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Back in December 2017 I was sat with a friend of mine, Oisin Lunny, in the Basketmakers pub in Brighton. After 2-3 pints of Guinness, I started on a bit of a rant about the state of customer experience (CX) and what we needed was for someone to do something more ‘punk’ if they really wanted to stand out and lead their fields. That idea sat with me for a good six months. However, in the summer of 2018, the idea popped back into my head again and I started to think more deeply about what punk is and what a punk version of CX would look like. As I thought about it more and more,  what struck me was the idea that there was something that could be learned from the evolution of rock music genres and the emergence of punk rock in the 1970s. Prog rock as a musical genre, emerged in the late 1960s and 1970s in the UK and the USA. Now, whilst it was popular it was also often accused of being overly technical, too elaborate, complicated, more focused on itself rather than the audience and often in danger of disappearing up it’s own a***.
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Today’s interview is with Roger Dooley who is a a speaker and author of Brainfluence: 100 Ways to Persuade and Convince Consumers with Neuromarketing, the popular blog Neuromarketing, and Brainy Marketing at Forbes. He joins me today to talk about his new book: FRICTION―The Untapped Force That Can Be Your Most Powerful Advantage, what friction is, how it affects us and what to do about it when it comes to customer experience. This interview follows on from my recent interview – Behavioural economics, alchemy, customer experience and the power of ideas that don’t make sense – Interview with Rory Sutherland – and is number 303 in the series of interviews with authors and business leaders that are doing great things, providing valuable insights, helping businesses innovate and delivering great service and experience to both their customers and their employees. Here’s the highlights of my chat with Roger: Emotion, customer experience and the impact of psychology and behavioral economics/science have risen up the agenda in recent years. Roger has been speaking and writing about these topics on neursciencemarketing.com since 2005. Roger has just written a new book called: FRICTION―The Untapped Force That Can Be Your Most Powerful Advantage. The origin story
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A couple of weeks ago I took a bunch of people, from one of my clients, to visit The Walton Centre in Liverpool as part of a customer service excellence and continuous improvement programme. Not only is The Walton Centre a world class facility that specializes in neurology, neurosurgery, spinal and pain management services, it is also an award winning organization in terms of how it manages its people having been awarded the Investors in People Gold Standard (2014, 2017) as well as the Health and Wellbeing IIP (Investors In People) Award. It’s important to note that less than 1% of all UK organizations have achieved this dual accreditation. We were there to find out about their approach to patient experience, see what we could learn and to figure out how we could apply that to the improvement of customer care in my client’s organization. For me, one of the stand out parts of the briefing that we received came when they explained how they gather and act on patient feedback. Like many other organizations they conduct surveys, review complaints, host listening and engagement events and gather feedback from friends, families, stakeholders and charities they work with. That’s all very
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Today’s interview is with Rory Sutherland, Vice Chairman of Ogilvy in the UK and author of a new book: Alchemy: The Surprising Power of Ideas That Don’t Make Sense. Rory joins me today to talk about his new book, behavioural economics and what we can all do to uncover stand out ideas that don’t make sense. Note: This interview is longer than many of the usual interviews that I conduct but dive in and enjoy it as it is packed with wit and bags of insight from Rory. This interview follows on from my recent interview – How many exposure hours have you had with your customers over the last few months? – Interview with Andy MacMillan of UserTesting – and is number 302 in the series of interviews with authors and business leaders that are doing great things, providing valuable insights, helping businesses innovate and delivering great service and experience to both their customers and their employees. Here’s the highlights of my chat with Rory: There are 11 rules of alchemy in the book. One of them is that the opposite of a good idea can be another good idea. The whole idea of customer experience doesn’t really submit
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This is a guest post from Benjamin Shepardson, web development guru and founder of NoStop Content Services. Digital transformation is an exciting prospect in the business world of today. And yet, many high-profile digital transformations fail. This isn’t due to a failure of the concept, but rather a failure of execution. Businesses struggle to pull off digital transformations because their concept of how a digital transformation works is entirely wrong. It’s not a destination. It’s a journey. Here’s why digital transformation is a journey, and how you can change your approach to create a more successful transformation. What is Digital Transformation? Digital transformation is a buzzword of the moment. But to understand how it works, you first need to know what it means. Digital transformation is a radical rethinking of how businesses think about and utilize their technology. But it’s not about technology, not really. You see, when digital transformation focuses solely on technology rather than the factors surrounding it, these transformation efforts are doomed to fail. It’s not as uncommon as you think–70% of all digital transformation initiatives at large companies fail to meet their goals. Why does this happen? Because companies think that it’s all about technology and
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Today’s interview is with Andy MacMillan is CEO of UserTesting and joins me today to talk about their new research report: The Rise of the Experience Economy – The 2019 CX Industry Report, the work that they do, what the best brands do to understand their clients and what leaders and professionals in the CX space should be doing more of. This interview follows on from my recent interview – Everyone in an organisation should be a loyalty leader – Interview with Sandy Rogers of FranklinCovey – and is number 301 in the series of interviews with authors and business leaders that are doing great things, providing valuable insights, helping businesses innovate and delivering great service and experience to both their customers and their employees. Here’s the highlights of my chat with Andy: Talking today about UserTesting’s new report called The Rise of the Experience Economy – The 2019 CX Industry Report. The big headline this year was that people have really starting to talk more about the overall experience more than technology or just digital. The implication from this is that in the last few years whilst firms might have said they wanted to be customer centric or customer
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The following is a Q&A conversation that I had with Anna Jordan, a reporter at SmallBusiness.co.uk. The conversation was originally published here. The customer experience is central to the longevity of any small business. Advisor Adrian Swinscoe shares his thoughts on the topic. Getting the customer experience right is a tough challenge for small businesses. We’ve seen major changes in the way that people are accessing goods and services, but what about the way businesses deal with people? Adrian Swinscoe is an advisor on both customer experience and customer service. We thought we’d ask him for some insights on the role of technology and what today’s customers expect from companies. Why is customer service in some businesses lacking? I think companies are divorced from the customer and what they experience. It’s like a psychosis that affects many people – we wake up in the morning and we’re a customer, then when we cross the threshold of the organisation we work and we might end up becoming this company person who has no relation to the previous person they woke up as. It’s a Jekyll and Hyde thing – you’ll leave at the end of the day and revert into that
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Today’s interview is with Sandy Rogers, the co-author of new book: Leading Loyalty: Cracking the Code to Customer Devotion and the leader of FranklinCovey’s Loyalty Practice. Sandy joins me today to talk about the new book, how leading companies develop loyalty (Spoiler alert: it’s not about a loyalty programmes), what they do to get in the way of loyalty and how they can put themselves on the right path. This interview follows on from my recent interview – New tech at work and improving the employee experience – How to get it right – Interview with Carrie Duarte – and is number 300 in the series of interviews with authors and business leaders that are doing great things, providing valuable insights, helping businesses innovate and delivering great service and experience to both their customers and their employees. Here’s the highlights of my chat with Sandy: Leading Loyalty: Cracking the Code to Customer Devotion was co-authored with Leena Rinne and Shawn Moon. So much of the difference between a good and a great experience comes down to how we feel about the people serving us. The book advocates for three core loyalty principles: empathy, responsibility and generosity and each comes with
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TINYpulse recently published their 2019 Employee Engagement Report titled The End of Employee Loyalty. With reputedly one of the largest databases in the world for employee feedback, they are well positioned to provide real insights into employee engagement trends. In fact, from January to December of 2018 they were able to collect responses from over 25,000 employees, working in more than 1,000 different companies across 20 industries spread across Northern America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. One of the headline findings from the report was that 43% of employees said that they would be likely to leave their current companies if they were offered a 10% pay rise elsewhere. That number was up from 25% in their 2017 survey. Now, the report says that weak company cultures are to blame. That may very well be true. But, healthy job markets can have an impact too. What is true, however, is that companies cannot become complacent in their efforts to continually improve their cultures, talent development and retention efforts if they want to maintain a high level of employee loyalty. But, while the report was full of a number of other interesting findings, it was their findings related to the question “What
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Today’s interview is with Carrie Duarte, Partner at PwC, Workforce of the Future Leader and Director on PwC’s U.S. Board. Carrie joins me today to talk about PwC’s new Tech at work and employee experience research report, the main findings, what they mean and what leaders should be doing about them. This interview follows on from my recent interview – Only 20 percent of support teams provide self service and other customer experience trends – Interview with Jeff Titterton – and is number 299 in the series of interviews with authors and business leaders that are doing great things, providing valuable insights, helping businesses innovate and delivering great service and experience to both their customers and their employees. Here’s the highlights of my chat with Carrie: Conversation about PwC’s new Tech at work and employee experience research report. Global survey of about 12,000 people from Canada, China, Hong Kong, Germany, India, Mexico, the UK and the US on their views about digital tools that they use in their daily work. Organizations have spent millions on technology but they’re not getting the bang for their buck. The reason why is that they’re often not thinking about the workforce and how it
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