are free of: gluten, wheat, dairy, egg, soy, peanuts and tree nuts! They are top-8-free and vegan too!
Author: Allergy Awesomeness
Recipe type: Christmas Dessert
Cuisine: American
Serves: 12
Ingredients
  • EGGNOG CUPCAKES:
  • 1 and ⅔ cups gluten-free flour
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 and ¼ tsp baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon xanthan gum
  • ¾ cup vegan butter, room temperature
  • 6 Tablespoons aquafaba (the brine from a can of chick peas)
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract
  • ¾ tsp nutmeg
  • 1 cup vegan egg nog
  • EGGNOG FROSTING:
  • ½ cup vegan butter
  • ½ cup shortening (if you need soy-free shortening, try palm)
  • 4 cups powdered sugar
  • 4 Tablespoon vegan eggnog
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 tsp nutmeg
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp imitation rum extract
Instructions
  1. Grease a muffin tin and preheat your oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. In a stand mixer beat your vegan butter and brown sugar until creamy.
  3. Add in the vanilla and eggnog.
  4. Next mix in everything else while the mixer is on slow, finishing with the flour last. Be sure to scrape the sides of the bowl so everything is fully incorporated.
  5. Fill each muffin tin ¾ full of batter. Bake for 17-20 minutes, or until the tops spring back when you lightly touch them and the edges are golden.
  6. Allow them to cool in the pan for ten minutes, and then turn them to a wire rack to finish cooling.
  7. While they cool, make the frosting by creaming the vegan butter ans shortening together. Next, add the vanilla, nutmeg, cinnamon and rum extract and cream.
  8. Finally, alternate 1 cup of powdered sugar and 1 Tablespoon of the vegan eggnog and beat in between until you've used up all of the powdered sugar and eggnog and your frosting is whipped and fluffy.
  9. Frost the cupcakes and enjoy!
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Do you want some other allergy-friendly & vegan Christmas goodies? Check out some of my favorites:

 Christmas Chocolate Crinkle Peppermint Cookies (GF, Vegan, Peanut/Tree nut Free)
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The bright red and green color of this no-bake Christmas Rice Krispie Roll makes for a festive and easy holiday dessert. The fun swirl adds a little Christmas magic and helps the regular rice krispies look extra decorated. Plus, this recipe is free of: gluten, wheat, dairy, egg, soy, peanuts and tree nuts. These are top-8-free and have a vegan option too–so you can freely share this treat with those with food allergies.

This post contains affiliate links.

Are you sensing a theme from my last few posts? Quick, no-bake holiday desserts?! Can you tell it’s my first Christmas being a mom of three? Haha.

But seriously though, I don’t have my shopping all of the way done, I frequently have dishes in the sink and I’m almost always one of the last moms in the pick up lane at school–this momma needs some easy holiday treats to hand out to neighbors!

And, this treat is great because the kids can get involved and there really is a fun wow factor when you cut into the log and reveal these slices with the pretty swirl in the middle. They’re fun to lay out on goodie plates and present to neighbors.

I was one of those moms that told my boys that they couldn’t get a treat when we got home if they didn’t sing when we delivered the treats. I didn’t make them sing a long or hard song, just “We wish you a Merry Christmas” but it was still a struggle. We won’t be trying out for “The Voice” as a family band any time soon!

Making and taking treats to neighbors is one of my favorite holiday traditions. Between actual neighbors, family friends and church members the list seems to get longer every year, so I’m so glad to come up with easy and inexpensive treats to pass out at Christmas time.

Details on the allergy-friendly ingredients:

For cereal: Regular and generic brands of rice krispies use barley in all the brands I’ve ran across. (So they are wheat free, but not gluten-free). I’ve found Malt-0-Meal & Erewhon are great gluten-free substitutions.

For food dye: I’ve been asked by many what food coloring I use. So, confession: I used Wilton’s food coloring gels long before I was smart enough to check their label. I don’t know why I didn’t think food coloring might have something in it! I have called Wilton before, and the person I talked to said they’ve added a may contain label if there is something in the same facility.  So, we’ve used it and never had an issue–BUT–only do what you’re comfortable with for your own food allergies and go with what your allergist tells you. I’ve heard (but not personally tried) that AmeriColor has allergy-friendly food gels. Just note, that you’ll need to use a good amount of red to get it to look red and not pink.

For marshmallows: If you’re needing this to be vegan, be sure to use appropriate marshmallows like Dandies. (Does anyone know them–I seriously should work with them since I’m always touting their product!)

For oil: If you can’t do coconut, shortening should do. We can do regular soy/vegetable shortening, but I’ve also used palm oil.

I hope this easy, no-bake Christmas recipe also helps you and your kids make a fun holiday treat together–as well as make some memories. Happy holiday season friends!

Christmas Rice Krispie Roll (Gluten, dairy, egg, soy, peanut & tree nut free; top-8-free; vegan option)
 
Prep time
15 mins
Cook time
10 mins
Total time
25 mins
 
The bright red and green color of this no-bake Christmas Rice Krispie Roll makes for a festive and easy holiday dessert. The fun swirl adds a little Christmas magic and helps the regular rice krispies look extra decorated. Plus, this recipe is free of: gluten, wheat, dairy, egg, soy, peanuts and tree nuts. These are top-8-free and have a vegan option too--so you can freely share this treat with those with food allergies.
Author: Allergy Awesomeness
Recipe type: Christmas dessert
Cuisine: American
Serves: 16-20 slices
Ingredients
  • RED RICE KRISPIES LAYER:
  • 3 Tablespoons coconut oil (or shortening if you can't do coconut)
  • 6 cups of gluten-free crispy cereal (see post for details)
  • 1 package of marshmallows (use vegan marshmallows if needed)
  • Red food dye to liking (see post for details)
  • GREEN RICE KRISPIES LAYER:
  • 3 Tablespoons coconut oil (or shortening if you can't do coconut)
  • 6 cups of gluten-free crispy cereal (see post for details)
  • 1 package of marshmallows (use vegan marshmallows if needed)
  • Green food dye to liking (see post for details)
  • Wax paper
Instructions
  1. In a pot over medium low heat, add your coconut oil and melt. Next, stir in your marshmallows until they're melted. Add the red food dye until you reach your desired color (be sure to use gels and not liquid, to not throw off the recipe since you'll need a good amount to make it red and not pink.)
  2. Add in your cereal and stir until it's completely incorporated.
  3. Pour onto wax paper in a baking sheet and press flat with greased or wet hands (so it doesn't stick) to make a rectangle. (Note: it will stain your hands a bit!)
  4. Allow it to cool.
  5. Make the second batch of krispies the same way you did before, only adding in green food coloring this time.
  6. Spread the green krispies directly over the red rice krispies and shape it to match the same size.
  7. Once it is cool enough, take the krispies out of the pan (that was just to help you shape it evenly.) Place another piece of wax paper on the top and with a rolling pin, roll the two rice krispies until they're a bit flatter. (You don't have to do this, but I found doing so helped it roll if it wasn't so thick.)
  8. Starting at one end, roll the krispies together into a log. Allow to cool so the shape can harden a bit. Cut off swirls and serve.
  9. Keep covered room temperature (otherwise the coconut oil will harden and make the krispies tough.)
Notes
Cereal tips: Regular and generic brands of rice krispies use barley in all the brands I've ran across. (So they are wheat free, but not gluten-free). I've found Malt-0-Meal & Erewhon are great gluten-free cereal substitutions.
Marshmallow tip: If you need this to be vegan, be sure to use vegan appropriate marshmallows, like Dandies
3.5.3208

DON’T FORGET TO PIN IT, SO YOU DON’T LOSE IT! BE SURE TO ALSO CHECK OUT MY OTHER ALLERGY-FRIENDLY PINTEREST BOARDS.

Looking for other allergy-friendly Christmas treats? Check out these other favorites:

Allergy-friendly Reindeer Rice Krispies

Dairy-free & Vegan Homemade Hot Cocoa

Christmas Chocolate Peppermint Crinkle Cookies (GF, Vegan, Peanut/Tree nut Free)

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