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MILWAUKEE (May 21, 2019) – Harley-Davidson Motor Company and the Milwaukee Bucks have launched a special merchandise collaboration. Available now, the limited-edition line of adult and youth apparel will be available at:

• Harley-Davidson Dealers
Harley-Davidson.com
• Harley-Davidson Museum®
• Bucks Pro Shop locations
Bucks.com
Fanatics.com
NBAstore.com

/This growing collection of merchandise features graphic lockups of the Bucks and Harley-Davidson Bar and Shield logo, along with a modern twist on the outline of the state of Wisconsin.

“This shared apparel collaboration is a celebration of the Bucks’ successful 2019 season, and proudly represents the brands’ shared city to fans and riders,” said Mary Kay Lee, Director of Consumer Product Portfolio, General Merchandise, at Harley-Davidson.

“This co-branded apparel line is an exciting extension of our collaboration with Harley-Davidson,” said Matt Pazaras, Bucks Senior Vice President of Business Development and Strategy. “We are proud that the Bucks sport a Harley-Davidson patch on their jerseys on the court. Now we look forward to seeing people wear these two iconic Milwaukee brands together as well.”

The special collection features adults printed T-shirts and sweatshirts and a youth T-shirt. Visit www.h-d.com/dealerlocator to find a Harley-Davidson dealer and shop.bucks.com to find a Bucks Pro Shop location.

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American Iron Magazine has partnered up with J&P Cycles to host an all-American motorycle show at the J&P Cycles Customer Appreciation Weekend in Anamosa, IA Saturday, June 29.

In addition to all the great suff the folks at J&P Cycles do at their event, we will help judge the custom bike show and cover this event in the pages of our magazine. PLUS J&P Cycles will feature all the winning bikes on social media.

$1,000 prize money for the Best In Show bike!

All showbike owners get free lunch AND free admission to the National Motorcycle Museum just down the road.

Bike show registration begins at 9 am Saturday, June 29. Awards presentation at 4:30.

In addition, the National Motorcycle Museum, just down the road, will be running a motorcycle swap meet and classic (pre 1988) bike show and more!

Meet Frank Fritz and Dave Ohrt from the American Pickers TV show!

For more information please click on Museum

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Our Motorcycle Kickstart Classic ride returns to Dale’s Wheels Through Time Museum again in 2019 for what might be the best ride we have event put together for our staff and readers.

The Motorcycle Kickstart Classic is open to all make, models and years of motorcycles, trikes and sidecar rigs. Founder Buzz Kanter jokes “We have the older bikes ride up front and the newer ones in the back to pick up whatever parts fall off the older ones.”

Dale and Trish Walksler – our host and hostess at Dale’s Wheels Through Time.

Registered riders and passengers are invited to Dale’s Wheels Through Time Museum Tuesday, October 8th with free access to the museum and a welcome dinner that evening.

We will take a group photo the next morning, then get on the road West. We will stay off the highwyays and main roads to enjoy a nice pace for the old bikes.

After an overnight stop, we ride to Loretta Lynn’s Dude Ranch the next day (Thursday, October 10. We will arrive in time to be part of the amazing Tennessee Motorcycles & Music Revival, where all Kickstart riders will have VIP access.

The two-day ride is about 400 miles in total.

All riders and passengers need register to join us. Registration is $195 per person, or pre-register before September 8 and save $45 per person.

All registered riders get free access to Dale’s Wheels Through Time Museum Oct 8, as well as the welcome reception and dinner. Also ride support and two event t-shirts per person.

You can download a registration form here or request one from Rosemary at 203.425.8777 x114 or email her at RosemaryC@TAMCommunications.com

Sponsors to date include American Iron Magazine, Garage Build magazine and Greaserag.

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By Steven Wyman-Blackburn

Have you ever read some of the funny, and oftentimes misleading, descriptions one might find while sifting through the piles of junk that is used motorcycle hunting? When asking our fans on Facebook to share all the nonsense they’ve had to deal with, one of the first responses was ironic. Mike Dencklau wrote about a bike he bought that had the following description: “Needs new spark plug wire.” Well, the bike inevitably ended up having trouble, so Mike turned to someone who could identify the problem. And guess what? All it needed was a new spark plug wire. However, on the complete other side of the spectrum, James Stoncius shared a time (before eBay) when he and his buddy pulled over to look at a Harley dirt bike a guy was selling. After inspecting the machine, they realized it was missing a lot of parts (James claims there were 80 parts MIA). James’ friend asked, “So does it run?” And here’s the kicker. The guy responded by saying, “Oh, it’ll run — if the right guy looks at it.” The moral of the story is that some sellers actually know what they’re talking about. Meanwhile, others don’t.

Below is a list of some attention-grabbing titles (along with their meanings) that you might come across when looking for a used bike or parts. Whether it’s eBay, craigslist, or some other trading site, the language is universal. Keep in mind, though, what “selling my bike” means as a particular ad we noticed called “Harley Super Fast glide” records: “Wife. Enough said.” (Editor’s Note: If the seller uses ampersands, stars, or an excessive amount of exclamation points in his title, the symbols are usually there to make up for something. Whether it’s a junk ride or a complete wreck, just turn and run and don’t look back.)

Mint condition: The seller is hoping that you judge a book by its cover. While the bike might look great on the outside, there’s nothing mint about the internals. Stock: After bolting on a lot of chrome, the owner stripped it down to make it look like it came right off the factory line.

Custom chopper: Everything but raking the chassis was done. The bike could well be a stock Breakout or Rocker. In a worst case scenario, the above bike actually comes with extra decals and bolt-on parts. Oh, and usually the tank is painted with some form of Old Glory.

Low miles: I rode it for a day. The bike won’t start anymore and has been sitting in my garage for a few years now./I installed a new speedo. Head turner: The head, in every case, is turning away from the bike. In other words, it’s ugly.

90-percent restored: Nowhere close to being done. Might as well read, “90 percent of the bike still needs to be restored.” The percentage, in this case, is referring to the surface area of the bike that’s finished. The remaining 10 percent is usually the motor and transmission.

New <insert part name here>: New doesn’t necessarily mean it’s the latest, top-of-the-line component. New usually translates to “new on my bike.”
Custom stretch: The original builder either stretched the bike correctly and the rest of the bike doesn’t match up or there is no rest of the bike. Good luck! Modified engine: The power plant is ruined. ’Nuff said.

High-performance: Switch performance with maintenance and you’ve got it about right.

Good beginner bike: I suck at riding.

Rare bike: Nobody else was stupid enough to buy it. Rare is being used to convey the amount of people who have actually gone out and bought the bike even when it was offered at a great price. It’ll be rare seeing it on the road. You’re more likely going to see it gathering dust in someone’s garage or showcased in a dealer showroom.
Rare part: I can’t find anything like it in my Harley-Davidson Parts & Accessories catalog. Wife says it has to go: My wife has to go.

Classic or Vintage: It doesn’t have those bags on the side./It doesn’t have a Big Twin or XL Evo engine./There was rust on the bike when I bought it. In other words, the guy doesn’t know what classic or vintage actually mean.

Collectible: Yeah, it’s a collectible bike. It collects dust.

Must sell: I’m leaving the country immediately. Whether the person is moving, going on vacation and needs the money, or is a criminal and has to get off the grid pronto, it’s probably the truth. That or the seller maxed out his credit card and just wants more money to spend. No title or

Lost title: I’m a klepto.

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The Moto Classic Series started out as a wild idea from the mind of Roland Sands and crew and developed into a Southern California motorcycle cultural explosion. This year we’ve geographically expanded with the Mayo Moto Street Classic in Tulsa, Oklahoma Saturday June 15th – promising everything from what you’ve come to expect, and so much more. We’ve joined forces with the Mayo Moto Museum with one of the greatest motorcycle, music, and art cultural experiences to hit the Midwest.

The festival hosts the fifth stop of the 2019 Progressive presented Super Hooligan National Championship (SHNC) powered by Indian, a series of heavy bike flat track motorcycle races across the U.S. curated by Roland Sands Design, a California-based motorcycle, product, apparel, and event company. In addition to Super Hooligan riders racing through the streets of downtown Tulsa, the festival features The Lansing Street Drag Races, Moto Classic Bike show, Stay Gold Art Show, Stunt Show and a vendor village. The Mayo Moto Street Classic is also hosting the official grand opening of the Mayo Moto Museum, a motorcycle and memorabilia collection boasting 200+ rare and unseen vintage bikes.

Live musical performances take place on an indoor stage throughout the day with local and regional music acts. At 8 pm, the music will move outdoors to the main stage with a performance from Tulsa’s Paul Benjaman Band, followed by headliner, southern soul rockers, JJ Grey & Mofro.
Tickets to this event are $35. A percentage of the gate proceeds will be donated to support Oklahoma teachers.

“We are so excited to be a part of this event,” says Jason White, 2003 Heisman winner and Vice President of Air Comfort Solutions, the festival’s presenting sponsor. “This festival will draw people from all over the country to our city. It’s a great opportunity to showcase all Tulsa has to offer. We are particularly happy to be able to contribute some of the proceeds from this new event back to the hardworking Oklahoma teachers.”

In its third season, Progressive MC presents the RSD Super Hooligan National Championship powered by Indian Motorcycle, is a potent mix of moto culture, customs, and competition. Super Hooligan race rules are simple; 750cc and up, production street bikes with flat track tires in stock frames. This series brings racing to the people in unexpected locations like downtown Tulsa, where a specially built TT track will be assembled by the Mayo Moto team. Expect local riders and national caliber talent battling elbow to elbow in a mix of classes.

“It’s incredible to bring the Super Hooligans to Tulsa,” says RSD founder, Roland Sands. “Bob Wills was a cousin to my grandma, so I grew up listening to steel guitar and Texas Swing. Bringing the love of music and motorcycles together in one place with the type of energy provided by Tulsa is a special opportunity, and we have an amazing partner in John Snyder and the Mayo crew. We’re racing in the streets!”

For tickets and information please visit:
https://www.ticketstorm.com/event/mayomotostreetclassic/mayoplace/tulsa/22805/
https://www.motoclassicevents.com/moto-street-classic
https://www.rolandsands.com/super-hooligans

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Fans to Help Select Winning Designs by Voting Now

For the first time, local trade school students partnered with Harley-Davidson® dealers for a unique, real-world training opportunity: helping build the coolest custom motorcycles in the world in the “Battle of the Kings” competition.

Now, Harley-Davidson is calling on the public to help select the winner by voting for their favorites from April 15 to May 15 at H-D.com/BattleOfTheKings.

The “Battle of the Kings” competition highlights the endless possibilities to personalize Harley-Davidson motorcycles. It’s the largest dealer custom build bike competition in the world, showcasing Harley-Davidson’s leadership in customization. Since 2015, Battle of the Kings has created more than 500 custom bikes.

This year, U.S. trade school students were invited to join their local Harley-Davidson dealership for the builds, with the goal of inspiring the next generation of skilled tradespeople to join the world of motorcycling. Under the guidance of experienced Harley-Davidson mechanics, students from across the country were introduced to the creativity, customization prowess and technical precision of motorcycle customization.

“Harley-Davidson’s goal is to build the next generation of riders, and those new riders will need service technicians and customization experts to help them along the way,” said Heather Malenshek, Senior Vice President of Marketing and Brand. “Introducing trade school students to the unlimited possibilities of custom bike building will unlock their creativity and inspire them to think outside the box as they embark on their careers.”

Vote Now to Help Pick Winner
The public can vote from a selection of more than 40 rolling works of art featuring the latest in design, fit and finish created in partnership with the students of future automotive mechanics, designers and welders of America. Starting today, the first round of voting, called People’s Choice, is open at H-D.com/BattleOfTheKings.

See the builds from dealerships around the world by following #BattleOfTheKings on social media. For more information on the rules of the competition and to vote on the bikes, visit H-D.com/BattleOfTheKings.

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FTR 1200 S Review - YouTube

Buzz came back from the FTR press launch in Mexico all smiles. He said this bike was amazing, had a great time riding it and was blow away by the capability of the machine.

We’ll be running his full new bike ride & review in issue 377 of American Iron, that hits newsstands on June 25.

Here’s a quick video review buzz did of the FTR 1200 S on location. Yeah, that’s our Editor in Chief putting a knee down through the Baja canyons, making all us staffers back here in the office jealous and impressed.

American Iron may be acquiring a long term tester, so we can really put some miles on this tracker for the street and see how she deals with the New England canyons.

Follow our social pages (Facebook, Instagram & Twitter) and check back here often to get continuing coverage on the FTR 1200 S. If this bike’s as fun as it looks, Indian may have struck flat track gold. Buzz sure seems to think they’re on point.

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SHIFTING GEARS by Buzz Kanter

SHIFTING GEARS, by Buzz Kanter, Publisher

It’s only $40,000 away from being a $35,000 bike

The weather is finally breaking—the riding season is here for most of us. As a motorcycle rider living in the Northeast, I have often wondered what it might be like to live where it is warmer year-round. Places like Florida, Texas, or Arizona. Unlike here in Connecticut. I enjoy picturing myself riding all year, the biggest question being whether I wear a long- or short-sleeve shirt under my jacket.

Since I have no current plans to move, I make the most of the offseason (I hate riding on roads covered in salt and/or ice) by reading and writing about motorcycles and, when I can, getting in some quality wrench time. Yes, I enjoy going out to the garage, turning up the radio, and working on my various projects. Some of them end up in American Iron Magazine or in our all-tech Garage Build magazine. But I must admit, I much prefer riding to wrenching.

Towards the end of last year’s riding season, I bought an old project bike, basically a mix-and-match Harley Knucklehead that was stored in a garage that had burned down. The previous owner replaced the burned-up components, like the wiring harness, tires, and rubber bits. He cleaned it up a bit and got it running. But it still needed a lot of work to get it dependable and safe. I got it home and up on the garage lift. And there it sat all winter. No matter how many times I planned to get to work on it, other projects and priorities came up.

So now that I’ve gone public and announced this bike, I hope and expect it will finally motivate me to start working on this old Knucklehead project. I know it’ll be a lot of fun and should be interesting enough to share on these pages. I own and love another Knuck, which is mostly correct and that I ride a lot. And I’d love to build a funky, old, custom one for riding—this one might just be the ticket.

Because this bike is so far from correct, a real mix-and-match bike from various years using original and aftermarket parts, I’m not going to try to restore it to correct. A friend described it as “only $40,000 away from being a $35,000 bike.” So, I need to decide how to build and customize it. I’ve never cared for long fork choppers, so am leaning towards a post-war bobber style for this one. Maybe pull the front fender, bob the rear one, and strip it of anything not necessary for some serious riding. Thoughts?

Speaking of riding, if you like to ride—and I’m guessing you do, or you wouldn’t be reading this—here are some great motorcycle events and places to check out in the next month or so.

If you enjoy bike rallies on or near the beach, check out the Thunder Beach Rally in Panama City, Florida, from May 1-5. A bit farther north and a week later is the Myrtle Beach Bike Week in South Carolina, May 10-19. I’ve never been to either of these rallies but look forward to checking them out sometime soon.

If classic, antique motorcycles is more your thing, I highly recommend three events along the East Coast. The classy and fun Riding Into History near St. Augustine, Florida, is May 10-11; their focus this year is American motorcycles. Another great event is the AMCA (Antique Motorcycle Club of America) swap meet and bike show in Denton, North Carolina, on May 17-18. And the third is the Greenwich Concours (which American Iron Magazine sponsors and supports) in nearby Greenwich, Connecticut, on June 1-2. I have been actively involved in this high-profile event for several years. Maybe I’ll see you there.

Ride safe, ride smart, have fun.

Buzz

Follow Buzz on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram

To order back issues, visit Greaserag.com.

To subscribe to the PRINT edition, click here.

To receive DIGITAL DELIVERY, click here.

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Steve Lita, American Iron Magazine Editor

RIDE TO WORK by Steve Lita, Editor

…anyone who’s spent any extended length of time on the road can sympathize…

Daytona Bike Week 2019 is a fresh memory in my mind. You may be reading this in late April, but as of this writing, Bike Week is still going full swing. I couldn’t stay for the entire week this year, as I spent the week prior to the rally getting there from 2,833 miles away. Talk about doing things the hard way. I outlined the plans for my adventure in my column in issue #371. At that point, it was but a mere glimmer in my eye. Today, however, it’s history.

The adventure started in San Diego, California, and took four intrepid riders (and two almost as intrepid support truck crewmen) six days to cross the United States via what we thought would be the warmest, southernmost route from the West Coast to the East Coast. Little did we know, a polar vortex (who comes up with these names?) would produce freezing temperatures in central Texas on exactly the same two days we were going to be crossing the 800-mile-wide state. Thanks to modern technology’s cellphone weather apps, we were taunted by the prediction of comfortable weather on the day before our arrival at the western Texas border and the day after our departure from the state. Timing is everything, and ours was off by two days. Luckily, one of the bikes on the ride was equipped with factory heated grips and seat. And, yes, I hogged that bike to myself for almost the entire ride through the Lone Star state. The folks who designed our bikes must know what it’s like to be cold, being based in the frigid North, and they spec’ed some serious heaters for these bikes. Even in 35-degree temps, I couldn’t keep the grip heat setting at its highest. My hands got too hot on the 8, 9, or 10 power setting.

Participating in a group ride produces the paradox of being able to do something solo; ride your own bike, while doing it with others. To keep me company on this ride I didn’t opt for the helmet-to-helmet headsets some were using. I just blasted songs from my mp3 player through the bike’s speakers. And lo-and-behold I was treated to the blues/boogie tune “Six Days on the Road” several times. My player contains the version made famous by George Thorogood and the Delaware Destroyers, but Dave Dudley’s original from 1963 is a favorite of mine as well. Imagine, that song is as old as I am. It’s been covered by the likes of Sawyer Brown, Tom Petty, and Boxcar Willie. And anyone who’s spent any extended length of time on the road can sympathize with the lyrics. Any truckers out there know what I mean?

Perhaps you followed our adventure sporadically via social media as we checked in at various Indian motorcycle dealerships across the country. Indian Motorcycle Tucson lent us some tools and a bike lift for some oil changes on our new bikes and some minor repairs. Mission City Indian Motorcycle in San Antonio put out a spread for us and made sure nobody left hungry. And the showroom of G. Smith Motorsports in St. Rose, Louisiana (near New Orleans) is a sight to behold for fans of high-performance vehicles, both two- and four-wheeled varieties. Our hosts at every stop were gracious and generous with their staff and resources. A huge thank you goes out to all.

I’m not going to give away all the juicy details here, and I would never be able to cover everything in this one-page column. So, watch for stories about the ride, the bikes, and the people in upcoming issues.

Speaking of motorcycle people and one-page columns, check out who wrote a Guest Column for us in this issue on page 30. When Jordan and I spoke about the prospect of him contributing to American Iron Magazine, I didn’t have to think twice about it. I knew he was a good fit. He’s immersed in the custom motorcycle culture, and I know he’s done his share of six-days-on-the-road rides. Welcome, Jordan Mastagni.

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We’re on the sand in Mexico’s Baja putting this new Indian FTR 1200 S to the test. Amazing machine, and quite the looker. Here’s a quick walk around, much more to come in an upcoming issue of AIM.

Indian FTR 1200 Motorcycle Walk Round - YouTube

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