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Try this easy macro to instantly highlight be-verbs in a Microsoft Word document. You don't have to know anything about macros or code.

The post Instantly Highlight (Almost All*) Be-Verbs in a Microsoft Word Doc appeared first on Writing.Rocks .

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Dip in to this list anywhere, and give your inner editor’s funny bone a tickle. Take “hurriedly scurried.” Or “moral high horse.” Or “live studio audience.” “Old codgers.” “Old coots.” “Old fossils.” “Old ruins.” “Commonly available general knowledge that anyone would know.” Come on. I’m dying here. I don’t make this stuff up. Bonus: Smiling at redundant phrases sharpens your writing. Warning: These things are addictive.

The post ‘I Used to Be an Ex-Manager’ and More Than over 1100+ Other Redundancies appeared first on Writing.Rocks .

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Even a slight change in wording can alter your text's impact on a given audience—and not always in the way you'd predict.

The post How to Choose Your Words on the Web? Put Them to the Test appeared first on Writing.Rocks .

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A car pulled up next to my Prius at a stoplight in downtown Portland. The driver opened her window and asked, “What does your bumper sticker mean?” Through my passenger window, I told her that it means to look for verbs like “is” and “were” and “are,” and then consider how you might reword to make the writing tighter and more impactful. “You made my day," she said.

The post Be-verb Bumper Stickers Make a Comeback appeared first on Writing.Rocks .

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My commitment to writing traces back to the moment I discovered "The Hemingway Reader." It’s one of the books I’d grab if our house were on fire. The observations and excerpts in Charles Poore’s foreword have shaped my writing efforts in journalism, playwriting, fiction, poetry, technical writing, marketing writing—every kind of writing I’ve ever done.

The post Hemingway’s Style and Today’s Business Writer appeared first on Writing.Rocks .

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The trouble with companies is that they’re full of people, and people insist on having unique personalities and distinct voices. It’s no wonder that, when we take an honest look at our content, issues of consistency and tone of voice invariably creep into our conversations.

The post How Do a Bunch of People Write with One Voice? appeared first on Writing.Rocks .

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Want to write masterfully? Read masterful writing. For example, open a Doerr—something written by Anthony Doerr, that is.

The post Want to Write Well? Open a Doerr appeared first on Writing.Rocks .

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How often does a technical communicator get to be the hero? I got my chance recently. Well, the real hero is a mindset that I share with all technical communicators. Here’s what happened.

The post Yes, You Can Jump-start a Car with a Prius: A Technical-Communication Hero Story appeared first on Writing.Rocks .

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