Loading...

Follow Afro Latin Jazz Alliance on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
Or

Valid


"Three Revolutions" by Arturo O'Farrill and Chucho Valdéz
Arturo O'Farrill & Chucho Valdes - Three Revolutions (Live at Symphony Space) - YouTube

During the GRAMMY awards ceremony held on Saturday, January 27, pianist, composer and conductor Arturo O’Farrill won his fourth prize at the 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards. Held this year in the Madison Square Garden in New York City, O’Farrill won Best Instrumental Composition for the original piece “Three Revolutions,” from his latest work Familia: Tribute to Bebo+Chico, an album released in September 2017 in honor of the families of pianists Arturo O’Farrill and Chucho Valdés.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Harlem, NY – Monday, January 8, 2018 – Multi-GRAMMY® Award-winning composer/pianist/educator Arturo O’Farrill and the non-profit The Afro Latin Jazz Alliance (ALJA) are thrilled to announce one of NYC’s standout 2018 concerts, On the Corner of Bourbon, Malecón & Broadway, featuring three giants of the jazz genre: Arturo O’Farrill, Ellis Marsalis, and Steven Bernstein alongside the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra and The Hot 9. At the intersection of musical cities New Orleans, Havana and New York City – all pivotal in the evolution of jazz, three of today’s most innovative artists present contemporary amalgamations of classic and non-traditional jazz repertoire at the Peter Jay Sharp Theatre @ Symphony Space on January 26 & 27, 2018. Artist interviews are available upon request.

ALJA’s annual live performance season features quarterly concerts with Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra appearing with a rotating cast of renowned guest artists. With more than 30 special programs presented at Symphony Space and select venues such as The Apollo Theater, ALJA has partnered with the biggest names in jazz and beyond over the past decade. At its core, the ALJA performance series serves as a platform for O’Farrill to workshop and debut awe-inspiring arrangements, many of which later appear on award-winning recordings.

On The Corner of Bourbon, Malecón & Broadway stands as O’Farrill’s most ambitious Symphony Space show to date with compositions stretching to the cultural corners of these three imperative musical cities. O’Farrill delves deep into the music of Havana with his distinctive NYC sensibility. O’Farrill notes, “Ellis, Steve and myself are cooking up a batch of red beans and rice, hummus and pita, and frijoles negros y arroz. We got’s plenty, but come hungry for the sounds of New Orleans, Cuba and The Upper West Side because things might get heated and there may not be enough for leftovers. Mambo meets Second Line by way of the #1 train! It’s gonna be a throw down.”

NEA Jazz Master and patriarch of New Orleans’ great musical family, Ellis Marsalis brings to the stage his inimitable take on modern jazz influenced by the Crescent City. Marsalis’ storied career has established him as one of the most respected jazz pianists with his solo work and collaborations with fellow contemporaries Cannonball Adderley and Al Hirt. With upwards of 20 of his own albums, he’s frequently appeared on many distinguished artists’ recordings. As a leading educator, he’s influenced the careers of countless musicians, including Terence Blanchard, Harry Connick Jr., Nicholas Payton; as well as his four musician sons: Wynton, Branford, Delfeayo and Jason.

“Arturo O’Farrill’s Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra is one of the premier Jazz Orchestra’s in the world,” says Ellis Marsalis. “The O’Farrill family’s legacy to the Afro Latin Jazz idiom is legendary and I am deeply honored to represent the New Orleans heritage in this program which is curated to showcase the sisterhood of Jazz idioms.”

Three-time GRAMMY® Award-winning trumpeter/arranger Steven Bernstein is a NYC staple for jazz and experimental music. Bernstein’s three-decade imprint on the scene continues to push the standards of what makes NYC such a thriving and leading-edge music mecca. Ranging in his work with the Lounge Lizards, Levon Helm and Lou Reed, his arranger credits effortlessly cross genres and arts disciplines from music to film, theatre, and dance. The New Yorker touts, “The trumpeter Steven Bernstein is a left-of-center provocateur…” while NPR says, “…Bernstein has been stretching music in new directions…a musical detective who’s always on the hunt for music that’s been overlooked by classic jazz.” He brings his powerhouse The Hot 9 to Symphony Space for a uniquely metropolitan spin on jazz.

Bernstein comments, “I see this event as a meeting between two distinct ensembles, two distinct arrangers, two distinct rhythm sections, two distinct pianists… a chance to do some cross-pollinating, make some new connections and have some fun. It’s Allen Toussaint meets Mario Bauzá!”

Don’t miss one of winter’s most anticipated shows in New York City featuring three acclaimed artists with two stalwart big bands!

On The Corner of Bourbon, Malecón & Broadway
Featuring Arturo O’Farrill & the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra
with Special Guests Ellis Marsalis, Steven Bernstein & The Hot 9
Friday, January 26 & Saturday, January 27, 2018
Peter Jay Sharp Theatre @ Symphony Space
2537 Broadway at 95th Street, NYC
Advance Tickets: $40/$30/$20
Day-of-Show Box Office Tickets: $45/$35/$25
Seniors/Students/Symphony Space Members/Children: $20/$15/$10
For tickets go to: www.symphonyspace.org or call 212-864-5400 or visit the box office
*A Pre-performance artist Q&A will take place at Symphony Space on January 26 at 7 pm.

About Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra

GRAMMY Award winning pianist, composer and educator Arturo O’Farrill — leader of the “first family of Afro-Cuban Jazz” (New York Times) — was born in Mexico and grew up in New York City. Son of the late, great composer Chico O’Farrill, Arturo was educated at Manhattan School of Music, Brooklyn College Conservatory and the Aaron Copland School of Music at Queens College. He played piano in Carla Bley’s Big Band from 1979 through 1983 and earned a reputation as a soloist in groups led by Dizzy Gillespie, Steve Turre, Freddy Cole, Lester Bowie, Wynton Marsalis and Harry Belafonte. In 2002, he established the GRAMMY® winning Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra in order to bring the vital musical traditions of Afro Latin jazz to a wider general audience, and to greatly expand the contemporary Latin jazz big band repertoire through commissions to artists across a wide stylistic and geographic range.

Following his 2009 GRAMMY® Award for “Best Latin Jazz Album” for the Orchestra’s debut recording, Song for Chico (ZOHO), O’Farrill has received numerous GRAMMY® nominations and most recently two GRAMMY® wins for The Offense of the Drum (“Best Latin Jazz Album”) and Cuba: The Conversation Continues (“The Afro Latin Jazz Suite,” “Best Instrumental Composition”). Cuba: The Conversation Continues won a 2016 Latin GRAMMY® for “Best Latin Jazz Album,” and his latest album with Chucho Valdés, Familia: Tribute to Bebo & Chico, has been nominated for a GRAMMY® Award in the “Best Instrumental Composition” category.

Arturo O’Farrill has lectured and performed in colleges and universities throughout the US and South America, is Director of Jazz Studies at the Brooklyn College Conservatory of Music (C.U.N.Y.) and is Artist-In-Residence at the Casita Maria Center for Arts & Culture. He’s currently collaborating with director Moises Kaufman and the Tectonic Theater on an Afro Cuban version of Bizet’s opera, Carmen. He is also a member of the Board of Governors of the New York Chapter of NARAS, and is a Steinway Artist.

Afro Latin Jazz Alliance

The non-profit Afro Latin Jazz Alliance (ALJA) was established by Arturo O’Farrill in 2007 to promote Afro Latin Jazz through a comprehensive array of performance and educational programs. ALJA self-produces the Orchestra’s annual performance season at Symphony Space (2007 – 2016), and maintains a weekly engagement for the Orchestra at the famed jazz club Birdland. The Alliance also maintains a world-class collection of Latin jazz musical scores and recordings. ALJA’s education initiatives include the Afro Latin Jazz Academy of Music in-school residency program serving public schools citywide with instrumental and ensemble instruction, and the pre-professional youth orchestra, the Fat Afro Latin Jazz Cats, which prepares the next generation of musicians. The Afro Latin Jazz Alliance maintains an administrative office at the Minisink Townhouse of the New York Mission Society. For more information on the Afro Latin Jazz Alliance, please visit afrolatinjazz.org.

###

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Congratulations to ALJA founder and artistic director Arturo O’Farrill, who today received a GRAMMY nomination in the category “Best instrumental composition” for “Three Revolutions” from the album Familia: Tribute to Bebo+Chucho, with Chucho Valdés and Arturo O’Farrill & the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra.

Arturo O'Farrill & Chucho Valdes - Three Revolutions (Live at Symphony Space) - YouTube

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Durante la década de los 50, dos grandes creadores fueron protagonistas absolutos de la edad de oro de la música cubana: el inefable arreglista Chico O’Farrill y el virtuoso pianista y director de orquesta Bebo Valdés. Ambos artistas fallecieron, pero su legado sigue vivo en la música de sus respectivos hijos: los pianistas Arturo O’Farrill, radicado en Nueva York y director musical de la celebrada Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra, y Chucho Valdés, fundador de la mítica agrupación Irakere.

Co-producido y orquestado por O’Farrill, Familia: Tribute to Bebo+Chico es un extraordinario disco doble que nace como colaboración entre los dos pianistas, pero también incluye a los nietos de Valdés y O’Farrill participando en una serie de excitantes y ambiciosas composiciones de Latin jazz. O’Farrill conversó con AARP en español sobre este nuevo trabajo, que será recordado como uno de los mejores discos latinos del año.

Recuerdo haber entrevistado a su padre —el maestro Chico O’Farrill— un año antes de que falleciera. Me sorprendió su humildad y lo genuino que era al hablar. ¿Qué recuerdos guarda de él?

Mi padre era un hombre de sentimientos muy profundos, que sin embargo mantenía sus emociones bajo control. Era un verdadero romántico; quería mucho a su familia y el sentido del humor era gran parte de su lenguaje. Los domingos teníamos un ritual: almorzar en familia. A mi hijo —que en ese entonces tendría 4 ó 5 años— le encantaban las aceitunas y mi papá le hacía muecas para distraerlo, se robaba el platito de aceitunas y fingía esconderlas debajo de la mesa para comerlas él. En vez de ponerse sentimental, expresaba su amor con bromas como esta. Yo lo quise mucho, precisamente porque no era demasiado expresivo. Sus acciones hablaban más que sus palabras.

El nuevo disco, Familia, reproduce la misma elegancia que caracteriza a los arreglos de Chico O’Farrill. ¿Cómo cree que su padre se transformó en un orquestador tan sofisticado?

Mi padre fue, ante todo, un amante de la música. Muchos compositores dejan de crecer una vez que alcanzan un cierto nivel de maestría en su oficio. Él no fue así. Se sentaba a estudiar partituras todos los días, como si fuera un muchacho de 20 años. Al final de su vida estaba fascinado con los cuartetos de cuerda de Haydn, que son algo así como el ABC para cualquier compositor. Y tenía un apetito voraz para escuchar música. Escuchaba discos dos o tres horas por día: música clásica, jazz tradicional, los éxitos del momento; siempre quería aprender cosas nuevas y ponerlas en práctica. Adoraba a Duke Ellington, que es considerado una de las mentes musicales más brillantes en cuanto a su elegancia y ‘melodismo’, Chico adoptó los mejores elementos de Ellington.

Pasando a su trabajo en este nuevo disco, me sorprende que aunque sus orquestaciones son suntuosas y progresivas, nunca se vuelven confusas o excesivas. ¿Cómo lo consigue?

Siempre pienso que son confusas. Pienso que mi trabajo es pésimo, que no tengo la más mínima idea de lo que estoy haciendo y debería jubilarme [risas]. A cierto nivel, los compositores tenemos una cierta arrogancia crónica porque somos inseguros. En cuanto a las orquestaciones, hay una técnica que utilizó. Se llama “cross-voicing”, y la usaban tanto Duke Ellington como Chico O’Farrill. Se trata de presentar una melodía a través de distintas secciones de la banda. Por ejemplo, una melodía no es tocada solo por las trompetas, sino tal vez por una trompeta, dos trombones y un saxo. Esta mezcla de texturas crea tensión, una incertidumbre en el escucha. Los sonidos no se definen fácilmente y esto le agrega profundidad al arreglo, una paleta de colores más amplia. Es uno de los trucos del oficio.

El amor a Cuba es un referente indispensable en este disco. ¿Cuáles son sus impresiones después de haber visitado la isla?

He pasado tiempo allí al menos una vez por año desde el 2002. Amo a Cuba. Me gusta la belleza natural de la isla, la manera en que la luz, el sonido y el calor se reflejan en su gente. Es uno de esos lugares, como Brasil, que reflejan el potencial de fusionar muchas culturas. En Cuba se mezclan lo mejor de África, Europa y el nuevo mundo, además de las olas migratorias de Irlanda, Rusia, China y tantos otros lugares. Cuando se unen tantas sangres distintas en una sola persona, esto desarma cualquier odio o racismo. Es difícil ser racista si uno mismo no está seguro de qué raza es exactamente. Esta mezcla tan hermosa me parece un milagro. Se refleja en la música, la gastronomía, la manera en que este pueblo trabaja y se divierte. En mi opinión, Cuba nos ofrece una imagen del futuro.

Me sorprendió que en “Raja Ram”, el último tema del disco, aparezca como invitada Anoushka Shankar, de la India. ¿Cómo surgió esa colaboración?

La idea surge de mi gran amigo y productor ejecutivo de este proyecto, Kabir Sehgal, cuyo origen es de la India. Hablamos mucho sobre el concepto de la familia. Era fácil pensar que este disco habla de la nostalgia y las dinastías, pero no es el caso. Queríamos comunicar la idea de la familia como un concepto global, incorporando también a otras familias musicales. Anoushka Shankar viene de una gran familia que también incluye al maestro Ravi Shankar y a la cantante Norah Jones. Son imágenes de una realidad más grande todavía: que lo que nos mantiene unidos como una sola raza de seres humanos es universal.

Por Ernesto Lechner

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By Félix Contreras, NPR

It’s hard to overstate the importance of both Bebo Valdés and Chico O’Farrill to Afro-Cuban jazz and Cuban music in general.

Valdés, who died in 2013 at age 94, was winning GRAMMYs and Latin Grammys for his music right up near the end of his life. One contemporary Cuban pianist called him “the entire history of Cuban piano.”

O’Farrill, who died in 2001, was part of the migration of Cuban musicians in the middle of the 20th century; he not only helped create the genre we now call Latin jazz, but was also an influence on popular music in his adopted home.

The two men’s sons, pianists Chucho Valdés and Arturo O’Farrill, recently collaborated on Familia: Tribute to Bebo+Chico, an album both dedicated to their memory and inspired by their towering historical presence. It’s a true family affair, bringing in a third generation of Valdes and O’Farrill progeny to perform on the album.

This week on Alt.Latino, the music is full of life and beauty. And the conversation with Arturo O’Farrill is free-flowing and, as always, thought provoking.

To hear the full interview on Alt.Latino on NPR, please click here

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By Félix Contreras, August 31, 20175:00 AM ET

Note: NPR’s First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Apple Music playlist at the bottom of the page.

It’s impossible to overstate the importance of both Bébo Valdés and Chico O’Farrill to 20th century Afro-Cuban music and jazz.

Their rich and multi layered influence is evident in iconic compositions, big band arrangements written 60 years ago that still sound cutting edge, and piano playing that echo Cuban classical music and jazz pianist Bill Evans.

The curious thing is that each made those contributions on opposite sides of the Florida Straights. Bebo Valdés (1918-2013) was a pianist, composer, arranger and bandleader in Havana, while Chico O’Farrill (1921-2001) was busy leading ensembles in New York. Their paths through Cuban music reflect unbreakable musical ties between the U.S. and Cuba that defied politics and a Cold War.

Familia: Tribute to Bebo and Chico, is just that: a multi-generational celebration of their lofty contributions led by their sons, pianist and composer Chucho Valdés and pianist and bandleader Arturo O’Farrill, in a series of performances that not only pay tribute to their fathers, but also continue to expand the tradition of Afro-Cuban jazz.

Tribute’s generational magic doesn’t stop there. Pianist Leyanis Valdés and drummer Jessie Valdés would have made their grandfather proud, and the same can be said about trumpeter Zack O’Farrill and drummer Adam O’Farrill. These inclusions are not just acts of empty nepotism. The playing is skilled, creative and impressive. For fans of Chucho and Arturo, this will come as no surprise since each pair of progeny have recorded extensively under the family name.

Chucho Valdés is literally a towering figure of Cuban music made on the island. Standing over 6 feet in height, his explorations of the African influences in Cuban music are so profound that he is revered by musicians who play jazz, dance music, Buena Vista styled classic Cuban son, and even the island’s hip-hop community.

Arturo O’Farrill took over his dad’s regular Sunday night big band gig when his father died in 2001 and used the gig to remind music fans not just of Chico’s individual contribution, but also of the magic found in the sounds of all those horns playing intricate, joyful noise over Afro-Cuban mambos swing. He has recast the band as the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra and has brought the music into the 21st century.

The entire album is full of music that would have intrigued both elder statesmen. And yet this album is so much more than a tribute to musical giants. It has the feel of an emotional homage to patriarchs who have left both a familial and musical legacy in their wakes.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Nueva York, 1 sep (EFE).- Chucho Valdés y Arturo O’Farrill, hijos de los músicos cubanos Bebo Valdés y Chico O’Farrill, respectivamente, se han unido para grabar un álbum en tributo a esas leyendas musicales cubanas, cuyo legado traspasó barreras para escribir páginas en la historia de la música cubana.

El disco “Familia: Tribute to Bebo and Chico”, que saldrá a la venta el próximo 15 de septiembre, reunió en un estudio de grabación a los premiados pianistas y compositores Chucho Valdés y Arturo O’Farrill, y también a sus hijos, una nueva generación de músicos y compositores que ha querido homenajear a sus antepasados.

La emoción estuvo a flor de piel. Arturo, hijo del compositor, director de orquesta y arquitecto del jazz afrolatino Chico O’Farrill, fallecido en 2001, aseguró a Efe que “él siempre está a mi lado cantando, bailando, componiendo”.

“En el momento en que Chucho y yo nos pusimos a tocar juntos lo sentí más cerca. En esta vida los ancestros siempre están contigo y guían tus pasos”, aseguró en la entrevista con Efe el músico, que afirma que el concepto familia debe ser uno global, extensivo a amigos, vecinos, a todos los que rodean a cada persona.

“Tenemos que tener amor y respeto por todo el mundo y ese es el problema, que pensamos que la gente que no es como nosotros no es familia”, agregó Arturo O’Farrill, fundador y director de la Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra.

Señaló además que el pianista, compositor y arreglista Bebo Valdés (1918-2013), una de las figuras más prominentes del jazz latino que contribuyó a la fusión del jazz y flamenco, y su padre Chico O’Farrill (1921-2001) “presidieron” todo el proceso del disco.

“Coloqué sus fotos bien alto, detrás de mí y de Chucho, para que vieran todo y lo bendijeran. Bebo y Chico no están vivos para dirigir o tocar pero están vivos en cada nota”, afirmó.

“Los sentí en toda la sesión. Además, como padre, tienes orgullo por tus hijos e hijas. Fue algo inolvidable”, explicó al referirse al trompeta Adam O’Farrill, los batería Zack O’Farrill y Jessie Valdés y la pianista Leyanis Valdés, que grabaron y compusieron para este proyecto.

El pianista, que también mantiene una fundación que enseña el jazz afrolatino a jóvenes, recordó que sus hijos son parte del grupo de músicos con los que viaja y que además participaron en la grabación de su pasado disco “Cuba, la conversación continúa”, con el que ganó un Grammy latino.

“Cuando tocas música con tu padre o tus hijos hay una conexión bien fuerte, espiritual, y se pueden hacer cosas musicalmente que no se pueden hacer con cualquier persona”, aseguró el pianista, ganador de cuatro premios Grammy, tres de ellos latinos.

“Familia: Tribute to Bebo and Chico”, consta de doce temas en dos discos, uno con la Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra y otro con el Third Generation Ensemble (grupo de Chucho Valdés) e incluyen clásicos de Bebo, “Ecuación” y “Con poco coco”, y de Chico, “Pura emoción” y “Pianitis”, así como otros compuestos por sus hijos y nietos.

O’Farrill ha dicho que este proyecto “es una conversación entre Chico y Bebo, viejos amigos y compañeros de Cuba, que una vez compartieron música y una profunda admiración, que continuó y se expandió con otras voces familiares”.

La idea, recordó, surgió de conversaciones con Chucho sobre el legado que dejaron sus padres y cómo mantenerla viva en sus hijos.

“Estamos muy emocionados de esa herencia y de compartirla con el mundo”, aseguró.

Entre los temas en este álbum figura también “Raja Ram” que tuvo como invitada a la citarista Anoushka Shankar, hija del músico indio Ravi Shankar (1920-2012), padre también de la cantante Norah Jones.

Según O’Farrill este tema celebra aún más el concepto de familia.

“La lección de ese tema es que la familia es global, que nos debemos tratar como si fuéramos familia”, dice, para agregar que “si pensamos que la gente de la India son como familia, vamos a estar interesados en las cosas de la India”.

“En este momento hay tanta división, tanto racismo. Estamos viviendo un tiempo tan feo, antiinmigrante, de anti esto y anti lo otro. Tenemos que parar (lo que ocurre en el país) y seguir adelante como raza humana”, argumentó.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Afro Latin Jazz Alliance by Carlos Gimenez - 5M ago
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

01/09/2017 09:12

Ruth E. Hernández Beltrán

Nueva York, 1 sep (EFE).- Los hijos de Bebo Valdés y Chico O’Farrill se han unido para grabar un álbum en tributo a las leyendas musicales cubanas, cuyo legado traspasó barreras para escribir páginas en la historia de este país.

El disco “Familia: Tribute to Bebo and Chico”, que saldrá a la venta el próximo 15 de septiembre, reunió en un estudio de grabación a los premiados pianistas y compositores Chucho Valdés y Arturo O’Farrill, y sus hijos, una nueva generación de músicos y compositores que ha querido homenajear a sus antepasados.

La emoción estuvo a flor de piel. Arturo, hijo del compositor, director de orquesta y arquitecto del jazz afrolatino Chico O’Farrill, fallecido en 2001, aseguró a Efe que “él siempre está a mi lado cantando, bailando, componiendo”.

“En el momento en que Chucho y yo nos pusimos a tocar juntos lo sentí más cerca. En esta vida los ancestros siempre están contigo y guían tus pasos”, aseguró en la entrevista con Efe el músico, que afirma que el concepto familia debe ser uno global, extensivo a amigos, vecinos, a todos los que rodean a cada persona.

“Tenemos que tener amor y respeto por todo el mundo y ese es el problema, que pensamos que la gente que no es como nosotros no es familia”, agregó Arturo O’Farrill, fundador y director de la Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra.

Señaló además que el pianista, compositor y arreglista Bebo Valdés (1918-2013), una de las figuras más prominentes del jazz latino que contribuyó a la fusión del jazz y flamenco, y su padre Chico O’Farrill (1921-2001) “presidieron” todo el proceso del disco.

“Coloqué sus fotos bien alto, detrás de mí y de Chucho, para que vieran todo y lo bendijeran. Bebo y Chico no están vivos para dirigir o tocar pero están vivos en cada nota”, afirmó.

“Los sentí en toda la sesión. Además, como padre, tienes orgullo por tus hijos e hijas. Fue algo inolvidable”, explicó al referirse al trompeta Adam O’Farrill, los batería Zack O’Farrill y Jessie Valdés y la pianista Leyanis Valdés, que grabaron y compusieron para este proyecto.

El pianista, que también mantiene una fundación que enseña el jazz afrolatino a jóvenes, recordó que sus hijos son parte del grupo de músicos con los que viaja y que además participaron en la grabación de su pasado disco “Cuba, la conversación continúa”, con el que ganó un Grammy latino.

“Cuando tocas música con tu padre o tus hijos hay una conexión bien fuerte, espiritual, y se pueden hacer cosas musicalmente que no se pueden hacer con cualquier persona”, aseguró el pianista, ganador de cuatro premios Grammy, tres de ellos latinos.

“Familia: Tribute to Bebo and Chico”, consta de doce temas en dos discos, uno con la Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra y otro con el Third Generation Ensemble (grupo de Chucho Valdés) e incluyen clásicos de Bebo, “Ecuación” y “Con poco coco”, y de Chico, “Pura emoción” y “Pianitis”, así como otros compuestos por sus hijos y nietos.

O’Farrill ha dicho que este proyecto “es una conversación entre Chico y Bebo, viejos amigos y compañeros de Cuba, que una vez compartieron música y una profunda admiración, que continuó y se expandió con otras voces familiares”.

La idea, recordó, surgió de conversaciones con Chucho sobre el legado que dejaron sus padres y cómo mantenerla viva en sus hijos.

“Estamos muy emocionados de esa herencia y de compartirla con el mundo”, aseguró.

Entre los temas en este álbum figura también “Raja Ram” que tuvo como invitada a la citarista Anoushka Shankar, hija del músico indio Ravi Shankar (1920-2012), padre también de la cantante Norah Jones.

Según O’Farrill este tema celebra aún más el concepto de familia.

“La lección de ese tema es que la familia es global, que nos debemos tratar como si fuéramos familia”, dice, para agregar que “si pensamos que la gente de la India son como familia, vamos a estar interesados en las cosas de la India”.

“En este momento hay tanta división, tanto racismo. Estamos viviendo un tiempo tan feo, antiinmigrante, de anti esto y anti lo otro. Tenemos que parar (lo que ocurre en el país) y seguir adelante como raza humana”, argumentó. EFE

http://www.lavanguardia.com/vida/20170901/43953221724/bebo-valdes-y-chico-ofarrill-se-unen-en-tributo-generacional-a-bebo-y-chico.html

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free year
Free Preview