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Quick Tech: 1969 Chevrolet Chevelle "Sally"
Chassis Type & Mods: 12 point cage 8.50 cert. Stock front suspension and ladder bar rear
Suspension & Brakes: AFCO BNC shocks in the front and AFCO Big Guns in the rear. Wilwood disc brakes on all four corners.
Body & Paint: Custom Quasar Blue by Cliffs Auto Body. Removeable fiberglass 6" cowl hood and deck lid.
Engine: 565 CI Dart Block with Dart 345 Heads, Sniper Jr. Intake, Callies Crank, Manley Rods, Venolia Pistons, Jesel valvtrain, 13.5:1 Compression
Induction and Fuel Delivery: Sniper Jr. Intake with a Holley 1290 cfm Dominator. Barry Grant regulator and a Magna Fuel pump.
Electronics & Ignition: MSD Pro Billet distributer and an MSD 7-AL
Exhaust: Super Comp 2 1/8 Headers into 3.5" collectors
Transmission & Driveline: Sepanek Turbo 400 with a super case. Dynamic 4500 stall converter. Custom driveshaft.
Differential: Moser 9" with Mark Williams center section. Moser 40 spline axles. 3:90 gears
Tires & Wheels: FRONT - Racestar 15x3.5 with Hoosier 28x4.5. REAR - Racestar double bead lock 15x10 with Hoosier 30x10.50
Special Thanks: I would like to thank my wife Sharon for all of her support and my children Jordan, Saige, and Jaina for all of their encouragement.
Scott Embley of Saylorsburg, PA has been the proud owner of this piece of iconic American muscle for the past 25 years. It all began while riding his BMX bike through town one day and had a love at first site moment. He fell so in love that he traded his 1987 lifted, Nissan pickup along with the $3500 he still owed on it and bought the Chevelle that same night. It is a very powerful thing when a young man not only finds his dream car, but makes a sacrifice and buys it as well.
Scott was raised by his mother "Jeanne" who knew her son all too well and took him under her loving wing and introduced him to drag racing the very next weekend. Jeanne was a long time bracket racer and figured if she taught her son how to race safely on the track, he would stay off the streets. That weekend the Chevelle now called "Sally" made her first pass with Mom cheering them both on. Scott's first trip down the track resulted in a very modest 14.80 at 93 mph and forever hooked him into drag racing.
Scott and his Mom worked hard making Sally a reliable street / strip car from that day on. After losing his drivers license a few times, Scott's mom decided it was time to buy him his first trailer (which he still has) and dedicate Sally to the strip. Scott started laughing while telling me this and admitted that he had 53 points on his license at one time. Jeanne taught Scott the basics of towing and bracket racing and the two of them had a lot of fun times together racing and working on Sally together.
Tragically, Jeanne lost her life at the young age of 53 to cancer but managed to get Scott and Sally into the 11.90's before she passed in 1996. Jeanne is forever immortalized on the back of Sally with a decal that says, "In Loving Memory Of Mom." To this day Scott and Sally share every pass down the track together with Jeanne and will forever remember the love and lessons they experienced together.
Fast forward to 2017 and Sally is both ferocious and stunning at the same time. She demands attention and respect wherever she goes. This Chevelle took a lot of blood, sweat, tears, and cash to get to where she is today. Scott had five different versions of it that ranged from its first days as a 14.80 car into 12.80's, then 10.90's, then 9.70's, then 9.20's and finally into its best pass of 8.90.
The heart of Sally is a 565 cubic inch Dart big block which houses a stout rotating assembly that includes a Callies crankshaft, Manley rods, and Venolia pistons. A pair of Dart 345 heads and a Sniper Jr. Intake sit on top of the 565 and keep the 13.5:1 compression contained during those 8 seconds of violence. Speaking of valve train, a Jesel billet belt drive and Jesel rockers are connected to a top secret cam and valve dimensions that Scott is not ready to share with the public.
The 112 octane racing fuel gets sucked out of the fuel cell by a Magnafuel fuel pump and is sent to a Barry Grant regulator before going to a 1290 cfm Holley Dominator. A complete MSD ignition provides the spark necessary to send the exhaust out of a set of Hooker Super Comp 2 1/8" headers.
Helping get the 1000 plus horsepower to the ground is a Dynamic 4500 stall converter that is connected to a Sepanek built TH400 with a Reid Super Case. A custom driveshaft connects the Moser 9 inch and Mark Williams center section that turns a set of Richmond 3.90 gears and Moser 40 spline axles.
Sally's chassis is 8.50 certified and has a rather simple ladder bar and custom valved AFCO Big Gun shocks in the rear, and the stock front end uses a pair of AFCO BNC shocks which help keep things smooth after those wheelies that she is famous for.
The final components that get this 3590 pound, wheel standing Chevelle down the track in under 9 seconds are the Racestar double beadlock wheels with a pair of Hoosier 30x10.50 slicks out back. A Wilwood master cylinder and disc brakes on all corners help keep Scott from breaking out and hitting the sand trap.
Part of what makes Sally so elegant is her true to stock appearance. With the exception of a 6" cowl, a removeable deck lid, and a lexan windshield her body is all Detroit Muscle. Breaking into the 8 second club required Scott to mount a parachute out back. After breaking a lot of parts during a monster 330 foot wheel stand, he decided to install a set of wheelie bars to prevent Sally from standing on her bumper during those violent launches and into her 1.2 second sixty foot of fun.
Keeping true to her classic look is a stock interior with a set of Autometer gauges, a B&M Pro Stick, G-Force 5 point safety harness, and rollcage.
Scott is a true bracket racer and is highly competitive in the Pro Footbrake class, representing Island Dragway in the bracket finals since 1995. Scott and Sally have won numerous races over the years but none as cool as winning The King Of The track at Island Dragways 50 year anniversary. Without any help from Scott, Sally won the Super Chevy's Top 10 Editors Choice Award two years in a row.
When I asked Scott if he has any power adders he said, "The only power adder Sally has is my Moms love. No nitrous, turbo, or blower can top that"! Having recently lost my own Mom, I tend to agree. There are a lot of different types of love we get on a daily basis, but a mothers love is a love like no other. Jeanne not only passed this love for drag racing down to her son Scott, unknowingly she started a family legacy and birthed a family racing team. Scott's wife Sharon races a mid 9 second 1971 Nova in the Pro Class, his 25 year old son Jordan is building an S10 Blazer, his 15 year old daughter Saige races her 1992 S10 Blazer in the Jr. Street class and was track champion her rookie year. While his 11 year old daughter Jaina is too young to race, she takes the role as crew chief for EFR (Embley Family Racing) and helps keep the cars ready on race day. Scott admitted that its a chore to run four cars on a limited budget and still stay competitive, but his family wouldn't have it any other way. While most families decide which country, island or amusement park they are going to spend their family vacation, the Embley's would rather attend a high paying footbrake race in another state.
Scott has plans on building a blown 1969 Chevelle station wagon as a tribute to the car his Mom used to race and use it as a tow rig to bring Sally to local races. They will never be for sale and will be passed on to his children to continue the family legacy that Jeanne started back in the spring of 1990 when she lovingly took Scott and Sally to the dragstrip for the first time.
Out of all of the cool cars on the track or at a show on any given weekend, I am honored to have been trusted with telling the story behind this 69 Chevelle. The story needed to be told and a Moms sacrifice, commitment, and love for her son needed to be shared with everyone. Sally and Jeanne are definitely "A Love Like No Other."
JT
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You Can't Go Wrong With The Right Tool
To the average person, tools are metal objects that are kept in a toolbox and occasionally used to hang a picture or tighten a loose screw. To a gearhead, tools are like food and water – basic necessities. Most serious DIY mechanics own a variety of tools that might include a welder, plasma cutter, chop saw, drill press, tubing bender, sandblaster, air compressor, hydraulic press, sawzall, and possibly a few other essentials. For the more advanced enthusiast, the next level in the “tool chain” could include a lift, tire machine, balancer, brake lathe, front end rack, and a custom welding table. And then there’s the extreme enthusiast, the gearhead that covets the machines you would normally only find in a pro engine building shop. This is the top of the “tool chain” and includes things like a cylinder hone, crank balancer, seat and guide machine, head/block surfacer or even a valve refacer.
Now let’s be serious. How cool would it be to have all of those tools at your disposal? Assuming you had the knowledge to not only operate these cool tools but also conquer the repair at hand, you would be a self-sufficient one-man shop. Such is the case with a buddy of mine who has a very successful transmission shop near my home. Whenever I drive by, I like to stop in and enjoy a little Shop Talk. The other day, I was watching him rebuild a transmission and could not believe the number of special tools that he HAS to use. Besides a massive toolbox filled with your standard everyday tools, he has a small fortune of job-specific tools that enable him to complete more difficult repairs. He is a modest guy and swears that transmissions are not as hard to work on as everyone makes them out to be. The most challenging part for him was actually acquiring all of the tools and textbooks needed to do the work.
I often talk about the importance of tools, and how having the right tool can make a task a bit easier to perform. Putting my tool obsession aside, though, the reality is there are certain tools that are absolutely job specific and as necessary as the part being replaced.
It’s no secret that when it comes to auto repairs, I have an incredibly anal-retentive approach. I am a perfectionist that labors over every detail, as it is often the details that separate success from failure. This is not something to be taken lightly when it comes to the street or the strip. Not only is someone’s life at risk, there is an extremely expensive custom machine to protect.
I have written about it many times –
The difference between success and failure all start with a keen eye for the details. When it comes to wrenching on a thousand horsepower or more, your life is in the hands of someone who either did it right, or just did it.
Recently, I was hanging in my shop with my garage squad and the topic of tools took center stage. On this particular day, I happened to be taking the rear out of my Pro Street Camaro, because she was making sounds that are not suppose to come out of a Dana 60. The guys watched as I unbolted the custom 4 link and z-bar I fabbed for the car. They watched as I removed the wheels, brakes, calipers, and rotors. They watched as I unbolted the driveshaft and made sure the rear end was free of any other connected part. Knowing that I’d be working alone for the remainder of the job, I needed a way to remove, relocate, and re-install the whole rear and axle assembly by myself. My shop squad watched as I fabricated a rolling and adjustable rear axle stand right in front of their eyes. They were impressed as I lowered the car onto my newly built stand and effortlessly rolled the rear from underneath my car into a free bay to work on it.
As far as I was concerned, my work was done for the day. But the squad had every intention of watching me rebuild the rear. They were bewildered at my response. I told them I simply did not have the tools necessary to complete the job and was planning to take it to a friend’s shop so he could help me with it. They were like, WHAT!? You don’t have the tools? You are going to let someone else touch your car? They went on to say there was no one they would rather have rebuild their rear than me. After all, I am Mr. Detail, and it seems rear ends and being anal-retentive goes hand in hand – right?
I proudly support all DIY’ers out there. After all,
no-one is going to put as much care into a repair
as you will on your own car.
I thanked everyone for their confidence in my abilities and the relentless anal-retentive jokes, and sent them home for the night. As the evening progressed, I could not stop thinking about what they said. I decided to do some research and take inventory on the tools I would need to complete this job myself. These are by no means your ordinary, run-of-the-mill toolbox fillers.
These are special tools that are needed to complete the job to the required specifications. I looked at my assortment of torque wrenches and was surprised that I had seven. Out of the seven, one would be able to tighten the pinion yoke to the required 250 ft. lbs., but I didn’t have a dial indicator torque wrench that could read the 20-25 inch pounds of preload that the pinion bearing needs with the yoke torqued to 250 ft. lbs. I also did not have a dial bore gauge that could read the proper backlash specs of .005”-.010.” Adding to this part of the rebuild required me to have a set-up tool or jig to mount my dial bore gauge to and measure the pinion depth. I have a 20-ton shop press and some clamshell bearing removers, but didn’t have one large enough for the carrier bearings. I have an assortment of brass punches but needed a really long one to pop the race out of pinion housing. Now that I had my shopping list, I just needed to convince my wife these were worthy purchases. Tools are an investment in future work, right? She lovingly indulged my thought process and ordered them up.
If you have ever spent any time in a machine shop, you have seen this little tool used a lot. The average home mechanic will never need a dial bore gauge. But anyone who wants to set pinion depth and backlash on a rear end will be lost without it.
I went to work reading every article I could find on Dana 60 rebuilding and found an extremely easy to follow A-Z procedure from Strange Engineering. Bolts are bolts, bearings are bearings, and torque specs are torque specs. Why are people so afraid of setting up rear ends? I truly believe it’s the fear of not having the correct tools to do the job properly. I disassembled the entire rear and thoroughly cleaned the housing and axles. While I was at it, being Mr. Anal, I sanded the rear and put three coats of fresh paint and three coats of clear on it, as well as the fully adjustable ladder bars. I also ordered all new Timken bearings, and seals, along with a new Strange carrier and ring & pinion set. I had recently replaced the end bearings and seals so I left them alone.
My newly constructed axle stand proved to be a lifesaver throughout the entire process, but I also devised a clever plan to assist with the bearings. I purchased an extra set of matching pinion and carrier bearings and had my dear friend, Jason Leindecker of Leindecker Racing Engines, mill out the bearings just enough so I could push them on and off by hand during setup. This was truly invaluable as it took me over a dozen times to get the pinion pre-load to be within the required specs, due to a lack of .001 shims. Removing a bearing and pressing it back on a dozen times, not only takes forever, but the chances of damaging the bearing are very high. This setup-bearing plan was priceless.
The rebuild was a success, but looking back, I should have invested in a very large adjustable wrench to hold the pinion yoke while torquing to a gargantuan 250 ft. lbs. The large pipe wrench I used unfortunately put some teeth marks in my very expensive Mark Williams Yoke. My shop squad was very proud of me for biting the bullet and buying the tools necessary to complete the project myself. My new tools are already being put to good use (generating work), as one member of my squad brought me another rear to rebuild.
I’ve said it before, and I will say again – with a slightly different ending. Respect your engine builder/machinist not only for their knowledge, but for the tools they’ve invested in. Respect your transmission expert for the same, and while we are at it, respect the person who tears into your rear. My garage squad now calls me the proctologist. If only I could charge what they do! So my friends, I hope I’ve presented a rock-solid case on the importance of tools. You truly can’t go wrong when you have the right ones. When in doubt, fear not and follow my lead – ORDER UP!
Until next time…
Keep wrenching,
JT
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MFG. Part #: 91689400
Makes angled tubing joints from 40° to 90° quickly and accurately. Is a must have for making custom roll cages and exhaust headers/manifolds. Works well with 9/16" to 2" O.D. tubing and is useful in joining different sized tubing. Compatible with drill press or 1/2" power drill. Spanner wrench, 1-3/4" hole saw blade, and threaded reducer are included.
Notes:
Prior to initial use, it may be necessary to rotate the tubing holding bracket fixture into the proper position in order to match up the tubing cradle in the bracket with the V-bracket. Please see above pictures for proper bracket positioning illustration.
Some parts are not legal for use in California or other states with similar laws/regulations.
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Part Number: 89204
Only fits 68.4″ and 78″ bed lengths. Does not fit if vehicle is equipped with MagneRide.
Stainless steel roll plates which protect the air springs and help increase load capacity of the springs by up to 10%Stainless steel braided air lines for added protection against sharp edges and road debrisStainless steel air spring mounting hardwareJounce bumper inside the air spring absorbs shock and can be safely run with zero air pressureMilitary-grade AN fittings simply thread together for a metal-to-metal seal, ensuring an easy-to-install, leak-free system with no air line cutting required
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Car - 1957 Chevrolet
Nickname - White Lightning
Body & Paint - Stock 57 White re-paint. Removable fiberglass hood, doors, and deck lid.
Engine - 598 CI Dart Block with Brodix Heads, MBE Sniper Intake, Callies Crank, Callies Rods, J&E Pistons, Jesel valvetrain, 11.0:1 Compression
Transmission & Driveline - Select Performance Turbo 400 with a Reid super case. Select Performance 10” nitrous converter with a 3500 stall. Nassau built custom driveshaft.
Rear - Fab 9- Ford 9" Strange 40 spline axles. 4:10 gears
Tires & Wheels - FRONT – Sander Engineering 15x4.5 with Hoosier skinnys REAR – Sander Engineering 15x10 with Mickey Thompson 32x16.
Best Pass To Date - 8.30 @162mph
Years Owned - 13 years
The 57 Chevy is perhaps one of the most iconic cars ever built. It is a symbol of freedom. From its post-war styling cues, to its overwhelming popularity, people went crazy over this piece of american muscle. The overall look of the 57 Chevy was actually inspired by jet fighters. The quarter panels were shaped like the tail of an F-86 Sabre fighter, while the lower edge of the rear bumper caps had a blacked-out area that emulated the exhaust ports on the jet, and the headlamp bezels were designed to look like jet engine intakes. The designers didn’t stop with the body style, though, they even installed a jet-age (for 1957) instrument panel which included a trio of circular pods for the gauges. Directly in front of the driver sat a large circular speedometer with white numbers on a black background, and a red indicator needle that completed the styling cues from the cockpit of the Sabre Jet. Chevrolet wanted its customers to know they were sitting behind something almost supersonic.
For Massapequa, Long Island resident Tom Reeks, the 57 Chevy represents much more than an iconic muscle car, though. Tom’s particular 57 is a symbol of liberty and freedom from the many hardships he has faced in life. It represents overcoming adversity and rising from it like the proverbial phoenix. It represents dedication and hard work. And last, but certainly not least, it represents his passion for cars.
Tom first laid eyes on the white 57 Chevy in 2005, just one month after purchasing a stock blue one. It was love at first sight, and he knew he couldn’t live without her, so he made a deal to trade the blue Bel Air for the already modified mid 10 second white 57. Tom raced the car, as is, until he blew the engine, transmission, rear, and in his own words, “everything in between.”
The 57, better known as White Lightning, got its first major upgrade in the form of a 496 nitrous engine, a new Turbo 400, and a Moser 9 inch rear with 3:90 gears. This upgrade took White Lightning from the 10 second class and put her deep into the 9s. Tommy ran the car with that combo for 10 years while he satisfied his need for speed and addiction to horsepower.
The 57 saw its next upgrade with a new 598 cubic inch engine and a 4:56 gear to try and get more wheel speed. This combo made significant improvements bringing White Lightning into the high 8s, which only furthered Tom’s need for more speed and backing up the 57s “supersonic” legacy.
In his own words Tom explains, “I was making a great pass. Wheels up in first gear and staying up into 2nd. As soon as it goes down, I shift into 3rd and wheels up once again! Then all at once the motor grenades itself, and me being the guy I am, keep my foot into it until the end of the quarter mile. That was the end of that chapter and it was time to get serious!” For most of us a high 8 second wheel standing pass is serious enough, but not for Tom and his 57. He had big plans in mind and just needed to find the right shop to turn his vision into a reality.
The first step was to contract Scott Shafiroff Racing Engines and have them build the new heartbeat of this piece of American muscle. Shafiroff started this task with a solid foundation that includes a 598 cubic inch Dart Block. A Callies crankshaft and rods got connected to a set of J&E Pistons that push a pump gas friendly 11:1 compression ratio. Helping this beastly big block breath is a Competition cam and lifters, Brodix heads, Brodix valves, and Jesel rockers.
Fuel is fed into this thirsty 57 with an Aeromotive fuel pump and regulator, and then sends it to a custom built Williams 1250 Dominator that that sits on top of an aluminum MBE Sniper intake manifold. This combo was dyno’d to almost 1000 horsepower. And with the addition of an extra 800 horsepower from the x275 nitrous system, White Lightning is closing in on 1800 ponies. Keeping this supersonic 57 cool during flight is a Griffin radiator/shroud/fan combo and a Meziere electric water pump.
White Lightning for the most part has its factory dash in tact. Tommy uses a Race Pak digital dash to monitor all of the vitals during take off. Aluminum racing seats, A CO2 assisted M&M Shifter, 12 point rollcage, and the Edelbrock nitrous controller complete the racing look of the interior, and remind everyone this is not your Grandpa’s 57.
Tom decided to trust the fate of his 57 in the hands of two Connecticut natives, Mark from MRC Race Cars and Paul from Total Induction. Mark immediately went to work and rebuilt the chassis into its current 7.50 certified state. A Chromoly 12-point roll cage complete with a funny-car style driver’s cage, showcase Mark’s attention to detail. Mark also back halved the car and installed a set of custom built Santhuff rear shocks and AFCO double adjustables in the front. A Fab 9, Ford 9 inch was next to be upgraded and made home to a set of Strange axles and 4:10 gears. A custom Nassau driveshaft connects the Fab 9 to a Select Performance built Reid Case Turbo 400. Select Performance also custom built a 10” nitrous torque converter that is responsible for bringing all of that power to the wheels. Completing the chassis work and stopping flight 57 from actually taking off is a Strange master cylinder that is connected to a set of Wilwood disc brakes out front and Strange disc brakes in the rear. The Simpson parachute helps to quickly slow this beast down in the event things get out of hand. Keeping White Lightning connected to the pavement is a set of Sander Engineering wheels with a pair of Hoosier 15x4.5 skinnies up front, and Mickey Thompson 32x16x15” ET Drag slicks out back.
Paul from Total Induction got the 57 from the chassis shop and did all of the wiring, including installing and setting up the Race Pak data logger and the MSD Power Grid. Paul then made sure all of the sensors were working properly and personally coached Tommy’s crew chief, “Fortune,” on the entire system and how it works. Paul also installed and set up the Edelbrock progressive nitrous controller to work with the Induction Solutions X275 Nitrous system.
Tommy can’t say enough about how professional these guys are. “Let me tell you, these guys put this car together in 3 months! To top it off, they came to the track with me and made all of the necessary adjustments and decisions, coaching my crew chief all the way.”
White Lightning is an old Islip Speedway car and an old Hamptons Track car. Tommy proudly supports Long Island Needs A Dragstrip, and is counting the days until it has one. Until then, you can find White Lightning and Tommy’s awesome group of friends, tearing up dragstrips all over the east coast pushing the limits of their incredible machines. These guys are a great group of people who love to have fun at the track. They opened up their pits to me and made me feel right at home while I was taking notes and gathering the details for this story. It warmed my heart to see such a close-knit group of friends helping each other out at the track and doing what they love. Do yourself a favor and be sure to visit them in the pits if you ever have the opportunity.
I was very happy to find out that White Lightning is a registered and insured vehicle that can be found frequently terrorizing the streets of Long Island. Before her most recent list of upgrades, the 57 had a best time of 8:30 at 162 mph. Tommy hopes to get into the high 7s and continue his quest to push the envelope, proudly representing Long Island, NY and honoring the legacy of the 57 Chevy for years to come. The way I see it, Flight 57 is officially ready for take off!
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How did you get started in drag racing and how long have you been racing?
I have been racing for 13 years now and started in junior dragsters like most did. I putted around on a little dirt bike for a few years and always watched my dad drag race motorcycles. One day, I decided to be just like him and line up like I was racing someone, pretended I was watching a tree and took off. When I was about seven years old, my parents discovered the junior drag bikes, but I couldn't race until I was eight years old. By the time I was finally old enough to race, they stopped doing the junior drag bikes, so when I was nine, I started out in the dragsters. When I was old enough to race motorcycles, the plan was to make the transition to bikes and eventually race a Pro Stock Motorcycle. Thankfully that's exactly what happened! I wanted to move to a bigger dragster, but my dad pushed the bike on me. After I tried it, I was hooked and never wanted to go back to a car. I started on a Buell Blast when I was 16 and progressively moved up to bigger, faster bikes.
In a predominantly male sport are you treated fairly / equally by your fellow male racers?
In a male dominated sport, I feel as if I'm being treated fairly most definitely! It's so amazing how much of a family we have all become. Many have taken me under their wing, and look out for me like a little sister or niece. The professional racing world is a lot different than the local, being that I’ve built a family nationwide.
What are the top 3 things that you enjoy the most about drag racing?
1. One of my favorite things about drag racing is the fans, and the ability to connect with people you can personally inspire – those who want to learn from you and find out what they need to do to get to where you are.
2. Second, I'd probably have to say that I love the family I’ve acquired with the other racers, teams, and officials. They all make me feel welcome and like I have a place where I belong. Without racing, I really don't know what else I'd do!
3. Third, I ultimately love the thrill of going fast and the challenge that along comes with it – being both mentally and physically challenging! Every pass is a new chance to get better and fix what you may have messed up on the last run.
Recently woman have been dominating the national drag racing circuit. What do you think is the reason for this?
I feel as if more women are joining in on this male-dominated sport because they are starting to realize their strengths and that they can do just about ANYTHING a man can – sometimes even better. Women have definitely more of a fan base than the men nowadays, because we are out there kicking butt and winning races!
Who is your favorite female racer and why?
My favorite female racers would have to be Erica Enders and Katie Sullivan. Erica, because when I was young and racing junior dragsters, dreaming about being very successful, I loved watching the Disney Channel movie, Right On Track, that was based on her life story. Katie, because she is definitely one of the sweetest, most humble bike racers I’ve ever met. We are both California girls and being she was only about 5 hours away from me, she took me under her wing, happy to show me she ropes whenever I had a question.
Is there anyone that you would like to thank for helping you get started into drag racing?
I'd really like to thank my parents, James and Caryn Surber, for getting me started in drag racing and making everything possible! I would also like to thank my grandfather who always believed in me, and always said I was going to be the next Jennifer Snyder. Junior Pippin is another who deserves so much more than a thank you for all he has done with the motor programs for both me and my dad. I really couldn't appreciate him enough. Definitely wouldn't be where I am today if it wasn't for his help!
Photos by Rick Belden Photography @rickbeldenphotography
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The Eastwood Pro Brake Flaring Tool lets you create 3 kinds of precision flares, in any of 5 sizes of tubing, in minimal time.
Create 45-degree single, double and bubble brake flares in secondsBrake-flaring tool works with stainless steel, steel, and soft metal tubingUse for brake lines, transmission cooler lines and fuel linesTurret-style indexed head keeps all forming dies ready to useQuick-release "T"-handle screw clamp securely holds the tube-retaining diesIncludes Pro forming tool; 3/16", 1/4", 5/16", 3/8" and 4.75mm tube-retaining dies; handle; instructions and case
This brake line flaring tool will pay for itself with the first project, and it'll give you peace of mind knowing that your brake flares are of OE-precision quality and safety. You don't want to skimp on the brake system of your project vehicle!
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