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The skills gap is here, and it is a pressing issue. Whether its cause is generational, educational, experiential, or a mix of all of the above, employers are contending with shrinking labor pools, expanded competition for top talent, and high turnover — it’s time to revisit the quality of the learning and development (L&D) environment.

Traditional Learning Management Systems Don’t Bring Enough Value

In a recent survey, Aberdeen found that Best-in-Class companies are 3.4x more likely than All Others to use a traditional learning management system (LMS). 46% of managers and HR professionals think that the traditional LMS contributes the most value toward developing the skills they need from the workforce.

Meanwhile, 80% of managers and HR professionals contend that they still cannot overcome internal skills gaps, 69% lament low or declining productivity, and 67% report that they are unable to meet internal financial and performance objectives.

Let’s just stop and contemplate this for a moment: If the LMS is so functional, then why is the workforce metric case is so bad?

Investing in Talent Acquisition vs. Talent Management

Aberdeen has reported time and again that the average employee today is looking for career opportunities beyond simply filling a role. On the other hand, managers generally want the same commitment from employees, despite c-suite calls to cut labor costs looming overhead.

The average HR and departmental management professional is well aware that a slightly higher initial investment in retaining an employee up front pays out more in the long run by retaining experiential skills and eliminating the constant need to acquire and train new talent. However, one of the biggest challenges is that management often can’t get the L&D environment quite right. In fact, the average management team assessed in Aberdeen’s data is so focused on resolving short-term problems that, within broad-based talent placement, talent acquisition spend outpaces talent management spend by a factor of up to 2 to 1.

What this means is that, just like consumer subscription businesses (cable companies, cell-phone service providers, etc.), the average employer spends most of their time wooing net-new employees instead of significantly investing in the retention of the employees they already have. As a result, employers lose the net financial benefits of stemming outflow while acquiring new talent.

It’s Time to Focus on Personal Employee Development

The L&D environment is the primary resource that both candidates and employees look to when they try to understand the kind of investment an employer will make in their personal development.

If the L&D environment is lacking, disruptive, antiquated, or isolated, candidates may join. Regardless, employees will most surely leave in an undesirable timeframe unless, for some reason, employee advancement is tied to something other than measurable growth or performance — and we all know that constitutes a whole other problem. (Really, you needed to resolve non-performance-based advancement yesterday — this article will still be here when you get back.)

Getting to a winning situation with the L&D environment requires a few more modern resources integrated with some promising old ones to drive productivity gains, improve revenue potential, increase tenure, and close emerging skills gaps. At the top of the list, consider the options to:

  • Streamline early learning in on-boarding
  • Implement career and content analytics to personalize learning tracks based on L&D system engagement
  • Offer micro-learning and integrating it into compensation advancement considerations
  • Renovate in-person training
  • Use analytics to improve peer-to-peer and mentorship training
  • Integrate performance data into the L&D analytics case to drive relevant content and programming to the right employees at the optimal time
  • Use learning time and attendance to understand how content and programs are being consumed and translate that into resource optimization in deployment

The post It’s Time to Modernize Your Learning and Development (L&D) Ecosystem appeared first on Aberdeen.

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There are plenty of reasons to invest in third-party intent data—to improve content marketing strategy, maximize sales enablement, support personalized marketing, or even optimize ABM efforts.

But no matter which use case is right for you, the ultimate goal is to improve your organization’s win-rate percentage.

One of the biggest advantages of using intent data to improve win-rate percentage is that you get visibility into individual buyer journeys. Understanding the activity of target accounts and contacts at each step of the buyer’s journey will help you send the right marketing/sales messages at the right time.

But buyer journeys can become extremely complicated. Staring at a massive dataset might not make insights obvious enough, which is why data visualization is so important to drawing winning connections between your marketing and buyer needs.

What a Marvel Data Visualization Teaches Us About Intent Mapping

If you’ve followed pop culture even remotely over the last decade, you know that the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) has essentially dominated consumer attention. When the billion-dollar-blockbuster Avengers: Endgame premiered in April 2019, it was the 22nd movie in a complex series that started all the way back in 2008.

The result is a web of character relationships and plot points that looks something like this:

This data visualization put together by The Straits Times contains detailed descriptions about the roles of every character throughout the MCU. But it’s not just a wiki with a paragraph or two about the movies characters appeared in—it lets you sort by various relationships and activities that connect individual characters and movies on the larger scale.

Unless you’re a serious MCU fanatic or were somehow involved in creating the movies, it’s understandable if you lose track of how events in 2008’s Iron Man were later referenced in 2019’s Avengers: Endgame. Or, how Tony Stark’s father is connected to the man who created the Ant-Man suit.

With a data visualization, you can quickly identify valuable insights much faster than if you were just looking at a spreadsheet. This is as true for the MCU as it is for mapping intent in a buyer’s journey.

We like to think that the buyer’s journey is linear. But you know that it’s often more complicated than that. A target account could view middle-of-the-funnel content one day and fall back to the research phase the next. Or, you could lose a deal to a competitor only to find that the account is back to actively looking for a solution soon after.

Being able to cut through all that noise and truly understand real-time intent signals is the key to improving your win-rate percentage. This is where a third-party intent data provider can help.

Visualizing Intent with Machine Learning

Using data visualization to wrap your head around the MCU before a new movie comes out might be fun, but it won’t exactly help you improve business results.

The missing link between something entertaining like the MCU data visualization and a model designed to improve win-rate percentage is the presence of causal links. You don’t just want to see the individual points of activity on a specific buyer’s journey—you want visibility into what leads to won opportunities and what leads to losses.

When evaluating third-party intent providers, make sure that they use machine learning to maximize their results. Machine learning algorithms can take all of the different intent signals of your target accounts, determine levels of active research ahead of sales opportunity creation, and predict win-rate variances.

By weaving machine learning into our B2B purchase intent analysis, we can help you identify the causes and effects of your closed deals and determine how to apply those insights to new opportunities. If someone can simplify all the interwoven characters in the MCU, we can help you find the valuable insights in all that buyer’s journey data.

Do you know which specific companies are currently in-market to buy your product? Wouldn’t it be easier to sell to them if you already knew who they were, what they thought of you, and what they thought of your competitors? Good news – It is now possible to know this, with up to 91% accuracy. Check out Aberdeen’s comprehensive report Demystifying B2B Purchase Intent Data to learn more.  

The post How Visualizing Intent Data Can Improve Win-Rate Percentages appeared first on Aberdeen.

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Influencer marketing was brought to the attention of many earlier this year by Netflix’s “Fyre” documentary — highlighting the creation and unraveling of a music festival promoted extensively through influencers such as models and musical artists. Despite the recent hype, influencer marketing isn’t a new tactic. For decades, Marketers have been promoting new products, events, etc. through newspapers and magazines long before digital channels such as the web and social media became mainstream channels in marketing programs.

How Does Influencer Marketing Fit into Customer Service?

While marketers have perfected the use of influencer marketing to improve brand awareness and drive revenue, influencer marketing is still a relatively new concept for customer service leaders. For the service organization, influencer marketing refers to detecting satisfied clients and encouraging them to share their positive experiences with peers across various social media portals such as Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. This, by definition, requires the service organization to meet and exceed customer needs to earn such positive word-of-mouth.

Aberdeen’s March 2019 CX Executive’s Agenda study shows that 62% of Best-in-Class service organizations currently have a program where they determine satisfied customers through various methods such as online surveys, IVR surveys, and speech analytics, and encourage them to share their positive experiences. It’s worth noting that of these firms with this capability, 32% are firms with a pure Business-to-Business (B2B) model. Hence, we can note that working with influencers as part of the broader CX activities isn’t reserved just for Business-to-Consumer (B2C) companies.

Service leaders are in a unique position to determine satisfied clients. They capture a wealth of customer feedback and behavioral data through post-call surveys in the contact center, speech analytics to detect sentiment as well as utilize online surveys, etc. to gauge their ability to meet and exceed client needs. Incorporating influencer marketing within service activities therefore requires segmenting this data to determine clients with positive sentiment or feedback and asking them to share their experiences.

Spotting Influencers (and Keeping Them Satisfied)

It’s also important to note that while a client may be extremely satisfied with a recent experience, they may not have a large number of followers across their social media portals. This is where service leaders must also segment satisfied clients based on their ‘influence.’

While influence is a rather subjective term, the most common definition of influencers in marketing programs is refers to individuals who have more than average influence in the purchase and loyalty decisions of clientele. Several of the most common ways that marketers determine influencers includes taking into account their number of followers on Twitter and/or Instagram and their number of subscribers to their YouTube channel as well as account activity such as number of posts.

Once you determine influencers, you should then provide them with incentives to share their positive experiences. While these incentives can be financial such as a flight upgrade and other complimentary services, they can also be non-financial such as upgrading clients from silver to gold membership level. Because each individual has unique preferences, it’s best to micro-segment influencers by different criteria such as age or region to determine best ways to encourage them. For example, such micro-segmentation may reveal that influencers that are below age 30 are more likely to share positive word-of-mouth when the company rewards them with  a $50 gift card versus influencers over the age of 30 being more likely to share positive word-of-mouth when they are rewarded with a complimentary two-year product warranty program.

To reveal such insights, service leaders must initially provide influencers with a variety of incentives and then analyze the most popular ones across each micro-segment. This analysis must be refreshed at least annually since customer expectations change, and the service organization must ensure the incentives provided to motivate influencers to share their positive experiences are relevant to the current expectations.

There’s Already a Foundation for Influencer Marketing

The good news for service leaders is that they don’t have to reinvent the wheel when it comes to influencer marketing. It’s already a mature activity in marketing, and they have the opportunity to learn from the best practices that work for marketers to achieve the best results in their own service programs. This means establishing a formalized approach to determine influencers for the brand. If your marketing team already uses an influencer marketing program, we recommend collaborating to have a unified approach to manage influencer relations across your business.

While influencer marketing provides significant potential for service leaders to differentiate themselves by leveraging the voice of their happy clients, it’s critical to remember that influential clients will recommend company products and services only when their needs are met efficiently. As such, service leaders must not lose sight of core activities such as building and maintaining a single view of customer insights, using these insights to deliver contextual customer experiences across all channels, and improving efficiency by empowering contact center agents. When you balance those activities successfully, you’ll also transform your service organization to become the face of your brand impacting your brand awareness and perception.

The post Influencer Marketing in Customer Service appeared first on Aberdeen.

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This week, we’re looking at headlines related to intent data from the month of June. Our roundup includes stories that discuss major acquisitions, political campaigns, digital advertising changes, and innovation in ABM technology.

Industry Activity

It was a big month for data visualization and analytics startups. Early in June, Google Cloud acquired Looker, an analytics company, for $2.6 billion. Just a week later, Salesforce announced its acquisition of Tableau, a data visualization company, for $15.7 billion.

In each case, you see that the world’s biggest tech companies are seeing a market need for more accessible data analytics. It’s not enough to just collect data about customers or application users. Especially in terms of intent data and data-driven marketing, it’s important to be able to gain actionable insights from all of the information available to you.

These are two of the biggest data visualization/analytics acquisitions. But you can be sure we’ll see more as time goes on.

In other news, Boston martech company IntentData.io announced the launch of its Contact Level Intent Data. For ABM to succeed, you can’t just market to accounts as a whole — you need to dig deeper into the contacts within a target buying team. This new offering intends to help make that easier.

Google Brings Deeper Segmentation to Digital Ads

At an event called Google Marketing Live, the tech giant announced a number of new products and features related to digital advertising segmentation.

One announcement, in particular, stands out in the intent data industry. Google is adding more in-market segments to it advertising products, giving users the ability to group audiences by purchase intent as indicated by search and browsing behavior.

While many of the new offerings revolve around B2C marketers, the shift toward more personalized and intent-based segmentation is clear.

Getting to the Heart of Data-Driven Marketing

If you asked 10 different colleagues what “data-driven marketing” really means, you’d probably get 10 different answers. That’s why Econsultancy took the time to give an overview of what data-driven marketing means in 2019.

This article includes data about what motivates B2B marketers most, the keys to becoming more data-driven, and the challenges keeping marketers from getting more out of their data.

Political Campaigns Using Intent Data

It seems political campaign strategists understand the power of intent data. During the Democratic presidential debates in late June, Republicans invested heavily in YouTube masthead advertisements.

This ad placement was based entirely on intent data. The strategists recognized that voters would be going to YouTube to find clips and streams of the Democratic debate. And instead, Acronym, a digital media organization, estimated that more people would see the masthead ad than videos of debate candidates.

Timing and segmentation are everything in digital advertising. With intent data, anyone from political candidates to B2B marketers can get them right.

The post Intent Data Industry News: ABM Innovation, Politics, Acquisitions, and More appeared first on Aberdeen.

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It’s easy for marketers to get sucked into shiny object syndrome. We’re tasked with generating real business results and with so many companies vying for buyer attention, it’s tougher than ever to break through. That’s why there’s such a strong push to embrace content marketing, deliver innovative self-serve digital channels, leverage live chat, improve social media engagement, take advantage of video, and more.

In this world of digital marketing, it’s easy to brush off traditional channels and tactics as either old-fashioned or outdated.

But when it comes to B2B marketing, you know there’s often no substitute for in-person communications. Studies show that close rates for in-person meetings hover around 40% and that in-person requests are 34x more successful than those made over email.

That’s why product demos can be so effective for field marketers. But you still have to find ways to stand out against the competition. If you want to deliver the kind of product demo that can boost sales by upwards of 475%, you need these four keys to success.

1. Personalize the Experience

Field marketers often fall into the same trap with their product demos that all other areas of marketing struggle with—focusing too much on the product.

When you’re meeting a prospect in person to run a product demo, you want to tailor the presentation to their specific needs. That means having a firm grasp on where they stand in the buyer’s journey, how their unique role would benefit from your product, and which concerns might keep them from making a purchase decision.

All too often, field marketers have a nearly-scripted product demo that they deliver to every prospect. You might move a few prospects further down the funnel—but you’ll see far more success if you can personalize the experience.

2. Build Relationships with Prospects

This is along the same lines of personalizing the product demo experience. But beyond the actual product demo, your goal should be to use in-person meetings to build relationships with your prospects.

If they’re in the market for a new solution, it’s unlikely you’re the only field marketer or salesperson they’ll be meeting with. While your product might speak for itself from a feature perspective, it’s your job to do the emotional work of building a relationship that keeps your brand top-of-mind when it comes time to make a purchase decision.

Building relationships with prospects is all about connecting with them at every level of the buyer’s journey. If you’re a field marketer running a product demo, you need to understand the prospect’s behavior in the earliest stages of research as well as any interactions they may have had with competitors. Then, you also have to understand the context of their business, seeing the challenges they face both today and as their companies evolve.

When you see the bigger picture and can weave a roadmap to success into your product demo, prospects will be more likely to trust you and buy into your product demo.

3. Bridge the Gap with Sales

Field marketers sit in the middle ground between top-of-funnel marketers and the sales teams focused on closing deals. While you’re out in the field interacting with prospects the way a salesperson might, there’s a chance you still don’t quite gel with sales.

Marketers and sales are often speaking different languages, leading to frustration that could hurt conversion rates. For field marketers to bridge the gap with sales, your focus needs to be on how you’ll make the handoff to sales.

This means having a real strategy for moving the sale forward from the product demo. You can’t end the demo without making a specific ask that perfectly matches the needs of an individual prospect. And to do that, you need to know where prospects stand in terms of purchase intent even before you schedule the meeting.

Intent Data Is the Foundation for Product Demo Success

If you look closely at all three of these keys to product demo success, they all come down to one thing—doing your homework. The more you know about your prospects going into the product demo, the easier it will be to give a presentation that engages and sparks action.

But the information necessary to ace your product demo isn’t always readily available in your own organization. That’s where third-party intent data comes into play.

When you find the right intent data partner, you’ll gain access to all kinds of information about prospect behavior—from the content they engaged with during the research stage to the ways they’ve interacted with your competitors and how likely they are to actually make a purchase.

The challenge is finding ways to make the most of your intent data. If you want to learn more about what intent data can do for your marketing (both in the field and elsewhere), download our free report, Demystifying B2B Purchase Intent Data.

The post 3 Keys to Acing Your Next Product Demo appeared first on Aberdeen.

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“If you build it, they will come.” Wouldn’t it be nice if life were that easy for B2B companies?

Building a great product is only part of the battle. You know that there’s a lot more you have to do if you want to stand out among your competition. Unfortunately, there’s consensus among marketers that building brand awareness is one of the top challenges of the job.

One reason brand awareness can be such a mystery is that it doesn’t necessarily fit into the new world of data-driven marketing. Brand awareness metrics can be vague, leaving executive stakeholders to wonder whether or not you’re making progress.

However, you don’t have to fly blindly when you’re trying to build brand awareness. Using intent data to overcome the following three key brand awareness challenges will make it easier to drive tangible results.

1. Lack of Content Visibility

Content marketing is one of the main ways to boost brand awareness. But while you might have been ahead of the curve if you published content a decade ago, the competition for attention is more intense than ever. Publishing content won’t get you anywhere if no one sees it.

To improve brand awareness with content, marketers often turn to search engine optimization (SEO). However, you can’t just game a keyword system and expect to hit the first page of Google for every important search term.

Building brand awareness by improving content visibility starts with understanding what content you should actually be creating. This is where intent data can help. Investing in third-party intent data gives you insight into what content really matters to your target audience. From seeing what industry media sites prospects visit to gaining visibility into the competitor content they engage with, intent data offers a foundation for promoting content more effectively. And that, in turn, will lead to improved brand awareness.

2. Inability to Reach the Target Audience

Because brand awareness can be so vague, it’s easy to start chasing any kind of tangible metrics/results. Everything from page views to social shares and email open rates can seem like your key to proving that marketing tactics are building brand awareness.

But there’s a problem—what if all of those vanity metrics are coming from the wrong audience? When brand awareness is coming from the wrong people, you risk wasting marketing resources on an audience that will never make a purchase.

Intent data is your key to identifying the total active demand for your products and services. It goes beyond your first-party personas to include the hidden prospects you don’t realize are actively looking for a product in your market. Not only that, but third-party intent data helps you build more complete prospect profiles, ensuring that the audience you’re targeting is showing purchase intent.

When you spend your marketing resources on in-market prospects that fit well with your product’s features and benefits, it will be easier to drive brand awareness and convert leads.

3. Low Engagement with Digital Advertising

In a perfect world, you might be able to rely on organic search and content promotion to generate brand awareness. Even though it’s great to focus on improving organic brand awareness, we all know that digital advertising plays a key role.

Building brand awareness requires more than just going through the motions with digital ads, though. It’s not enough to just throw together copy for social media and try to blast a message out to your industry. You need to take the time to properly segment the audience, personalize the copy for specific segments, and time the ads correctly. Doing all of these things successfully requires a strong foundation of data.

Intent data provides the insights you need to boost engagement with your digital advertising. Instead of scrolling right past your ads, you’ll get your target audience to stop and recognize your brand. With so much digital advertising noise competing for buyer attention, you can’t afford to waste your budget without setting yourself up to make good data decisions.

Find the Right Intent Data for Your Brand Awareness Needs

Don’t make the mistake of blindly investing in third-party intent data. Every provider has its advantages and disadvantages, leaving you with the challenge of deciding who can help you overcome your brand awareness challenges.

However, if you’re just getting started with intent data, it can be difficult to know what to look for in a third-party dataset. Your first step is to educate yourself on the ins and outs of intent data.

Download our free report, Demystifying B2B Purchase Intent Data, for all the information you’ll need before choosing your intent data provider.

The post Solving 3 Brand Awareness Challenges with Intent Data appeared first on Aberdeen.

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The keyboard and mouse are dead! Or maybe, like the old man in Monty Python and the Holy Grail, they’re not quite dead yet.

But without a doubt, we are finally seeing the long-expected shift in how we interact with computing devices and resources. And we are all spending a lot less time using our fingers to tell a computer what to do.

Computing Interfaces Are Evolving

The rise of smart speakers and devices like Amazon Alexa and Google Home, along with smartphone-based assistants like Apple’s Siri, has led to voice commands quickly becoming a primary way to interface with computing. And while this seems commonplace now, just ten years ago few would have expected this shift in computing interfaces to become this ubiquitous this fast.

Along with voice, there are other innovations and changes that are coming quickly to radically change the nature of computing interfaces. And many of these changes fit within the highly fluid (meaning, heavily hyped and hard to define) category of ambient computing.

Joining voice in these innovations is using our hands but not actually touching anything. New technologies like Google’s Project Soli and Intel’s ambient PCs are making it possible to use hand gestures in the air to tell a computing device what to do.

So instead of touching a screen to scroll down or zoom in or to do many other tasks, a user can simply wave their hands over a sensor to do the same things. When tied to augmented reality systems, especially delivered over smart glasses, we can quickly see a change in computing interfaces much like those seen in movies and shows like Minority Report or Westworld.

But when can we expect to see these advancements and the benefits they bring to be tangible?

The Future is Already Here (Well, Almost)

Believe it or not, some of these changes are already happening, especially in areas like repair and in field service. While field service may not often seem like a sexy, cutting-edge technology arena, it has historically been a testing ground for many innovative technologies such as mobile video, the Internet of Things, and augmented reality.

Of course, this is just simple good sense, as technicians in the field are able to see immediate benefits from these new technologies. Imagine being a tech trying to repair complex machinery where you need both of your hands. Being able to talk to a device, to use glasses to see live IoT driven telemetry in an augmented reality view, and being able to just wave your hand instead of picking up a tablet or laptop — all of these can save time that technicians would otherwise spend focusing on repairs and not on how they are going to balance their tablet.

Some may think these new computing interfaces may be far off, or not applicable — many said the same thing about voice controls and now they spend most of their computing time talking to a digital assistant.

So expect to see continued changes in computing interfaces and expect them to come sooner rather than later. But don’t expect the keyboard and mouse to go away anytime in the near future.

While we may be using them less to interface with a computer or scroll through web content, they are still the best way to write anything longer than a sentence or two. And since content is still one of the biggest drivers of today’s Internet, keyboards will still be clacking away for some time.

Long live the keyboard and mouse!

The post What the Next Five Years Will Bring for Computing Interfaces appeared first on Aberdeen.

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As organizations struggle to get the right talent to the right place at the right time, Recruitment Process Outsourcing (RPO) is improving the odds of hiring and retaining top talent. From improving the strategic hiring focus to matching individual career goals to the goals of the organization, RPO is helping set a new standard for long-term workforce value.

Within this context, Aberdeen has concluded that there can be little doubt left about the value-add of partnering with a RPO provider. A recent survey showed that for every 1% increase in the likelihood that companies will expand their spend on RPO, they increase the likelihood of reducing employee turnover by 47%. By comparison, traditional recruiting and staffing leads to an increase in this likelihood of only 28%. RPOs go beyond the value proposition of expanded talent pools to provide guidance around best practices for recruitment and retention — and the strategies that facilitate them.

How Are the Best-in-Class Recruiting Top Talent?

Aberdeen has found that Best-in-Class companies are 74% more likely than All Others (40% vs. 23%) to develop tighter internal integrations between their internal talent acquisition ecosystem and the one that supports talent acquisition. At the same time, Aberdeen found that technology spend on talent acquisition resources now outstrips spend on performance management technology by a ration of up to 2 to 1.

While front-loading talent acquisition like this has helped to populate talent pipelines and gather more information on potential candidates, 29% of Best-in-Class companies have found that they are losing track of what defines their talent market while 26% find that they are unable to construct and sustain talent pipelines. Another 59% of the Best-in-Class find that they are unable to recruit top-quality talent and they still do not know precisely why.

The integration of performance data into talent acquisition means that the market is finally on the precipice of looking at all-encompassing talent placement that no longer differentiates between front-end acquisition and back-end management. Before the technology space gets to this point, however, managers and HR need strategic help on how to change their mindsets on how talent is processed, engaged, and managed within the organization. Doing this in reverse is saddling the average firm in Aberdeen’s data-sets with up to four recruitment, sourcing, and candidate processing solutions with data management and metric analysis centered on the applicant tracking system (ATS).

RPO Improves Talent Placement

While RPO is not a replacement overall, it is a strategic partner that helps re-align the internal needs of the organization to the external demands of the market for candidates. As subject-matter-experts (SMEs) in sourcing and recruiting based on where internal metrics meet the outside metrics of the general market for talent, RPOs are in a unique position to guide the transformation of the talent strategy away from siloed talent acquisition and performance management to one of integrated talent placement.

The Best-in-Class are taking note that their short-term needs are not feeding into their long-term goals for talent retention and goals alignment. In fact, the they are 3x more likely than All Others (75% vs. 25%) to be implementing new strategies that link candidate hiring profiles into broader performance management. For 51% of Best-in-Class firms, this strategy evolution has been directly guided, influenced, and facilitated by their partnership with an RPO.

Today, Best-in-Class companies are 17% more likely than All Others (68% vs. 58%) to engage an RPO to rectify the shortcomings of their talent placement strategies, and to take corrective action on low-grade recruitment. Organizations that use RPOs achieve a 1.8x greater likelihood that they are able to drive higher average tenure among incoming employees (50% vs. 30%).

Where the high-end average retention for non-RPO users sits between 3 and 5 years, for RPO users, the low-end average sits between 4 and 8 years. The Best-in-Class are also 4.1x more likely than All Others (98% vs. 24%) to have realized increases in revenue per FTE in the last 12 months with increased productivity directly driven by longer tenure and higher employee engagement rates.

As the old methodology of internal recruitment strategies disconnects from the changing worlds of work and talent, organizations need all the help they can get to stay ahead of a market that more than 65% of them admit they no longer understand. What this means is that the value of engaging an external SME for talent acquisition is only going to increase until employers figure out how to eliminate buyer’s and seller’s markets for talent.

The post RPO Improves Long-Range Talent Placement appeared first on Aberdeen.

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Last night, Aberdeen had the pleasure alongside Randstad Technologies of hosting the Women in Technology International (WITI) event, Breaking Through Barriers: Climbing the Tech Ladder.

The event was filled with interesting discourse regarding the gender and diversity gap in the tech sector between five female influencers — exploring ways to advance women of all levels, and backgrounds by addressing leadership and empowerment while simultaneously creating a culture of inclusivity.

Photo credit: WITI Boston

The speakers (left to right) included Kaye Cullum – Senior Director, Global Talent Acquisition at Thermo Fisher Scientific, Paola Lucetti – Director, IT Global Transformation Office, Governance and Innovation at Proctor and Gamble, Deirdre Schreiber – Sr. Training Program Manager at Harvard University, Jean Johnson – Head of Global Procurement at LogMeIn, and Leesa Haslam – Senior Director, Product Development and PMO at Wolters Kluwers. Each woman brought a diverse set of skills and ample knowledge to the conversation.

One of the specific talking points about job placement got everyone thinking. While Dierdre was discussing her own experience in taking on different roles that she was unsure of, she brought up always accepting the opportunities that come your way — even if you don’t see yourself in it. If management is offering you the chance to take on a new place within the company, they see something within you that you may not necessarily see in yourself. She spoke of how its okay if you don’t know exactly what you want to do in life as long as you have a positive attitude and push to persevere. Her career began as a coordinator in London when she graduated college and now shes the Senior Training Program Manager for Harvard University’s IT Academy — a role she hadn’t necessarily saw herself working towards.

Jessie Coan (VP of Marketing at Aberdeen) & Parna Sarkar-Basu (VP of Brand Marketing at WITI)

Speaking of saying “yes” to opportunities, the women of course discussed the topic of being your own advocate, and speaking up when it comes to negotiating your salary. A startling statistic was thrown out there by Kaye Cullum, that 78% of men negotiate their salary at their first job, compared to a mere 6% of women. Although the wage gap is known, this was far more than anyone had expected. Kaye emphasized that opportunities are there, women simply have to ask for them.

One quote that specifically stuck out regarding female leadership was from Paola Lucetti, “A Mentor will talk to you. A Coach will talk with you. A Sponsor will talk about you.” She delved into this and discussed her own experience in roles where she had the chance to mentor others, and how that experience can vary depending on your own role withing an organization.

Paola also spoke about getting out of your own comfort zone — if you are feeling too comfortable, it is time for change that allows you to challenge yourself and experience something new that you can learn from. Leesa echoed this idea — additionally noting that anyone in a tech related role should be in constant search to gain knowledge about technology. Commenting on her own experience, she said that she seeks out any chance to learn something new and evolve alongside tech.

Photo credit: WITI Boston

Each speaker brought something to the proverbial table that they made their own seat at, and offered sage wisdom that both men and women alike could learn from. It was inspiring to listen to how far each of them have come while remaining humble, and genuinely caring about supporting other women to have the chance to do the same.

Special thanks to Rancstad technologies and WITI Boston for hosting this event with us. If you have an questions about WITI Boston, please contact Parna at parna@corp.witi.com

The post Takeaways from WITI Boston’s Breaking Through Barriers: Climbing the Tech Ladder appeared first on Aberdeen.

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Personalization is supposed to be the marketer’s secret weapon for cutting through content noise. Studies have shown that, when done correctly, personalization can deliver five to eight times more ROI on your marketing spend.

But marketers have spent decades trying to personalize content and struggled every step of the way. Until recently, the technology simply wasn’t there to scale personalized marketing activities. Even now, with all of the necessary technology and customer information available to you, bad data can create a barrier between you and personalization.

If you’re ever struggling against bad data, purchasing third-party insights can help fill in the gaps and give you a foundation for personalization.

However, bad data isn’t the only barrier to personalized marketing. Increasingly-strict data privacy regulations can put a halt to personalization efforts if you don’t adapt.

Marketing in the Era of Data Privacy

The marketing world spent about two years worrying about the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) before it went into effect in May 2018. Suddenly, your ability to collect first-party data about customers would be severely restricted. And as a result, your ability to gain the insights necessary for personalization would be hampered. Worse yet, any violations could result in millions of dollars in penalties—more than enough to offset the potential benefits of average personalization.

Just when you started to get comfortable with GDPR regulations, more data privacy laws are emerging. Now, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) is on the horizon and is being heralded as the U.S. version of GDPR. While the CCPA is similar to the GDPR, complying with one doesn’t necessarily mean you’re compliant with the other.

One of the unique marketing challenges that will come along with CCPA enforcement is that it could restrict your ability to purchase third-party data. Unlike the GDPR, which broadly focuses all data processing, the CCPA is concerned mainly with the sale of consumer data. That means that the data vendors who once filled the gaps in your first-party data will now be restricted in what they can and can’t sell to you.

The result will be an era of marketing that is even more focused on first-party data collection. Being able to build compliant pipelines for first-party data generation will be key to successful personalization.

However, if it were so easy to gather enough quality first-party data to scale marketing personalization, you would have already done it.

Instead of writing off third-party data providers altogether, it’s important to spend more time searching for the right partner. In the era of consumer privacy, you can’t take a high-volume approach to purchasing third-party data. Rather, you need a partner that can address compliance on your behalf while drilling down into those contacts and accounts that best fit your business. This is where intent data comes into play.

Finding an Intent Data Provider Built for Data Privacy

GDPR is already here, CCPA is coming, and more data privacy regulations are surely on the horizon. This isn’t a fading trend you can ignore if you want to make the most of data in your marketing efforts. You need to take concrete steps toward personalizing your marketing while maintaining data privacy compliance.

You might be tempted to avoid third-party data in an effort to cut costs, putting the responsibility of data privacy compliance squarely on your own shoulders. But all it will take is one violation to derail those cost-cutting efforts.

When you evaluate third-party intent data providers, make sure that they have proven success with data privacy compliance, including GDPR and CCPA. That will help you strike a balance between compliance and the data collection necessary to personalize your marketing—all without increasing risk for your organization.

The challenge is finding intent data providers that follow through on their compliance promises.

If you want to learn more about compliant third-party intent data and how it can benefit your personalized marketing, download our free report, Demystifying B2B Purchase Intent Data.

The post GDPR, CCPA, and the Challenge of Data-Driven Marketing appeared first on Aberdeen.

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