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Entering into a treatment program for drug or alcohol addiction can be scary. Not only is a person leaving behind the substances they have grown dependent on, but he or she is also about to embark on a new way of life. Being as prepared and knowledgeable as possible when entering treatment can help ease anxiety and set a person up for success.

Before someone is admitted into a treatment program and begins receiving treatment, he or she will first go through an intake process. The intake process is a fundamental part of every rehab program and allows the treatment staff to better understand an individual’s unique needs and condition.

The intake process is typically made up of several steps. These steps include the initial contact with the potential patient and comprehensive assessments of a person’s emotional, medical, and social needs.

Initial Contact

A person’s experience with the rehab facility begins when he or she or a family member contacts the center regarding treatment. This often happens either by calling the treatment facility or by visiting it. A liaison will often be assigned to each potential patient to ensure a steady point of contact when determining if the rehab facility is the right fit.

The primary goals of the initial contact include:

  • Intervention — Some people don’t enter a rehab program by choice. Rather, due to emergency circumstances such as the risk of suicide or overdose, individuals are entered into a treatment program to prevent potentially fatal consequences. The initial contact with a rehab facility can help provide assistance and support throughout this process.
  • Eligibility — Not all treatment programs are right for a person. The initial contact with a rehab facility allows both potential patients and the center to determine if the program is the right fit.
  • Education — During the initial contact, the treatment center will provide education as to what a patient can expect throughout his or her stay at the facility.
  • Identify Specific Needs Of Patient — Each patient is unique and will have different needs throughout a program of recovery. During the initial contact, the liaison will work to identify the specific needs of the potential patient. These needs could include any medical disabilities that will require special attention and co-occurring disorders that will need to be addressed.
  • Insurance/Payment Information — The liaison will go over insurance coverage as well as other forms of payment that may be accepted at the treatment facility.

Additionally, an admission date will be scheduled during the initial contact with the treatment facility. When the patient arrives at the facility, he or she will begin the on-site intake process.

Questions About Treatment? Call now to be connected with one of our compassionate treatment specialists. (888) 966-8973
Intake Assessment And Interviews

Before beginning treatment, each patient will go through an extensive intake process upon arriving at the rehab center. The goal of the intake process is to thoroughly assess the patient’s condition and determine the best plan of action for his or her treatment program.

The intake process may include:

  • Initial Interview — During the initial intake interview, patients will be asked about their substance abuse and medical history. Detailed questions about education, work, family, and social life may also be asked. Any previous addiction treatment will also be discussed.
  • Physical And Medical Evaluation — In addition to a comprehensive medical history, many treatment centers will also perform extensive physical and medical examinations of each patient. This may include toxicology tests, physical exams, and the evaluation of potential withdrawal symptoms. Physical and medical evaluations are performed by medically trained personnel and are confidential.
  • Psychological Evaluation — In addition to medical and physical assessments, a person’s psychological state and needs are also evaluated. Individuals are screened for existing mental health conditions that may need to be addressed during treatment. A patient’s lifestyle, cultural background, and religious or spiritual beliefs will also be taken into consideration. All of these factors will be used when determining a treatment plan for a patient.
  • Paperwork — Extensive paperwork is often part of the intake process. Questionnaires and information regarding medical history, special needs, insurance, and other important information will be gathered during this time.

Every aspect of the intake process is important, as it allows the treatment facility to develop a customized plan for each patient. The information a patient provides during the intake process, the better able the treatment center is to cater to his or her unique needs and condition.

Treatment Facility Orientation

Once the comprehensive intake evaluation is complete, the treatment facility staff will help the new patient get oriented to the center. During this time, patients will be shown where they will reside during their stay and given a tour of the facility.

Patients will also be given an outline of their customized treatment plan and go over what to expect throughout the duration of their stay. The rules of the facility will also be discussed at length as well as disciplinary actions that may be implemented if these rules are broken.

Additionally, patients’ belongings will be searched to ensure that no substances or other potentially harmful items are taken into rehab. Many treatment centers have a list of prohibited items on their website, so checking ahead can prevent any surprises.

Ready to make a change?
Call to speak to a treatment specialist.

Finding An Addiction Treatment Program That’s Right For You

It’s normal to feel anxious or hesitant when entering an addiction treatment program. Ensuring that a rehab facility is right for your needs and condition can help ease anxiety and assure you that you’re in the right place. Addiction Campuses has several treatment centers throughout the nation that provide tailored recovery plans for each patient that walks through our doors.

To learn more about what you can expect during the intake process at a rehab facility, contact an Addiction Campuses’ treatment specialist today.

The post What To Expect During A Drug Rehab Center Intake Process appeared first on Addiction Campuses.

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Drugs and alcohol are linked to countless diseases, injuries and medical conditions. Repeated substance abuse can lead to addiction, and long term health risks, including brain damage.

Drugs and alcohol act as toxins to the body. They disrupt normal functioning in the brain, distorting reality and result in feelings of euphoria.

Disrupting normal function in the brain is extremely dangerous, because, over time, these disruptions can become both semi-permanent and permanent. Repeated or long-term substance abuse raise these risks significantly.

Brain Damage From Drugs and Alcohol

There are a number of ways that drugs and alcohol can damage the brain. Some of the effects of drugs and alcohol in the brain can occur after one use, while others may materialize after long term or heavy use.

The specifics of brain damage often depends on the substance used, length of use, and method of ingesting. Nearly all forms of brain damage are the result of one or more of the following:

  • oxygen deprivation
  • lack of nutrients to sustain brain tissue
  • altering brain chemical levels, neurotransmitters and hormones
  • directly damaging, injuring, or death of brain cells, neurons, and receptors

Drugs and alcohol tend to impact the chemical levels of the brain, resulting in significant changes in brain function. When brain function changes, it can change mental status, physical abilities, thought processes and even the personality of the individual.

The brain thrives with consistency. The brain is made of up interconnections of neurons and each section of the brain communicates using these pathways. This is how learning occurs, personality develops, abilities are maintained and functioning occurs. Drugs and alcohol disrupt all of this.

Alcoholic Dementia, Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome And Alcohol Addiction

Individuals who abuse alcohol often struggle with malnutrition, and lack of proper nutrients can result in a number of issues.

Alcohol affects the body’s ability to absorb vitamin B1, also known as thiamine. Thiamine is necessary for proper brain function, as well as heart and liver function.

Thiamine deficiency can result in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, a combination of Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff’s psychosis. Other forms of encephalopathy can occur with alcoholism, resulting in a buildup of toxins in the brain.

Individuals addicted to alcohol are also at risk for a form of dementia referred to as Alcoholic Dementia, caused by brain cell damage due to alcohol.

Korsakoff’s Psychosis and Alcoholic Dementia are irreversible consequences of alcohol abuse and addiction. Exposure to alcohol in utero also has irreversible effects on brain function.

Psychopathology And Marijuana

Some studies have indicated that there is little evidence to connect marijuana and brain damage. However, there have been other studies that suggest marijuana use can trigger psychosis in individuals predisposed to schizophrenia or other mental health diagnosis.

Other studies have linked marijuana use to lower dopamine levels, reduction in size of the structure of the hippocampus, right anterior cingulate gyrus and amygdala, as well as negative impact on the mediotemporal lobe and variations in cannabinoid receptors.

Questions About Treatment? Call now to be connected with one of our compassionate treatment specialists. (888) 966-8973
Opioids And Brain Death

Opioids act as a depressant on the central nervous system (CNS), and often result in significantly depressant respiration. This can result in a decrease of oxygen in the bloodstream, resulting in the brain becoming oxygen deprived.

Hypoxia is usually considered sudden oxygen deprivation that occurs with opioid overdose, but it can also be the result of long term opioid use. Hypoxia of either kind can result in brain damage that is largely irreversible.

Hallucinogens And Sensory Perception Malfunctions

Hallucinogenic drugs, such as LSD, psilocybin, peyote, ayahuasca, DMT or MDMA, can cause visual and auditory hallucinations. Some individuals experience residual hallucinations after the drug has left the system, sometimes for several years.

These continued visual hallucinations and echoing could be a result of damage to the visual area of the brain (occipital lobe) or the enzymes responsible for perception and vision. Research continues to explore this phenomena, as it is not well understood.

Stimulants And Lack Of Pleasure

Drugs like methamphetamine, cocaine, Adderall and ecstasy affect dopamine and dopamine receptors in the brain. Long term use can result in neurotransmitter and receptor damage, and even death.

Dopamine cell death can result in a person being unable to experience pleasure or happiness without using a stimulant drug. This often leads to severe depression, self-harming or self-destructive behaviors, and even suicidal thoughts.

Warning Signs Of Drug Or Alcohol Induced Brain Damage

If someone you know is struggling with alcohol or drug addiction, they are at risk for developing brain damage. Some of the warning signs to be aware of include:

  • delayed reactions
  • severe memory problems
  • hallucinations
  • lack of coordination
  • problems thinking

Sometimes these effects are a direct result of drug or alcohol consumption, but they may also occur after a seizure, stroke or overdose. Whether or not these symptoms are permanent depends on a number of factors.

Is Drug or Alcohol Induced Brain Damage Reversible?

There are many different types of brain damage that can occur as a result of drug and alcohol abuse. Damage that is the result of missing nutrients that is caught in the early stages of brain damage have a chance of being reversed.

Extensive brain damage, cell death or brain damage due to injuries due to intoxication are often times irreversible. Alternative options may be available, rehabilitation can help.

Ready to make a change?
Call to speak to a treatment specialist.

Treatment For Addiction Induced Brain Damage

It is difficult to determine the level of brain damage that has occurred if a person is still abusing drugs or alcohol. Sobriety is an important step in determining what, if any, long-term damage has been sustained.

Finding a substance abuse treatment program that includes a detox program can help restore nutrients and vitamins that are vital to brain function. Once balance has been restored, a thorough assessment can be completed to determine the level of brain damage has occurred.

During this assessment, a treatment plan can be established that will work toward healing as much of the damage as possible, and using therapeutic interventions to help a person adjust to sober life with whatever permanent damage may exist.

Getting treatment is the first step toward recovery. Reach out to our trained staff today, so we can help find a program that meets your unique needs.

The post Can Drug And Alcohol Abuse Cause Brain Damage? appeared first on Addiction Campuses.

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Entering into a treatment program for drug or alcohol addiction can be scary. Not only is a person leaving behind the substances they have grown dependent on, but he or she is also about to embark on a new way of life. Being as prepared and knowledgeable as possible when entering treatment can help ease anxiety and set a person up for success.

Before someone is admitted into a treatment program and begins receiving treatment, he or she will first go through an intake process. The intake process is a fundamental part of every rehab program and allows the treatment staff to better understand an individual’s unique needs and condition.

The intake process is typically made up of several steps. These steps include the initial contact with the potential patient and comprehensive assessments of a person’s emotional, medical, and social needs.

Initial Contact

A person’s experience with the rehab facility begins when he or she or a family member contacts the center regarding treatment. This often happens either by calling the treatment facility or by visiting it. A liaison will often be assigned to each potential patient to ensure a steady point of contact when determining if the rehab facility is the right fit.

The primary goals of the initial contact include:

  • Intervention — Some people don’t enter a rehab program by choice. Rather, due to emergency circumstances such as the risk of suicide or overdose, individuals are entered into a treatment program to prevent potentially fatal consequences. The initial contact with a rehab facility can help provide assistance and support throughout this process.
  • Eligibility — Not all treatment programs are right for a person. The initial contact with a rehab facility allows both potential patients and the center to determine if the program is the right fit.
  • Education — During the initial contact, the treatment center will provide education as to what a patient can expect throughout his or her stay at the facility.
  • Identify Specific Needs Of Patient — Each patient is unique and will have different needs throughout a program of recovery. During the initial contact, the liaison will work to identify the specific needs of the potential patient. These needs could include any medical disabilities that will require special attention and co-occurring disorders that will need to be addressed.
  • Insurance/Payment Information — The liaison will go over insurance coverage as well as other forms of payment that may be accepted at the treatment facility.

Additionally, an admission date will be scheduled during the initial contact with the treatment facility. When the patient arrives at the facility, he or she will begin the on-site intake process.

Questions About Treatment? Call now to be connected with one of our compassionate treatment specialists. (888) 966-8973
Intake Assessment And Interviews

Before beginning treatment, each patient will go through an extensive intake process upon arriving at the rehab center. The goal of the intake process is to thoroughly assess the patient’s condition and determine the best plan of action for his or her treatment program.

The intake process may include:

  • Initial Interview — During the initial intake interview, patients will be asked about their substance abuse and medical history. Detailed questions about education, work, family, and social life may also be asked. Any previous addiction treatment will also be discussed.
  • Physical And Medical Evaluation — In addition to a comprehensive medical history, many treatment centers will also perform extensive physical and medical examinations of each patient. This may include toxicology tests, physical exams, and the evaluation of potential withdrawal symptoms. Physical and medical evaluations are performed by medically trained personnel and are confidential.
  • Psychological Evaluation — In addition to medical and physical assessments, a person’s psychological state and needs are also evaluated. Individuals are screened for existing mental health conditions that may need to be addressed during treatment. A patient’s lifestyle, cultural background, and religious or spiritual beliefs will also be taken into consideration. All of these factors will be used when determining a treatment plan for a patient.
  • Paperwork — Extensive paperwork is often part of the intake process. Questionnaires and information regarding medical history, special needs, insurance, and other important information will be gathered during this time.

Every aspect of the intake process is important, as it allows the treatment facility to develop a customized plan for each patient. The information a patient provides during the intake process, the better able the treatment center is to cater to his or her unique needs and condition.

Treatment Facility Orientation

Once the comprehensive intake evaluation is complete, the treatment facility staff will help the new patient get oriented to the center. During this time, patients will be shown where they will reside during their stay and given a tour of the facility.

Patients will also be given an outline of their customized treatment plan and go over what to expect throughout the duration of their stay. The rules of the facility will also be discussed at length as well as disciplinary actions that may be implemented if these rules are broken.

Additionally, patients’ belongings will be searched to ensure that no substances or other potentially harmful items are taken into rehab. Many treatment centers have a list of prohibited items on their website, so checking ahead can prevent any surprises.

Ready to make a change?
Call to speak to a treatment specialist.

Finding An Addiction Treatment Program That’s Right For You

It’s normal to feel anxious or hesitant when entering an addiction treatment program. Ensuring that a rehab facility is right for your needs and condition can help ease anxiety and assure you that you’re in the right place. Addiction Campuses has several treatment centers throughout the nation that provide tailored recovery plans for each patient that walks through our doors.

To learn more about what you can expect during the intake process at a rehab facility, contact an Addiction Campuses’ treatment specialist today.

The post What To Expect During The Intake Process appeared first on Addiction Campuses.

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Nicotine lozenges are a form of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), designed to help individuals stop smoking. With this medication, nicotine is absorbed from the lozenge into the tissues of the mouth, where it enters the bloodstream.

The controlled dose of nicotine in the lozenges replaces the nicotine a person would get from smoking cigarettes and helps ease potential withdrawal symptoms.

Is It Possible To Overdose On Nicotine Lozenges?

Nicotine is poisonous, and though overdosing on nicotine is uncommon, it is possible. A nicotine overdose happens when an individual consumes too much nicotine, resulting in a toxic reaction, also known as nicotine poisoning.

Symptoms of a nicotine overdose include:

  • difficulty breathing
  • vomiting
  • fainting
  • headache
  • weakness
  • increased or decreased heart rate

If someone consumes more than the recommended amount of nicotine lozenges in a day, they can experience nicotine poisoning. The symptoms of nicotine poisoning can be subtle and in some cases, hard to identify.

Signs of a nicotine lozenge overdose can include:

  • blurred vision
  • dizziness
  • headache
  • nervousness
  • pounding in the ears

In rare circumstances, individuals may also experience:

  • fast or irregular heartbeat
  • hives and excessive itchiness
  • rash, redness, or swelling of the skin
What To Do If Someone Is Showing Signs Of Nicotine Poisoning

If you or a loved one are experiencing nicotine poisoning, contact emergency services right away. Follow the medical guidance of the emergency personnel and do not force the individual to vomit or give them any fluids to drink.

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Call now to talk with a treatment specialist about your recovery options.

Other Potential Side Effects Of Nicotine Lozenges

Nicotine lozenges may produce some side effects that may not necessarily require medical attention. These side effects may go away as the body adjusts to the new form of nicotine absorption and can include:

  • mouth sores, blisters, or irritation
  • nausea or vomiting
  • sore throat

Less common side effects of nicotine lozenges also include:

  • acidic or sour stomach
  • belching
  • diarrhea
  • heartburn
  • hiccups
  • mouth, tooth, jaw, or neck pain
  • problems with teeth
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
How Much Nicotine Is Too Much?

Nicotine overdose depends on a handful of factors, including body weight and the source of nicotine. Fortunately, the mortality rate from nicotine poisoning remains very low.

Most researchers agree that a lethal dose of nicotine for adults falls between 50 to 60 milligrams (mg), which roughly equates to five cigarettes or 10 ml of liquid nicotine. Some research claims it takes 500 to 1000 mg of oral form nicotine to kill an adult.

Nicotine Lozenges: Dosage And Consumption

Nicotine lozenges come in two or four mg doses and are usually only recommended for eight to 11 weeks of use at a time.

How many lozenges you take a day is based on how many cigarettes you are accustomed to smoking and will vary by brand recommendation.

Here are a few tips to keep in mind when consuming nicotine lozenges:

  • only take one nicotine lozenge at a time
  • do not exceed the total recommended daily amount of lozenges on the package
  • do not eat at least 15 minutes before use, as this can disrupt the absorption process
  • do not eat or drink with the nicotine lozenge in your mouth
  • let the lozenge sit in your mouth, moving it from side to side occasionally—do not suck on, bite, chew, or swallow the lozenge.

Most lozenges are designed to dissolve in your mouth within half an hour.

Treatment Options For Nicotine Abuse And Addiction

There are a few treatment options for individuals with nicotine addiction. Nicotine replacement therapies, such as nicotine lozenges and patches, are great options for people looking to quit nicotine use on their own.

However, some people may find that receiving additional help from an outpatient treatment program may be what they need to kick their nicotine habit for good.

To learn more about nicotine lozenge overdose, or how to beat nicotine addiction, contact an addiction treatment specialist today.

The post Nicotine Lozenge Overdose Signs and Symptoms appeared first on Addiction Campuses.

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The HuffPost reports that the fourth of July is one of the deadliest holiday weekends, in part because of alcohol and drug abuse. The good news is, with a little bit of planning, you can stay sober and still enjoy this American tradition.

7 Things You Can Do To Stay Sober On The Fourth Of July

Holidays can be stressful and potential triggers for individuals recovering from drug or alcohol abuse. However, the best way to stay sober isn’t by holding up like a hermit and avoiding the world.

Instead, set realistic expectations and make enjoyable plans. Ensuring that these plans are safe and fit into a substance-free lifestyle is critical. Here are some ideas to consider:

1. Plan To Hang Out With Sober Friends

Large holiday parties can be a trigger for some people going through the recovery process. This year, why not start a new tradition and make plans with friends and family members who are sober?

Going to a completely substance-free gathering may be one of the best ways to ensure your sobriety on the fourth of July.

2. Host A Family Barbeque

Being the host of the party means that you get to dictate which beverages get served and what substances you will permit.

Plus, the duties of a host are never done, so you’ll stay busy and won’t even have time to think about slipping back into relapse.

3. Have A Reminiscent Fourth Of July

Do you remember being a kid spending the Fourth playing outside, running through the sprinkler, jumping into the water, and roasting marshmallows over the fire?

This year, try recreating some favorite childhood pastimes or attending a local fair with family or friends. These options can be great alternatives to attending a large party where alcohol and other substances may be present.

Questions About Treatment? Call now to be connected with one of our compassionate treatment specialists. (888) 966-8973
4. Practice Saying “No”

It may sound a bit odd, but this strategy can be very useful. Merely saying “no” when offered a drink or drugs can go a long way. Most people won’t try to force the issue.

5. Be Mindful Of H.A.L.T.

Feeling hungry, angry, lonely, or tired? Try eating some favorite foods, talking to a loved one, attending a local peer-support meeting, or taking a power-nap.

Whatever you do, don’t sit there stewing in these negative emotions, or they’ll fast track you into an unwanted relapse.

6. Pre-plan An Exit Strategy

It’s always a good idea to have a way out of triggering situations. Ideally, if you’re going somewhere, drive yourself or get an accountability buddy who is cool with making a quick exit if need be.

7. Avoid The “Just Once” Trap

When it gets tempting to take just one drink, or hit, or pill, remember how far you’ve come. Keep a reminder of the progress you’ve made, and remember how much work it will be to start the recovery process over again.

Because the fact is that “just once” rarely ends up being a single incident. Often, it turns into “just one more” until it eventually slips into a full-blown relapse.

Things To Remember When Experiencing A Relapse

The chronic nature of addiction means that, for some people, relapse is a part of the recovery process. The rate of relapse for drug use are similar to relapse rates for other chronic medical illnesses.

In no way does returning to drugs or alcohol mean that the individual has failed. Addiction treatment involves changing deeply rooted behaviors, and relapsing doesn’t mean that treatment has failed either.

Relapsing indicates that the individual needs to return, modify, or enroll in another type of addiction treatment.

The Dangerous Side To Relapse

One thing to be cautious of is that while relapse is a normal part of recovery, for some substances, it can be extremely dangerous—possibly deadly.

Individuals who have stopped taking a substance may be inclined to take the same dose they consumed before quitting. Doing so can easily lead to an overdose because their bodies are no longer accustomed to their previous levels of drug exposure.

Finding Help After A Relapse

If you or a loved one fall victim to relapse this Fourth of July it is important to seek help immediately, before the problem becomes more severe.

Whether you want to find treatment for the first time or due to a relapse, AddictionCampuses.com can help. Find out more by contacting one of our addiction specialists today.

The post 7 Things You Can Do To Stay Sober On The Fourth Of July appeared first on Addiction Campuses.

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Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been diagnosed in over 6.1 million children nationwide. The age of diagnosis keeps getting younger, and in 2016 nearly 388,000 children between the ages of two and five were diagnosed with ADHD.

About 64 percent of children with ADHD also have another condition that affects their mental health:

  • more than half struggle with a behavior or conduct diagnosis
  • almost 33 percent have anxiety
  • autism spectrum disorder (14%), depression (17%) and Tourette’s syndrome (1%) also affect some children with ADHD

Many mental health diagnoses have been connected to substance abuse, however, there has been no indication that one causes the other. There also has not been a link solely between ADHD medications and future substance abuse or addiction.

ADHD Treatment Medications

Recommended treatment for ADHD usually includes medication and therapy. ADHD medications include stimulant and nonstimulant options, although the standard method of treatment is a stimulant medication.

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We are here to help you through every aspect of recovery. Let us call you to learn more about our treatment options.

Available ADHD medications include:

  • Non-Stimulant ADHD Medications
  • Strattera (atomoxetine)
  • Intuniv (guanfacine)
  • Kapvay (clonidine)
  • Stimulant ADHD Medications
  • Ritalin (methylphenidate)
  • Daytrana (methylphenidate)
  • Metadate (methylphenidate)
  • Desoxyn (methylphenidate)
  • Concerta (methylphenidate)
  • Adderall (dextroamphetamine and levoamphetamine)
  • Dexedrine (dextroamphetamine)
  • Vyvanse (lisdexamfetamine)
  • Focalin (dexmethylphenidate)
Stimulant Treatment For ADHD And Addiction

Of the more than six million youths receiving treatment for ADHD, over 3.7 million minors are being prescribed medication. Concerns regarding the effects of these medications have been consistently voiced, and research has continued to find side effects of these medications.

Studies have continued over a number of years that investigate any connection between stimulant medications and addiction. However, recent studies have shown that treating ADHD with stimulant medication does not predispose children to abuse drugs or alcohol when they get older.

A study from 2002 indicated that stimulant medications for ADHD resulted in less drug-seeking activity as adults, however, this study has not been replicated.

Recent research has not been able to connect stimulant medications to an increase or decrease in substance abuse, drug seeking or addictive behaviors in individuals being treated for ADHD during childhood.

ADHD And Addiction

What the research has shown is that there is a connection between ADHD and addiction. However, ADHD is only considered a moderate risk factor for addiction in adults.

There are additional factors that increase the risk associated with ADHD and addiction. For example, a child diagnosed with both ADHD and a behavioral or conduct disorder has a significantly high risk of developing an addiction.

Many childhood ADHD symptoms have been linked to substance abuse later in life. Hyperactivity, inattention, and impulsivity have been linked to substance use disorders. More specifically, those behaviors in children at age three could predict alcohol misuse disorders at 21.

Children who are restless, squirmy, fidgety and jumping around at ages six through ten were found to be more likely to use drugs and smoke cigarettes as adolescents and teens.

ADHD, Addiction And The Brain

Problems with dopamine systems in the brain have been linked to both ADHD and addiction. Specific areas of the brain that are part of the dopaminergic pathways, the reward center and the frontal cortex, have been found to be dysfunctional in individuals with ADHD.

A person with ADHD may not be able to understand the severity of the consequences of substance abuse. Additionally, the lack of impulse control may also lead to compulsively fulfilling desires of immediate gratification with drug and alcohol abuse.

ADHD and addiction seem to be connected, however, the connection does not appear to be a result of stimulant medications.

Overlap Of Stimulant Medications And Substance Use Disorders

Concerns regarding the stimulant medications prescribed for ADHD and addiction are valid. It seems many college students and professionals alike are misusing prescription drugs like Adderall and Ritalin for academic or professional gain.

This type of prescription abuse can lead to addiction. However, it is not the same as an individual who takes a daily medication, as prescribed, to treat a condition like ADHD.

A person who takes a prescription medication that is not prescribed to them, or in a way that it is not prescribed is misusing the drug. This behavior indicates a potential problem that can lead to addiction. A person abusing a stimulant medication may be in need of substance abuse rehab.

A child who is struggling with ADHD and is taking a medication that is prescribed to them, as it is prescribed to them, is not abusing the medication and studies have indicated that they are not at risk for developing an addiction or substance abuse disorder.

Risks Associated With ADHD And Addiction

While there have not been definitive links between ADHD and addiction, some studies have shown that there are some additional risk factors that put individuals with ADHD at risk for developing a substance use disorder.

These risk factors include:

  • co-occurring disorders (bipolar, ODD, conduct disorder, other behavioral conditions)
  • enrolled in a difficult college program
  • belonging to a frat or sorority
  • untreated ADHD symptoms
  • starting stimulant treatment during college
  • white or Latino race
Treatment Options For Stimulant Medications Addiction

Substance abuse treatment options are available for anyone struggling with a stimulant medication addiction.

If you are not sure that someone you know may be abusing or addicted to a stimulant prescription medication, we are available to assist. Contact us today and we can help you with your unique situation, and discuss options that would work for you or your loved one.

The post Do ADHD Medications Predispose Children To Future Substance Use Disorders? appeared first on Addiction Campuses.

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Cocaine is an illegal stimulant that offers feelings of euphoria and an energy rush. A cocaine high does not last long, which usually leads to repeated use over a short period of time. Binging a drug like cocaine can quickly lead to addiction.

Cocaine is considered a party drug, and due to this popularity, many people falsely believe that cocaine is somehow safer than other drugs. Unfortunately, cocaine use comes with a significant amount of problems, including cardiac arrest, arterial vasospasms, and heart palpitations

Even if a person stops using cocaine, it can create long-term or permanent changes in the brain. While they are using cocaine, a person’s decision making skills are severely impacted. This can lead to being in dangerous situations, or putting themselves or others at risk.

Cocaine can be used in a number of ways. The most common is snorting, but injecting and freebasing are common as well. Freebase cocaine is a water insoluble base version, that is abused in the following way.

Freebasing Cocaine

Freebasing cocaine is essentially inhaling the vapor from applying a heat source to base cocaine. It is usually simply referred to as freebasing and is not the same as smoking crack cocaine or attempting to smoke powdered cocaine.

Find Treatment For Cocaine Addiction Today.

We are here to help you through every aspect of recovery. Let us call you to learn more about our treatment options.

Freebasing usually involves putting freebase cocaine into a glass pipe and heating it until it boils into a vapor, which is then inhaled. A small amount of copper is usually placed in the pipe as well, to assist in the boiling process.

Freebase cocaine enters the bloodstream and brain much faster than other forms of cocaine. In some cases, it is faster than injecting it. Several people have reported that the ‘high’ they get from freebasing is more intense than other methods.

Creating a freebase version of cocaine requires a process that actually removes impurities and chemical components of cocaine hydrochloride, reducing the drug to a form that has a low melting point, does not dissolve in water, and takes effect almost immediately.

How To Make Freebase Cocaine

What is commonly referred to as cocaine is actually cocaine hydrochloride. By adding a chemical compound that includes ammonia, it allows a reaction that draws out a more pure form, or base form, of cocaine.

Essentially, by a chemical process, the cocaine becomes free from its sodium base. This is where the term ‘freebase’ comes from. The next step takes a form of ether to dissolve the cocaine. This form of ether is highly combustible and often results in explosions in the labs that create freebase cocaine.

Nearly pure cocaine has a very low melting point, which makes it easier to heat, boil and inhale the vapors. Because it is also lipid soluble, it results in a fast and intense high.

Freebasing Effects

The effects of freebase cocaine are quick, and they don’t last long. The intense rush of euphoria and energy burst tend to dissipate after about 30 minutes, and an equally intense crash occurs as the person starts to ‘come down’.

As the effects of the freebase cocaine wear off, a person may experience depression, irritability, fatigue, anxiety, or even paranoia. In an attempt to avoid these effects, a person may begin a dangerous cycle of continued use. This can indicate a pathway toward addiction.

The short-term effects of freebasing include insomnia, decreased sexual function, nausea, headaches, pinprick pupils and excess sweating. Long term freebase cocaine abuse can lead to mood changes, restlessness, hallucinations, paranoia, depression, and anxiety.

Additionally, there are significant health risks when a person is smoking or inhaling any chemical or toxin. A person is more likely to develop cancer, respiratory problems, damage to the mouth, throat, and lungs.

Over time, nearly all organ systems in the body can be damaged by cocaine abuse. The heart can stop working properly or completely shut down, the brain is more susceptible to stroke and seizures, a person can develop asthma or other breathing issues.

These health risks are in addition to the harm a person can do to their body when making or using freebase cocaine. There is an increased likelihood a person could burn their hands, arms or face when freebasing, and dangerous explosions can occur while making freebase.

Freebase Cocaine Withdrawal

Withdrawal symptoms from freebasing cocaine are similar to any other form of cocaine overdose. The main difference is the psychological withdrawal can be more intense due to the intensity of freebasing.

Some of the more common withdrawal symptoms associated with freebasing cocaine are:

  • strong cravings
  • nervousness
  • anxiety
  • excessive fatigue
  • muscle pain
  • thoughts of self-harm or suicide
Freebase Overdose

Due to the fact that freebasing cocaine is ingesting a very pure form of cocaine, there is a higher risk that a person may overdose from use.

If a person is freebasing cocaine and begins displaying any of the following symptoms, contact emergency medical personnel immediately:

  • hyperventilation
  • fast heart rate
  • convulsions
  • stroke symptoms
  • coma

A person exhibiting these signs are at a high risk for stroke, seizure, and death.

Mixing freebase cocaine with any other drugs or alcohol places a person at an even higher risk for overdose.

There are several treatment options for a person who struggles with an addiction to freebasing cocaine. Contact our staff today to allow us to locate a facility near you.

The post What Is Freebasing? appeared first on Addiction Campuses.

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A reward pathway, or reward system, refers to a group of brain structures that are activated by rewarding stimuli.

The most crucial reward pathway in the brain is known as the mesolimbic dopamine system. Though there are other existing reward pathways, the dopamine reward system is a key detector of rewarding stimuli.

A series of experiments conducted by James Olds and Peter Milner in the 1950s were the first indication of reward pathways in the brain. These experiments involved implanting electrodes into the brains of rats. The rats then pressed levers which stimulated different areas of the brain.

Olds and Milner found that the rats repeatedly pressed the lever to receive stimulation to the front end of the brain called the corpus callosum.

It was determined that the corpus callosum is the most sensitive area of the brain, with rats pressing a lever over 7,500 times in 12 hours to receive electrical stimulation to that area of the brain.

This repetitive behavior was a strong indication that the rats were enjoying the stimulation. It is now understood that when our brain structures are exposed to rewarding stimuli, like drugs or alcohol, brains respond by increasing the release of the chemical, dopamine.

Addiction And The Brain: The Difference Between Natural And Artificial Rewards

Research into reward pathways has shown that the brain is hardwired to repeat rewarding behaviors as a survival instinct. Intrinsic rewards such as food, water, sex, and nurturing allow for feelings of pleasure while eating, drinking, copulating, and being nurtured.

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Each of these natural rewards are meant to inhibit human survival on a primal level. However, natural reward pathways can sometimes feel limited once someone is exposed to an artificial reward.

Artificial rewards release more substantial amounts of “feel-good” chemicals like dopamine and serotonin in the brain compared to natural rewards.

From Reward Pathway To Addiction: The Brain On Dopamine

How are the reward pathway and addiction linked? The more someone repeats a behavior, the more reinforced that behavior becomes, creating a feedback loop.

After a certain amount of time, physical changes occur in the brain, altering the reward pathway permanently. The amount of time it takes for such changes to occur depends on the type of substance being abused. This could be after one use or over the course of months.

Changes in the brain due to reinforced behavior are highly influential when a person transitions from casual use of a substance to addictive substance use.

The persistent release of dopamine during chronic drug use gradually rewires specific brain structures, embedding drug cues, which leads to obsessive cravings for the substance.

Addiction is a complex brain disease. However, at its core, addiction is a biological process, which is why substance use affects brain circuitry.

How Reward Pathways Contribute To Chronic Relapse

Multiple types of substances cause similar behavioral changes or addiction. This can be explained by the fact that all drugs produce common actions within the brain, such as activating the dopamine reward pathway.

Once this pathway is activated, it can lead to permanent changes in brain structure. These changes are what make withdrawal so difficult and recovery a life-long process.

Compulsive drug use can be a result of four overlapping brain regions or pathways, each with a distinctive pull toward substance abuse.

The four brain regions/networks that commonly lead to relapse include priming (single use that develops into a binge), drug cues, cravings, and stress.

The sections of the brain that instigate priming and drug cues also describe the mechanisms involved in addictive processes, which adds to the likeliness of an individual relapsing.

Recovering From Addiction With Effective Substance Abuse Treatment

Due to the hold reward pathways have over an individual’s actions, it can be nearly impossible to break free of an addiction cycle without support in treatment.

Treatment options will vary, depending on the severity of substance abuse. Adequate substance abuse treatment has proven to play a critical role in a person’s ability to stop addictive behaviors and restore control over their lives.

The most effective treatment types work to address the individual’s unique issues, including what caused them to begin substance abuse. By confronting both the mental and physical aspects of addiction, individuals are more likely to have a successful recovery outcome.

The post The Reward Pathway Of Addiction appeared first on Addiction Campuses.

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Detox is considered a valuable part of the recovery process. Detox helps individuals struggling with addiction to rid the body of drugs, alcohol and other toxins they have encountered as a result of addiction.

Removing drugs and alcohol from the body is necessary for recovery, but flushing them out can also be quite scary and even painful. Having medical staff available during the detox process can ease the symptoms of withdrawal in a number of ways.

The length of time spent in a medically-supervised detox center depends on the drug a person is addicted to and how long they have been abusing the drug. A thorough assessment can help to determine the length of time a person should expect to stay in a detox program.

Detoxification specifically focuses on the physical addiction related to substances of abuse. Managing the physical addiction in detox allows a person to focus on recovery during treatment.

Drug Detoxification Explained

Detox is one phase of substance abuse and addiction treatment. Detox takes place before rehabilitation, outpatient services and aftercare programs.

During this initial phase, medical professionals are available to monitor and treat individuals in withdrawal from drugs or alcohol. They can administer medications, provide supplements and help the body restore balance that was lost due to addiction.

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Different drugs affect the body differently. Depending on which substances are being abused, the length of time a person needs to detox can vary greatly. A team of addiction specialists can assess each individual and create a treatment plan that is unique to each situation.

Changes In Your Brain From Drug Detox

When a person is addicted to drugs or alcohol, the chemistry in their brain changes. These changes can severely affect a person if they attempt to remove drugs or alcohol without assistance.

The body can become physically dependent upon drugs or alcohol. Attempting to stop consuming these substances will often cause the body and brain to go haywire, and stop working properly.

Not only does the person not feel normal without the drug, but the body also does not operate properly without the drugs or alcohol once they’ve become addicted.

The staff at detox centers are trained to monitor and evaluate individuals experiencing withdrawal from drugs or alcohol. They can provide medication for nausea, vomiting, chills, fever, aches, and pains. Antidepressants and supplements are also commonly prescribed to individuals at detox centers.

Substances that may require a medically supervised detox program before entering substance abuse treatment include alcohol, opioids, benzodiazepines, and methadone.

Alcohol Detox

Alcohol withdrawal can be fatal. Alcohol detoxification can take anywhere from three days to two weeks, depending on the severity of their alcohol addiction.

A person who has been drinking heavily for five years decides to quit cold-turkey, they may have seizures, become delirious or experience cardiac arrest. All of these can result in death.

Alcohol withdrawal symptoms usually emerge within six to twelve hours after the last drink. However, the more intense, deadly symptoms can take days or even a week to emerge. Being supervised at a detox center during this time can help keep a person safe.

During detox, a person may be prescribed medications to ease withdrawal symptoms. Benzodiazepines, like chlordiazepoxide (Librium), diazepam (Valium) or lorazepam (Ativan), are some of the most commonly prescribed medications to treat alcohol withdrawal.

Benzodiazepines decrease anxiety, help with sleep and control seizures. Under medical supervision, benzos are prescribed during withdrawal and the person is slowly weaned off them. This process can take up to 14 days.

Opioid Detox

Detox for heroin and other opioids (morphine, hydrocodone) typically lasts about seven to ten days. Symptoms of opioid withdrawal can begin within the first 24 hours and, for those who use opioids chronically, may last up to a month.

Opioid detox is uncomfortable and can be extremely painful, however, it is not usually fatal unless the person has been combining opioids with other drugs.

Opioid replacement therapies involve removing opioids, like heroin or Vicodin, and introducing another opioid medication that reduces cravings and withdrawal symptoms. Using a gradual tapering method, the person eventually can be opioid-free.

Methadone and buprenorphine are the two most common medications to treat opioid addiction, however, Lucemyra (lofexidine hydrochloride) was approved in 2018 to assist in the treatment of opioid withdrawal symptoms.

Benzodiazepine Detox

Withdrawal from benzodiazepines can be fatal. Attending a detox center for benzo withdrawal can last two to eight weeks, and sometimes longer.

The withdrawal symptoms associated with benzo addiction can last weeks, and, in some cases, months. The type of benzo and length of addiction are factors that affect how long a person with experience withdrawal symptoms.

The initial withdrawal symptoms usually last about one to four days. Depending on which benzo is being abused, the onset of symptoms begins within the first six to 24 hours after the last dose is taken. Acute withdrawal symptoms last several weeks.

At a detox center, a tapering method is used to gradually reduce the levels of benzodiazepines in the body, alleviating many withdrawal symptoms. Tapering also lowers the chance of rebound effects occurring, like insomnia and anxiety.

Once a person has removed all benzodiazepines from their body, substance abuse treatment is important to consider. Benzo addiction, in particular, can result in long term rebound effects and withdrawal symptoms. Learning how to manage these symptoms can help maintain sobriety.

Methadone Detox

A person struggling with methadone addiction can spend ten to 20 days at a detox center. Although methadone is an opioid, it stays in the body longer and this is why withdrawal symptoms last much longer than other opioids.

Methadone withdrawal is just as uncomfortable as other opioid withdrawal symptoms. It is not usually fatal, but the discomfort and pain associated with methadone withdrawal can cause a person to relapse, even if they want to stop using.

Detox From Drugs Or Alcohol In 24 Hours

Many detox remedies are advertised offering a quick fix from toxins, and this is not only false, but it can also be extremely dangerous. If a person is struggling with an alcohol or benzo addiction, these cleansing remedies can launch a person into deadly withdrawal.

It is important to seek the professional advice of an addiction specialist when attempting to manage withdrawal symptoms. Detox centers are available to help ease symptoms of withdrawal and save lives.

Detox Protocols And Plans

The initial contact with detox programs includes a thorough evaluation.

The treatment team typically assesses the following information to develop a protocol unique to the person seeking detox:

  • length of substance abuse
  • last time drugs were taken
  • what is the individuals’ drug of choice
  • additional substances taken
  • past attempts at sobriety
  • medical history
  • mental health status

This information is used to develop a tentative treatment plan. This plan can be modified and adjusted based on the progress and needs of the person.

Detox Centers And Substance Abuse Treatment

When seeking addiction treatment, exploring detox centers is an important step. Especially if a person has attempted sobriety before. These detox centers exist to help ease a person through withdrawal, into substance abuse treatment and toward a life of sobriety.

We are available to answer any questions and concerns you may have about detox centers and addiction treatment options. Reach out to us today and allow us to help you or your loved one.

The post How Long Is The Average Stay At A Detox Center? appeared first on Addiction Campuses.

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Alcohol poisoning can cause irreversible brain damage, coma, and death. Chronic drinking over time can also cause multiple organ failure and other serious medical problems. For these reasons, people with alcohol poisoning should receive immediate medical care.

In certain cases, alcohol poisoning may be a sign of a larger problem. Individuals who routinely engage in heavy or binge drinking may struggle with an alcohol use disorder or addiction.

Comprehensive alcohol addiction treatment could help a person find sobriety. It may also protect them from alcohol poisoning and other alcohol-related health risks.

Understanding Alcohol Poisoning

Alcohol is the most frequently abused drug in America. Despite its widespread social acceptance, alcohol abuse can cause great bodily injury and harm, including alcohol poisoning.

Alcohol poisoning is the most dangerous form of alcohol overdose. When alcohol poisoning sets in, alcohol, which is also referred to as ethanol, has reached toxic levels in the body. Because of this, alcohol poisoning is also called ethanol poisoning.

About six people die each day in America from alcohol poisoning, according to the most recent estimates available from the CDC.

When alcohol is consumed in moderation, the body is typically able to eliminate it in a safe and timely manner. When a person consumes more than their body can process, the alcohol can continue to circulate in the body, causing an increased blood alcohol concentration (BAC).

At a high enough BAC, an alcohol overdose can set in. In the early stages, a person may seem highly intoxicated or drunk, but as alcohol overdose progresses, the brain and critical life-support systems can become highly impaired. Alcohol poisoning can cause these systems to shut down, leading to death.

The exact amount needed to cause alcohol poisoning can vary per person. Consuming any type of alcoholic beverage can lead to alcohol overdose, including:

  • beer
  • gin
  • tequila
  • vodka
  • wine
  • whiskey

When a person binge drinks or consumes a large enough quantity of alcohol to bring their blood alcohol concentration to .08 percent or higher, they face a higher risk of alcohol poisoning.

For a woman, this generally occurs after four drinks, and for a man after five drinks. This is typically over a period of two hours. Teens and college-aged individuals may face a higher risk of alcohol poisoning, due to increased behaviors of binge drinking.

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Alcohol Poisoning Causes

Anyone who drinks a large quantity of alcohol quickly may be in danger of an alcohol overdose. However, certain factors can influence a person’s risk for alcohol poisoning, such as their:

  • age
  • gender
  • weight and size
  • state of health
  • tolerance to alcohol

If a person has recently eaten, their risk can also change. A person’s health and medical conditions, including any medications they may take, can also influence this risk.

If a person is taking other drugs that depress the CNS, such as opioids, sedative-hypnotics, and anti-anxiety medications, they may be more vulnerable to the effects of alcohol. This is true when these drugs are taken as prescribed or consumed in patterns of abuse.

Consuming alcohol with heroin, prescription painkillers, benzodiazepines, and sleep aids such as zolpidem (Ambien) can place a person at a greater risk of alcohol poisoning.

The amount or percentage of alcohol in a person’s drink can also influence their risk. Many of today’s beers contain more than one standard drink’s worth of alcohol.

Even more, many mixed drinks at bars and restaurants also contain more than this amount. If a person consumes these or other strong drinks, they may not realize they are binge drinking or consuming too much alcohol too quickly.

A standard drink contains .6 fluid ounces or 14 grams of pure alcohol. This equals:

  • 12 fl oz of regular beer that is about 5 percent alcohol
  • 8 to 9 fl oz of malt liquor that is about 7 percent alcohol
  • 5 fl oz of wine that is about 12 percent alcohol
  • a 1.5 fl oz shot of 80-proof distilled spirits, such as gin, rum, tequila, vodka, or whiskey

Monitoring alcohol intake or abstaining from alcoholic drinks can prevent alcohol poisoning.

Alcohol Poisoning Risks And Dangers

A person’s blood alcohol concentration can continue to rise after they’ve stopped drinking or even after they’ve passed out. This is because any alcohol that remains in their stomach or intestines can make its way to the bloodstream. The greater a person’s BAC, the greater the risk of alcohol poisoning.

As a person’s blood alcohol concentration increases, their central nervous system can become depressed. The CNS is responsible for keeping crucial life support systems functioning.

When alcohol overdose causes the CNS to be depressed, areas of the brain that regulate a person’s blood pressure, breathing, heart, and temperature could become impaired. Alcohol poisoning can cause these vital systems to start shutting down.

Sleeping it off can be very dangerous for a person who is struggling to stay awake or who is already unconscious due to alcohol poisoning. In these states, they could breathe in and choke on (aspirate) their vomit.

Additionally, without prompt medical help, a person may:

  • experience a blood sugar crash (hypoglycemia)
  • have seizures from hypoglycemia
  • become severely dehydrated from vomiting
  • go into cardiac arrest from hypothermia
  • slip into a coma
  • develop brain damage
  • According to Mayo Clinic, any of these conditions can be fatal.
Alcohol Poisoning Signs And Symptoms

When a person begins to show signs of alcohol intoxication, such as a lack of coordination and slurred speech, they’re already at risk of alcohol overdose. If they ignore these signs and continue to drink, an overdose could progress to fatal alcohol poisoning.

As alcohol reaches toxic levels, and as a person’s body struggles to detoxify itself, signs of alcohol overdose will likely become apparent.

When alcohol poisoning causes the central nervous system to slow to life-threatening levels, the body’s temperature may plummet, a state referred to as hypothermia. This can cause cold, clammy skin that appears pale or bluish in color.

At this time, a person’s heart and breathing rates may slow. Major signs of alcohol poisoning include when a person’s breathing slows to eight breaths or less per minute or becomes irregular, to the point where there are 10 or more seconds between each breath they take.

Additional signs and symptoms of alcohol poisoning include:

  • confusion
  • intestinal and stomach bleeding
  • no gag reflex
  • slurred speech
  • seizures
  • stomach pain
  • slowed responses
  • stupor
  • unconsciousness
  • unsteadiness
  • vomiting (may be bloody)

Knowing the symptoms of alcohol poisoning could help a person get themselves or someone close to medical care.

Passing the signs of alcohol poisoning off as only intoxication or drunkenness could endanger a person’s life. In this state, it can be very dangerous to wait for a person to develop all the signs of alcohol poisoning.

Even if a person doesn’t have all or any of these symptoms, if alcohol poisoning is suspected, emergency medical services should be contacted.

Alcohol poisoning can be a medical emergency. If a person has consumed a fatal amount of alcohol, emergency medical care could save their life at this time.

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Alcohol Poisoning Treatment

An individual who is believed to be overdosing on alcohol should not be left alone. If a person is fully unconscious, or even semi-conscious and having a hard time staying awake, emergency medical treatments may be required. If a person cannot be woken up, they are at risk of losing their life.

Contrary to popular belief, many of the remedies people try at home at this time don’t reverse alcohol poisoning. Instead, they may make the situation worse, including:

  • cold showers
  • hot coffee
  • walking

Semi-conscious and unconscious individuals should not be left to “sleep it off.” If at all possible, a person should be kept awake at this time, so that they don’t lose consciousness.

Someone should stay with a person at all times to make sure they don’t fall or choke. A person should be moved to a sitting position, so they’re somewhat leaning forward. If they are unconscious or will not sit up, they should be rolled to one side so they don’t choke.

Unless directed to do so by a healthcare professional or Poison Control, do not attempt to make a person vomit.

Certain information can help first responders provide more effective treatment at this time, including:

  • a person’s age and weight
  • what they drank
  • how much they drank
  • when it was consumed
  • if they took any other drugs recreationally
  • if they take any medications or have health problems

Once a person arrives at the emergency room, they will be closely monitored and lab work will be done. Medical treatments will likely be administered, including, but not limited to, airway support, IV fluids, medications, and certain tests.

Finding Treatment For Alcohol Abuse And Addiction

While experiencing alcohol poisoning doesn’t necessarily mean a person is addicted to alcohol, it does mean they’ve abused alcohol. In certain cases, patterns of alcohol abuse can accelerate to addiction. If a person is addicted, comprehensive treatment for alcoholism is available.

The most effective programs for alcohol addiction often blend medications with behavioral therapies, an approach is known as medication-assisted treatment.

Alcohol dependence can cause severe withdrawal. For this reason, a medical detox program that uses medications may be required to help a person safely withdrawal. Once a person has detoxed, they should proceed to rehab for the best chance of a successful recovery.

Though outpatient and inpatient rehab programs for alcohol addiction are available, a residential alcohol treatment program is often preferable for moderate to severe alcohol addiction.

Contact Addiction Campuses now for more information on alcohol poisoning and alcohol addiction treatment.

The post What Is Alcohol Poisoning? appeared first on Addiction Campuses.

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