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Ektar 100 is one of my favourite colour films, and that’s saying a lot because I don’t shoot a lot of colour film. But when it comes to Ektar 100, it is the first of many ‘new’ colour films to come out of Kodak since I first started shooting film. The name itself, a historical word in the Kodak Dictionary is an acronym for Eastman Kodak TessAR the lenses produced between 1936 and 1962 and I own a 203mm Ektar which I still run on my Crown Graphic. Then it became a line of professional films rated at 25, 100, and 1600 starting in 1989, but Royal Gold in 1997 would replace it. I have shot the old Ektar 25 once. And then Ektar went away, but in 2008 it returned in its current form and started the ball rolling on a film resurgence at Kodak which today has seen the return of Ektachrome E100. But E100 is a review for later this month! With rich colours and a look that for me is the closest thing to Kodachrome in a colour negative film, Ektar 100 is certainly my choice when I’m out travelling and want a good colour film!

Film Specs
Type: Colour Negative Film (C-41 Process)
Film Base: Acetate
Film Speed: ASA-100, Latitude: +/- 1-Stop
Formats Avaliable: 35mm, Medium, Sheet

Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington CameraNikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington CameraNikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington CameraNikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington Camera

Colour Redition
Ektar 100 loves colour, perfect from the late spring through the fall. Everything is far more vibrant on the film than it is in real life giving the appearance of almost a hyper-reality. And while it is not as contrasty as Fuji Velvia, but it certainly leans closer to Kodachrome 64. But Ektar 100 doesn’t just pick out one colour it brings all the reds, greens, and blues into sharp focus. And while the film performs well in almost every lighting condition, it loves the bright sunlight because you get the maximum colour saturation and rendition. Even in overhead light like high-noon you get amazing results.

Nikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington CameraNikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington CameraNikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington CameraNikon F5 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington Camera

Image Quality
When it comes to image quality, Ektar 100 has it in spades. Honestly, I remember my early days shooting consumer film and thinking that it was good quality (mostly rebranded Fuji or Kodak stock) for the price point. But when I first saw the Ektar negatives, I knew that I could probably never go back to the consumer stuff and relegated myself to being picky when I shot colour film. Ektar 100 images are sharp and fine-grained. Each colour renders well, and the contrast is natural, nothing too punchy. And this quality extends to any format from 35mm up to 8×10, although the larger the format, the finer the grain will be, when you have fine-grain at 35mm it is near invisible in large format stocks. Being a colour negative film blesses the film with a good dynamic range, I found that I didn’t lose anything in my highlights and shadows so even in uneven light, I still had shadow detail and blue skies.

Rolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington CameraRolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington CameraRolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington CameraRolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington Camera

Scanning
Scanning colour is always a difficult task. However, Ektar 100 is not a terrible film to digitise either with lab scans or your scanners. Now in my case the two rolls I shot specifically for this review was scanned on an Epson V700 (Rolleiflex) and a Nikon Coolscan V ED (F5). Both scanners did a superb job on the film. Like many Kodak films the scans do lean towards the magenta cast, but running it through Photoshop’s Auto Colour will swing it into the Green, but Auto Tone will bring it back to a happy middle. I didn’t need to go in and manually fine tune the images. Also, there were no coloured artefacts in the scans either, at least nothing of note that couldn’t be removed using the noise reduction filter in Photoshop. In general Ektar 100 is an easy film to scan at home.

Rolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington CameraRolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington CameraRolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington CameraRolleiflex 2.8F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektar 100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Burlington Camera

Overall Impression
I like Ektar 100; I’m glad that after setting colour film aside in favour of mostly B&W stocks I started back up with Ektar 100. In both cases it made the world look almost exactly as I saw it through the viewfinder, and in many cases it made the world look better and brighter. It also made me look at the world differently. I actively looked for colour in my shots, not just contrast. It made me realise that so much of the areas where I tend always to shoot are full of colour. And while I don’t shoot the volume of colour to maintain home colour processing, I know that even in my little more cavalier developing methods Ektar 100 will shine!

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How do Developers Work?
Before you can get into the actual developers, we should recap how developers and black & white film photography works anyways. We’re going to put on our lab coats and try to explain this process as simple as possible. Black & White film is made up of individual crystals, the crystals are known as silver halide (2Ag+Br–) is made up of a positive silver ion and a negative bromide ion. These crystals while theoretically would be perfect, in reality, there are small imperfections in each crystal.

The crystals are naturally light sensitive, however, when they are bombarded by photons (light) the bromide will boot out one of its electrons. These electrons stick in the imperfections this attracts the silver, darkening the crystals. This forms a latent image.

The next step is to turn the latent image into a permanent image, through means of reducing the silver halide into metallic silver. This is done through a reducing agent, which we commonly call a developer. The most common of these is metol (elon), however, there are several others including hydroquinone, phenidone, p-aminophenol, glycine, pyrogallol, and catechol. Additionally, there’s an additive to help give the developer an Alkaline pH balance, this is done through Borax or Sodium Hydroxide. Not to mention other additives to help prevent oxidization, or reduce base fog such as Potassium Bromide that acts as a restraining agent.

Because the developer works in an alkaline environment the fastest way to stop the actions of the developer is to turn the solution acidic, this is done through a chemical stop bath, but you can also just use water to dilute the developer so much in just has no energy left to keep working. However, at this point, there are still unexposed and unreduced silver halide ions on the film. We call this step fixing, because it permanently fixes the metallic silver, washes away the unexposed, yet still light-sensitive silver halide, to the film base. The usual chemical that takes care of this action is Sodium Thiosulfate (Na2S2O3). The Fixer will turn the silver halide into a water-soluble solution which you can then wash way using an archival wash, such as Kodak Hypoclear, Permawash, or the FPP Archival Wash. Followed by a water wash.

Of course, you could go on for hours on the science behind black & white development but we just wanted to ensure you had a base knowledge to understand how some of the developers work and the chemistry that goes into them.

Kodak D-76/Ilford ID-11/Kodak D-23
We cannot get into D-76 or ID-11 without first talking about D-23. When it comes to developers it doesn’t get much simpler than D-23, the developer contains three ingredients, Metol, Sodium Sulfite (Anhydrous), and Water. It is a slow working Developer that has some compensating characteristics. But in this 1920s Kodak released D-76, which is the developer everyone starts with. D-76 improved on D-23. The addition of hydroquinone, which acted as a supercharger for the metol, and Borax to improve the alkalinity of the developer. As a developer, it does a solid job on most films, and can also be used to developer paper. If you’ve done home developing there’s a good chance you started with Kodak D-76 or Ilford ID-11, which is identical to D-76.

A bag of Kodak D-76, unlike Ilford ID-11, D-76 comes in a single pouch while ID-11 comes in two separate pouches.

To Make D-23
750mL Distilled Water at 125F
7.5g Metol
100g Sodium Sulfite (Anhydrous)
Water to make up 1L

Hasselblad 500c – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:2.8 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20CPacemaker Crown Graphic – Fuji Fujinon-W 1:5.6/125 – Ilford FP4+ – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20CCanon 7 – Voigtlander 21mm 1:4 – Fomapan 100 @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (1+1) 15:00 @ 20CPentax Spotmatic SP – Super-Takumar 200mm 1:4 – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-40 – Kodak D-23 (1+1) 15:00 @ 20C

To Make D-76
750mL Distilled Water at 125F
2g Metol
100g Sodium Sulfite (Anhydrous)
5g Hydroquinone
2g Granular Borax
Water to make up 1L

Mamiya m645J – Mamiya-Sekor C 1:2.8 f=55mm – Ilford Delta 400 – Kodak D-76 (1+1) 14:00 @ 20CRolleiflex 3.5F – Carl Zeiss Planar 80mm 1:3.5 – Fuji Acros 100 @ ASA-100 – Ilford ID-11 (1+1) 10:00 @ 20CNikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak D-76 (1+1) 9:45 @ 20CKalimar A – Terionon 45mm ƒ/3.5 Lens – Polypan F 50 – Kodak D-76 (1+1) 13:00 @ 20C

Kodak Xtol
Introduced in 1996, Kodak Xtol remains the final developer invented and released by Kodak for Black & White Film. It also is the first developer that used something other than hydroquinone as the developing agents. Xtol ran with Phenidone and Ascorbic Acid and the developing agents, to reduce the toxicity and make it more user-friendly. It also gave Xtol the capability for producing sharp fine-grained images even in faster films and did wonders for push-processing. However, there are drawbacks, first is that it does not perform well at high-dilutions, best to stick to 1+1 anything higher can cause failure, in fact, the highest dilution we recommend is 1+2. Second, being that the developer will just die, suddenly, and also you do need to mix up at minimum a 5L packet. Now, they did produce a 1L packet, but these suffered from stability issues so they were pulled from shelves shortly after release. Now you can store your 5L mix into 1L bottles. But it is important that you should treat Xtol as a one-shot, even when using stock dilution. Trust us, you won’t regret it when you pull out a blank strip of film when you develop it in Xtol you don’t remember when you mixed it up.

Intrepid – Schneider-Kreuznach Symmar-S 1:5.6/210 – Kodak TMax 100 @ ASA-32 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 8:00 @ 20CPentax KM – SMC Pentax 55mm 1:2 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 9:00 @ 20CVoigtlander Bessa R – Voigtlander Super Heliar 15mm 1:4.5 – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak Xtol (1+1) 9:00 @ 20CNikon FA – AI-S Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4 (Red 25a) – FPP Infrapan @ ASA-200 – Kodak Xtol (Stock) 8:00 @ 20C

Kodak TMax Developer
Like the film of the same line, Kodak released their TMax Developer in 1986 and was the first developer released by Kodak since HC-110. A moderately active liquid developer which promoted high-quality images and excellent shadow detail. Designed to work perfectly with T-Grained film, but could produce excellent results with any continuous tone films. Designed to be a one-shot developer at either 1+4 or 1+9 dilutions, Kodak did release a variant, TMax Developer RS that came with a replenisher and they also had a TMax Slide developer that turned TMax films into black & white slides. Although the Slide and RS developers are hard to find these days. TMax developer also because of its semi-active nature works well as a compensating developer and does a decent job when push processing.

While not the most economical developer, TMax Developer is a solid choice for many films.Nikon F2 Photomic – AI-S Nikkor 35mm 1:2 – Legacy Pro 400 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+4) 6:00 @ 20CNikon FM2n – AI Nikkor 28mm 1:2.8 – Legacy Pro 400 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+4) 6:00 @ 20CNikon FE – AI-S Nikkor 105mm 1:2.5 – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-200 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+4) 9:00 @ 20CNikon F5 – AF DC-Nikkor 105mm 1:2D – Kodak TMax 100 @ ASA-200 – Kodak TMax Developer (1+4) 7:30 @ 20C

If you want to hear more chemical talk, you can tune into the Negative Positives Podcast Ep. 239 where John, James, Bill, and Alex join Mike and Andre to discuss more about developers, stop, fix, and washing. Don’t see the developer that you use, well tune into Part Two where the team tackles HC-110, Rodinal, and Pyrocat-HD!

Looking for a good spot to get your gear and material fix check out Burlington Camera (Burlington, ON), Downtown Camera (Toronto, ON), Film Plus (Toronto, ON), Belle Arte Camera (Hamilton, ON), Pond’s FotoSource (Guleph, ON), Foto Art Camera (Owen Sound, ON). Out West there’s The Camera Store (Calgary, AB) and Beau Photo Supply (Vancouver, BC). Additionally you can order online at Argentix (Quebec), buyfilm.ca (Ontario), the Film Photography Project or Freestyle Photographic.

Also you can connect with us through email: classiccamerarevivial[at]gmail[dot]com or by Facebook, we’re at Classic Camera Revival or even Twitter @ccamerarevival

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Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered in #photochat, hop onto Facebook, Twitter, or good old fashioned Email and let me know!

The Topic for Thursday 13 June 2019 is Culling (or Editing) Your Images!

Question 1 – When do you start the culling processing, that is picking the images you want to edit and post?
Question 2 – How do you pick your images to edit and post, do you have special criteria or gut instinct?
Question 3 – Do you cull your images in camera, either through deletion or simply not taking a photo?
Question 4 – On average how many images do you take on a photo shoot or adventure and how many of those do you post?
Question 4b – Has that percentage gone up or down since you started?
Question 5 – Share a favourite photo you’ve taken and posted recently!

Past topics have included: Photojournalisim, Classic Lenses, Self-Improvement, Websites, Portfolios, This or That, Work Flow (2019), Film Processing, Processing, Photographic Perceptions, Street Photography (2019), Printing (2019), Brand Loyalities, Couples, Slowing Down, Quick Thinking, Why are you a Photographer (2019), Sensitive Subjects (2019) Bad Weather, Photographic Goals (2019), Year in Review (2018), Getting to Know You (2018), Blogging, Self-Promotion, Gifting (2018), Software, Portrait Photography (2018), Timing it Right, Toxicity in Photography, Photographic Frustrations (2018), Slow Photography, Fast Photography, Film Photography, Random Questions, Wildest Dreams, Famous Photographers, Teaching The Craft (2018), Photography, Photographic Rituals, Toy Cameras (2018), Photography Hacks, Networking, Sharing Your Work (2018), Summer Vacation, Astro Photography, Selling Gear, Buying Gear, Infrared, Getting the Shot (2018), Power of Photography, Photographic Evolution, Photography Projects (2018), Mobile Technologies, Black & White Photography (2018), Colour Photography (2018), Photographic Perks, Buying a New Camera, Optics, Keep it Simple, Accessories, Helping Out, Battle Damage, Ultrawide Angle, All About the Love, Podcasts, What’s in your Bag (2018), Self-Improvement, Snapshots, Exposure Troubles, Street Photography (2017), Event Photography, Photographic Gifts, Film Photography (2017), Photographic Annoyances, Locations, Strange Habits, Collaboration, Buying Work, Silly Mistakes, Show and Tell, The Discomfort Zone, The Comfort Zone, Influence, Consistency, Inclement Weather, Stock Photography, Going Freelance, Photo Sharing, Photography Books, Creativity in Photography, Colour Photography, Black & White (2017), Critiques, Lenses, Blogging, Regrets, What’s in Your Bag (2017), Promotion, Random Questions, Photo Projects, Shooting Film, Photographic Buzz Words, Photographic Wins, Photographic Fails, Still Life, Portrait Photography, Automotive Photography (2017), Traveling With Gear, Photographic Quirks, Why is Photography Important (2017), Ethics (2017), Difficult Situations, Phone Photography, Web sites, Self-Improvement (2017), Personal Branding, Photographic Gifts, Brand Loyalties (2016), Location Scouting, Food Photography, The Good, The Bad, Photographic Slumps, Wedding Photography, Post-Processing, Digital Photography, Film Photography, Keeping It Simple, Photographic Fads, Regular Maintenance, Personal Vision, Travel, Snapshots, Extreme Weather, Sports Photography, Pet Peeves, Out of the Box, Portrait Photography, Infrared Photography, Good Practices, Landscape Photography, Photography as a Skill, Photography as an Art, Getting Noticed, Post-Processing, Film Processing, Instant Photography, Tripods, Pet Photography, Budget Photography, Nude Photography, Workflow, Vintage Gear, The 5 W’s, Going Pro, Importance of Photography, Filters, Photography & the Law, Editing Your Work, Travelling with Gear, Street Photography, Get Up and Go (Motivation), Photographic Goals (2016), Low-Light Photography, Photographic Dreams, Cold Weather, Naturally Artificial, LoFi Love, Product Photography, Chasing Light, Automotive Photography, Finding Inspiration, All About You, Landscapes, Shooting for Colour, Digital Video, Back to School Parts I and II, Self-Publishing, Keeping Calm, Photography & Zen, Camera Bags, Dealing with People, Printing Your Work, Adventure Photography, Camera Clubs, Fireworks Photography, Aircraft Photography, Architectural Photography, Photo meetups, Getting Rid of GAS, Keeping it Organized, Favourite Things, Photo Competitions, Biggest Challenges, Compact System Cameras, film vs. digital, landscape photography, seasonal photography, the basics of composition, what’s in your camera bag?, night photography, portrait photography, forced perspective photography, black and white photography, golden hour photography, macro photography, how photography has changed your life, to photoshop or not, motion photography, photojournalism, the best gifts for photographers in 2014, extreme weather photography, photographic aspirations, street photography, why are you a photographer, improvisational lighting tactics, post-processing rituals, photographic blunders, getting paid, photographic triumphs, shooting hardship, photographic anxieties, quick thinking, making a difference, favorites, appropriation, brand loyalties, small photography, BIG photography, focus, photography in advertising, battle scars, sharing your photography, creative evolution, the inanimate subject, photo vs. video, emerging tech, teaching the craft, getting the shot, traveling with your camera, sweet gear deals, mobile lighting solutions, quelling frustrations, finding work, sensitive subjects, DIY projects, defamation, making and maintaining a website, in defense of photography, capturing action, post-processing, photo lingo, cold weather shooting, food photography, death in photography, film photography, famous photos, critiques, videography, user-generated content, composition, iPhoneography, standing up for yourself, blogging, workflow, the first time, candid portraiture, copyright and licensing, ethics, gear investments, inspiration, long shots, making it in the photo business, networking, night photography, perks of being a photographer, photographer stressors, photography philosophy, photography trends, picking your priorities, pricing, promoting yourself and your work, protecting your assets, self-improvement, odd photography, and travel.

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It was the 6th of November 1837, and Lower Canada had erupted in open armed revolt against the Colonial Government. The Patriotes under Louis-Joseph Papineau and many others fuelled by the ideals of the American Revolution, French Liberty, and Republicanism. They decided that they would only rid themselves of the influence of the British Ruling Class, a group of Tory elites organised into a group known as the Chateau Clique was to begin a revolution when their demands for reform were ignored. There had been some communication between Lower Canada Patriotes and the radicals in Upper Canada under William Lyon MacKenzie. And while a coordinated uprising would have been of greater efficiency, the fact was that by November MacKenzie was far from ready. Unlike Papineau, MacKenzie was less a leader and more an orator. Sir John Colborne, now the Lieutenant-Governor of Lower Canada had no trust in the local militia, fearing that they might turn in support of Papineau did not have the regular troops to soundly defeat the rebellion prevailed on Sir Francis Bond-Head to send reinforcements. Bond-Head, despite knowing the threat that MacKenzie posed ordered nearly the entire garrison to Lower Canada to support Colborne’s efforts. Many saw this as a short-sighted move, among them James FitzGibbon, a former British Army Officer who was serving as the acting Adjutant-General of the Militia. FitzGibbon feared that if MacKenzie rose up in rebellion, the militia might join the rebel cause. But Bond-Head continued to downplay the treat to help soothe the Province. MacKenzie saw these two events as an opportunity and gathered his supporters at Doel’s Brewery in Toronto to discuss his plan.

The Northern Ontario Building stands at the intersection of Bay and Adelaide where Doel’s Brewery once stood. The Brewery burned down in 1847 and was not rebuilt.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 35mm 1:3.5 N – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Blazinal (1+25) 9:00 @ 20C

There were still many in the movement who did not like the idea of an armed rebellion, such an act if they failed would mean the gallows for them all at the worst. MacKenzie downplayed the more violent aspects of his revolution. Calling it more an armed demonstration, with the British Garrison gone, they just had to march on City Hall, seize the arms there for the militia and then take Fort York. Such an act, MacKenzie concluded would only force Parliament into giving in to their demands to establish the Republic he dreamed of. Some agreed with MacKenzie, others did not, without any consensus they sent MacKenzie out to gather support from the population throughout the rural areas surrounding the city, where much of their base support lived. Charles Duncombe would head west to the London District to gather his supporters together to launch their uprising and rejoin MacKenzie in Toronto. The group agreed to meet again to go over the plan and to see if they had enough support. MacKenzie along with Samuel Lount and Peter Matthews travelled through the small villages that harboured support for the cause. While MacKenzie spoke at length on the plan, it would be Lount and Matthews who convinced the public that they were only armed to show their resolve, there would be no violence. They were all told that the day of the demonstration would be the 7th of December and that they should gather at Montgomery’s Tavern. Montgomery’s provided a jumping off point, located outside the city limits on Yonge Street one of the main thoroughfares in and out of Toronto. But not all who attended MacKenzie’s rallies were supporters of the cause and word reached back to the Executive Council. Furious, Bond-Head issued a warrant for MacKenzie’s arrest. Since John Rolph had not yet been fingered as being a part of the rebellion, learned of the warrant immediately issued a counter order for the gathering to take place on the 4th of December. For many, the revolution had gained a life of its own, and there would be no stopping it now. MacKenzie unable to issue a second counter order, inflated the numbers he had and rode for Montgomery’s.

The former Postal Station K sits on the site where Montgomery’s Tavern once stood, today a Condo Project named Montgomery Square is under construction regaining the site’s historical name.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 35mm 1:3.5 N – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Blazinal (1+25) 9:00 @ 20C

Many who marched to Montgomery’s did so unarmed and in small groups, to prevent suspicion. Plus MacKenzie had promised both food, arms, and ammunition up arrival. But even MacKenzie had promised more than he could deliver. While Montgomery supported the Reform cause, he had no love for the radial arm and was most surprised at the arrival of rebels at his doorstep. He had already rented out his tavern to customers, ironically Tory supporters. But had little choice when the rebels began to show up, even MacKenzie was surprised at the numbers. Some took to the local farms, stealing and killing the animals for food, and stealing what weapons and ammunition they could find. In Toronto, John Rolph continued to play his part as a loyal member of the Government. Marshall Spring Bidwell, who had nothing to do with MacKenzie’s rebellion began to plan his escape, due to his name being mentioned in several Rebel documents. FitzGibbon continued his crusade to get Bond-Head to call out the militia to prevent the revolt from happening. When faced with Bond-Head’s refusal, he quietly went around to the officers living in the city to be ready and pass the word around to their men. The situation at Montgomery’s was little short of chaos, the only man with military experience, Captain Anthony Anderson, worked on arranging for some semblance of order. Those who were armed were assigned to Samuel Lount and sent out as a rough picket around the Tavern, Anderson knowing that such a large group would not stay secret for long. A local blacksmith delivered a pile of rough pikes, which the rebels connected to staffs, others readied clubs. The rebels had only a few, maybe one hundred men who were armed with firearms, a rough collection of musket, rifles, and personal fowling pieces. The rebel gathering attracted the attention of Robert Moodie. Moodie, a retired Lieutenant-Colonel who commanded the 104th Regiment of Foot during the War and settled in the area in 1835 rode out to investigate the sounds, as he rode out closer. Encountering an armed picket, he made to escape; a sharp rifle shot ended his flight and his life. Word of Moodie’s death and the gathering of rebels at Montgomery’s Tavern spread like wildfire through Toronto. Bond-Head continued to downplay the threat, hoping for calm. Others continued to ready their militia equipment or irregular groups to stand in defense of the city. Alderman John Powell, wanting to get a better idea of the situation at Montgomery’s gathered his friend Archibald MacDonald and rode north. When they encountered a small force of Rebels, MacKenzie himself was among them, and Powell surrendered. Upon their return to the Tavern, many among the rebels wanted the two men searched for weapons. Powell insisted he was unarmed, and MacKenzie took the Alderman at his word, having served with him during his tenure on city council. As the rebels argued over what to do with the prisoners, Powell pulled out one of his hidden pistols, the first shot rang through the tavern, filling the room with smoke, Captain Anderson lay dead. In the chaos, Powell aimed his second at MacKenzie, but it misfired. The two men lept to safety and ran into the night, crossing Queen’s Park, Powell abandoned his horse to move on foot through the thick trees. As he arrived at the Governor’s mansion, he was surprised to find FitzGibbon already there trying to get some action from the sleeping Bond-Head. Together the two men again entered the governor’s bedroom, Powell recounted his harrowing escape. The tale rose Bond-Head to action, he ordered the militia called up from any district who could mobilize. FitzGibbon agreed, but also recommended that the rebels might be agreeable to surrender if the proper terms were forwarded. But who would Bond-Head send? He needed people whom he could trust, but would also appear friendly to the rebels. John Rolph quickly agreed, Marshall Spring Bidwell quickly turned down the governor and made his way out of the country. Robert Baldwin, despite his previous resignation from all forms of public life, was still held up as an example of a strong moral character by Bond-Head seemed hesitant. Bond-Head insinuated that Baldwin’s refusal could be grounds for him being lumped in with the rebels, Baldwin backed into a corner, agreed.

Today Gallows Hill is home to Toronto’s Mount Plesant Cemetary, pictured at the cemetery’s grand front gates on Yonge Street.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 45mm 1:2.8 N – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Blazinal (1+25) 9:00 @ 20CThe intersection of Yonge and College where the Rebels Clashed with Jarvis’s York Rangers on the 5th of December.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 45mm 1:2.8 N – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Blazinal (1+25) 9:00 @ 20C

Both sides did not realise that their opposite now marched towards them. The rebels made their way south, nothing more than an armed mob of angry men lead by MacKenzie, Lount, and Matthews. While Baldwin, Rolph, FitzGibbon, and others rode north under a flag of truce. The two groups met at what was then known as Gallows Hill; today is where Mount Plesant Cemetery stands. The rebels, confused and scared at the site of one of their standing with the Tories. Baldwin was of no consequence, having separated himself from public office after the 1836 elections and left the Province. The government treaty party presented an offer of amnesty if the rebels laid down their arms and returned to their homes in peace, the offer did not extend to the leaders, especially MacKenzie who was the centre of the whole affair. In return, MacKenzie turned down the offer and demanded that the Upper Canada Parliament be dissolved, and Bond-Head turn over power to an interim council and hold a Constitutional Congress. As the government party turned and rode back south, Rolph hung behind. Here history is a little iffy on what happened; some say that Rolph spoke to Lount, others to MacKenzie. To whomever, he spoke he informed them that the city was undefended and that if they followed him, they would be able to take direct control of the city and force their demands. Rolph then rode hard to rejoin the government party but did not join them at the Governor’s mansion. Instead, he headed for Elliot’s Tavern located at Yonge and Lot (Queen) which was a known radical hangout; he informed them that the rebel army was on its way and they should stand ready to join them. Rolph then, fearing his involvement would be discovered made his escape to Buffalo. It took a bit of time for MacKenzie to get the mob moving, as they marched south they destroyed the tool booth at Bloor Street, at that time was the northern limit of Toronto. Lount and his riflemen moved ahead of the main body, as they reached College Street, a small group of men under Toronto’s Sheriff, Samuel Jarvis opened fire. Lount’s riflemen lined up as best they could and opened fire, but as the front rank dropped to reload, the second rank ran out of fear. The skirmish lasted only a moment, but it was enough to halt the rebel advance. As they returned to Montgomery’s, MacKenzie ordered two private homes of Tory allies destroyed, and if it had not been for the intervention of Lount, the wanton destruction might have continued. But the damage had been done, MacKenzie’s will was wavering.

@ Queen West sits on the site where Elliot’s Tavern once stood, the grand building is currently undergoing extensive restoration.
Nikon F6 – AF-S Nikkor 14-24mm 1:2.8G – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak D-76 (1+1) 9:45 @ 20CThe Davenport Tollkeepers Cottage is a prime example of the style of building destroyed by the Rebels at Bloor Street. The Davenport cottage is restored and serves as a small museum located at Bathurst and Davenport in Toronto.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 45mm 1:2.8 N – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-125 – Blazinal (1+25) 9:00 @ 20C

Militia troops from all across the home district and beyond flooded into the city, Toronto took on the role of an armed camp; businesses were shuttered, private homes barricaded and boarded up. Among the troops to arrive was a small force from the Gore District, commanded by Allan Napier MacNab and William Chisholm. MacNab, a close friend of Bond-Head, was welcomed warmly and promptly offered full command of the small army gathering in the city. To FitzGibbon the appointment of a militia officer to such a high command was a slap in the face to FitzGibbon. While both men were members of the Family Compact, in his role as Adjunct General, although only acting the position should have gone to him. Although Bond-Head quickly reversed his choice, putting FitzGibbon in overall command, and MacNab the center body of the army. MacKenzie rebel force was in chaos, after the events of the previous night many had chosen to leave the movement to prevent their arrest and imprisonment, although many others joined the ranks to replace them. His continued to rant, taking only one action. He ordered a small raid against a mail coach as it rode out of the city, ambushing it on the Dundas Road at the Peacock Inn. The mail coach did little to tell the rebels of the government disposition. But for those not in the tavern life would be far more difficult as the militia and paramilitary groups were rounding up those connected to the radical reformers and parading them in chains. MacKenzie continued to delay. By the 7th of December, the arrival of Colonel Anthony Van Egmond marked the return of some form of military leadership. However, the former Cavalry Officer who had served in Napoleon’s Grande Armee. Colonel Van Egmond did not look kindly on the situation at the tavern and history states that harsh words were exchanged between him and MacKenzie. Van Egmond knew a desperate situation when he saw one, the tavern was far from defensible, pickets were loose, and the leadership is wanting. Van Egmond recommended withdrawal, and a regroup, MacKenzie wanted to hold to show resolve. While we don’t know it was said between the men, but Van Egmond decided to stay. He moved Lount’s riflemen forward to the fence and treelines and sent another group far forward to Gallow Hill as watchmen for the militia force they knew were coming. As a diversion, Peter Matthews led a raid against the Don River Bridge that carried King Street over the river. While the rebels saw initial success destroying a toll booth and setting fire to a tavern, the arrival of the militia chased the raiders off and many, including Matthews, was captured. The grand militia army formed up in front of the home of Bishop John Strachan, known to the residents as the Bishop’s Palace on Front Street, parading in front of Bond-Head, Strachan, MacNab, and FitzGibbon. And with bands playing and the muskets shining in the cold winter sun marched north on Yonge Street. The group was split into four divisions, the center division contained the largest body and marched straight up Yonge Street. The wings advanced through the farm fields to the east and Queen’s Park to the west. The fourth division under Colonel William Chisholm guarded the Dundas Road heading west to prevent the rebels from fleeing.

A plaque near where Anthony Van Egmond lies today in the town that bears his name, Egmondville.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 1:2.8 f=80mm – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. H 10:00 @ 20CA historical plaque located at the Jack Astors on Front Street in Toronto, the building stands on what was the Bishop’s Palace, the grand home of Bishop Strachan and the rally point for the Government Militia on the 7th of December.
Nikon F6 – AF-S Nikkor 85mm 1:1.4G – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak D-76 (1+1) 9:45 @ 20C

The rebel sentries at Gallow Hill melted back without any effort to resist the government force. And when MacKenzie learned that the militia was on the march, his fear got the better of him, and without pausing the take his belongings, he fled from the tavern leaving his supporters to stand their ground. The rebels had no chance, but encouraged by the remaining leaders stood their ground. The loyalist militia had gotten their hands on a pair of cannons which drew up ahead of the infantry and peppered the woods with both round and canister shot. But the one gun crew did not want to kill the rebels outright but only force a surrender by firing over their heads splintering the trees. The other crew fired directly into the rebel line. The air filled with dirt, shot, splinter and screams. As the rebels fell back, the artillery began to fire on Montgomery’s Tavern and the Paul Pry Inn where the rebels huddled under shelter. But those with firearms fought a pitched battle against the government militia. But the battle could not be won by the rebels, and as the infantry pushed in on all sides, the rebels were flanked and ran. Victorious, Bond-Head ordered MacNab to give chase while the tavern searched. A great deal of intelligence could be found among MacKenzie’s forgotten papers, lists of names and settlements where the rebel cause saw support. They also found a curious flag, twin silver stars on a blue field, with the word Liberty in red beneath the stars. They also found among the list of names, Charles Duncombe who was planning his uprising. Once the rebels were rounded up and arrested, Bond-Head ordered the tavern burned. FitzGibbon warned the governor against such an act, but Bond-Head feared the survival of the tavern would be a focal point for future rebels. With the Toronto uprising suppressed and the leaders on the run, now hunted by the militia and Tory irregulars, the government turned their eyes west. All but FitzGibbon, who tendered his resignation and retired to England due to his treatment by Bond-Head.

The former house of Doctor Charles Duncombe in St. Thomas, Ontario. Today it is a local history and military museum.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 45mm 1:2.8 N – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20CA Plaque to Duncombe’s uprising and the “Battle” of Scotland, which sits hidden on an intersection in Scotland, Ontario.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 45mm 1:2.8 N – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20CDowntown Norwich today, there are no plaques or reminders of the Miltia camp that lasted here for a week.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 45mm 1:2.8 N – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20C

In the west, Doctor Charles Duncombe faced a problem; he had no communication direct or indirect with MacKenzie in Toronto. Since the beginning of December, the rebels in the west had moved out of the major settlements into the rural regions where they found a great deal of support. And many had already been arrested in a raid against one of their hangouts in London. But unknown to them, MacNab had returned to Hamilton and gathered a far larger force and was on the march towards Brantford. Duncombe, thinking no news was good news, gathered his small band of rebels in the village of Scotland to begin their march first on Brantford and then Hamilton. From there they would join MacKenzie in Toronto. But as Duncombe marched out of Scotland, they were met by a fellow supporter who bore dire news. The man had recently escaped from a government militia camp in Brantford and brought news of MacKenzie’s defeat and the warrants out for the arrest of any rebel leaders. He also spoke of the size of MacNab’s army, which Duncombe had no hope of countering. But unlike MacKenzie, Duncombe would not lose his cool, he ordered his men back to Scotland first, where he ordered them to disperse, go into hiding, give up the cause, or flee to the United States. A few volunteers offered to remain behind in Scotland to provide a rearguard action. On the 13th of December, Duncombe ordered his papers hidden, and he made his way in disguise to the United States. The few volunteers in Scotland were quickly overwhelmed and surrendered to MacNab’s Militia. To display the might of his authority, MacNab paraded the prisoners through Norwich and called out the local militia who turned out in larger numbers than the unprepared colonel could have imagined. He also had both MacKenzie’s and Duncombe’s Papers which made the job rounding up the rebels in the area far easier. Any who resisted would find themselves arrested. But MacNab did not stop there, anyone connected to rebels, family or friends, found themselves terrorized, and properties destroyed. MacNab did this more out of instilling fear among the local population which had..

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From the grand bridges spanning the St. Lawerence River, east along QC-175, the homes become older, these give away to even older structures, towered armouries, and then the grand Parliament Building of the National Assembly and in front of you stands the old walled city. The Old City of Quebec is only one of two cities in North America that retains their fortifications. Heather and I decided to make a super-long weekend for ourselves last month and head to one of the oldest cities in Canada, Quebec. Now, this was not the first time I had visited the city, but the last time I spent only a few hours there and did not get a chance to explore this beautiful ancient city fully. I’ve been itching to return and share some of my favourite places with Heather, so of course, Quebec had to be on the list. While we only had three days in the city we spent only two outside in amazing weather. Friday was spent in the Old City, and a chance to finally visit the oldest section, the Lower Town. And while I strangely did not have many digital images from there, most of the shots were done on a roll of Portra 160 which was specifically for a review of that film stock. But I think it was the sheer amazement of the area made me just enjoy with my eyes and with my wife.

Taking advantage of the continued amazing weather, Friday we visited the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (National Museum of Fine Arts of Quebec) and while most of my images from the morning are on digital from inside the museum, after a lovely lunch at the Three Brewers I took to the Plains of Abraham. The first time I visited the city I did not get a chance to fully explore the historic battlefield. My wife decided to stay at a Starbucks and let me freely wander. I never got the extent and scale of the battlefield and the battle itself. Plus a display of captured German Artillery from the First World War to memorials to the thin red line and General Wolfe.

I’ll say it again if you ever get a chance to visit Quebec City, do it. It is well worth the drive, flight, or train journey to visit one of the oldest cities in Canada, especially if you’re a lover of history. And I’m sure my wife and I will be back again!

Technical Details:
Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta AF Zoom 35-70mm 1:4 – Rollei RPX 100 @ ASA-100
Kodak HC-110 Dil. H 18:00 @ 20C
Scanner: Nikon Coolscan V ED
Editor: Adobe Photoshop CC

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I have to say, Kodak took the photography world by storm when they announced the return of Ektachrome. Kodak got out of the colour reversal game in 2013, after over 70 years of production dating back in 1940. But in 2018 they announced the return of Ektachrome in a new formulation called E100. It again took some time, with a re-release of TMax P3200 keeping us teased, but it finally hit the market with an initial release which was snapped up, but now the supply is flowing! I never shot a lot of slide film and stuck mostly with Fuji products. But when I shot with E100, it usually was E100G or GX with some VS thrown in and each time even with the expired stuff I stood impressed. I do have to say; I had a hard time waiting to load this into the camera until we got better weather here in Southern Ontario. Thankfully April blessed us with a few good days to get out and shoot and the results, well, they’re stunning! Plus I also gave the film a bit of a leg up by using my two best cameras in my kit, the Nikon F5 and Minolta Maxxum 9, which probably helped and having an excellent lab, Borealis Photo Lab in Montreal, Quebec handle the processing.

They took up the classic E100 styling for their boxes, excellent.

Film Specs
Type: Colour Reversal (E-6)
Film Base: Acetate
Film Speed: ASA-100
Formats Available: 135 (120 and Sheet are Coming)

Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis PhotolabNikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis PhotolabNikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis PhotolabNikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis Photolab

Colour Rendition
The first thing that grabbed my attention with E100 is how real the colour looks; there’s no mistaking the colour separation. And nothing is hyper-real like you get with Ektar 100 and got with Kodachrome. Red, Green, Blue, they all look like they do in the real world. And they’re rather bright, but nothing overly saturated or muted about them, true real colour reproduction. Which having shot with the older versions of E100 is the perfect balance between all three versions of the film but seems closest to E100G or GX, GX being my favourite of the previous versions of the film.

Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis PhotolabNikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis PhotolabNikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis PhotolabNikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis Photolab

Image Quality
In general, you’ll get amazing image quality out of slide film, mostly because of how exacting you need to be with the exposure due to the lack of forgiveness. That said E100 is some of the best slide films I’ve seen since Kodachrome and Fuji Velvia 50 but without the slap you in the face hyper-real colour. Each frame is sharp and nearly grain free. There’s very little in the way of colour aberration from the scanning process, and these would probably look brilliant when projected up on the screen.

Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta Maxxum AF 28mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis PhotolabMinolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta Maxxum AF 28mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis PhotolabMinolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta Maxxum AF 28mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis PhotolabMinolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta Maxxum AF 28mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis Photolab

Scanning
I found the images very easy to scan. The colours looked fantastic right off the bat. They required little to no adjustment in Photoshop and came in rather clean, aside from a few bits of dust and some scratches that came from debris on the scan rollers. There are a few I had to brighten in post-processing but nothing too serious. I’m fairly impressed with the ease I had in scanning. It probably helps that I use a Coolscan V opposed to my V700. But even so, I think they would scan fairly well in any scanner you run them through.

Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta Maxxum AF 28mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis PhotolabMinolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta Maxxum AF 28mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis PhotolabMinolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta Maxxum AF 28mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis PhotolabMinolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta Maxxum AF 28mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Ektachrome E100 @ ASA-100 – Processing By: Boréalis Photolab

Overall Impression
Colour Film, especially Colour Slide Film has always been a stock I’ve avoided shooting for many reasons. First off the processing is difficult to go through a lab, having to mail it out, wait a few weeks and then get it back. It’s also hard to shoot being very picky on shadows and highlights and needing particular lighting conditions to get things just right. That said, however, the new E100 is perfect, beautiful and makes me want to shoot more slide film, especially E100. It sees the world as I see the world and colour. The images are sharp, fine-grained, and well exposed. And while it won’t ever have the same latitude as a black and white film or certain colour negative films, I’m rather happy with my results and glad I have another roll to shoot and plan on bringing it along to Saskatawan in August to get some colour into my holiday film photos. I’m glad Kodak took the time to bring the film back and improve upon the product.

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I’ll be the first to admit, I’m a sucker for professional 35mm cameras, and there are two that I’ve always wanted, the Nikon F5 and the Minolta Maxxum 9. While I loved working with the Maxxum 7, the 9 still drew me in just that little bit more. And while the 7 and 9 share many similar features and design cues, the Maxxum 7 to the Maxxum 9 is what the Nikon F100 is to the Nikon F5. All solid cameras, it’s just the 9 and F5 are aimed more for the professional than the advanced amateur. I was sold on the 9 as soon as I picked it up in my hand; everything just felt right. Not to mention the familiar dial design that I got with the F4 but the power I get with the F5.

The Minolta Maxxum 9 with the 35-70mm f/4 zoom that looks more like a Prime Lens and the optional VC-9 Grip.

Camera Specifications
Make: Minolta
Model: Maxxum 9, Alternativly Dynax 9, α-9
Type: Single Lens Reflex
Format: 35mm (135, 24x36mm)
Lens: Interchangable, Minolta (Sony) A-Mount
Year of Manufacture: 1998

Background
The Maxxum 9 is the final answer to a short lineup of professional Minolta cameras that began back in the 1980s with the release of the 9000, their first autofocus professional camera, unlike the other of the x000 line the 9000 used a manual film release and many of the controls were still knobs and dials, when the 9xi was released these knobs and dials vanished in favour of the sleek design that came with the xi series. But these queues thankfully were dismissed with the two direct predecessors to the 9, that would be the 800si and the 600si. The 9 would take more of its design queues from the 600si with a squat aggressive look and only a few functions controlled by a menu all the major options are done through control knobs and dials giving a retro look and feel. The Maxxum 9 first showed up in 1998 at the Minolta booth at Photokina and saw moderate release later that year with a broader release in 1999 along with a special edition 9Ti. The 9 sported stainless steel and diecast Zinc frame whereas the 9Ti swapped these out of titanium. Each was rubberized and completely weather sealed. Sporting a carbon fibre shutter allowing for the blistering 1/12000″ shutter speed at the top end. While the 9/9Ti were not the last 35mm SLR from Minolta, they were the last ‘professional’ 35mm SLR released from the company before going to digital and then acquisition by Sony.

Impressions
The first thing you notice about the Maxxum 9 is the weight; this is not a lightweight camera. But don’t let the heft get you hung up, that’s the all metal construction and weatherproofing. Trust me; this camera can take anything you can throw at it and keep on ticking. The first time I had it in the field, it was pouring rain, and it never skipped a beat. Despite being a contemporary of the Nikon F5, the camera takes its design cues from the Nikon F4 with a squat low-profile prism rather than one that stands fairly high from the top panel. And the hand grips on the camera are perfectly molded, even without the optional grip I can easily hold just the body, though the grip does add a beautiful vertical release with the button angled just as on the body and about 3/4 up from the bottom allowing for the same easy balance in both landscape and portrait orientation. And speaking of balance the added weight helps with the overall balance of the camera with any lens, primes or the 35-70 or the 70-210 “beercan” everything is dead on. But let us get into the controls, again like the design the Maxxum 9 is all Nikon F4 with the major controls all in dial form with only a few settings being done through menus and buttons. Camera modes (P, A, S, M), Drive Mode, EV Compensation all easily accessed on the top panel and well laid out. The on/off switch is a nice feature although the off is relabeled as “Lock” additionally you can use smaller switches for the Eye-Start, which again you can turn off (thank goodness). There’s even a dial control of the focus mode and auto/manual focus toggle. There’s also an on/off switch on the vertical grip. The shutter buttons are a bit sensitive on the half-push, but in general, are pleasing and don’t take much pressure to trigger, and both the trip and the body have two command dials for adjusting the settings. Although the best control is the battery select control, now this is on the vertical grip which allows you to set which battery power to use, either the one in the camera or the ones in the grip. But I’ll get back to the batteries later.

Experiences
The Maxxum 9 is a joy to use; it just is. The viewfinder is big and a bright 100% coverage with a clear and easy to read display. And while I mentioned it being heavy even with a stock factory strap, it did not weigh too much on my neck after a few hours in the field, and that’s dual wielding a Nikon F5 along with the Maxxum 9. Everything on the camera fits and sings right down to the sound of the shutter release and drive advance. The controls are well laid out, and despite having never used the Maxxum 600si on which they’re based, the camera controls were instantly familiar, probably because of my familiarity with the Nikon F4. And then the meter is dead on accurate in any mode, and there are three, the matrix, centre-weight, and spot each one is perfect, and it will pull out a proper exposure in any condition. The autofocus, even using older lenses is a little bit sluggish, but a whole lot faster than my 7000 (RIP). Now the one thing I do have a bit of a beef with is the menu button controls I had a bit of trouble getting the ISO manually set having the hold down the ISO button and keep the spring loaded door open; it took a couple tries to nail the film EI. I’m not looking forward to adjusting some of the customer settings, such as turning off automatic rewind and having the camera leave the tail out from the film canister. The latter being a feature I wish they had on the F5.

Optics
The Minolta (Sony) A-Mount is both a blessing and a curse. It’s a blessing because you can get a lot of rather nice glass for the camera in both prime and zoom lenses. And if you look in the right places the lenses won’t cost you an arm and a leg. The 35-70 f/4 and 70-210 f/4 are both amazing zoom lenses that won’t break the bank. Even the prime lenses are on the inexpensive side with a 50 f/1.7 running you under 100$ at the right place. And these lenses are right on par with the old manual focus Rokkor glass I enjoy with my XE-7 and XG-M bodies. You do have to watch out, the stock 9 does not have support for the modern SSM glass, but some 9’s have been upgraded with a new board to allow SSW support. I’m not sure if my example has such an upgrade, but I also have no SSM glass to try it out. If you do have a lot of SSM glass, then a Maxxum 7 might be a better option. The curse is that the modern Sony DSLRs use the same mount, so all your Minolta AF glass will work on the Sony DSLRs. That said while some lenses are harder to find on the used market, there’s still plenty of inexpensive options available.

Lowdown
When it comes to 35mm SLRs the Maxxum 9 has it all, it honestly does. There are enough modern options to stand up to the F5 but enough manual option to make it a joy to operate and simple as well! And now probably the best feature of the camera is the power, you have three options. If you’re running with just the camera body, you are limited to a CR123 battery, which isn’t too expensive. But if you get the battery grip you have the options of using AA, CR2 or CR123, and there’s a switch to tell where to pull the power from the body, or the grip, with separate settings for CR2 or CR123a/AA. And if you’re running AA, it only takes four. Now the Maxxum 9 is not the cheapest camera on the used market, with eBay prices running from 300-500, which is on par with the Nikon F5. However, the updated variant, the Maxxum 9Ti, will run you a bit more 500+ if you can find one. Overall I’m rather pleased with the addition of the Maxxum 9 to my tool kit, and it certainly will be coming along on many more trips.

Further Reading
Don’t just take my word on the Maxxum 9 check out the reviews by other awesome camera reviewers!
Hank Jammes – Minolta Dynax 9
Shutterbug – Minolta Maxxum 9 First Look
Photographic Central Minolta Maxxum 9
Fun Tech Talk – The Fastest SLR Ever Made – Minolta Maxxum 9

All Photos Taken in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta Maxxum AF 28mm 1:2.8 – Kodak Panatomic-X @ ASA-32
Kodak D-76 (Stock) 5:00 @ 20C

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Established in 2013 by MainStreetHost and taken on by Alex Luyckx Photography in 2015, #photochat is a community of photography professionals and enthusiasts who congregate to talk shop and discuss anything and everything photography. To participate in our weekly chat (every Thursday at 1:00pm) search the #photochat hashtag to see the conversation, or find me at @AlexLuyckxPhoto on Twitter for more info. Be sure to include the hashtag in your tweets to answer the questions and talk with the other participants.

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The Topic for Thursday 6 June 2019 is Photojournalism!

Question 1 – Do you feel that Photography is important to the journalism process?
Question 2 – Do you think that trained/practised photographers should be part of news organisations still today? (Why/Why Not).
Question 3 – How would you go into a situation to provide journalism coverage (Gear/Mindset/Process)?
Question 4 – Have you considered doing photojournalism professionally (as a job)?
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Up until 1834, there had been a conflict between those in Upper Canada who were reform-minded and those who were allied with the Conservative Family Compact. But those in the reform movement had no desire for radical change or an American style republic, but there were also some that were. The same remained on the Tory side, there were those who were moderates who thought that some change might not be a bad thing, but others who wanted stricter controls, those who wanted to turn Upper Canada into a perfect England, where English was supreme, and the only church was the Anglican church. But like so many years before, everything started to hinge in 1834; the avalanche had started, it was too late for the pebbles to vote.

Toronto’s First Post is in reality the Fourth Post office of the City of York. Today it remains a functioning Post Office and a Museum.
Pacemaker Crown Graphic – Schneider-Kreuznach Xenar 1:4,7/135 – Rollei RPX 400 @ ASA-320 – Pyrocat-HD (1+1+100) 18:00 @ 20C

On the 6th of March, 1834, the town of York incorporated as a City by an Act of the Provincial Parliament and signed into Law by Sir John Colborne, the Lieutenant-Governor. The municipal elections for the city provided a new battleground between the Tories and the Reformers. Despite the city being a large body of Conservatives, William Lyon MacKenzie managed not only to get himself elected as an Alderman, a term used for those who sat on City Council but also managed to convince the other aldermen to elect him mayor. During this period, the position of Mayor was elected by the City Council, not the electorate of the city. Taking a page out of American President Andrew Jackson’s book, MacKenzie began to remove those who allied themselves with the Tories from their posts within the city’s government and positioning those who were allied with him in their place. The council itself proved to be a hostile place, with MacKenzie often brawling with the other aldermen or causing them to fight amongst themselves. All the while, MacKenzie continued to print offensive content in The Advocate against both those Tories on Council and in The Legislative Assembly, a body he remained a member. Despite the malfunction in the Toronto Council, some bills managed to pass to allow for better fire suppression and control. However, the bigger issues such as the city’s debt, sanitation, and roads remained outstanding. It didn’t help that the city was limited on how much it could raise taxes.

The Children of Peace continued to be a centre for the Society of Consitutional Reform.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 45mm 1:2.8 N – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20C

But the mayorship was only a distraction for MacKenzie when four-year term on the Assembly expired, MacKenzie threw himself into election mode. As did many other reformers and their success again yielded control of the Assembly. With Bidwell returned to the Speakers Chair, he still put MacKenzie on the hunt. Like before MacKenzie opened the book on everything done by the Upper Canada Parliament, he investigated the Banks, the Canada Company, the Welland Canal, and more. He compiled everything into a single report, loftily titled the Seventh Report on Grievances. He read his report aloud in the Legislative Assembly before sending it onto the Colonial Office in London. In London, MacKenzie’s report would not be the only one that they would receive. Two similar reports had arrived from British North America, one from Lower Canada and the reform-minded men under Joseph Louis Papineau and New Brunswick. All three together called into question the entire Colonial System. Change it seemed was on everyone’s mind. A great change had passed through England a few years back with the signing of the Reform Bill, but those changes did not affect the Parliaments of the Provinces because they were nothing more functions of the bureaucracy of the Colonial Office. The interesting this was that the Colonial Office decided to deal with both Upper and Lower Canada differently as both seemed on the edge of Revolution. To Lower Canada, they sent Sir John Colborne as their new Lieutenant-Governor. Colborne having proved himself in combat during the Battle of Waterloo and having a military-minded governor might reduce the threat of armed insurrection. Their response to Upper Canada proved a little more interesting. Looking back, the appointment of Sir Francis Bond-Head to the Governorship was a mistake, Bond-Head, had little in the way of experience in colonial administration, getting the governorship only through his connections within the government. His most recent post had been to administer the new Poor Laws in England, and by his writing and zeal in executing these laws in helping the less fortunate, they felt that Bond-Head would be a liberal reformer, someone to help bridge the widening gap between the reformers and Tories. The Colonial Office had also received a response written by Chief Justice John Beverly Robinson in response to MacKenzie’s Report and promptly told Bond-Head to pay the document no mind.

A panel depicting MacKenzie presenting the Seventh Grievance Report to the Upper Canada Parliament. Part of a Rebellion Memorial from the 1938 which was removed in the 1960s and installed in the 1970s at the MacKenzie House in Toronto.
Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 50mm 1:1.4D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-800 – Ilford Microphen (Stock) 11:00 @ 20C

Sir Francis Bond-Head arrived in Toronto in January 1836 and was welcomed with great fanfare, and he decided to shake things up. First and foremost he approached several of the moderates among the Reform Camp, John Rolph and Robert Baldwin among them, to be on his Executive Council. Rolph accepted immediately, Baldwin, however, had some misgivings. Baldwin went to his father and other members of the reform society for guidance. Explaining that he would feel wrong accepting the post to Bond-Head’s invitation, while he had maintained a civil tone with those in the Assembly in the Tory camp, he had spoken out against them in private. The elder Baldwin would convince his son to accept Bond-Head’s invitation. And when Baldwin was again approached by Bond-Head, he accepted. While many in the reform camp celebrated, the more radical derided. MacKenzie among them who felt he should have been among those appointed. But the presence of reform-minded men in the Executive would be short-lived. When Baldwin began to make suggestions towards the idea of Responsible Government, Bond-Head soundly chastised the timid lawyer, suggesting that he and others familiarise themselves with their new role before taking on anything major. Baldwin among others, including a few moderate conservatives resigned their posts in protest. Their response paled against the response from the Reform controlled Assembly who sent a scathing letter of rebuke to Bond-Head and then refused to pass any money bills, denying Bond-Head the needed tax income from the Province. It was the only card they had to play against Bond-Head. In his dual role as both Colonial Administrator and Commander-In-Chief of the British Army stationed in Upper Canada, Bond-Head could have drawn the needed money out of military coffers, but instead, Bond-Head decided to show the Reformers exactly who held power. He ordered the Assembly dissolved and a new set of Elections called.

Today the CBC Broadcast Centre in Toronto sits on the site of the Third Parliament Building in Toronto where much of this drama took place.
Nikon F6 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Kodak Tri-X 400 @ ASA-400 – Kodak D-76 (1+1) 9:45 @ 20C

The elections of 1836 proved one of the nastiest in the history of Upper Canada Politics. The reform camp struggled to separate themselves from the radical members like William Lyon MacKenzie. And MacKenzie struggled to separate himself from the label of Traitor. He argued that loyalty to Canada was not disloyalty to England. The splitting of the reform vote played right into the hand of the Tories and the Family Compact. But the Tories had help from Bond-Head. Usually, the Governor separated themselves from the Provincial Elections, to give the electorate some illusion of free elections. Bond-Head had no illusions of what side he was on. While he had great respect for Robert Baldwin and several others among the moderate reformers, he had learned from the start to take a great deal of council from the Family Compact, especially John Beverly Robinson, the Chief Justice of the Province. And the Tory-controlled Executive and Legislative Council had their tricks up their sleeves in changing the borders of the ridings within the Province to downplay the power of the Reform vote. They also made use of various Tory groups such as the Orange Order or Town Line Blazers to disrupt the rallies by Reform candidates either verbally or violently. They also showed up at polling stations on election day to ensure the men voted the right way. The result would be exactly what the Compact wanted, a Tory-controlled Assembly. Even MacKenzie who enjoyed wide support throughout the Toronto Township lost his seat.

The Village of Bond-Head is one of the few areas of Ontario that take their name from Sir Francis Bond-Head.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 150mm 1:3.5 N – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20C

Those few reformers that made it into the Assembly began to raise concerns over the legality of the election. MacKenzie called out Electorial Fraud, and his ally in the Assembly, Charles Duncombe spoke out at length. An investigation was launched but ultimately found nothing. MacKenzie would not take this lying down, he immediately restarted his printing presses and began to publish a new newspaper, and there was no hiding what he wanted. The first edition of The Constitution saw publication on the 4th of July, 1836. He decried the move by the British Parliament to limit the power of the Legislative Assembly in Lower and Upper Canada, removing their control over passing taxes over to the Governor. He had gone over to the full out radical reform; he had lost all trust in the Colonial System, the Provincial Government, even England herself. MacKenzie spoke out in public, holding rallies throughout Upper Canada, often those rallies were disrupted by Tory Thugs. These rallies attracted wide attention, especially from those in the rural areas of the Home District, where those directly affected by the stranglehold of the Family Compact often eeked out an existence. And while MacKenzie continued to claim he desired a non-violence revolution to establish a proper Republic, often Liberty or Death Banners flew at his rallies. In secret, however, with the help of Charles Duncombe, MacKenzie and his supporters formed small vigilance committees, ready to lead and rise in armed demonstration should a non-violent approach fail to achieve the results he desired. Many rallied to his cause as leaders, Samuel Lount, Peter Matthews, John Rolph, Charles Duncombe, and Anthony Van Edgmont. These men formed MacKenzie’s inner circle; each would then form their circle of trust around themselves.

An example of a Gordon Quarter Press on display at the MacKenzie House and Printery, such presses were used to print handbills such as the ones MacKenzie seemed so fond of publishing.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 45mm 1:2.8 N – Ilford FP4+ @ ASA-100 – Kodak D-23 (Stock) 6:00 @ 20C

Many in the government saw MacKenzie as a direct threat to the security of Upper Canada and watched as even Lower Canada began to spiral down into open armed revolt throughout the remainder of 1836. The strange thing was that Bond-Head seemed to play down the threat of MacKenzie and his band of radicals. The truth was that Bond-Head and many in the Family Compact were worried about MacKenzie and the threat he posed to Upper Canada. No one wanted open rebellion or civil war; even the Compact knew that their power was at the mercy of London and even that could be snatched away. At the urging of Robinson, the Executive and Bond-Head downplayed the threat, presenting a face of calm and order and hoping that such actions would calm the masses. MacKenzie continued to nothing more than whip up public fury at the government but did little to move towards an armed rebellion. That is at least until the death of King William IV on the 20th of July 1837. Here MacKenzie saw his chance, the death of a king meant early elections in the Legislative Assembly if the reform movement could again take control they might have a chance at change. The Assembly, with the blessings of Bond-Head, voted against dissolving. MacKenzie spoke out, publishing handbills featuring a declaration of independence. He called for an immediate Constitutional Congress, the establishment of a Republic with Marshall Spring Bidwill appointed as acting Chairman until proper elections could be arranged. Many saw this as direct treason, even the hardliners in MacKenzie’s camp took a step back urging MacKenzie to calm down. But the forces in Lower Canada were already preparing for armed revolt and were about to present a perfect opportunity to act.

The former house of Dr. Charles Duncombe in St. Thomas, Ontario. Today it is a local military museum.
Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 45mm 1:2.8 N – Ilford HP5+ @ ASA-400 – Kodak HC-110 Dil. B 5:00 @ 20C

It is hard to figure out who is to blame about the sudden radicalisation of William Lyon MacKenzie, ever since his first jump into Provincial Politics he had been swayed by those who surrounded him. He picked and chose the ideas and ideologies he would follow based on his ideas on how a government should be run. And yes there was a great deal of corruption and backroom dealings in Upper Canada. And yes, the actions of the Family Compact and the Colonial Office certainly factored into the rise of radical reform within Upper Canada. But MacKenzie was not the only one who had a bone to pick a similar movement had risen in Lower Canada for much the same issues as those in Upper Canada faced. In the end, it was MacKenzie’s choice to fall into open treason. Many in the Reform Movement would turn their back on MacKenzie, even Robert Gourlay who first opened this can of worms in 1818 declared MacKenzie little more than a traitor. But MacKenzie’s fall from grace had only begun. Today there is little to remind us of these early days of the Upper Canada Rebellion. Most of the action took place in the Third Parliament Building, the building survived until 1892 and housed the United Canada Parliament and the first Parliaments of the Province of Ontario. Today the land on Front Street in Toronto is home to Simcoe Park and the CBC Broadcast Centre. A memorial to MacKenzie’s Grievance Report would be installed in Niagara Falls in 1938, however, it was dismantled in the 1960s and put into Storage. It can be found today along with a Rebellion Memorial at the MacKenzie House Museum on Bond Street in Toronto. A small unincorporated village in Bradford West Gwillimbury takes the name Bond Head after Sir Francis Bond Head. The Sharon Temple of the Children of Peace is also open to the public today as a museum and has a great deal of Rebellion and Reform History on display.

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Back when I was starting to work on my 1867 project a friend and fellow reenactor pointed me towards a facebook group called Friends of the Welland Canal. The facebook group is a joint effort between local residents and a group known as the Welland Canal Advocate (WCA). Over the Victoria Day long weekend, Heather and I took the opportunity to attend one of the monthly WCA hikes that took us through a section of the first and second canals that run through St. Catherine’s Centennial Gardens. That said when the canals were in operation, the area was actually in a separate community known as Merritton. The weather was perfect, sunny, warm, and a few clouds in the sky. I had visited the park during a trip last year to collect photos for 1867 but I had no idea what I had missed. Rene, the man behind the WCA and these hikes, guided us around the surviving section of the canal that runs through the middle of the park and spoke on the history of the canal and the park itself. The two highlights for me was seeing the remains of an original lock from the first canal (Lock 6) and Lock 5 from the Second Canal which now acts as pilings for a modern road that runs over the old canal. A local councillor spoke on those living rough in the parks of St. Catherine and how we can reach out to local groups to assist. But enough talking, let’s get to the photos I took!

Despite being the long weekend, I am impressed at the hike’s numbers.
Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta AF Zoom 35-70mm 1:4 – Kosmo Mono 100 @ ASA-100 – Blazinal (1+50) 7:30 @ 20CChecking out the remains of Lock Six from the 1st Canal.
Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta AF Zoom 35-70mm 1:4 – Kosmo Mono 100 @ ASA-100 – Blazinal (1+50) 7:30 @ 20CLooking along the Canal towards Lock Six.
Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta AF Zoom 35-70mm 1:4 – Kosmo Mono 100 @ ASA-100 – Blazinal (1+50) 7:30 @ 20CA water control gate where the old canal goes under several roadways.
Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta AF Zoom 35-70mm 1:4 – Kosmo Mono 100 @ ASA-100 – Blazinal (1+50) 7:30 @ 20CWhen the park was built in 1867, they discovered original wooden remains of Lock six and preserved them.
Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta AF Zoom 35-70mm 1:4 – Kosmo Mono 100 @ ASA-100 – Blazinal (1+50) 7:30 @ 20CRene and his son Hunter leading the hike.
Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta AF Zoom 35-70mm 1:4 – Kosmo Mono 100 @ ASA-100 – Blazinal (1+50) 7:30 @ 20CListening in on the historial information.
Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta AF Zoom 35-70mm 1:4 – Kosmo Mono 100 @ ASA-100 – Blazinal (1+50) 7:30 @ 20CChecking out some mill ruins.
Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta AF Zoom 35-70mm 1:4 – Kosmo Mono 100 @ ASA-100 – Blazinal (1+50) 7:30 @ 20CNot much remains of the old mill but still lots of good walls still stand.
Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta AF Zoom 35-70mm 1:4 – Kosmo Mono 100 @ ASA-100 – Blazinal (1+50) 7:30 @ 20CThe base of an old light standard that once illuminated the route of the old Canal.
Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta AF Zoom 35-70mm 1:4 – Kosmo Mono 100 @ ASA-100 – Blazinal (1+50) 7:30 @ 20C

While I’m going to miss the next couple of hikes, I certainly hope to return in September, and might even try and convince some folks from the Toronto Film Shooters to join in the fun. And I certainly plan on doing a photographic trip back to the canals and exploring more of the remains now that I have a better resource and maybe putting together a ‘zine on the subject. Yeah, my brain is already tossing around these ideas. You can check out the entire set of photos I took on the hike over on Flickr. Additionally, check out the Friends of the Welland Canal group and the WCA website for future details on upcoming hikes!

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